1
Roster and Record of Iowa Troops In the Rebellion, Vol. 4
By Guy E. Logan
HISTORICAL SKETCH
OF AN
IOWA CAVALRY COMPANY
Which Was Assigned to the State of Pennsylvania
AND BECAME
Company A, of the Eleventh Pennsylvania Cavalry
The subjoined roster shows the names and service records of a company, composed exclusively
of Iowa men. A foot-note, appended to the original roster of the company, reads as follows:
This company was originally raised for Colonel Josiah Harlan's "Independent Cavalry,"
which afterwards became the Eleventh Pennsylvania Cavalry Captain Stratton's company
(Company A) was an Iowa company, and commissions were issued to its officers, by the
authorities of this State, at the request of the general commanding the division in which said
company was, at the time of the organization of the regiment. l
The roster shows that, upon the completion of its organization, the company numbered 83
menu rank and file. Beyond the publication of the roster—and the footnote referred to—but little
further reference is made to the company in the Adjutant General's Reports, except the
correspondence with the War Department, claiming credit for this company upon Iowa's quota of
troops, which credit was subsequently allowed. Therefore, in the absence of the necessary
official data from which to prepare a history of the operations of the company, the compiler
avails himself of a history of its organization and service, contained in the "Annals of Iowa,"
published by the Historical Department of the State. 3 A revised roster is published as a
supplement to this history, giving the personal record of service of each officer and Enlisted
man of the company. With the omission of some of the less important details, the history is
herewith quoted, as follows:
1 Report of the Adjutant General of Iowa, 1863, Vol. 2, pages 652 to 654 inclusive. Original
Roster of the company.
2 Annals of Iowa. Third series, Vol. VI, No. 8, January, 1905. History of Company A, Eleventh
Pennsylvania Cavalry, by George L. Cruikshank, First Sergeant of the Company.
Company A, Eleventh Pennsylvania Cavalry, was organized at Fort Dodge, Iowa, in August
1861. When the news of the battle of Bull Run was received, a number of young men who had
been drilling during the spring and summer, resolved to organize a company for the service, and
messengers were sent up the Des Moines River as far as Spirit Lake. On the 2d of September the
company met at the court house in Fort Dodge; and, before electing its officers, was sworn into
the service of the United States. by James R. Strow, Justice of the Peace. Franklin A. Stratton
was elected Captain; G. S. Ringland. First Lieutenant, and George W. Bassett, Second
Lieutenant. The company went by stage to Cedar Falls, and thence by railroad to Dubuque,
where, on September 21, 1861, it was mustered into the service of the United States by Captain
Washington. It left Dubuque October 6th, and reached Washington, D. C., October 10, 1861, one
2
of its members, Peter Bowers, was killed in a railroad accident near Lewiston, Pa., and was
buried there.
At Washington, D. C., the company joined the regiment then known as Harlan's Independent
Regiment of Light Cavalry. Colonel Josiah Harlan was a relative of Senator James Harlan of
Iowa, and it was through his influence that Company A joined that regiment. Later, the Secretary
of War, finding he had no authority to accept independent regiments, the name was changed to
the Eleventh Pennsylvania Cavalry, that State having the largest number of troops in the
regiment. On the 16th of October it left its cams on Seventh Street, and crossed the Potomac to
Ball's Cross Roads, Va. In November it marched to Annapolis, Md., and thence proceeded to
Fortress Monroe, Va., by steamer. Here stables were built for the horses, and the regiment was
thoroughly drilled.
On March 8, 1862, when the Merrimac sank the Cumberland, and the Congress was burned,
the regiment was on picket duty on New Market Creek, and, on the morning of the 9th, saw the
beginning of the fight between the Monitor and the Merrimac. The company was under fire for
the first time on the old battleground of Great Bethel, in March, 1862. On May 7th the regiment
was reviewed by President Lincoln. On May 15th Companies A, E, G, H and L. were sent to
Norfolk, Va., and soon after to Suffolk. Company A was detached from the battalion and placed
under the immediate orders of General Mansfield. Captain Stratton was a civil engineer and,
under the direction of the General, made maps of all the routes between Suffolk and the Black
Water .... In August the part of the regiment that had been on the Peninsula with McClellan came
to Suffolk. On December 2, 1862, the company was in the mounted charge at Beaver Dam
Church. in Virginia, where the enemy was routed and a number of prisoners were taken, On
January 30, 1863, Company A led the advance in the attack on the Deserted House, in which
General Prior was defeated. During the year at Suffolk the command was constantly employed
on scouting and outpost duty. In June, 1863, the regiment. with other troops, was sent by steamer
to the White House, on the Pamunkey River, and from there to Hanover Court House, where a
wagon train was Captured. At South Anna Bridge in mounted charge was made, by companies A
and G upon an earthwork, and the work captured. The object of the raid was to break up the
railroad communications north to Richmond. On the expedition the rebel General Fitzhugh Lee
was captured.
