Residents of English River Township Biographies
Anderson, J. M., physician and surgeon, Webster; the subject of this sketch was born in Trumbull county, Ohio, June 20, 1832; his father, James Anderson, A. M., D. D., was pastor of the first Presbyterian Church of Lancaster Ohio, and his mother was Principal of Fairfield Female Seminary for eighteen years; youth, surrounded by influences that but few have enjoyed; he commenced his education at the academy of that place, continuing it until sixteen years of age; he they entered Athens University, and after pursuing his collegiate course, graduated in 1849 with high honors from that institution; he was professor of Latin and Greek for six months in the Miller Academy, in Guernsey county, Ohio; he then accepted the position of president of Vienna Academy, Trumbull county, Ohio, for one year; during this time he was studying medicine with William D. Payne, an eminent physician, for four years; he practiced his profession from 1858 until 1861, when he enlisted in the Sixteenth Ohio Infantry; served three months as a private, and was then detached, acting as assistant surgeon until his regiment was discharged; after the discharge he assisted in recruiting the Eighteenth Ohio Infantry, a was captain of company I; he held that position until July 23, when he was appointed by General Grant superintendent of the contrabands in the department of Tennessee; that position he held for about one year; he was then ordered to Michigan as military commander of the Rendezvous Draft Camp, remaining there for nine months; in February of 1865 he was ordered to the front, and appointed provost Marshall of the eastern department of Tennessee, on the staff of General Myer, which position he held until he was mustered out at the close of the war; he came to this county and engaged in the practice of his professional he married Miss Louisa Summitt June 22, 1867; she is a native of Franklin county, Kentucky; they have three children: Katie, Mary and Scott M.

Baker, William M., South English

Bair, S. H., farmer, Sec. 5; White Pigeon

Bair, Sarah J., farmer, Sec. 8; P. O. White Pigeon

Bair, John S., farmer, Sec. 8; P. O. White Pigeon

Bane, Mary, farmer, Sec. 9; P. O. South English

Bets, J. A., farmer, Sec. 7; P. O. White Pigeon

Bland, John S., county superintendent of schools; P. O. White Pigeon; born in Jefferson county, Indiana, in 1844, and was brought by his parents, when eight years of age, to Keokuk county, and was raised a farmer; his opportunities for receiving and education were limited, and he may well be termed a self-made man; he has been engaged in teaching for the last twelve years, and was elected to his present position in October 1879.

Bottomfield, W. C., farmer, Sec. 28; P. O. South English

Bowser, Michael, farmer, Sec. 26; P. O. South English

Bowser, O. J., farmer, Sec. 23; P. O. South English

Bowser, Valentine, South English

Boyd, Miss Mollie M., South English

Brown, Jacob, farmer, Sec. 25; P. O. South English

Brown, J. M., farmer, Sec. 19; P. O. Webster

Brumback, Grant, farmer, Sec. 25; P. O. South English

Butler, Mrs. M. E., farmer, Sec 2; P. O. North English

Butler, E. A., farmer, Sec. 1; P. O. North English

Cabler, Edward, farmer, Sec. 14. P. O. South English

Cabler, John W., farmer, Sec. 12; P. O. South English

Clarke, Mrs. C. E., farmer, Sec. 36; P. O. South English

Coffman, W. T., of the firm of Coffman & Co, druggists, South English; born in Augusta county Virginia, July 24, 1838; when sixteen years of age he came to Washington county, this State, and engaged in farming, which occupation he followed until August 17, 1862, when he enlisted in company K, Thirtieth Iowa Infantry, and served with that regiment until the close of the war; he participated in the following battles: Chickasaw Bayou, Arkansas Post, Vicksburg, Jackson, Lookout Mountain, Missionary Ridge, Ringgold (where he was severely wounded through the hand), Resaca, Dallas, Big Sandy, Kenesaw Mountain, Atlanta, rear of Jonesborough (where he was terribly wounded in the face, capture of Savannah, capture of Columbia and Bentons; he was discharged at Washington D. C., June 5, 1865; Mr. Coffman returned to Washington county,  Iowa, after his discharge, and resumed farming, which he continued until 1871, when he moved to South English and engaged in his present business; he was married January 21, 1873, to Miss Elizabeth J. Lambert, a native of Virginia: they have by this union two daughters: Virginia Lyle and Lillian A.

Coffman, D. N., station agent, South English; born in Rockingham county, Virginia, September 2, 1838, where his childhood and early youth were spent; in company with his mother and family, he came to this county in the fall of 1856, locating in Liberty township and to this enterprising village in 1870; his first employments, after receiving his education, were farming and teaching school during the winter; he followed this for some years and then entered the employ of J. F. White of South English, as salesman, where, by his courteous bearing and strict attention to business he won the confidence of his employers and the esteem of his numerous acquaintances; in the summer of 1879 he was appointed railroad agent at this point; December 24, 1863, he was united in marriage to Miss Leah R. Wyne, a native of Allen county, Ohio; they have a family of two children: Eva May and Katie Carmillia.

Cosby, C. F., postmaster and grocer, South English; born in Jefferson county, Indiana, February 13, 1833, where he had the advantages of a good common school education until he was sixteen years of age; he then made the carpenters trade his future occupation; he served an apprenticeship at the trade which he has since followed for twenty seven years, building some of the finest churches and residences in this part of the county; he removed to this county in May, 1856, where he has since resided, and has been prominently identified with the growth and development of the township; he engaged in his present business in the spring of 1877, giving universal satisfaction as an officer and tradesman; in June 1861, he enlisted in company F, Fifth Iowa Infantry, and served till January 1862, when he was honorably discharged on account of disability; he is a man of decided conviction ever searching for right principles, which he firmly maintains; he commands the respect and esteem of his numerous acquaintances, and has held various offices of trust in his township; on the 9th day of November, 1854, Miss Ann Rhea, a native of the north of Ireland, became his wife; she died on 22 November 1855, he was married again to Miss Kate R. Sprague, who was born in Ohio; by this union they have two children: one son and one daughter; Lillie A. and C. Elmer

Cox, James, farmer, Sec. 27; P. O. South English

Cox, William, farmer, Sec. 22; P. O. South English

Crawford, Barzillai, deceased, English River; born at Saratoga Springs, new York, August 25, 1804, where he was raised; he was there married to Miss Eliza Hemphill, January 27, 1828; she was born and raised in that county; in 1834 they moved to Anondye county, where Mr. Crawford died June 19, 1837; Mrs. Crawford then moved to Fulton county Ohio; living there for fifteen years, and then came to this county, where she has since resided; owns eighty acres of good land; she has two children: Elias H. and Lucy A.

Crawford, E. H., farmer, Sec. 18; P. O. White Pigeon

Debow, Nelson, farmer, Sec. 27; P. O. South English; born in Tioga county, New York, November 16, 1828; when seven years of age his parents moved to Hudson county Ohio, where his youth was spent until 1844, when he removed to La Grange county, Indiana; there he settled on the place where he now resides and which consists of 100 acres of choice land under splendid cultivation; he married Miss Anna M. Richmond, a native of Ohio, April 2, 1848; she died August 7, 1876; they had one daughter, who died in infancy; he was married again to Miss Sally T. Drake, a native of Greene county, Pennsylvania, November 4, 1877; they have one daughter: Jennie Myrtle.

Dillion, Captain John, farmer, stock raiser and feeder, Sec. 5; P. O. White Pigeon; born in Ireland February 28, 1827; when two years of age his parents emigrated to the United States, settling in Zainesville Ohio, where his mother died a few months after their arrival; his father was a man of considerable means but at the loss of his wife he became thoroughly prostrated with grief and like too many others sought to hide is sorrows in the intoxicating cup and in this way squandered his wealth; but his affection for his children through all his troubles persuaded him to send to Ireland for a sister and the subject of this sketch was brought up under the care of his aunt until about 1838, when his father bound him to Abner Bades, a horse dealer; with this man he moved to Coshocton county, where he lived until nineteen years of age, when he enlisted in company B, Third Ohio Infantry, and passed through the Mexican war; he returned to Ohio in 1848, and in 1849 came to this county, and entered the first piece of land on the north side of the English River in June 1849; this he has since improved and occupied and he now owns 515 acres of good land; August 14, 1861, he enlisted as private in company H, Thirty-third Iowa Infantry, and was elected captain of his company, which position he was obliged to resign July 26, 1963, much against his desire, on account of ill health; he returned home and has since devoted his time to agriculture pursuits and stock dealing; he has been honored by the citizens with the position as one of the members of the board of supervisors, and has held offices of trust in his township; May 22 1850, he was married to Miss Susannah Baker, a native of Coshocton county, Ohio; they have six children: Charles L., William H., Mary E. (now Mrs. I. Bair of Iowa county) Libbie C., and Perry W. and Anna May.

