IAGenWeb Project - Clayton co.


- Odds & Ends -

Bootleggers & Moonshine


Additional info. for this page is welcome!

Prohibition was a constitutional amendment due to the Volstead Act (18th Amendment), which went into effect January 20, 1920. Among a list of other items, prohibition banned the sale and production of alcoholic beverages in the United States. The amendment was repealed on December 5, 1933. Remote, wooded areas and hard to reach islands in the Mississippi sloughs, made Clayton county an idea place for local individuals to engage in the manufacture and sale "moonshine". Some Clayton county residents ran afoul of the law. The area papers reported them as follows in this compilation of news reports.

Researchers should bear in mind that the news articles didn't always report on the outcome of the people arrested or bound over to the grand jury. Court records should be consulted for further information.

- 1921 -

Judge Taylor Fines Bootleggers

Judge Taylor convened court here Tuesday for a brief session, adjourning again Tuesday. Two bootleggers were brought before him. The docket shows the following:

State of Iowa vs Harry L. Bass. Bootlegging. Defendant appears in open court in person, is duly arrainged, pleads that he is guilty of the crime of bootlegging and that he does not wish an attorney to defend him; and that he pay a fine of $500.00 and costs of prosecution, and be comitted to the jail of Clayton county until fine is paid at the rate of $3.33 1-3 per day for each day so committed. Bond on appeal filed at $700.00.

State of Iowa vs H.A. Teslow. Aiding in the delivery and distribution of intoxicating liquor unlawfully sold. Defendant appears in open court in person and by his atoorney, is duly arrainged, pleads that he is guilty of the crime charged. Adjudged that the defendant is guilty of the crime and that he pay a fine of $100.00 and costs of prosecution, and be comitted to the jail of Clayton county until fine is paid at the rate of $3.33 1-3 per day for each day so committed. Bond on appeal filed at $200.00.

~Elkader Register, Thursday, June 30, 1921

Hopping Onto Clayton Hootch

Saturday was a painful day for moonshiners and blind piggers of Clayton county, says a McGregor dispatch in the Telegraph Herald. Five federal officers, two state men, county sheriff and deputy county sheriff under the leadership of county Attorney W.L. Eichendorf, dropped in at various places around the county. They worked collectively and in squads. A portion of County Attorney Eichendorf's office had to be cleared out to receive the pile of samples which were taken. It's a valuable pile. Most of it at the time of capture was selling at 50 cents a drink.

The ten men took the early morning train Sunday, going south from McGregor. Some got off at Guttenberg, part left the train at Buena Vista, Turkey river was the destination of the rest.

The Guttenberg crew found George Junk busy as could be in a cave back of the house with two stills running. They smashed the stills and took a bottle of mash. The soft drink parlor of F.M. Walsh and pool hall of John Rodemaker were net visited, liquor found and bottles of it taken for evidence.

While this was going on at Guttenberg, the Buena Vista squad had taken a still at the house of Wm. Wachendorf and discovered liquor in the soft drink parlor of Ellis Nagle.

The Turkey River raiders captured a still and mash barrel at William Bolsinger's.

Returning to McGregor with their loot, the Frank Steck house was entered and liquor taken. The rest of the local bootleggers had been tipped off and nothing more could be done temporarily in McGregor.

County Attorney Eichendorf already has to his credit the most arrests and largest collection of fines for violation of the prohibitory act of any county attorney in Iowa. He is out to get the rest of them. It will be quite a job, for no Kentucky mountains probably ever harbored more stills than the hills and islands of the Mississippi along northeastern Iowa. Caves up around the Yellow river country are particularly favored. Clam shell boats - so called - are a popular way of peddling the moonshine manufactured in the caves and on the islands. It was in such a shell boat that Lou Willhite was crossing from his island factory near Waukon Junction when he was drowned last week. His body has not been found.

~Postville Herald, November 17, 1921

District Court

State of Iowa vs George Junk, illegal manufacture of intoxicating liquor. Defendant plead guilty of the crime charged. Adjudged that the defendant is guilty of the crrime of illegal manufacture of intoxicating liquor and that he pay a fine of $200.00 and costs, and be committed to the jail of Clayton County, Iowa, until said fine is paid at a rate of $3.33 per day, so committed. Bond on appeal fixed at $200.00.