In July the second expedition, under General Petty, was made against the Richmond and
Manassas Railroad. The command returned to Norfolk and, on the 9th of August, a raid on the
Petersburg and Weldon Railroad was made. It was hard service, and but little was accomplished.
In October an expedition went to Matthew's Court House, to break up the contraband trade. Soon
after, Company A was detached from the regiment and was placed on provost guard duty at
Norfolk, Va. In the following February, the company returned to the regiment, and was sent to
Williamsburg and participated in General Wistar's famous expedition against Richmond. The
expedition got no further than Bottom Bridge, on the Chickahominy. On the return of the
regiment to Williamsburg, Company A was detached and stationed at Glouscester Point,
opposite Yorktown.
During the winter General Lee's army was encamped on the Rapidan River, and many of his
men, especially cavalry, were furloughed for the purpose of recruiting their ranks. At different
times during the winter twenty-five of the Glouscester company were captured. In March, 1864,
General Kirkpatrick made a raid on Richmond. A part of his command, under Colonel Dalghren,
became separated and, while attempting to make their way to our forces at Glouscester Point,
were ambushed in the night. Colonel Dalghren was killed, and the command scattered. A
sergeant and five men made their way to our camp. A force sent out under Major Wetherill found
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none of Dalghren's command, but captured one man of the Fifth Virginia Cavalry, and one from
the Ninth Virginia Infantry.
April 9, 1864, we crossed the York River and marched to Newport News, on the James
River, took transports to Portsmouth, and were soon at Camp Getty, where the cavalry division,
under General August V. Kautz, was organized. It consisted of the Third New York, Fifth
Pennsylvania, Eleventh Pennsylvania and the First District of Columbia regiments. The last were
armed with the Henry repeating rifle, and two guns of the Eighth New York Battery were
attached to the division. On May 5th, a beautiful spring morning, the division moved out of
Camp Getty for the last time. Everything in the way of baggage or incumbrance was left behind.
The march was toward Petersburg, crossing the Black Water River near Wakefield Station, on
the Petersburg and Norfolk Railroad. The advance struck the Weldon Railroad at Stony Creek
Station, and captured the guard, The next day Jarratt's Station, with a guard of seventy men, was
captured The railroad bridge across the Notoway was burned, and Companies A and D were sent
to destroy a wagon bridge to the left. From there the march was continued to City Point, which
was in possession of General Butler and his colored troops. On May 11th we crossed the
Appomattox at Bermuda Hundred. Raids, in which bridges were burned, railroads torn up, and
much valuable property destroyed, were in constant progress, the division sometimes marching
three hundred miles in six days. So constantly were we kept on the move that, on the night of
June 1st, when we reached the lines in from of Petersburg, the men took off their clothes to rest
for the first time since leaving camp Getty on May 5th. The company had taken part in
destroying a large amount of railroad track on the Danville, the South Side. and the Weldon
Railroads.
At Pittsburg the regiment was dismounted and manned the breastworks, performing infantry
duty. On the 9th of June an attack was made on the Jerusalem plank roads. After some artillery
fire, a charge was made and the lines carried. If General Gilmore had made any attempt to carry
out his part, by an attack on the east line of the rebel works, Petersburg would have been
captured. On the 15th of June another attack was made on the lines of the Norfolk and Petersburg
Railroad. The regiment was under severe fire for some time, but failed to carry the works. On the
21st of June General Kautz's Division again left camp along the breastworks and crossed the
Appomattox to Zion's Church, where it joined the Third Division of General Sheridan's cavalry
under General J. H. Wilson, in a raid, the object of which was the destruction of the Danville
Railroad.. .. This was accomplished. For thirty miles not a vestige of railroad remained. The
extreme heat of the fire, added to that of the sun, prostrated a number of the men. After a march,
in which the men and horses suffered severely, the command reached the Petersburg and Weldon
Railroad at Stony Creek Station. Here it met a strong rebel force. After sharp skirmishing, it
marched north to Reams' Station, where the rebel infantry with bayonets, and tour cavalry with
sabers, came to a hand to hand contest. By outflanking the rebels, General Kautz's Division
reached our lines at Petersburg that night. The column was led by the Eleventh Pennsylvania
Cavalry, with Colonel Stratton in command, Company A taking the advance of the regiment.
General Wilson retreated south, and was four days in reaching our lines. After this the
Eleventh Cavalry was on picket duty in Prince George county. It was with General Hancock in
the attack on the Weldon Railroad August 22, 1864, where Company A had one man killed and
one wounded. The picket duty in Prince George County was hard service. On the 20th of
September 1864, the members of the original company A—except those who had re- enlisted—
were mustered out of the service of the United States, at General Butler's headquarters, on the
Appomattox.