Fancher, J., farmer, sec. 6; P. O. White Pigeon

Fancher, R., farmer, Sec. 5; P. O. White Pigeon

Fancher, James, farmer, Sec. 17; P. O. White Pigeon

Fancher, W. T., farmer, Sec. 17; P. O. White Pigeon

Fluckey, Amos, South English

Fluckey, Aaron, South English

French, Marion, farmer, Sec. 8; P. O. White Pigeon; born in Switzerland county, Indiana, August 31, 1837; in 1849 his parents moved to Lee county, this State, where he was principally raised on a farm, attending school winters; he moved to where he now resides in 1870, and owns 140 acres of good land; married October 14, 1864, to Miss Susan Beur, a native of Virginia; she is of German origin.

Fry, Perry, farmer, Sec. 28; P. O. South English

Fry, Pete, farmer, Sec. 16; P. O. South English

Fry, Conrad, farmer, Sec. 21; P. O. South English; born in Mercer county, Pennsylvania, march 14, 1833; there he was raised on a farm, attending school summers; he has followed farming exclusively all his life except the time spent in defending his country; in 1853 he moved to Stephenson county, Illinois, remaining there for two years; then removed to this county, staying here till 1861, when he returned to Illinois, where his family resided; in 1865 he came to Bremer county Iowa, and in 1868 located where he now resides; has 185 acres of choice land, splendidly located on the banks of the English River, well adapted for stock and grain; January 5, 1863, he enlisted in company K, Forty-sixth Illinois Infantry, and served with that regiment until the close of the war; in June 1865, he was mustered out at New Orleans; he was in the battle of Spanish Fort and Fort Blakely and others, and also in numerous skirmishes; March 18, 1855 he married Miss Louisa Gibbler, of Ohio; she is of German and English descent; have seven children: Perry H., John P., Ada A., Mary E., Katie, Willie and James; he is social and entertaining and possesses in a high degree the confidence of all who know him.

Giesler, Charles, of the firm of Giesler & Garlick, dealers in lumber and agricultural implements, South English; born in Germany, December 25, 1834; in 1844 his parents moved to Muscatine county, where he was raised on a farm; in 1869 he went to the agricultural implement business for five years with success, and has followed the railroad and has finally located in this beautiful town; he is a thoroughly educated business man, energetic, courteous and genial and is an honorable acquisition to the business portion, as well as to the society of South English; he was married August 26, 1854, to Miss Lena Wickey, a native of Germany.

Gilchrist, James, farmer, Sec. 1; P. O. North English

Gilchrist, David, farmer, Sec. 12; P. O. North English

Glandon, Elizabeth, farmer, Sec. 24; P. O. South English

Glandon, S. M., farmer, Sec. 21; P. O. South English, born in Hancock county, Indiana, December 17, 1830, but raised in Morgan county; he had a good common school education and followed farming as the principal occupation; in the fall of 1850 he removed to this county in company with his uncle, F. S. Glandon, built a saw mill on the English River, on Sec. 15, being the first in the north part of the county; he taught school the winter previous, 1850-51, being the second who taught school in the township, his wife having the honor of being the first; he then went to work at the carpenters trade, which he followed for seven years; from that time to this he has devoted himself exclusively to farming; he owns a farm of 300 acres of land, well improved; was married May 1, 1851, to Miss E. J. Reynolds a native of Ohio; she came to this county at an early day; they have six children: Alma V., E., Laura A., Cassius, M. C., Harriet L. and David L.; lost two: Amanda C. died December 1852, and Mary; Mr. G. was elected justice of the peace at the first election in the township, but refused to qualify; is a man of strong prejudices.

Glandon, James R., farmer, Sec. 25; P. O. South English

Glenn, J. M., South English

Greenlee, G. M. Jr., farmer, Sec. 14; P. O. South English

Greenlee, J. A., farmer, Sec. 11; P. O. South English

Greenlee, Adam, farmer, Sec. 11; P. O. South English

Gregory, John, farmer, Sec. 6; P. O. South English

Gore, W. H., farmer, Sec. 35; P. O. South English; the subject of this sketch was born in Jefferson county, Indiana, October 10, 1832; when he was two years old his parents moved to Johnson county and afterward returned to Jefferson county, where he spent his youth and early manhood; in 1853 he moved to this county where he owns a farm of 190 acres of choice land well improved; until 1854 he worked at the carpenters trade; August 5, 1862, he enlisted in company H, thirty-third Iowa Infantry, as a private and from meritorious conduct and ability, he was deservedly promoted until he became the captain of his company; he participated in the battles of Helena, Yazoo Pass, Shell Mound, Little Rock, and Jenkins’ Ferry, going into this battles with forty-two men and coming out with twenty-one; he was in various other engagements and was mustered out in August, 1865; January 15, 1857, he was married to Miss Mary, daughter of Martin Slate; she is a native of Franklin county Ohio; have four children: Alice May, Howard B., Albert H. and Walter E.; Mr. Gore was left an orphan at an early age, and without help has been the architect of his own fortune and well deserves the esteem in which he is held and the success that has attended his efforts.

Griner, Jacob, farmer, Sec. 18; P. O. Webster

Grimes, John, farmer, Sec. 18; P. O. Webster

Hale, A., physician, South English; the subject of this sketch was born in Columbiana county, Ohio, July1, 1829 where he lived until removing to Jefferson county, Indiana in 1853, and in 1856 to his present location; Dr. Hale was educated at Mount Pleasant, Ohio in the Friends’ Boarding School, and attended medical lectures at the Eclectic Medical College of Cincinnati, Ohio; he has been very successful in profession and has a wide and extended practice, as he well deserves; he was married to Miss Rebecca Neil, a native of Ohio; the compliment of their family circle consists of three children: Lydia, A., William and Clarence.

Hall, Mrs. Annie E., farmer, Sec. 23; P. O. South English

Hall, Abel, farmer, Sec. 1; P. O. North English; born in Licking county, Ohio, September 10, 1824; when nineteen years of age he moved to Rock county, Wisconsin, where he remained until coming to this State and county in 1849; he first settled on the border of Keokuk county, but in 1858 settled where he now resides; owns eighty acres of choice land; when he first came to this county he endured many hardships in common with other pioneers; Iowa City furnished the nearest mill of any importance; in 1851 there were heavy rains for a long time so that no grinding was done, and corn had to be soaked in water and then grated and baked into bread; he has had to swim the South English river on his way to mill and on one of these voyages nearly lost his life, as his wagon and load were lost and he himself barely reached the bank; he has been twice married; first, January 23, 1847, to Miss Mary Stewart, a native of Glasgow Scotland; she died in 1855, leaving four children: James, Jasper, Charlie and C.; Married again to Mrs. Louisa (Sears) Butler;’ have seven children: Ida, Effie, Jessie, Wilford, Maynard, Lamont and Chester; lost two; Mrs. Hall has four children by a former marriage: Ethan, John F., Nancy and Elva.

Hale, Allen, farmer, Sec. 26; P. O. South English

Hall, L. C., farmer, Sec. 12; P. O. South English

Hallowell, Sam, Webster

Harper, Mack, South English

Hardenbrook, Abraham, farmer, Sec. 25; P. O. South English

Harris, W. H., farmer, Sec. 15; P. O. South English; born in Herefordshire, England, May 2, 1828; emigrated to this country in 1853, and located in Philadelphia; he remained there for one year, working in a foundry of that city; when seventeen years of age, he, being of a mechanical turn of mind, entered the employ of a prominent machinist, working in that employ for two years, when he was given the charge of and engine to run on a railroad; he continued at that for five years, and since leaving Pennsylvania has devoted himself to farming; in 1854 he moved to Lorain, County Ohio,  and lived there for ten years, when he came to this county and settled where he now lives in 1868; owns 170 acres of land, well improved and under cultivation; unaided he has by hard work, perseverance, etc., fought the battle of life and has been entirely successful; August 10, 1852, he married Miss Margaret Price, a lady of refinement, and it is through her aid, encouragement and good management as well as his own energy and perseverance, that success has crowned his efforts; they have two children: Henry A. and Edward P.

