IOWA STORIES
Volume 2

By
CLARENCE RAY AURNER

Printed by the Clio Press Iowa City, Iowa 1918
Copyright 1918 by Clarence Ray Aurner

Transcribed by Sharon Elijah, June 21, 2013

  PREFACE p. 3
     
  CONTENTS p. 5
     
I. WHEN IOWA WAS WITHOUT A NAME p. 9
  What the first settlers found –No local laws—The Iowa Country joined to Michigan—The first counties—The Iowa Country joined to Wisconsin--The Territory of Iowa.  
     
II. MANY COUNTIES IN PLACE OF TWO p. 19
  The two large counties divided—Arrangement of counties—County seats—Attached counties—The debt of the large counties—Each county to pay its share.  
     
III. HOW COUNTIES WERE MANAGED p. 30
  Selecting a clerk—The business of counties—Collecting money—Waiting for pay from the county—Amount of taxes—Guarding prisoners--The county seals—The county board and other offices.  
     
IV. THE HISTORY OF A PIECE OF LAND p. 41
  Each piece distinguished from every other—The surveyed townships—The civil township—The first townships—Where to look for land history.  
     
V. MAKING A NEW STATE p. 49
  Governor Lucas wants a state—Voting for a constitution—The boundary of Iowa—Iowa admitted to the Union—Territorial governors of Iowa—First State election—The General Assembly.  
     
VI. BUILDING A NEW CAPITAL CITY p. 57
  Governor Lucas arrives at Burlington—Other Territorial officers—Locating a new city—Laying out the “City of Iowa”—The capitol building—The steamer Rock River visits the capital—Territorial officers move to the “City of Iowa”—Another capital in view—The last of Monroe City.  
     
VII. THE IOWA-MISSOURI QUARREL p. 68
  Causes of the dispute—The Sullivan survey of 1816—An army approaches—The Iowa militia ordered out—Good sense prevents a fight—Congress helps to settle the trouble—The boundary fixed.  
     
VIII. THE CALICO RAILROAD p. 77
  Talk about railroads in 1844—The direction of the first one mentioned—The St. Louis market—Plank roads—The first road surveyed—Money for it—Work begun—The end of it all—The Calico.  
     
IX. THE BEGINNING OF REAL RAILROADS p. 88
  Chicago and St. Louis become rivals—The big “M and M” railway—Muscatine wants the main line—A great celebration—First freight shipments-Reaching the capital city-Another celebration.  
     
X. OTHER MAIN LINES OF RAILROAD p. 97
  The Dubuque and Pacific—The right of way—The Market of the Northwest—St. Louis objects to any bridge—The Chicago, Iowa, and Nebraska—Another celebration—The steamer Black Hawk—Eight roads by 1857—Public land for their use—Desire for railroads.  
     
XI. THE BUSINESS OF RAILROADS p. 107
  Like that of steamboats—Some cargoes—New kinds of freight—Shipments of game—Express companies.  
     
XII. LAYING BY SOME MONEY FOR SCHOOLS p. 112
  Provision for school lands—Renting the lands—Using the money from lands—Other school money—University land—Other ways to help schools.  
     
XIII. LAWS FOR THE PUBLIC SCHOOLS p. 122
  After 1834—Governor Lucas would have a good law—Borrowing laws—Districts—School taxes not favored—Laws of 1847 and 1849—How one district acted—Graded schools—Union schools—Re-writing the school laws, 1856—Mr. Horace Mann asked to help.  
     
XIV. THE FIRST STATE SCHOOL p. 129
  Called a University—Divisions of a university, 1849—Opening a School, 1855.  
     
XV. THE FIRST COLLEGES p. 132
  Their beginnings—First planned in New England—The Iowa Band, 1843—A minister’s decision—Church people plan schools—What the pioneers wanted.  
     
XVI. SOME EARLY NEWSPAPERS p. 142
  First at Dubuque Lead Mines—Some changes in names—What names meant—What papers contained—Some advertisements.  
     
XVII. OPENING THE WAY p. 154
  French explorers—Claims of France—Lewis and Clarke on the western border—Sergeant Floyd buried on Iowa soil, 1804—General Pike on the eastern border—Duty of the soldiers—Story of Lieutenant Albert M. Lea—Indians attack whites—Danger passes.  
     
XVIII. WHAT THE INDIANS OF IOWA GAVE UP p. 162
  Early lines drawn between tribes—Sacs and Foxes and Sioux—Boundary of the Black Hawk Purchase—Purchase of 1837—The Ioway’s claim—Sacs and Foxes leave in 1845—Sioux last to go—Where the money paid the Indians went—The white man’s advance.  
     

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