4
On reorganizing the company the officers were chosen from the veterans who had reenlisted,
as follows: Captain, E. P. Ring; First Lieutenant, William A. Barber; Second
Lieutenant, Oscar S. Matthews. In October, 1864, they were with the cavalry in the actions north
of the James River, where Lieutenant Barber was wounded and taken prisoners He died in
Richmond. The company was with General Sheridan at Five Forks. In the cavalry charge on the
enemy's line, Lieutenant Matthews was killed. On the memorable 9th of April, the Eleventh
Pennsylvania Cavalry was in the front line. Iowa was there represented by the officers in
command of the few remaining of grand old Company A, The regiment was mustered out of the
service of the United States at Camp Cadwalader. Philadelphia, August 13, 1865. At that time
there were but three of the original Iowa company left, Lieutenant Lucius L. Carrier, James
Lindsay and Oscar S. Slosson. 3
3 The names of all the killed and wounded. of those who died from wounds or disease of those
who were discharged for disability, or from whatever cause, will be found in the subjoined
roster, which also contains the personal record of each member of the company, in so far as the
same could be obtained from the history referred to.
It will thus be seen that this splendid Iowa company, while assigned to and serving with a
regiment from another State, nobly maintained the honorable record which was made by Iowa
soldiers everywhere, throughout the great War of the Rebellion. Its first Captain—Franklin A.
Stratton— became Major, Lieutenant Colonel and Colonel of the regiment, and Brevet Brigadier
General of Volunteers, at the close of the war. He was twice wounded. Many of the members of
the company have since achieved success in various avocations, both as private citizens and in
official positions.
In the autumn of 1864, Governor Stone appointed Hon. Charles Aldrich as the Iowa
commissioner to take the vote of the Iowa soldiers serving in the eastern army at the time
President Lincoln was re-elected. Among the troops visited by Mr. Aldrich, while in the
discharge of his official duty as election commissioner, was Company A, of the Eleventh
Pennsylvania Cavalry, among whom were a number of his personal friends and acquaintances.
The compiler deems it an appropriate closing of this sketch to quote a few brief extracts from the
very interesting account which Mr. Aldrich has given of his visit to the eastern army, upon that
occasion:
..... A company had gone from Fort Dodge—with many of the members of which I was
acquainted—to the Army of the Potomac. The theory in the formation of the regiment at the start
was to make it a composite affair, comprising one company from each of a certain number of
States; but the effort failed to materialize, the Adjutant General not being authorized to organize
such regiments; and, when the command was fully mustered in, it was christened the Eleventh
Pennsylvania Cavalry. I do not go into the history of this company to any farther extent, for the
reason that an article elsewhere in this number details minutely the services of the company, and
presents its full roster, showing the killed and wounded, as well as the few in the command at its
muster out. It is but simple justice that this gallant command should be placed Permanently in
our records. I trust that its appearance in these pages will accomplish that purposed I reported to
the Secretary of State at Des Moines, where I received my instructions, with the poll books,
blanks, etc.; I also carried tickets provided by each of the political Parties. The journey to
Washington was without any special incident. I applied at the War Department for permission to
visit General Grant's Army in my official capacity as "Army Vote Commissioner," and was
5
referred to Major Henry Clay Wood, (who, I believe, if living, must be a gray-haired colonel by
this time,) an Assistant Adjutant General. I found him an exceedingly affable and pleasant
gentleman. He gave me the necessary permit, limiting my stay to a certain number of days—five
or six. I took the first steamer down the Potomac and up the James, and in due time landed on the
point at the junction of the latter stream with the Appomattox. I was not long in finding Charles
A. Sherman, of Fort Dodge, who had been promoted to First Lieutenant and Assistant
Quartermaster, and had been detailed for duty at the headquarters of General August V. Kautz,
the distinguished cavalry leader. "Charlie" was an old political and personal friend, and gave me
a most cordial welcome to his tent and mess table. He wanted to vote, and proffered to go out
with me the next day to the point where the men were stationed, doing picket duty, far to the
front.
4 The Hon. Charles Aldrich was the founder of the Historical Department of Iowa, and was for
many years engaged in the collection of historical matter, giving especial attention to the
preservation of the early history of the State, and the history of Iowa military organizations.
We were up in the morning very early, leaving camp on horseback as soon as we had taken
on breakfast. We crossed the James at Deep Bottom, on a pontoon bridge, and started off in the
direction of Richmond, following the old road.. ... We now struck into the "Long Bridge road"
which led off through thick, grand old pine woods, toward Richmond. This was an ancient and
very narrow road, which had never been used very much, (or had been long abandoned. It was
very crooked, and at many points nearly choked up with briars and brush. But it was lined with
our pickets. These men were stationed at such frequent intervals that each could see the one next
ahead. They were ill mounted, sitting motionless and mute, with their carbines cocked, the very
impersonation of alertness and vigilance. It certainly looked very much like war, to see these
grim soldiers peering into the woods, as if in momentary expectation of seeing the approaching
enemy. We finally reached the most advanced picket post, when we found Colonel Spear and a
company of cavalrymen. Lieutenant Sherman introduced me to the Colonel, stating the errand
upon which I had come. After a hearty and most cordial greeting, I waited a moment to hear
what the Colonel might say. He spoke in an instant, about as follows
"Well, young man, if you are going to do anything here, you had better get about it—quick.