Heaton, L. H., farmer, Sec. 29; P. O. Webster

Hennon, Perry, farmer, Sec. 13; P. O. South English

Higgins, Decatur, farmer, Sec. 21; P. O. South English; born in Knox county Ohio, October 9, 1827; his father was a native of Vermont and of English ancestry, and his mother of Welch and German origin; when five years old he with his parents moved to Marion county, where he was raised; he came from there to this county in 1856, and improved the place on which he now resides, and which consists of 100 acres of finely improved and well cultivated land; his residence is surrounded by a fine grove of stately evergreens, which shelter the place; he has been intimately connected with the interests and growth of the county, and has been entrusted with prominent and important offices in the township; he was married September 17, 1857, to Miss Nancy A. Irons, of Adams township, formerly of Virginia; they have a family of three children: Jennette, Lafayette and Eltie Wren: have lost one daughter: Elsie, who died June 3, 1877.

Holmes, Bacon, farmer, Sec. 32; P. O. Webster

Howard, G. B., farmer, Sec. 35; P. O. South English

Horn, C. C., farmer, Sec. 26; P. O. South English; is of German descent, his ancestors having emigrated to this country in a very early day; the subject of this sketch was born in Greene county, Pennsylvania, March 24, 1831; there he was raised; in 1864 he moved to Appanoose county, Iowa living there until October of the same year, when he moved on the place where he now resides and which consists of ninety acres of choice land with good improvements; September 27, 1857, he was married to Miss Elizabeth Greenlee, a native of Greene county, Pennsylvania; have three children: William N., Emma J. and George; lost an infant.

Hoyt, Jane S., farmer, Sec. 30; P. O. Webster

Hurst, Melvina, farmer, Sec. 29; P. O. Webster

Jenkins, W. D., farmer, Sec. 26; P. O. South English

Jester, John W., farmer, Sec. 26. P. O. South English

Johnson, W. H., general merchant, Webster; born in Washington county, Pennsylvania, April 11, 1819, but raised in Knox county, Ohio; at age seventeen he learned the tanner’s trade, which he followed with success until 1876, when he moved to Iowa and entered into the mercantile trade; on the 22nd of May, 1839 he was married to Lydia A. Marshal, a native of Ohio; they have four children living: Ella, Emeline, N. D. and Flora D.; lost three: Marshall W., Adalade E. and Francis S.

Kemrey, Harriet, farmer, Sec. 23; P. O. South English

Kemrey, Daniel, farmer, stock feeder and raiser; Sec 20; P. O. South English; born in Lehigh county, Pennsylvania April 10, 1833; when four years of age his parents, who were of German origin, moved to Wayne county, Ohio; there he was raised; when he was eight years old his father died, leaving young K. dependent on no one, and to earn his own living; when nineteen years old he left Ohio, and went to Cass county, Michigan; lived there for two years and in 1854 came to this county and entered the land which he now resides and which consists of 320 acres, well improved and in good cultivation; July, 1854 he was  married to Miss Harriet Colcord a native of Lower Canada; they have four children: Helen E., (Wife of J. Charter of South English) George R., William A. and Elmer A.

Kimball, C. D., South English

Kimball, E., South English

King, William S., farmer, Sec. 16. P. O. South English

King, Charles, farmer, Sec. 12; P. O. South English

Kirkpatrick, Mrs. L. M., farmer, Sec. 23; P. O. South English

Kleinschmidt, A., farmer, Sec. 10; P. O. South English

Lakin, Richard, farmer and stock raiser, Sec. 17; P. O. Webster; born in England April 14, 1819, where he was raised; emigrated to this country in 1852, and settled in Ohio; after reaming there for four years he emigrated to this State in 1856 and settled in this county; he owns 200 acres of land under improvement; married October 1841, to Emma Walker, a native of England; she died March 26, 1863, leaving a family of six children living: Thomas, Mary, William, Anna, Edward and Richard; lost two: James and John; while serving his country at Helena, October 18 1864; he married again February 15, 1869 to Mrs. Margaret Griffin Maxwell, a native of upper Canada; they have four children: Emma, Maggie, Katie and Minnie May; she has six children by first marriage: Robert, Sally, Caroline, Sarah, Esther and Lizzie; he makes stock raising a principal business.

Lewis, John Q., harness maker and livery, South English; born in Henry county, Iowa, February 25, 1856; he lived there until fourteen years of age, enjoying good educational opportunities; in 1870 he went to Shellsburgh, Benton county, Iowa to learn his trade; remained there for three years, and thence to Marshall county; engaged in business there, and in 1873 came back to Shellsburgh, pursing his trade there for one year; in 1876 he came to his present location where he is doing a thriving business; September 19, 1877, he married Miss Mary J., daughter of George Dobey, an old settler of Sigourney; they have by this union one daughter: Ethel.

Lutton, A. J., farmer, Sec. 4; P. O. Pigeon; born in Lawrence county, Pennsylvania, April 3, 1828, but was raised in Mercer county, same State; in 1854 he, with his parents, removed to this county and settled on the place which he now resides; he owns eighty acres of well improved land, upon which he has a fine orchard; June 11, 1854, he was married to Miss Angelina Marshall, a native of Pennsylvania; they have three children: John F., William Z., and Charles W.; Nettie May died June 30, 1870; he commenced life with a capital of twenty five cents, a yoke of oxen and one cow, and by proper economy and perseverance assisted by his wife, they have a nice homestead and reasonable competence.

McAfferty, James, farmer and dealer in fine horses, South English; born in Lancaster county, Pennsylvania, July 25, 1812, and was raised there; in 1834 he went to Wayne county, Ohio, and engaged in farming; came to Jefferson county, Iowa in 1848 and remained there a few months when he went to Lynn county, and remained there until the year 1855; then he came to this county; at age seventeen he learned the milling trade, which he followed for about six years; finding it injurious to his health he had to leave the business, and has since followed farming and handling of stock horses; he has done much towards the improving the stock horses in this county; March 12, 1832, was married to Miss Fanny Butcher, a native of Pennsylvania; they have five children living: Elizabeth, Susannah, Sarah, John and Lydia; have lost three: Samuel, Fannie and Mary Jane.

McBride, Is., farmer, Sec. 31; P. O. Webster

McBride, James, general merchant and postmaster, Webster; born in Perry county, Pennsylvania, May 26, 1832 where he was raised a farmer; moved to Iowa in 1856, and to this county in 1857, where he now resides; attended Bloomfield Academy for upwards of two years, and graduated at the Commercial School of York county, Pennsylvania; followed farming and school teaching until 1863, then engaged in stock dealing, continuing it one year, or until 1864, when he entered the mercantile business, which he has since followed with success; he is of a social genial nature well adapted to gain and retain the confidence and respect of the community, which he employs to a great extent; married Miss Julia A. Findley, a native of Pennsylvania; they have five children: R. O., Frank E., Nora, Belle, Minnie L. and an infant daughter.

McCombs, B. M., farmer, Sec. 9; P. O. South English

McLanahan, J. M., farmer, Sec. 34; P. O. South English

McWilliams, William, retired farmer, Sec. 23; P. O. South English; his father, John McWilliams was born in Belmont county, Ohio, January 31, 1797; his grandfather, William McWilliams came to this country form Ireland about 1775, and participated in the struggle for independence; the subject of this sketch was born in Knox county, Ohio, January 11, 1820, where he was raised; moved to this county in 1857, where he has since resided; owns a fine homestead, containing five acres, and also in the vicinity eighty acres of choice land; January 9, 1841, he took for his partner and sharer of his joys and sorrows Miss Lucy A. Noffsinger, a native of Pennsylvania; the complement of their  family circle consists of nine children living: Margaret R. (now Mrs. D. W. Miller of South English), T. B., M. D., J. F., W. C. (recorder), H. A., Nuke, Ida, S. N. and Clara; Mr. McWilliams is a man of unblemished reputation, generous and courteous, and is held in high esteem by all who know him; has held various offices of trust in the township.