~Elkader Register, December 29, 1921

- 1922 -

District Court

The grand jury returned nine true bulls at the adjourned session of the district court here last week, seven were for bootlegging. Three of the men indicted pleaded guilty and received their sentences from Judge Taylor as follows:

Jack Walsh, who was arrested on the county attorney's information pleaded guilty and was fined $200.00 and costs for the illegal manufacture of intoxicating liquors.
Matt Miller, also indicted for bootlegging, was fined $350.00 and costs.
Joe Curran was fined $350.00 and costs for bootlegging.

All three parties are serving out their sentence at the county jail at the rate of $3.33 1-3 per day.

~Elkader Register, March 16, 1922

Hootch Raid West of Strawberry Point

Tuesday, County Attorney, W.L. Eichendorf and 2 constables swooped down upon the William Conway place a mile west of Strawberry Point and found him and his son busy making hootch. They had a still, some hootch and some mash on hand. These were seized and will be offered as evidence when prosecution time [illegible]. For some time reports have been going around that Conway was a hootch maker. He came to this county from Delaware county where the officers had been after him a number of times. He is reported to be pretty smoothe and always able to squeeze out of the difficulties he gets in. Being a man of little means, an attachment may be made on the farm for any fine given him by the county. At present he is at liberty, but the chances are that the officers will be here to get him within the next day or so.

~Strawberry Point Press, September 8 or 9, 1922

District Court

State of Iowa vs Chas. Otterbeck. Illegal manufacture of intoxicating liquor. Defenant pleaded guilty.

State of Iowa vs Christ Frederick. Illegal manufacture of liquor. Defendant fined $100.00 and costs and committed to the county jail at the rate of $3.33 until the fine is paid.

State of Iowa vs James Conway. Illegal manufacture of intoxicating liquor. Defendant fined $100.00 and costs and committed to the county jail at the rate of $3.33 until the fine is paid.

All of the following cases are for bootlegging and all have been continued at the request of the defendant:
State of Iowa vs Fred Clinton
State of Iowa vs Thomas Madden
State of Iowa vs Almond Hines
State of Iowa vs George Clinton

~The Clayton County Messenger, October 25, 1922

District Court Criminal Causes

State of Iowa vs Fred Clinton, indictment for bootlegging.
State of Iowa vs Thomas Madden, indictment for bootlegging.
State of Iowa vs Almond Hines, indictment for bootlegging.
State of Iowa vs Irvin Delp, indictment for bootlegging.
State of Iowa vs George Clinton, indictment for bootlegging.
State of Iowa vs Nelson Gore, indictment for illegal manufacture of intoxicating liquor.

~The Clayton County Messenger, December 6, 1922

- 1923 -

District Court

The first jury trial was reached yesterday - State of Iowa vs Nelson Gore, charged with the manufacture of intoxicating liquor. A still and coil with a small amount of moonshine were found upon the premises occupied by Mr. Gore and his family at Guttenberg, but the evidence produced was not sufficient to show that he had actually manufactured the liquor, so the jury gave him the benefit of the doubt and rendered a verdict of "Not Guilty" sortly before noon today.

~The Elkader Register, Thursday, May 17, 1923

District Court

State of Iowa vs Nelson Gore. Alex Holmes appointed by court to defend defendant. Tried by jury. Jury finds defendant "not guilty". Defendant discharged.
State of Iowa vs J.W. Stocks. Defendant pleads guilty to crime of bootlegging. Ordered that he be committed to jail for 60 days and pay a fine of $50.00. On account of this being his first conviction, jail sentence is suspended during good behavior.

State of Iowa vs Joseph Soliski, Jr. Defendant pleads guilty to crime of bootlegging. Adjudged that he pay a fine of $200.00 and costs of prosecution and that he be committed to jail until fine is paid at rate of $3.33 1-3 per day. Bond on appeal $300.00.

State of Iowa vs Frank Grady. Defendant pleads guilty to unlawfully keeping for sale intoxicating liquor. Adjudged that he pay fine of $80 and costs and be committed to jail until fine is paid at rate of $3.33 1-3 per day.