You don't know the peril you are in at this very moment! That line of trees over yonder (across a
meadow or pasture, and not more than forty or fifty rods away) is full of 'Johnnies,' and they may
open fire upon us at any minute !"
"All right, Colonel, here goes !"
An election board was quickly appointed "by the commissioner" from the soldiers, (as the
law stipulated,) and a cigar box fitted up for a ballot-box. The men were brought in as quietly as
possible, and in less time than one can imagine our votes were all in and canvassed. I was
informed that we were within less than eight miles of Richmond, and that the spires of the city
could be plainly seen from a point quite nearby. I have always supposed that the election was
held nearer the front, and in closer proximity to actual peril. than that organized by any other
army vote commissioner.
We were not disposed to linger an instant, and Lieutenant Sherman and I mounted our horses
and started for the rear. A young Second Lieutenant, by the name of Oscar Matthews, from
Dickinson County, Iowa, returned with us. He was a pleasant, handsome boy. He had been in
many battles, and the little black horse which he rode had not yet fully recovered from an ugly
wound in the side— and had other scars besides.
6
He was very attentive to us, and showed us many interesting objects along our route. At the
battle of Five Forks, on April 1, 1865, this gallant young officer was killed, while leading his
men in a charge .....
5 Annals of Iowa. Third Series. Vol. VI, No. 8, January, 1905, pages 618 to 623. Recollections
of Hon. Charles Aldrich, Founder of Iowa Historical Department.
SUMMARY OF CASUALTIES.
Total Enrollment ............. 165
Killed ....................... 5
Wounded ................. 10
Died of wounds ........... 2
Died of disease ........... 6
Discharged for wounds, disease or other causes......... 6
Buried in National Cemeteries .................... 0
Captured ........................6
Transferred ..................0
COMPANY A, ELEVENTH PENNSYLVANIA VOLUNTEER CAVALRY
Term of service three years.
Mustered into the service of the United States at Dubuque, Iowa, September 21, 1861, by
Captain Washington. Mustered out of service Aug. 13, 1865, Camp Cadwalader, Philadelphia,
Pa.
LINE OFFICERS.
Names of company officers at muster in of the company. Service record given opposite their
names in the alphabetical roster following.
Franklin A. Stratton, Captain. George S. Ringland, 1st Lieutenant. George W. Bassett, 2d
Lieutenant.
ROSTER O}' THE COMPANY'.
Barbor, William A. Age 18. Residence Border Plains. Enlisted Aug. 18, 1861. Mustered Sept.
21, 1861. Promoted Corporal July 7, 1864; First Lieutenant Oct. 6, 1864. Taken prisoner Oct. 7,
1864, Darbytown Road. Died while a prisoner.
Barclay, John J. Age 28. Residence Fort Dodge. Enlisted Aug. 15, 1861, as First Sergeant.
Promoted Second Lieutenant Aug. 20, 1862; First Lieutenant Jan. 25, 1863. Wounded and taken
prisoner June 29, 1864, Reams' Station, Va. Mustered out Sept. 28, 1864.
Barnes, James R. Age 21. Residence Border Plains. Enlisted Aug. 18, 1861. Mustered Sept. 21,
1861. Killed June 9, 1864, in from of Petersburg.
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Bassett, George W. Age 34. Residence Fort Dodge. Appointed Second Lieutenant Aug. 7. 1861.
Mustered Sept. 21, 1861. Promoted First Lieutenant Aug. 20, 1862. Wounded December, 1862;
Franklin, Va. Resigned Jan. 25, 1863.
Beach, James A. Age 21. Residence Border Plains. Enlisted Aug. 24, 1861. Mustered Sept. 21,
1861. Died Jan. 30, 1863, of wounds received at Deserted House, Va.
Beyers, John F. Age 29. Residence Webster County, nativity New York. Enlisted Jan. 2, 1864.
Mustered Jan. 12, 1864. No further record found.
Binkley, George W. Age 18. Residence Border Plains. Enlisted Aug. 18, 1861. Mustered Sept.
21, 1861. Mustered out Sept. 20, 1864.
Binkley, Lafayette. Age 19. Residence Border Plains. Enlisted Sept. 15, 1861. Mustered Sept.
2t, 1861. Mustered out Sept. 20, 1864.
Blake, Fletcher A. Age 26. Residence Spirit Lake. Enlisted Aug. 23, 1861, as Second Sergeant.
Mustered Sept. 21, 1861. Promoted First Sergeant Aug. 20, 1862; Second Lieutenant Jan. 25,
1863. Resigned Sept. 21, 1863.
Bowers, Peter. Residence Fort Dodge. Enlisted Aug. 26, 1861. Mustered Sept. 21, 1861. Killed
Oct. 9, 1861, on railroad near Lewiston, Pa.
Brown, John F. Age 21. Residence Waterloo. Enlisted Sept. 28, 1861. Mustered Sept. 28, 1861.
Mustered out Sept. 28, 1864.
Burright, William H. Age 20. Residence Fort Dodge. Enlisted Aug. 16, 1861. Mustered Sept.