McWilliams, H. A., farmer, Sec. 23; P. O. South English

McWilliams, James, farmer, Sec. 23; P. O. South English

Magee, William, South English

Mahannah, Clark, farmer, Sec. 2; P. O. North English; born in Greene county Pennsylvania, August 9, 1829; is of Irish and German descent; his grandfather was killed in one of the battles of the Revolutionary war; when quite young Mr. M. with his parents moved to Knox county, Ohio, where most of his youth and early manhood were spent; in 1856 he moved to Warren county, Illinois and after remaining in that place for one year he came to this county and located where he now lives; owns 200 acres of good land, with a nice dwelling and barn; on arriving in this county he and his wife had but a team and $150 in cash with which to start in a then comparatively new State, but by industry, economy, perseverance and good management they have all that is needful; August 11, 1862, he enlisted in company I, Twenty-eight Iowa Infantry, and served with that regiment until May 16, 1863, when he was wounded at the battle of Champion’s Hill; was there taken prisoner and paroled; he partially recovered and came home on a furlough in August 1863; returned to Davenport the next March, and was discharged on June 12, 1864; participated in the battles of Fort Gibson and Champion’s Hill, beside several skirmishes; October 10, 1853, married Miss S. Wier, of Ohio, but formerly of New Jersey; she is of German descent, her ancestors having emigrated to this country at an early day; they have ten children: Curtis D., William J., Emma G., Susannah (wife of William Dixon, of Iowa) Carrie A., Charles G., Sarah J., Lizzie M., Frank A., and Mattie B.; have lost two; Clark C., who died October 12, 1863 and Bessie, died May 22, 1875.

Mantz, D. H., farmer, Sec. 29; P. O. Webster; born in Schuykill county, Pennsylvania, August 29, 1826; there he was raised on a farm until eighteen years of age, when he learned the carpenter’s trade, which he followed until about 1873; in connection with that he has carried on farming; moved to this county in 1856, where he now resides and owns 128 acres of choice land; his improvements are excellent, his residence being the finest in the township and second to none in the county; his grounds are embellished by handsome evergreens; since 1848 he has accomplished his work alone, and he now owes his propriety to his industry, energy, good management, etc.; January 1, 1847, married Miss Mary Sasseman of Pennsylvania; they have seven children: George H., William, James, Salvina, Lizzie, Emma and Lily L.

Markwell, A. H., farmer, Sec. 4; P. O. South English

Massie, John, farmer, Sec. 16; P. O. South English

Mead, John F., blacksmith and wagon maker, South English; born in Rensellaer county New York, October 10, 1841; at the early age of twelve years his parents moved to California, where Mr. Mead was raised; he served his apprenticeship in San Francisco and followed his trade there until 1874, when he moved to this county; here he was married January 1, 1874 to Miss Julia, daughter of John and Elizabeth (Owns) Houston; they have three children: Elizabeth, Leslie and Mary D.; the mother of Mrs. Mead, Mrs. Houston and her husband were among the earliest settlers of this township, locating a little east of where South English now stands (which was called Houston’s Point for many years); we acknowledge our indebtedness to this lady for much valuable information in regard to the early settlement of this part of the county.

Meelick, Mrs. Louisa, South English

Miller, S., retired farmer, Sec. ___, P. O. South English; born in Washington county, Pennsylvania, August 18, 1810, where his early youth was spent; in 1828 he with his parents went to Knox county, Ohio, where he resided until 1843, and then went to Hancock county (same state), and in 1855 came to this county, where he has since resided; he owns 135 acres of land under cultivation and finely improved; April 7, 1836, he was married to Maria Braddock, a native of Knox county; they have seven children: Nancy A. (wife of Morgan Kizer). William B., Sarah (wife of A. Hurst), John B., Martin L., Wilson W. and Thomas L.

Miles, John G., farmer, Sec. 10; P. O. North English

Miller, N. C., farmer, stock dealer and livery, South English; born in Perry county Ohio, May 13, 1814, and raised there as a farmer boy; in 1838 he commenced the study of medicine, and attended lectures in Cleveland, Columbus and Cincinnati, Ohio, receiving a thorough medical education; he commenced the practice of his profession in 1844 and followed it until 1876; in 1854 he removed to this county and enlisted as a private June 22, 1862, in company D, Eighteenth Iowa Infantry; in the following August he was detached as surgeon of the Eighteenth regiment, serving in that capacity until November, when he has a stroke of paralysis and was honorably discharged in January 1863; previous to his discharge he was appointed assistant medical director of the Western division; he was married July 9, 1836 to Miss Elizabeth Sellers, a native of Perry county, Ohio; they have four children; Phillip D., Mary M. (now Mrs. J. D. Boyd of South English), David W. and Harriet L. ( now Mrs. S. M. Israel, of Ioka); have lost one son: Isaiah who died in November 1938.

Miller, William, farmer, Sec. 34; P. O. South English

Miller, Noah, farmer, Sec. 1; P. O. North English; born in Rockingham county, Virginia October 22, 1829, and was there raised on a farm until eighteen years of age when he engaged in milling, but was obliged to resume farming on account of ill health; in 1856 he came to this county, settling on the farm where he now lives; owns a fine farm of 255 acres of a good land as can be found in the county; has a fine orchard, and also a fine brick residence, surrounded by evergreens; has a barn 48 x 60 feet two stories in height, and the best in the county; he has been the architect of his own fortune, earning what he has by hard work; October 23, 1851, he married Miss Frances Lough, a native of Virginia; they have twelve children: Sarah A., Hiram W., Benjamin F., Michael H., Mary R., M. Ellen, Virginia C., Noah S., John H., Anna B., Nettie J., and Maggie May.

Miller, D. W., farmer, Sec. 24; P. O. South English

Monts, H., farmer, Sec. 32; P. O. Webster

Monts, Moses, farmer, Sec. 29; P. O. Webster

Monts, D. H., Webster

Monts, Wilson, farmer, Sec. 20; P. O. Webster

Morgan, Thomas, farmer and stock raiser, Sec. 30; P. O. Webster; born in Bourbon county, Kentucky, September 15, 1817; his father, David Morgan, was a native of Virginia and his grandfather, who came to this country about 1747, was born in Wales; his mother, whose maiden name was Hughbanks, was a native of Indiana; young Morgan lived in Kentucky until twelve years of age, when his father moved to Scott county, Indiana; there he was principally raised; came to this count In 1848; he bought a claim of a half section of land of Simeon Ballard, giving for it his wagon, a pair of oxen and a colt, which was all he possessed in the world; but with indomitable courage and perseverance, good judgment and economy, he has improved his farm and added to it until now he owns 720 acres of good land; January 3, 1839, he married Miss Polly Ballard, a native of Indiana; by this union they have eight children; two of whom now are living: Page B. and Hattie Ann (wife of James Morrison of this county); Mrs. Morgan died October 27, 1856; he married again to Miss Mary A. McBride, of Pennsylvania, February 15, 1859; they have three children: Elmira (now Mrs. William Carmichiel, of this county) Jennie and Thomas A.; have lost one son; Mr. Morgan has been closely identified with the interests, growth and development of the county; he has held various offices of trust in his township; is a man well preserved in years; naturally a social man and is respected by all who know him.