~The Elkader Register, Thursday, May 31, 1923

Moonshine Found

For some time it has been rumored that Mike Bente was making moonshine and selling it, and last week Wednesday Sheriff Chris. Larson with Deputy Sheriff John Kluth and Marshal Sam Boots, searched his home in town and his farm about four miles from here toward Communia. Nothing was found at the home but at the farm the searchers found fifteen gallon of moonshine and the barrels that had contained the mash. Mr. Bente has been bound over to appear before the Grand jury in October.

~The Elkader Register, Thursday, September 13, 1923

District Court Criminal Causes

State of Iowa vs Michael Bente. Pleads guilty of having in possession of intoxicating liquors with intent to sell same. Adjudged that the defendant pay a fine of $200.00 and costs. Bond on appeal, $1,000.

State of Iowa vs Wm. Rudolph. Preliminary hearing. Defendant pleads guilty of the illegal possession of intoxicating liquors

State of Iowa vs Elmer Gordon. Bootlegging. Defendant pleads guilty to the charge of bootlegging. Ordered that the defendant be confined in the jail of Clayton County, Iowa, for a period of six months at hard labor and pay the costs of this proceeding. Bail on appeal fixed at $500.00.

~The Elkader Register, Thursday, October 25, 1923

Hesselman Arrested

Sheriff Christ Larson and his deputy John Kluth autoed to North Buena Vista Thursday and arrested Anthony Hesselman for selling hootch and took him to Guttenberg before Justice of the peace and had him bound over to the Grand Jury next term of court at Elkader. This is his second offense, as he was fined heavily a few months ago at Dubuque on the same charge.

~Elkader Register, November 8, 1923

Authorities War on Hootch Hounds

Manufacturers and peddlers of moonshine, commonly known as bootleggers and "hootch hounds" received no small amount of attention from the local authorities during the past week and we have reason to believe that the end is not yet!

Yesterday Sheriff Chris P. Larson with Deputy John Kluth and Marshal Sam Boots raided the Otto Szemkus farm in Read township, where they discovered three 15-gallon kegs full of mash, a quart of finished moonshine, the still and the worm.

Last Friday the same offiers went to the farm of Fritz Roeben, also in Read township, where they found the equivalent of five barrels of mash in nine barrels, the still and the worm, three gallons of finished product buried in the garden in two jugs. It developed that the still was the property of Grover Haught, and so both of these are bound over to the Grand Jury under $300 bonds.

A visit paid to McGregor added two more violators to the list, one Jim Kelley, conductor of a soft drink parlor and John Poll, bootlegger. At the Kelley restaurant a quantity of hootch and a slot machine were seized and Poll was taken on a charge of bootlegging.

On Friday last, the officials searched the Fred Brase place in Jefferson township and found four gallon of illegal liquor. Brase has been bound over to the Court.

At North Buena Vista on last week Thursday the officials arrested Anton Hesselman for manufacturing and selling hootch and he likewise has been bound over to the Court.

Two places were searched in Guttenberg on the 27th of October. One, the pool hall of Frank Walsh and the other the restaurant of R.E. Wolters. In neither case, however, did the authorities find any evidence. Our officials are making amighty fine effort for law enforcement and with the proper co-operation of the people, they will make things pretty warm for the peddlers of this poison.

~The Guttenberg Press, Thursday, November 15, 1923

Sheriff Catches More Moonshiners

Last Friday Sheriff Chris Larson and his assistants rounded up three more moonshiners, Guy Coonfare, Miles Coonfare and Charles Clinton, all down in the rough Turkey River hills below Motor.

At the Guy Coonfare place a complete equipment still, coils, etc. was captured together with about two hundred gallons of mash. At Miles Coonfare's a similar outfit was found with about a hundred gallons of mash and about a half gallon of moonshine. At Charles Clinton's they got a complete outfit, still coil and about 200 gallons of mash and five quarts of liquor.

At the preliminary hearing the two Coonfare's plead not guilty and were bound over to the grand jury on bonds and were released on $500 bonds to await sentence by the judge.

Otto Szemkus, Fritz Roeben and Grover Haught, caught in recent raids have all plead guilty and are under bonds awaiting sentence by the judge.

Yesterday the officers found where a still had been in operation on the Seymour Latteyer place. Two stoves, barrels for mash, a pump to pump river water for the still, a board shute to carry used mash to the river and other conveniences for a big output. The still was hidden however and no liquor was found.