21, 1861. Taken prisoner Jan. 29, 1864; was in Andersonville. No further record found.
Carpenter, Daniel. Residence Border Plains. Enlisted Aug. 20, 1861. Mustered Nov. 2, 1861.
Died of disease Dec. 24, 1861, Washington, D. C.
Carpenter, William. Age 31. Residence Fort Dodge. Enlisted Aug. 17, 1861, as First Corporal.
Mustered Sept. 21, 1861. Mustered out Sept. 20, 1864.
Carrier, Lucius L. Age 18. Residence Dubuque. Enlisted Sept. 28, 1861. Mustered Sept. 28,
1861. Promoted Company Commissary Sergeant Oct. 19, 1864; First Sergeant Feb. 14, 1865;
Second Lieutenant May, 1865; First Lieutenant Aug. 13, 1865. Mustered out Aug. 13, 1865,
Camp Cadwalader, Philadelphia, Pa.
Carter, Allen B. Age 21. Residence Fort Dodge. Enlisted Aug. 21, 1861. Mustered Sept. 21,
1861. Mustered out Sept. 20, 1864.
Chandler, Starling. Age 20. Residence Waterloo. Enlisted Sept. 28, 1861. Mustered Sept. 28,
1861. Mustered out Sept. 28, 1864. Chase, Leander. Age 30. Residence Fort Dodge. Enlisted
Aug. 20, 1861. Mustered Sept. 21, 1861. Mustered out Sept. 21, 1864.
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Clark, Henry. Age 19. Residence Dubuque. Enlisted Sept. 23, 1861. Mustered Sept. 23, 1861.
Mustered out Sept. 23, 1864.
Cooper, Henry. Age 24. Residence Jamestown. Enlisted Sept. 9, 1861. Mustered Sept. 21, 1861.
Mustered out Sept. 21, 1864.
Cragg, Harry P. Age 23. Residence Humboldt County, nativity Pennsylvania. Enlisted Dec. 29,
1863. Mustered Jan. 16, 1864. Transferred to Company L, Fourth Cavalry.
Crosby, Charles T. Age 27. Residence Webster County, nativity New York. Enlisted Jan. 2,
1864. Mustered Jan. 12, 1864. Transferred to Company I, Thirty-second Infantry. See Company
A, Eighth Infantry.
Crosby, George H. Age 20. Residence Fort Dodge. Enlisted Sept. 3, 1861. Mustered Sept. 21,
1861. Promoted Sergeant Jan.—, 1864. Mustered out Sept. 21, 1864.
Cruikshank, George L. Age 27. Residence Fort Dodge. Enlisted Sept. 15, 1861, as Fourth
Sergeant. Mustered Sept. 21, 1861. Promoted Company Quartermaster Sergeant, 1862; First
Sergeant Sept. 21, 1863. Mustered out Sept. 20, 1864.
Daniels, George. Age 23. Residence Spirit Lake. Enlisted Sept. 7, 1861. Mustered Sept. 20,
1861. No further record found.
Davis, Abner T. Age 29. Residence Humboldt County, nativity Michigan. Enlisted Jan. 1, 1864.
Mustered Jan. 16, 1864. Transferred to Company L, Fourth Cavalry.
Emery, Seth P. Age 25. Residence Spirit Lake. Enlisted Sept. 7, 1861. Mustered Sept. 21, 1861.
Promoted to Hospital Steward.
Erwin, Allen. Age 40. Residence Border Plains. Enlisted Aug. 20, 1861. Mustered Sept. 21,
1861. Mustered out Sept. 20, 1864.
Evans, Hiram. Age 22. Residence Jamestown. Enlisted Aug. 20, 1861. Mustered Sept. 20, 1861.
Deserted July 3, 1863.
Fairman, John W. Age 23. Residence Humboldt County, nativity Canada. Enlisted Jan. 4,
1864. Mustered Jan. 16, 1864. Transferred to Company L, Fourth Cavalry.
Fitch, William S. Age 21. Residence Border Plains. Enlisted Aug. 23 r 1861. Mustered Sept. 21,
1861. Mustered out Sept. 20, 1864.
Fitzgerald, John. Age 19. Residence Fort Dodge. Enlisted Sept. 10, 1861, as Eighth Corporal.
Mustered Sept. 21, 1861. Promoted Company Quartermaster Sergeant, 1864. Mustered out Sept.
20, 1864. See Company K, First Infantry. (John H. Fitzgerald.)
9
Forbes, James W. Age 22. Residence Cedar Falls. Enlisted Sept. 1861. Mustered Sept. 21,
1861. Mustered out Sept. 20, 1864.
Forbes, Thomas J. Age 26. Residence Dakotah City. Enlisted Sept. 2, 1861. Mustered Sept. 21,
1861. Mustered out Sept. 20, 1864.
Frantz, Jacob H. Age 23. Residence Dubuque. Enlisted Sept. 26, 1861. Mustered Sept. 26,
1861. Mustered out Sept. 26, 1864.
Frost, William. Age 24. Residence Waterloo. Enlisted Sept. 25, 1861. Mustered Sept. 28, 1861.