Morgan, Mrs. M. J., Webster

Morgan, Honorable T. A., farmer, Sec. 31; P. O. Webster; while the lives of self-made men seldom aboud in incidents of a sensational character, there is yet an energy, a perseverance, and an underflow of charter, that lends to them a charm, attractiveness and worth that merits admiration and careful thought; Theron A. Morgan was born in Sheffield, Bershire county, Massachusetts, January 5, 1809; he traces his ancestry on his father’s side to Wales, the original ancestor coming to America and settling in Roxbury, near Boston, prior to 1640; Governor Morgan, of New York as well as many others of the same name who have honored their country, are descendents from the same source in a direct line; his father died when Theron was eight years old, and he was as it were, thrown on his own resources; his early life was that of a farmer boy; his early education was trained at the common schools, but this he has supplemented by extensive reading, and being a close observer, and a man of large experience; he has acquired an education of no mean order; he removed to Trumbull county, Ohio in 1828; and in 1829 he removed to Mercer county Pennsylvania, and was engaged teaching school; he remained there about one year and returned to Ohio and engaged in the comb manufacturing business with satisfactory results; in 1851 he went to California and remained there two years, and his operations were favored here as elsewhere; after his return from California he came to this State, and in 1854 made his home in Keokuk county, where he has since been engaged in agricultural pursuits and stock raising; his homestead includes 160 acres of choice land, with fine improvements; he has given 400 acres of land to his sons; he represented the county in the State Legislature in 1857, and was again elected to the same position in 1865, and served with credit to his county and honor to himself; he has also served as trustee of the State Agricultural College at Ames; he was married to Miss Sylvia Mallory November 9, 1828; she was born in New York; they have four children: E. L., Cornelius L., Gilbert D. and Mary (now Mrs. George Griswold, of Ottumwa); have lost one daughter: Polly A. (wife of L. Gorham), died April 1, 1855; Mr. Morgan is emphatically a self-made man; commencing life without a penny, he has, by his own unaided energy, industry and perseverance made for himself a competency; but few men have a better record or have been more successful from a small and discouraging beginning; he is known as a man of sterling integrity, decided character and untiring energy; he receives and merits the esteem and confidence of his fellow citizens.

Mowan, B., farmer, Sec. 26; P. O. South English; born in Columbiana county, Ohio, July 25, 1825; he was raised there; in 1853, he moved to Plymouth Indiana, and went back to Ohio in 1859, where he lived until 1865, and then went to Niles, Michigan; after remaining there for one and one half years, he moved to Summerbell, Cass, county where he resided for three years; then to Franklin, Tennessee, in 1872 and in 1878 he came to and located in this county; here he has a fine farm of 120 acres, well improved and under good cultivation, giving sufficient evidence that he is a thorough farmer; his early youth was spent on a farm sometimes attending school in the winter; in 1848 he commenced to work at the masonry, which trade he followed until September 1, 1864 when he enlisted in the U. S. Navy, was detailed to the Mississippi Squadron on the flag ship Benton, and served until the close of the war; returning to Ada, Hardin county Ohio, he engaged in his trade, which he has followed since; March 6, 1848, he was married to Miss Sophia Nogle a native of Trumbull county Ohio; the Mowan's came from Bavaria Germany, about 1750; Mr. M.’s mother is still living with her son; she is 83 years old and well preserved in years.

Newsome, W. W., M. D., physician and surgeon, South English; he is a native of England, and was born in Bradford, May 12, 1841, and is the son of William Newsome and Sarah, nee DeGars; the former was of English ancestry, and the latter of France; they emigrated to the United States in 1848, and settled in New Athens, Harrison county Ohio, and remained there four years; and then removed to Carwfordsville, Washington county Iowa, where the father of the subject of this sketch died in 1860; young Newsome attended the common schools until 16 years of age, and studied anatomy with his brother, Dr. A. Newsome, an eminent physician of Carwfordsville; at the age of sixteen he entered the academy at this place, and attended two years; having made choice of medicine as a profession, he devoted his entire time to the study thereof, with his brother a preceptor; he attended the college of Physicians and Surgeons at Keokuk, and graduated from that institution with high honors in 1863; during his college course he was employed as Assistant Surgeon at Estes Huse Hospital, and the experience received there has proved of incalculable benefit in his practice since that time; after his graduation in 1863, he selected South English as his place of residence, where he has pursued his chosen calling with untiring zeal and energy, and with a success which has earned for him an enviable reputation; in his medical relations he has  built up his own reputation by his skill and energy, and has acquired an extensive practice; the Doctor is well known throughout the county, and the respect shown him is as wide as his acquaintance; his intellect is quick and decisive, as well as comprehensive, possessing a wide range of experience; he possesses rare gifts as a public speaker, a fine conversationalist, and a most excellent social companion; June 6, 1864, he was married to Miss Jennie Maxwell, of Crawfordsville, Iowa, a lady of high attainments and thoroughly accomplished, and one who commanded the respect of all who knew her; she died July 18, 1865, from injuries received by the explosion of a lamp; the Doctor, who was present, made heroic efforts to extinguish the flames, but not in time to save her life; the effort nearly lost his own life; she left one son: William H.; he was again married on February 26, 1867 to Miss Kate R. daughter of Reverend James Anderson, D. D. who was a full cousin of General Robert Anderson, of Fort Sumpter fame; she died in July, 1874, leaving one son; J. W. and two twin daughters: Katie and Nellie; his mother is still living and was an intimate friend of Reverend P. Bronte and his talented daughters Charlotte Bronte, of national reputation and world-wide renown, and her sisters Ana and Emily, both well known authors; the attachment was so great between Mrs. Newsome and these celebrities that at one time when she was ill with typhus fever, Charlotte Bronte came from London, a distance of 100 miles to see her friend, and notwithstanding the physicians tried to dissuade her from entering the sick room, she with woman’s love scorning all danger, came and embraced her friend; this friendship was lifelong and during the many years of separation a loving correspondence was continued until the Bronte's died, and their letter are preserved as precious souvenirs.

Noffsinger, David, farmer, Sec. 28; P. O. South English

Noffsinger, S., farmer, Sec. 23; P. O. South English; born in Washington county, Pennsylvania, August 19, 1813; his parents, Daniel and Lucy (Van Treicy) Noffsinger moved to Knox county, Ohio, where he lived until 1856, when he removed to this county where he now resides; Mr. N. was raised a farmer, and had more than ordinary educational advantages: at the age of 22 he studied medicine at Mt. Vernon; not being to his taste he learned the carpenter’s trade, which he followed until 1863, when he resumed his early occupation of farming, and has since followed it; in January 1839, he was united in marriage to Miss Lydia McClain, who was born in Greene county, Pennsylvania; she died in 1852, leaving one daughter: Kate (now the wife of James Slate); he married again to Miss Dora Sprague in 1856, a native of Worthington, Ohio; they have one son: Ernest.

Noffsinger, A., farmer, Sec. 22; P. O. South English; born in Washington county, Pennsylvania, November 27, 1825, and raised in Knox county, Ohio; he came to this county in the spring of 1853 and located where he now resides; he redeemed 180 acres of land from its original wildness; in 1844 he married Miss Mary J. Trindle, who was born in Ohio; she died February 12, 1854, leaving a family of three children, two of who are now living: John and James; he was again married to Miss Helen Wood, in January, 1858, a native of Ohio; they have three children: Albert, Mary A. and Emma B.; has held the office of township trustee; he is a good farmer and generally respected by all who are acquainted with him.

Nyswaner, John, farmer, Sec. 36; P. O. South English

Parnell, Peter, farmer, Sec. 23; P. O. South English

Paterson, John, farmer, Sec. 2; P. O. North English; born in Scotland, February 29, 1824; there he lived until 1854, when he emigrated to the united States, locating where he now resides; he owns eighty acres of land, well improved; when he commenced farming he had but very little means, but by industry, perseverance and hard honest toil, he has prospered and now has a fine residence and barn; August 11, 1862 he enlisted in company I, Twenty-eighth Iowa Infantry and served with his regiment until the expiration of his term; he was discharged August 1, 1864, and they returned home, and has since devoted his time to farming; married June 15, 1849, to Miss N. Gilchrist a native of Scotland.

Peck, George H., farmer, Sec. 16; P. O. South English

Phelps, Margaret, farmer, Sec. 27; P. O. South English

Platt, W. D., druggist, South English; born in Rochester, New York, December 17, 1850; in 1859, he with his parents, removed to Davenport Iowa and two years later to Rock Island, Illinois; here he attended school until 1867, when, at the age of seventeen he entered into the employ of John Benston, Esq., an eminent druggist of that city; he remained in that capacity for four years; he then came to Muscatine Iowa, and for eight years continued his study of drugs, and in 1879 he entered into business in South English, having had unusual advantages in learning his business; he is a sage and competent druggist; May 10, 1876, he married Miss Mary C., daughter of W. D. Ament, a prominent carriage manufacturer of Muscatine; they have one daughter: Amelia.