~The Elkader Register, Thursday, November 15, 1923

- 1924 -

District Court

Fred Latteyer, who was caught by Sheriff Larson with a moonshine still in operation drew a good sized fine this morning when Judge Springer sentenced him to pay $750.00 and costs.

~The Elkader Register, Thursday, February 21, 1924

Sheriff Nabs Moonshiner

Monday morning, Sheriff Chris. P. Larson went to Marquette and arrested Dick Perrine for violating the liquor laws. At Perrine's home about 1 miles north of Marquette 23 gallons of moonshine was found. In a shack on an island near Marquette, Perrine was operating a still. The officers seized the still, coil and 250 gallons of mash.

Perrine was brought to Elkader Monday afternoon and in justice court was bound over to await the action of the grand jury. His cash bond was fixed at $500.00 which he furnished.

Sheriff Larson has nabbed quite a number of liquor law violators since his term in office. He is endeavoring to do his duty and enforce the law against the makers and peddlers of this poison product.

In district court Perrine plead guilty and was fined $700.00 and costs.

~The Elkader Register, Thursday, March 6, 1924

District Court - Criminal Causes

State of Iowa vs Earl Wescott. Guilty of the crime of bootlegging. Ordered and adjudged that defendant pay a fine of $350 and costs and that he stand committed to the jail of Clayton county until said fine and costs are paid. Bail on appeal fixed at $500.

~Guttenberg Press, March 6, 1924

Sheriff Larson Causes Bootleggers Arrest

Marquette, Ia., March 8 - Sheriff Larson and his deputies during the past few days cleared up two foxy illicit dealers whom they have been trying to get evidence against for a long time.

Dick Perrine, who has a wife and four children living in a clammer's shack a mile north of Marquette. The sheriff and two deputies swooped down on his cabin Wednesday night and found two pints of moon in his shack and then forced him to lead a trail that took them into a little island in the channel of the Mississippi over dangerous ice where they located 250 gallons of mash, a complete distilling, filtering and testing outfit and 23 gallons of finished liquor in a boarded dugout. The liquor was confiscated and the shack and its contents set to fire. He is awaiting the grand jury under $500 bail.

Freedom Jacobs, of Clayton, was taken before Justice Flannigan at Elkader carrying his home-made still which the sheriff and deputy had confiscated from his houseboat at Clayton, where his wife and six children are awaiting the outcome of the case before the grand jury. Fifty gallons of mash were destroyed.

~Guttenberg Press, Thursday, March 13, 1924

"Evidence"

One of the county trucks passed thru here [Garnavillo] loaded with the "evidence" of a hootch raid made by Sheriff Larson and assistants at the Chas Vorwald place in Millville township. It contained two extra large stills and a quantity of double distilled liquor. The officers destroyed about 60 gal. of liquor and 90 gal. of mash on the place.

~The Elkader Register, Thursday, July 10, 1924; Garnavillo column

Moonshine Raids Gather in 15 Suspects

During the last two or three weeks the county sheriff's office, and assisted by state and federal officers, has taken into custody several accused of illegal liquor transactions.

The Elkader Register of July 4, says:

"Tuesday morning Sheriff Chris Larson, acting upon information that had been given him dropped in on the farm of Chas. Vorwald of Millville township and captured the biggest moonshine outfit ever found in this county.

Sheriff Larson was accompanied by Deputy John Kluth, Marshall Tom Kilfoil and Jesse Turner, and after taking charge of Vorwald they made a search and found the outfit still warm from the work of the previous night. A county truck was summoned to bring the equipment to Elkader, consisting of two fifty-gallon copper stills with sheet iron furnaces, worm, etc. Forty-five gallons of finished double distilled liquor was captued while about the same quanity of single run liquor and ninety gallons of mash ready for the still were destroyed. This mash tested 27 per cent alcohol.

Vorwald was evidently doing business on a big scale and we are told that he expected to deliver 100 gallons at Dyersville yesterday. He was brought before Justice Flanagan yesterday and bound over to the grand jury under $1000 bonds."

The Clayton County Messenger of July 9 says:

"Without question, the greatest moonshine and bootleg raid ever conducted in this county was staged today by Sheriff C.P. Larson assisted by several state agents and a number of Federal officers when twelve violators were brought to the county seat. All those arrested waived preliminary hearing before Justice of the Peace John L. Flannigan and were bound over to the October term of the Grand Jury under $1000 bonds.