Mustered out Sept. 28, 1864.
Fuller, Jared. Age 40. Residence Fort Dodge. Enlisted Aug. 22, 1861, as Seventh Corporal.
Mustered Sept. 21, 1861. Discharged for disability Sept. —, 1863.
Galer, John. Age 21. Residence Jamestown. Enlisted Sept. 9 1861. Mustered Sept. 21, 1861.
Promoted Bugler, 1863. Mustered out Sept. 21, 1864.
Gardner, William V. Age 20. Residence Fort Dodge. Enlisted Aug. 20, 1861. Mustered Sept.
21, 1861. Promoted Corporal 1864. Mustered out Sept. 20, 1864.
Hinton, James N. Age 27. Residence Humboldt County, nativity Ohio. Enlisted Jan. 1, 1864.
Mustered Jan. 16, 1864. Transferred to Company L, Fourth Cavalry. (James M. Hinton.)
Hodge, Albert D. Age 25. Residence Estherville Enlisted Aug. 22, 1861, as Sixth Corporal.
Mustered Sept. 21, 1861. Wounded Jan. 30, 1863, Deserted House. Mustered out on account of
wound.
Holloway, Joseph H. Age 23. Residence Fort Dodge. Enlisted Aug. 15, 1861, as Company
Quartermaster Sergeant. Mustered Sept. 21, 1861. Furloughed Nov. —, 1863. Died at home.
Hood, James. Age 22. Residence Jamestown. Enlisted Aug. 20, 1861. Mustered Sept. 21, 1861.
Mustered out Sept. 20, 1864.
Horton, James. Age 20. Residence Fort Dodge. Enlisted Sept. 3, 1861. Mustered Sept. 21, 1861.
Promoted Corporal in 1863. Discharged September —, 1863, to take Lieutenant's Commission in
Eighth Iowa Cavalry; was Adjutant of the Regiment. Killed, Stoneman's Raid south of Atlanta,
Ga. He was chosen to represent the Cavalry Service on the Soldiers' Monument, Des Moines,
Iowa.
Hunter, James. Age 42. Residence Waterloo. Enlisted Oct. 11, 1861, as Farrier. Mustered
October, 1861. Mustered out Oct. 11, 1864.
Jenkins, Andrew R. Age 25. Residence Webster County, nativity Pennsylvania. Enlisted Jan. 2,
1864. Mustered Jan. 12, 1864. Transferred to Company I, Thirty-second Infantry. See Company
B, Eighth Infantry (Andrew K. Jenkins.)
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Jenkins, Henry. Age 26. Residence Estherville. Enlisted Aug. 22, 1861, as Second Corporal.
Mustered Sept. 21, 1861. Promoted Company Commissary Sergeant, 1864. Mustered out Sept.
20, 1864.
Jenkins, James S. Age 21. Residence Webster County, nativity Pennsylvania. Enlisted Jan. 2,
1864. Mustered Jan. 12, 1864. Transferred to Company I, Thirty-second Infantry. See Company
B, Eighth Infantry.
Jenkins, John S. Age 27. Residence Webster County nativity Pennsylvania. Enlisted Jan. 2,
1864. Mustered Jan. 12, 1864. Transferred to Company I, Thirty-second Infantry. See Company
B, Eighth Infantry.
Johns, William W. Age 26. Residence Border Plains. Enlisted Aug. 17, 1861. Mustered Sept.
21, 1861. Died Aug. 31, 1862, Hospital, Suffolk, Va.
Johnson, Samuel O. H. Age 19. Residence Border Plains. Enlisted Aug. 17, 1861. Mustered
Sept. 21, 1861. Committed suicide, while insane June 14, 1862, near Fortress Monroe, Va.
Jones, George W. Age 32. Residence Webster County, nativity New York Enlisted Jan. 2, 1864.
Mustered Jan. 12, 1864. Transferred to Company I, Thirty-second Infantry. See Company B,
Eighth Infantry.
Kendall, Edward. Age 19. Residence Fort Dodge. Enlisted Aug. 28, 1861. Mustered Sept. 21,
1861. Wounded June—, 1863, South Anna Bridge, Va. Mustered out Sept. 20, 1864.
Kennedy, Edward. Age 22. Residence Fort Dodge. Enlisted Aug. 23, 1861. Mustered Sept. 21,
1861. Mustered out Sept. 20, 1864.
Kimball, Jacob. Age l9. Residence Cedar Falls. Enlisted Sept. 16, 1861. Mustered Sept. 21,
1861. Died of disease May —, 1862, Camp Hamilton, Va.
Largent, Joseph F. Age 22. Residence Dubuque. Enlisted Sept. 27, 1861. Mustered Sept. 27,
1861. No further record found.
Lindsay, James. Age 29. Residence Fort Dodge. Enlisted Aug. 31, 1861. Mustered Sept. 21,
1861. Mustered out Aug. 13, 1865, Camp Cadwalader, Philadelphia, Pa.
McKee, Joseph A. Age 23. Residence Border Plains. Enlisted Aug. 17, 1861. Mustered Sept.