Reed, William, farmer, stock dealer and stock raiser, Sec. 29; P. O. Webster; born in Marion county, Indiana, February 11, 1829; there he lived until sixteen years of age; in 1849 he came from Indiana to this county and entered land upon which he now resides; he has a farm of 510 acres of the choice land upon which he now resides; he has a farm of 510 acres of the choice land of the vicinity; September 14, 1852 he was united in marriage with Mrs. Jemima H. Monical, a native of Ohio; by this union they have two daughters: Mary J. (now Mrs. James Randolph), and Manda F. (now Mrs. A. Bottenfiled); lost one son who died in infancy; Mrs. Reed has one daughter by a previous marriage: Matilda J. (now Mrs. James Irons of this county); he has been justice of the peace for several years and is a prominent member of the M. E. church.

Reed, Charles, farmer, Sec. 29; P. O. Webster

Reed, James, farmer, Sec. 29; P. O. Webster; born in Marion county, Indiana, June 2, 1835; he was raised there; he came to this county in 1855 and entered land on Sec. 31; in June 1861, he enlisted in company F, Fifth Iowa Infantry and served with that regiment until the close of the war; participated in the battles of Springfield, Corinth, Vicksburg, Iuka, Missionary Ridge, Lookout Mountain and several others; returned to this county in 1871 and went to Oregon remaining four years, and then returned; Mr. Reed is a man of sterling worth, of a kind and obliging nature and strong in his friendship.

Reed, Alexander, farmer and stock raiser, Sec. 29; P. O. Webster; born in Marion county, Ohio, July 24, 1832; he was there raised on a farm; in 1851 he moved to this county and entered the land on which he now resides; he owns 203 acres under good cultivation, with good improvements; the first two seasons after his arrival here he cultivated his corn with an ox; he had no friends to help him and he broke his land without favor from anyone; he is a man highly respected, honest in his dealing, and enjoys the good will and confidence of his fellow citizens; has held various offices of trust in his township; in early times, when on account of high water, it was impossible to go to mill, he was obliged to grind his corn three times a day for a period of eight weeks: July 2, 1855, he married Miss Malinda G. Long, a native of Illinois; they have seven children: Susan (wife of S. Bottenfield) Sarah E. (wife of B. F. Montz), Ida, W. L., Jennie, Isaac and Gertie; have lost two: Edgar and Mand.

Richardson, J. F., Webster

Richmond, C., farmer, Sec. 32; P. O. Webster; born in Loraine county Ohio, February 12, 1820; he was raised there on a farm until twenty years of age, when he was engaged as watchman of a steamboat on the Alabama river; he was soon promoted to mate of the same steamer, and after remaining at that occupation to several years, he moved to Illinois and engaged in farming, which he has since followed; in 1844 he moved to LaGrange county, Indiana living there until 1866, when he came to this county and located on the place where he now resides, which consists of 160 acres of choice land, situated within half a mile of Webster; Mr. R. commenced life without any pecuniary aid, and had accumulated his handsome property by industry and economy; February 27, 1841, he married Miss Elizabeth Marsh, of New Brunswick, but principally raised in Illinois; have six children: Benjamin F., Charlotte A. (wife of B. Holmes), Elvira R. (wife of D. C. Hoyt), Arthur M., Alice B. (wife of J. Herrick), and George H.; lost two; Charles A., died October 12, 1869 and an infant daughter.

Robinson, W. A., farmer, Sec. 9; P. O. South English

Rogers, Edward M., physician and surgeon, Webster; born in Philadelphia, May 9, 1853; when five years old his parents moved to Iowa City, where he was principally raised, attending common schools of that place; in 1872 he graduated from McLean’s Academy, of that city; then studied medicine with his father, E. M. Rogers, who was a graduate of “Her Imperial Institute of Physicians and Surgeons of London” and who has been deservedly considered on the most eminent surgeons and physicians of this country; young Rogers was a student until the fall of 1876, when he then attended a course of lectures in Iowa City, and graduated from Jefferson College, at Philadelphia, in March 1878; on his arrival  he had a capital of thirty-five cents with which to commence business; he located in Johnson county in the same year, and there practiced his profession for one year, and in March, 1879, came to his present location; in 1874, Dr. Rogers lost seven thousand dollars, having gone security for a friend who, through misfortune, lost his own and the Doctor’s money besides; he was married  November 4, 1876, to Miss E. W. Chissman, a native of Fayette county, Iowa; she is a lady of rare personal appearance and one who makes the Doctor’s home an agreeable place for friends; they have one son living; have lost one son; Edmond E., who died October 27, 1879.

Root, Joseph H., farmer, Sec. 27; P. O. South English; born in Cayuga county, New York, January 25, 1824, where he was raised a farmer; in 1855 he removed to Wisconsin, and came to this township in the same year, making the trip with an ox team; he owns 250 acres of choice land and his dwelling is surrounded with beautiful evergreens; has a fine bearing orchard also; in personal appearance Mr. Root is a true representative of a better class of the pioneers; unassuming, social and hospitable, he is held in high esteem by all who know him; he has held various offices of trust in the township, and credit is due him for the manner in which he has performed the duties pertaining to them; on May 17, 1855, he was united in marriage to Miss Laura A. Hoyt also a native of Cayuga county; she is a lady of refinement; they have two children living: Elmer L. and Gracie N.; have lost three: E. F., died February 18, 1872, George H. died July 5, 1870, and Jennie May died February 22, 1866; Mr. Root traces seven generations of his ancestors to England, over a period of 200 years back; Mrs. Hoyt-Root is in the possession of a geological history of her family; the book is in royal octavo form, consists of 686 pages and gives a complete history of the Hoyt family; in it we find that Simon Hoyt was the first who came from England, and this was some time before the year 1629; the mother of both John and General Sherman was of this family of Hoyt’s; Mr. Root has taken two children to raise: Mary Lafferty and John Cox; they surely have a good home.

Seaman, S. H., farmer, Sec. 29; P. O. Webster

Seaman, M. H., farmer, stock raiser and dealer, Sec. 29; P. O. Webster; born in Marion County, Ohio, February 20, 1846; there he was raised and attended the common schools for a short time in his early youth; his father died when he was six years of age and an older brother when he was twelve, so that Mr. S. was left the sole support of his widowed mother, and he has proved himself to be a kind and dutiful son; he was determined to acquire a more through education and worked hard in his youth to save the means necessary to accomplish this desire; at the age of twenty-three he entered Ohio Central College, which he attended for one year, but was obliged to forgo further study in that institution  as his services were needed at home; he returned and took charge of the farm and taught school during the winter; he came with his mother to this county in 1871 and located where he now resides; owns 120 acres in home and farm and 160 acres in the adjoining township.

Seerley, Thomas, farmer, Sec. 35; P. O. South English

Shepard, W. M., of the firm of Shepard & Co. hardware merchants, South English; born in Iowa City, Iowa; December 31, 1857, where he was raised and was educated at the university of that place; in 1875 he became the commercial agent of Remmington & Sons, which position he held until 1878, when he entered into the hardware business at South English; this firm is in a prosperous condition and is doing an extensive business; October 9, 1879, he was united in marriage to Miss Lizzie L. Miller of South English; Mr. Shepard is of English descent, his grandfather having emigrated to this country in the year 1879.

Shipman, Thomas Sr., farmer, Sec. 26; P. O. South English

Shinabarger, George, farmer, Sec. 26; P. O. South English; born in Stueben county, New York, October 26, 1826, and was there raised; his father could not afford to send him to school, so he was obliged to work to help support the family; at the age of 21 years he left home with one of suit of clothes and spent the most of the time teaming until 1852, when he went into the lime business; he followed that for a time, and then went into the dry goods business; in 1862 he devoted his attention to farming and bought the farm of 105 acres of good land where he now resides; he has a fine residence; when he came to this county he had lost all his property, but went to work and with indomitable energy and by the help of his noble wife they have been enabled to give their children a good education and now have a comfortable home; October 1, 1849, he married Miss Harriet Hill, of Rensellaer county, New York; they have three children: Ella (now Mrs. William Powell), Frank and Lidia.