Two state agents had been busy the past ten days or son in the county buying "evidence" at soft drink bars, etc., and when enough of the evidence was procured the officers started the "mop-up."

The following are those arrested:
McGregor - Earl Wescott, Allen Milks, Grover Bills, Bob Hill, James Kelley and Ed. Bruckner.
Guttenberg - John Dorweiler, John Cassutt, Frank Walsh and Ben Pache.
Marquette - A.A. Montour
Garber - Wm. Seippel

The Telegraph-Herald says:

"With the arrest of Bert Connell and Theodore Frye today, charged with bootlegging, prohibition agents who swooped down on Clayton county have gathered 14 in all within the past two days in their "dry net." Connell and Frye are residents of Garnavillo township. Both were released, following a preliminary hearing before Justice J.L. Flannigan, on $1000 bonds each. Considerable mash, finished product and stills were confiscated in the drive by the "sponge squad."

The Elkader Register of July 10 says:

"For some time the brazen disregard of law by so called "soft drink" parlors at McGregor, Guttenberg and some other points in the county has been rumored. It was stated that drinks of hard liquor were sold openly over the bar and that in addition open gambling was carried on at the Earl Westcott and Grover Bills places in McGregor.

Coming to the attention of the authorities some special agents were sent to this county to uncover the activities of the soft drink parlors, bootleggers and others. They got the evidence and on Tuesday night and Wednesday morning the trap was sprung.

Five state agents, four federal agents, Sheriff Chris Larson, Deputy John Kluth and some local assistants rounded up the following: A. Montour, Garber; Earl Wescott, Ed Bruckner, Bob Hill, Grover Bills, Allen Milks and James Kelley, McGregor; Ben Batche, John Dorweiler, John Cassutt and Frank Walsh, Guttenberg and Wm. Seipple of Garber. Oscar King of Clayton, who got in bad by destroying some of the evidence is also under arrest and will face a charge of contempt of court.

Of those arrested Earl Westcott and James Kelly have previously been before the court on a similar charge, and we understand that one or two of the others have been before federal authorities. John Cassutt* is one of Jefferson township's constables."

~Guttenberg Press, Thursday, July 17, 1924

[* transcriber's note: John Cassutt resigned as constable for Jefferson township at the August 4th County Board of Supervisors meeting.]

Another Raid

State Agent Stoner of Waterloo, assisted by Sheriff Chris. P. Larson, Deputy Sheriff John Kluth and Marshall Tom Kilfoil raided the farm of Fred Eggert in Garnavillo township last Thursday and found 100 gallons of mash, five gallons of "hootch", a still and several coils. Eggerth was taken before Justice J.L. Flanagan and was bound over to the grand jury under $1,000 bonds.

~The Elkader Register, Thursday, July 24, 1924

Two More Hootch Hounds

Thursday afternoon two more hootch hounds were brought in, Bert Connell and Theo. Frye, both of Garnavillo township. We are informed that this is the second time for some of the alleged bootleggers and that the end is not yet.

~Clayton County Messenger, July ?, 1924

District Court Criminal Causes

State of Iowa vs Fred Eggerth. Defendant pleads not guilty to charges of manufacturing intoxicating liquor, illegal possession of intoxicating liquor, possession of instruments intended for use in manufacture of inttoxicating liquor, and illegal possession of material with intent to use it in manufacture of intoxicating liquor. Case continued.

~The Elkader Register, October 30, 1924

- 1925 -

District Court

All of the persons indicted by the grand jury were arraigned and plead as shown:

State of Iowa vs Frank Amling. Defendant pleads not guilty to charge of bootlegging. Bail bond $500.
State of Iowa vs Warren Goodin. Defendant pleads not guilty to charge of maintaining a liquor nuisance. Bond $300.
State of Iowa vs Herman Reinhard. Defendant pleads not guilty to charge of maintaining a liquor nuisance. Bond $300.
State of Iowa vs Lambert Lorang. Defendant pleads not guilty to charge of maintaining a liquor nuisance. Bond $300.
State of Iowa vs Joe Ferris. Defendant pleads not guilty to charge of bootlegging. Bond $300.

