IOWA STORIES
Volume 2

By
CLARENCE RAY AURNER

Printed by the Clio Press Iowa City, Iowa 1918
Copyright 1918 by Clarence Ray Aurner

Transcribed by Sharon Elijah, June 21, 2013

  PREFACE p. 3
     
  CONTENTS p. 5
     
I. WHEN IOWA WAS WITHOUT A NAME p. 9
  What the first settlers found - No local law - The Iowa Country joined to Michigan - The first counties - The Iowa Country joined to Wisconsin - The Territory of Iowa.  
     
II. MANY COUNTIES IN PLACE OF TWO p. 19
  The two large counties divided - Arrangement of counties - County seats - Attached counties - The debt of the large counties - Each county to pay its share.  
     
III. HOW COUNTIES WERE MANAGED p. 30
  Selecting a clerk - The business of counties - Collecting money - Waiting for pay from the county - Amount of taxes - Guarding prisoners - The county seals - The county board and other offices.  
     
IV. THE HISTORY OF A PIECE OF LAND p. 41
  Each piece distinguished from every other - The surveyed townships - The civil township - The first townships - Where to look for land history.  
     
V. MAKING A NEW STATE p. 49
  Governor Lucas wants a state - Voting for a constitution - The boundary of Iowa - Iowa admitted to the Union - Territorial governors of Iowa - First State election - The General Assembly.  
     
VI. BUILDING A NEW CAPITAL CITY p. 57
  Governor Lucas arrives at Burlington - Other Territorial officers - Locating a new city - Laying out the “City of Iowa” - The capitol building - The steamer Rock River visits the capital - Territorial officers move to the “City of Iowa” - Another capital in view - The last of Monroe City.  
     
VII. THE IOWA-MISSOURI QUARREL p. 68
  Causes of the dispute - The Sullivan survey of 1816 - An army approaches - The Iowa militia ordered out - Good sense prevents a fight - Congress helps to settle the trouble - The boundary fixed.  
     
VIII. THE CALICO RAILROAD p. 77
  Talk about railroads in 1844 - The direction of the first one mentioned - The St. Louis market - Plank roads - The first road surveyed - Money for it - Work begun - The end of it all - The Calico.  
     
IX. THE BEGINNING OF REAL RAILROADS p. 88
  Chicago and St. Louis become rivals - The big “M and M” railway - Muscatine wants the main line - A great celebration - First freight shipments - Reaching the capital city-Another celebration.  
     
X. OTHER MAIN LINES OF RAILROAD p. 97
  The Dubuque and Pacific - The right of way - The Market of the Northwest - St. Louis objects to any bridge - The Chicago, Iowa, and Nebraska - Another celebration - The steamer Black Hawk - Eight roads by 1857 - Public land for their use - Desire for railroads.  
     
XI. THE BUSINESS OF RAILROADS p. 107
  Like that of steamboats - Some cargoes - New kinds of freight - Shipments of game - Express companies.  
     
XII. LAYING BY SOME MONEY FOR SCHOOLS p. 112
  Provision for school lands - Renting the lands - Using the money from lands - Other school money - University land - Other ways to help schools.  
     
XIII. LAWS FOR THE PUBLIC SCHOOLS p. 122
  After 1834 - Governor Lucas would have a good law - Borrowing laws - Districts - School taxes not favored - Laws of 1847 and 1849 - How one district acted - Graded schools - Union schools - Re-writing the school laws, 1856 - Mr. Horace Mann asked to help.  
     
XIV. THE FIRST STATE SCHOOL p. 129
  Called a University - Divisions of a university, 1849 - Opening a School, 1855.  
     
XV. THE FIRST COLLEGES p. 132
  Their beginnings - First planned in New England -The Iowa Band, 1843 - A minister’s decision - Church people plan schools - What the pioneers wanted.  
     
XVI. SOME EARLY NEWSPAPERS p. 142
  First at Dubuque Lead Mines - Some changes in names - What names meant - What papers contained - Some advertisements.  
     
XVII. OPENING THE WAY p. 154
  French explorers - Claims of France - Lewis and Clarke on the western border - Sergeant Floyd buried on Iowa soil, 1804 - General Pike on the eastern border - Duty of the soldiers - Story of Lieutenant Albert M. Lea - Indians attack whites - Danger passes.  
     
XVIII. WHAT THE INDIANS OF IOWA GAVE UP p. 162
  Early lines drawn between tribes - Sacs and Foxes and Sioux - Boundary of the Black Hawk Purchase - Purchase of 1837 - The Ioway’s claim - Sacs and Foxes leave in 1845 - Sioux last to go - Where the money paid the Indians went - The white man’s advance.  

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