Sigafoose, Nancy, farmer, Sec. 24; P. O. South English

Slate, Martin S., retired farmer, Sec. 24; P. O. South English; born in Franklin county, Massachusetts, September 28, 1824; when but eleven years of age he, with his parents, went to Franklin county Ohio, where he lived until 1850; he then came to this county and entered land on Sec. 27, which he still owns; has a fine farm of 115 acres; July 4, 1854, he was married to Miss Charlotte M. Ding, a native of New York; by this union thy had four children, one of whom now lives: A. C.; Mrs., Slate died January 31, 1862; he married again to Miss Eliza C. Mitchell, a native of Marion county, Ohio; they have one daughter: Addie Belle; Mr. Slate was the first justice of the peace elected in the township, which was in 1852; he has been township trustee and has held other offices of trust; is a man of strict integrity and is prominent member of the M. E. Church, and has been for upwards of thirty years.

Slate, Joseph, farmer, Sec. 11; P. O. South English

Sloan, William, South English

Sloan, Harvey, farmer, Sec. 23; P. O. South English

Smawley, John, farmer, Sec. 36; P. O. South English; born in Huntington county, Pennsylvania, September 24, 1821; he was there raised and in 1845; moved to Cedar county, Iowa; he then returned to Pennsylvania, reaming there for two years, when he then went to Johnson county, Iowa; in 1869 he located on the place where he now resides, and owns 137 acres of choice land, which he has gained by hard, honest toil, energy and perseverance, as he commenced life without funds or favor; he had but limited advantages for education, but  he improved what he did have, and has now gained a knowledge of no mean order; he married Miss _________; they have five children: Mary J. (wife of C. Troutman), William H., Amanda (now Mrs. H. McWilliams), Lucinda (now Mrs. Thomas Steele) and Samantha; lost two; John W. died March 12, 1861, and Louisa S. who died May 10, 1877.

Smith, Ira F., farmer, Sec. 2; P. O. North English; born in Greene county, Pennsylvania, March 16, 1829; he moved with his father to Scott county, Iowa, then the Wisconsin Territory; here he was raised having for his playmates the children of the aborigines, and he has seen as much pioneer life in this then pioneer State as any man in the county perhaps the State; in 1858 he moved to this county, where he has since resided; owns eighty acres and controls sixty acres beside; he had but very limited educational advantages, attending school but six months, but he has been an industrious student, and in now a well read and thoroughly informed man; we say honor to the hardy men who have fought the battle of life without funds or favor; in September 1847, he enlisted in company F, Fourteenth Regiment Illinois Infantry, and was discharged at New Orleans in July 1848; he then returned to Iowa, where he has since devoted his time to farming; August 21, 1855, he married Miss Harriet E. Connor, a native of Scott county Iowa; they have a family of three children: Rodella E. (wife of James Hall, of Nebraska), Jennie Viola, and Loretta.

Spickerman, A. D., farmer, Sec. 30; P. O. Webster

Sprague, Eli, farmer, Sec. 23; P. O. South English

Sprague, Charles, farmer, Sec. 23; P. O. South English

Stull, J. D., druggist, South English; born in Washington county, Pennsylvania, July 24, 1837; there he was raised upon a farm; he moved to this county in 1863; he owns a fine homestead, also a farm of 55 acres of choice land, besides wild land in Missouri; Mr. Stull has had fair educational advantages, but made the most of what he had; from 1856 to 1865 he was engaged in shipping stock; he then went into the mercantile business, which he followed until 1877, when he engaged into the drug business, the firm name being Newsome & Stull; he was married October 15, 1861, to Miss Elmira Zollars, a native of Washington county, Pennsylvania; she died in 1864: he was married again to Miss Mary Ann Newsome, December 25, 1867; they have two children: William H. and Wilfred W. N.

Stull, William L., farmer, Sec. 25; P. O. South English

Stull, Abigal C., farmer, Sec. 22; P. O. South English

Teeter, Parish H., farmer, Sec. 26; P. O. South English

Thomas, W. A., span farmer, Sec. 3; P. O. North English; born in Hamilton county, Virginia, May 17, 1827, and made that State his home until 1850, when he came to Washington county, Iowa; in 1852 he located in this county, on the farm upon which he now resides, and which consist of 570 acres, all improved; he also devotes considerable attention to stock raising and feeding; was married Dec 25, 1851; to Miss Jane Patterson, of Allegheny county, Maryland; they have six children living; Luvenia E., Margaret D., Hannah S., Mary A., Martha J., Annie S. and John W.; lost two: Charles M. and Carrie; he has held various township offices.

Thompson, Susan, farmer, Sec. 5; P. O. White Pigeon

Thompson, L. P., farmer, Sec. 15; P. O. South English

Van Tuyl, J. R., farmer, Sec. 32; P. O. Webster; born in Auburn New York; is a son of William H. Van Tuyl, an eminent architect and builder of that city; he had more than ordinary educational advantages: has had a good academic education; he worked with his father for several years but chose farming as his occupation which he followed in that State until 1867, when he removed to this county and located where he now lives; he owns eighty acres of land, under good improvement; Mr. Van Tuyl’s ancestors emigrated to this country from Germany at an early day; May 2, 1865 he married Miss Lavina Curtis; she was born in Auburn, New York, have one daughter: May, and one adopted son: Willis.

Vananken, A., farmer, Sec. 36; P. O. South English

Wait, W. H., farmer, Sec. 25; P. O. South English; born in Scioto county Ohio, January 3, 1835; brought up on a farm; he followed farming until December 7, 1861, when he enlisted in company K,  Fifty-sixth regiment Ohio Infantry; served with that regiment participating in all the engagements, which were as follows: Shiloh, siege of Corinth, Port Gibson, Champion’s Hill, Siege of Jackson, Sabine Cross Roads, Pleasant Hill, Snagg’s Point and several others; re-enlisted as a veteran in the spring of 1864, and served with the same regiment until his discharge at Columbus, Ohio in May 1866; then removed to this State and to the place where he now resides; this was in 1867; owns 160 acres of choice land under splendid cultivation; on the 16th of February 1867, was married to Miss Abigail Adams, a native of the same county as himself; they have four children: Isabel, Pearly H., Lillian and Theodore; have lost two: Edith, died November 15, 1873, and an infant; he lost a fine house with its contents by fire in 1873; commenced life a poor boy, and by energy, industry, good judgment, and economy, has surrounded himself and family with an excellent home with all its comforts.

Wertz, Levi, farmer, carpenter and joiner, Sec. 7; P. O. White Pigeon; born in Franklin county, Pennsylvania, April 17, 1827; was raised a farmer until eighteen years of age, when he was bound out for three years as an apprentice to learn the cabinet and carpenter’s trade; served his time and has followed it as an occupation nearly all the time since; in 1851 he moved to Wayne county, Ohio, and in 1856 came to Iowa county, this State; in 1862 he located in this county and bought a steam saw mill, which he still owns and runs; owns a farm of seventy acres of choice land, well improved; November 27, 1849, married Miss Margaret J. McGregor, a native of Bedford county, Pennsylvania; she is of Scotch descent; they have three children: J. W. Alexander and Orra; lost one daughter: Sarah E., who died in February 1857.

Wheeler, A., farmer, Sec. 7; P. O. White Pigeon; born in Richland county, Ohio March 31 1825; when nine years of age he with his parents moved to Fulton county, Illinois, where they lived until they came to this county in 1855; entered the land on which he now resides and owns ninety acres well improved and in good state of cultivation; in youth his school privileges were limited, but he has made the best use of the opportunities afforded, and may well be termed a self made man; has undergone the hardships incident to pioneer life, and has experienced its vicissitudes; at one time in company with one other person he started for the mill at Marengo, and had not proceeded far before the rain commenced falling in torrents; they were obliged to camp upon the trackless prairie; to make their situation more uncomfortable the wind blew the canvass covering from their wagon, and they were exposed all night to the fury of the storm; but in the morning they soon found that hospitality for which the early settlers were characterized; May 12, 1851, married miss Mary J. Marshall, a native of Ohio; they have one daughter: Josephine (wife of Jesse Fancher, of this county); a little girl, Mary J. finds a pleasant home in their family.