21, 1861 Mustered out Sept. 20, 1864.
Mock, Charles D. Age 29. Residence Cedar Falls. Enlisted Sept. 16, 1861, as Bugler. Mustered
Sept. 21, 1861. Mustered out Sept. 20, 1864.
Malcom, Augustus H. Age 29. Residence Jamestown. Enlisted Aug. 20. 1861, as Fourth
Corporal. Mustered Sept. 21, 1861. Promoted Sergeant, 1864. Mustered out Sept. 20, 1864.
11
Matthews, Oscar S. Age 20. Residence Spirit Lake. Enlisted Aug. 22, 1861. Mustered Sept. 21,
1861. Promoted Sergeant, Sept. —, 1864, Second Lieutenant Oct. 4, 1864. Killed April 1, 1865,
Five Forks, Va.
Meagher, Thomas. Age 22. Residence Fort Dodge. Enlisted Aug. 21, 1861. Mustered Sept. 21,
1861. Mustered out Sept. 20, 1864.
Mills, Andrew. Age 29 Residence Jamestown. Enlisted Aug. 20, 1861. Mustered Sept. 21, 1861.
Wounded and taken prisoner June 29, 1864, Reams' Station, Va. Was in Andersonville. Died
March —, 1866, Wilmington, N. C.
Minton, Henry P. Age 23. Residence Border Plains. Enlisted Aug. 17, 1861. Mustered Sept. 21,
1861. Promoted Saddler, 1864. Mustered out Sept. 20, 1864.
Minton, John N. Age 21. Residence Border Plains. Enlisted Aug. 17, 1861, as Fifth Corporal.
Mustered Sept. 21, 1861. Taken prisoner Aug. —, 1864. Died in prison.
Moon, James H. Age 33. Residence Humboldt County, nativity Pennsylvania. Enlisted Jan. 16,
1864. Mustered Jan. 16, 1864. Annals of Iowa says: "James Moon came to the Company from
Iowa in 1862."
Moore, Jacob M. Age 18. Residence Border Plains. Enlisted Aug. 17, 1861. Mustered Sept. 21,
1861. Mustered out Sept. 20, 1864.
Morgan, Edward D. G. Age 29. Residence Fort Dodge. Enlisted Sept. 2, 1861, as Fifth
Sergeant. Mustered Sept. 21, 1861. Promoted Second Lieutenant Sept. 21, 1863. Resigned July
7, 1864.
Morrell, Richard M. Mustered Sept. 21, 1861. Reduced to ranks from Non-Commissioned Staff
June 1, 1862. Deserted June 24, 1862. Was not an Iowa man.
Olcutt, George. Age 23. Residence Fort Dodge. Enlisted Sept. 9, 1861. Mustered Sept. 21,
1861. Mustered out Sept. 20, 1864.
Ostrander, William Sr. Residence Annapolis, Md. Enlisted Nov. 23, 1861. No further record
found.
Peterson, John. (Veteran.) Age 18. Residence Fort Dodge. Enlisted Aug. 31, 1861. Mustered
Sept. 21, 1861. Mustered out Sept. 20, 1864.
Platt, Henry A. Age 21. Residence Fort Dodge. Enlisted Aug. 24, 1861. Mustered Sept. 21,
1861. Mustered out Sept. 20, 1864.
Price, George R. Age 20. Residence Dubuque. Enlisted Sept. 24, 1861. Mustered Sept. 24,
1861. Mustered out Sept. 24, 1864.
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Ring, Euphronius P. Age 20. Residence Spirit Lake. Enlisted Sept. 6, 1861. Mustered Sept. 21,
1861. Promoted Sergeant Aug. 7, 1863; Second Lieutenant July 7,. 1864; Captain Oct. 4, 1864.
Resigned June 8, 1865.
Ringland, George S. Age 27. Residence Fort Dodge. Appointed First Lieutenant Aug. 15, 1861.
Mustered Sept. 21, 1861. Promoted Captain Aug. 20, 1862. Mustered out Sept. 27, 1864.
Rogers, George W. Residence Ball's Cross Roads, Va. Enlisted Nov. 11, 1861. No further
record found.
Rogers, Samuel R. Age 24. Residence Spirit Lake. Enlisted Sept. 7, 1861. Mustered Sept. 21,
1861. Killed Aug. 24, 1864, near Weldon Railroad.
Rood, Isaac P. Age 36. Residence Webster County, nativity New York. Enlisted Jan. 4, 1864.
Mustered Jan. 12, 1864. Transferred to Company I, Thirty-second Infantry. See Company B,
Eighth Infantry.
outer, Valentine. Age 37. Residence Humboldt County, nativity Bavaria. Enlisted Jan. 4, 1864.
Mustered Jan. 16, 1864. Transferred to Company L, Fourth Cavalry. (Valentine Reuther or
Ryder.)
Shaftner, Francis. Age 22. Residence Fort Dodge. Enlisted Aug. 21, 1861. Mustered Sept. 21,
1861. Mustered out Sept. 20, 1864.
Sherman, Charles A. Age 31. Residence Fort Dodge. Enlisted Aug. 21, 1861, as Third
Sergeant. Mustered Sept. 21, 1861. Promoted First Lieutenant and Regimental Quartermaster
April 4, 1862. Mustered out April 3, 1865.
Sherman, William. Age 18. Residence Jamestown. Enlisted Aug. 20, 1861. Mustered Sept. 21,
1861. Mustered out Sept. 20, 1864.
Simmons, Jason B. Age 25. Residence Fort Dodge. Enlisted Aug. 21, 1861. Mustered Sept. 21,
1861. Promoted Corporal, 1864. Mustered out Sept. 20, 1864.
Slosson, Oscar. Age 28. Residence Jamestown. Enlisted Sept. 9, 1861. Mustered Sept. 21, 1861.
Mustered out Aug. 13, 1865, Camp Cadwalader, Philadelphia, Pa.
Smith, George. Age 26. Residence Fort Dodge. Enlisted Aug. 21, 1861, as Third Corporal.
Mustered Sept. 21, 1861. Wounded June 25, 1863, South Anna Bridge, Va. Mustered out Sept.
20, 1864.
Smith, George G. Age 25. Residence Estherville. Enlisted Aug. 23, 1861, as Farrier. Mustered
Sept. 21, 1861. Taken prisoner Aug. 1864. Was in Andersonville.
Smith, William H. Age 26. Residence Webster County, nativity New York. Enlisted Jan. 2,
1864. Mustered Jan. 12, 1864. Transferred to Second Cavalry. (Unassigned.)
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Spring, Ichabod E. Age 21. Residence Border Plains. Enlisted Aug. 17, 1861. Mustered Sept.
21, 1861. Mustered out Sept. 20, 1864.
Stratton, Franklin A. Age 29. Residence Fort Dodge. Appointed Captain Aug. 15, 1861.
Mustered Sept. 21, 1861. Promoted Major Sept. 1, 1862; Lieutenant Colonel Sept. 19, 1864;
Colonel May—, 1865. Was brevetted Brigadier General on muster out of service. Twice
wounded.
Tanner, Charles. Age 25. Residence Spirit Lake. Enlisted Aug. 22, 1861. Mustered Sept. 21,
1861. Mustered out Sept. 20, 1864.
Taylor, Daniel C. Age 28 Residence Fort Dodge. Enlisted Sept. 2, 1861. Mustered Sept. 21,
1861. Wounded Jan. 30, 1863, Deserted House, Va. Lost an arm.
Townsend, Albert H. Age 19. Residence Border Plains. Enlisted Aug. 17, 1861. Mustered Sept.
21, 1861. Mustered out Sept. 20, 1864.
Townsend, Henry. Age 20. Residence Border Plains. Enlisted Aug. 17, 1861. Mustered Sept.
21, 1861. Mustered out Sept. 20, 1864.
Townsend, James L. Age 22. Residence Border Plains. Enlisted Aug. 17, 1861. Mustered Sept.
21, 1861. Mustered out Sept. 20, 1864.
Trusty, Joseph S. M. Age 24. Residence Webster County, nativity Illinois. Enlisted Jan. 2,
1864. Mustered Jan. 12, 1864. Transferred to Company I, Thirty-second Infantry. See Company
B, Eighth Infantry.
Underwood, Alonzo. Age 20. Residence Fort Dodge. Enlisted Aug. 16, 1861, as Saddler.
Mustered Sept. 21, 1861. Mustered out for disability Aug. 21, 1862.
VanGaasbeck, Jesse L. Enlisted Nov. 23, 1861. No further record found.
Vincent, Webb. Age 19. Residence Fort Dodge. Enlisted Sept. 3, 1861, as Second Bugler.
Mustered Sept. 21, 1861. Promoted Company Quartermaster Sergeant, 1863. Mustered out Sept.
20, 1864.
Vought, Lewis. Age 25. Residence Humboldt County, nativity Wisconsin. Enlisted Jan. 1, 1864.
Mustered Jan. 16, 1864. Transferred to Company L, Fourth Cavalry.
Wall, William W. Residence Philadelphia, Pa. Enlisted Sept. 30, 1861. No further record found.
Welch, William. Age 22. Residence Fort Dodge. Enlisted Sept. 12, 1861, as Wagoner. Mustered
Sept. 21, 1861. Mustered out Sept. 20, 1864.
Wentworth, Harrison H. Age 18. Residence Webster County, nativity Pennsylvania. Enlisted
Sept. 29, 1863. Mustered Jan. 16, 1864. No further record found.
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Williams, Thomas J. Age 21. Residence Dubuque. Enlisted Sept. 27, 1861. Mustered Sept. 27,
1861. Mustered out for disability.
Wilson, Richard W. (Veteran.) Residence Fort Dodge. Enlisted Aug. 27, 1861. Mustered Sept.
21, 1861. Deserted, date and place not given.