Wheeler, Marion M., farmer, and stock raiser, Sec. 31; P. O. Webster; born in Marion county, Ohio, February 24, 1847; lived there until 1865, when he came to this county; remained until 1868, when he returned to Ohio for the purpose of disposing of some property there, in order that he might become a Western farmer; in 1871 he again came to this county, and then took a trip to Kansas, but the location not being desirable he returned to this county; owns 240 acres of good land, with fine improvements, upon which he has a fine orchard; his farm was the first one entered on that section, and is one of the best in the county; September 7, 1874 married to Mrs. Mina J. Yoakens-Reed, a native of Marion county, Ohio; they have two children: Homer C. and Minnie Blanche; Mrs. W. has one child by a former marriage Ada A.; she lost one: Jessie A. who died February 16, 1877.

White, Mrs. E. C., farmer, Sec. 24; P. O. South English

White, F. E., farmer and stock raiser, Sec. 17; P. O. South English; born in Prussia, and was there raised; had a very limited education, and was raised under the most unfavorable circumstances as his father died when he was quite young, leaving a family of five small children to the care of his mother, who had to live with the most rigid economy, to save enough to keep the family from actual starvation; in 1857 emigrated to America and located in this county, where he has since resided; owns 420 acres of choice land, situated on the banks of the English river, and well adapted to stock raising, as it is supplied with water; March, 1862 he enlisted in company I, thirteenth Iowa Infantry; served with that regiment until the close of the war, and was discharged August 1865; participated in all the battles of the Corinth campaign—Vicksburg, Atlanta and Sherman’s march to the Sea; was never sick, and never missed a meal of victuals when he could eat; October 1866, was married to  Miss Lydia Betts of Ohio; they have family of three: Ira, Ida, and Virgil.

White, John F., merchant, South English; among the many worthy and enterprising citizens who have made their home in this township; no one is worthy of a more extended notice than the subject of this sketch, whose portrait appears in another part of this volume; he was born in Boone county, Indiana, June 3, 1835, his father being of English ancestry and his mother of Welsh origin; the former died when he was nine years of age, and the latter when he was fourteen; he received a very limited education in the district schools  of his native county, supplemented by an attendance at Lebanon, Indiana, Seminary for a short time; at the age of fourteen he commenced teaching and followed it as an occupation for five years; when he was nineteen years of age he improved a farm in Holt county, Missouri, breaking the land himself with a heavy yoke of oxen; in 1857 he decided to change his location and so came to Keokuk county, settling in English  River township and engaged in farming; there he owns a farm of 365 acres of land; the following year he bought out Hogin, Adams & Company dealers in general merchandise, and since that time has carried on business successfully and his record in this, as in other enterprises, is an enviable one, for during twenty-one years that he has been in business he has never had a suit in court or asked an extension of time on his commercial paper; in connection with his mercantile pursuits he has been engaged largely and successfully in stock feeding and stock dealing; he is a director in the Iowa City and Western R. R. , and it is largely owing to his effort and energy that the northern portion of the county now has railroad communications; he is also proprietor of the “Western Herald”, a journal that has quite a circulation in both this and adjoining counties; is a man of independent thought, but a kind and obliging nature; a man of the people and one true to the highest principles of honor and morality; as a citizen, quiet and unostentatious, cordially supporting any measure of real public benefit; he started in life without funds or favor with which to pave his pathway to success; he has a sanguine temperament strong in his prejudices and warm in his friendships; a good conversationalist and a gentleman whom one meets only to wish for more extended and intimate acquaintances; we are convinced that to him this township, as well at the northern part of the county, is indebted, and that he deserves his success, this fortune and his friends; he married Miss Maria Thompson, December 4, 1854, she is a native of Morgan county, Indiana; they have  four children: Virgil E., Theodore E., Willard W., and Elvina; have lost one daughter; Amazetta; Virgil E. and Theodore E. are associated with their father in business; the latter is married to Miss Alice Knox a native of this county.

White, Godfrey, farmer, Sec. 8; P. O. White Pigeon

Wiggins, T. J., farmer, Sec. 6; P. O. White Pigeon

Williams, J. A., farmer, Sec. 15; P. O. South English

Wise, H. J., farmer, P. O, White Pigeon

Wolfe, Jeremiah, South English

Wray, John, P. O. Webster

Wyant, Abraham, farmer, Sec. 6; P. O. White Pigeon; born in Jefferson county, Ohio, January 30, 1812; he was raised in that State; moved to Lawrence county, Illinois, in 1839, and remained there two years, and came to Jackson county, Iowa, and in 1849, located where he now lives; he owns 153 acres of choice land; when he came to this county he bought a portable saw mill to which in 1850 he added a run of stone; this was the first mill in the township; his principal occupation through life has been farming, in connection with which he has been for some yeas in the mercantile business; married Miss Catharine Baringer of Baltimore, February 22, 1838; have five children: Mollie, Luanda, Permilia, Sarah E., and Cordelia; have lost four: John B. Peter, Lavinda and Ellen.

Wyatt, Samuel, farmer and merchant, White Pigeon; born in Harrison county, Ohio, March 11, 1808; lived there until nineteen years of age, receiving a fair common school education, and then removed with his parents to Carroll county, where he lived until 1855, then coming to this county and locating where he now resides; has a farm of 220 acres under good cultivation; he has followed farming all his life; in 1872 in connection with farming he entered into the mercantile business, keeping a general store; was married May, 1832 to Miss Eliza J. McCombs of Ohio; she died in 1858, leaving eight children, six of whom are now living; James B., Peter J., Abraham, Margaretta, Archibald B., and Samuel; two have died: Isabelle and Bartlett; married again in September, 1859 to Miss Sarah J. Loun, a native of Ohio; have eight children by this union: Ann, Lettie J., Elizabeth, William, Minnie, Bertha, Richard, and Arthur; lost one in infancy.

Yoakam, Thomas, farmer, Sec. 18; P. O. Webster

Yoakam, S., farmer, stock raiser and stock feeder, P. O. Webster; born in Knox county Ohio, March 8, 1823; he lived there until he was fourteen years of age, when he with his father moved to Marion county, where the subject of this sketch spent his early manhood; in 1853 he moved to where he now resides; he owns 400 acres of as choice land as can be found in the county; he has it all fenced with a splendid hedge of some 9 miles in length; he also has a very fine residence and some out houses; he makes stock raising and feeding his principal business, which he conducts with admirable judgment, feeding and shipping his stock himself; he has given 360 acres of land to his children; he has never speculated but attended to farming, etc., exclusively; October 5, 1852, he married Miss Eliza Scovill, of Ohio; they have four children: Mina (now Mrs. Marion Wheeler of this county), Emma (now Mrs. A. Hall, of this county), Marion and Marietta (wife of James Wilhight); have lost three; Grant, Henry, and an infant; Mr. Y. commenced without any help and very little means; he is therefore a self made man; he is honest above reproach, and independent in thought.

Younkin, U., proprietor of National Hotel, South English; born in Summerset county, Virginia, November 15, 1828, and was raised there; in 1857 he removed to Henry county, Illinois, and three years after to Muscatine Iowa; has resided in this State since 1860, and in this county since 1879; in youth Mr. Y. had a good educational advantage which amply fitted him for business; he learned the blacksmith’s trade at the age of eighteen and followed it for about twelve years; his father was a physician and young Younkin studied medicine for a few years, and at the age of thirty began to proactive; he continued this for six years and was obliged to stop on account of disease in a paralytic form; since that time Mr. Younkin has been engaged in the hotel business, November 27, 1852 he married Miss Lydia E. Spaugh; she was born in Virginia; they have four sons: Orlando F., Orin F., Winfield S. and Chester; he is a gentleman well adapted to please the public and is a courteous and genial landlord.

Transcribed and graciously provided by volunteer John Davis. Thank you, John!


Reference: "1880 History of Keokuk County Iowa."

These pages were designed and are maintained by IAGenWeb solely for the  use and benefit of the  IAGenWeb Project, a part of the USGenWeb Project.
Copyright © 1997 by IAGenWeb & Other Contributors        
Please read the IAGenWeb Terms, Conditions, & Disclaimer  --all of which apply to Keokuk Co.

Back to top of page                             Return to Keokuk Co. IAGenWeb                             Back to top of page

Photo background collage is made from penny postcards of Keokuk County, donated to the USGenWeb Archives