~The Elkader Register, March 5, 1925

District Court

State of Iowa vs Dudley Perrine. Defendant plead guilty to charge of bootlegging and was sentenced to the Industrial School for Boys at Eldora until he reaches the age of twenty one. Sentence suspended and he is paroled to Sheriff Chris Larson.

State of Iowa vs John Pohl. Defendant arrainged and pleads not guilty to charge of bootlegging. Case continued.

State of Iowa vs John Nading. Defendant plead guilty to charge of manufacturing intoxicating liquor. Sentenced to pay fine of $300 and costs

State of Iowa vs Henry Wolters. Defendant plead guilty to charge of maintaining a liquor nuisance. Sentenced to three months in county jail at hard labor and to pay a fine of $500 and costs, including an attorney fee of $35. Bail on appeal $1,000.

~The Elkader Register, May 14, 1925

- 1926 -

Clayton Sheriff Has Big "Moonshine" Party

Elkader - Sheriff Chris. P. Larson of Clayton county had a party of his own New Year's day. The invited guests' were other officers and newspaper men. The repast consisted of 70 gallons of "moonshine," white and colored. The party was held on the large stone bridge spanning the Turkey river here.

During the course of the year Sheriff Larson has gathered a large amouont of "moonshine" liquor, as evidence. Seventy gallons of this representing perhaps eighteen or twenty varieties has served its purpose as evidence and was ordered destroyed by the judge of the district court and so the liquor was taken to the bridge Friday afternoon and thrown to rock banks of the river below, where every barrel, jug or bottle was broken by the fall and the contents flowed into the river.

The fish in the river soon after the party were seen doing the Charleston and a few of the modern dances.

~Postville Herald, January 7, 1926

Nabs Two Moonshiners Saturday Afternoon

Last Saturday afternoon sheriff Larson visited North Buena Vista between trains. He had a couple of assistants with him and knew just what he was after, so in that brief time they visited the place of one Albert Bates on an island just above the town; found two stills in operation; arrested Bates and his assistant Frank Hanson; confiscated the stills and coils; destroyed about ninety gallons of mash; and started back with the prisoners, stills and other evidence. The prisoners waived preliminary hearing and were bound over to the grand jury with bonds fixed at $1,000 each.

~The Elkader Register, Thursday, January 21, 1926

District Court Criminal Causes

State of Iowa vs Paul Krase. Defendant plead guilty to the charge of illegal possession of intoxicating liquor. Sentenced to the county jail for six months and to pay a fine of $500. It being a first offense the court remitted $400 of the fine and suspended five months of the sentence, to take effect after one month of the jail sentence had been served and continue during good behavior.

State of Iowa vs Albert Bates, charged with escaping from an officer. Defendant pleads not guilty.

~Elkader Register, May 20, 1926

Will Monty of Monona Guilty of Bootlegging Charge

Sheriff Larson picked up a bootlegger, Will Monty, at Monona Tuesday evening and he plead guilty and received his sentence from Judge Taylor in district court yesterday. Sentenced to pay fine of $500 and costs and serve three months in county jail.

~Clayton County Register, October 21, 1926

District Court Criminal Actions

State of Iowa vs Clifford Sparks. Defendant plead guilty to the charge of illegal possession of intoicating liquor and he was fined $300 and costs and was sentenced to the county jail for three months.

~Clayton County Register, December 9, 1926

- 1927 -

District Court Criminal Matters

State of Iowa vs Harry Sarazin. Defendant plead guilty to a charge of transporting intoxicating liquor. This was a second offense against the liquor laws of the State by this defendant and he was fined $500 and costs.

State of Iowa vs A. Walker. Indicted on a charge of selling intoxicating liquors. He waive any objections to the Grand Jury.

~Clayton County Register, Feb. 24, 1927

Bates Taken in Again

Albert Bates, 54, who three times has made his escape from the Clayton county jail, has once more been recaptured, this time at Sabula, Ia., and Sunday was brought to the county jail to complete his sentence. Bates originally was taken near North Buena Vista, on a charge of manufacturing intoxicating liquor. In view of the fact that he is a good worker, he has been allowed to work with some other prisoners at various times and three times he has taken advantage of unusual opportunities to make his get away. Each time, however, he has been captured again and now for the thrid time has been returned to the county bastile where he is being watched most carefully and is extended no privileges.

~Elgin Echo, May 5, 1927

District Court Criminal Causes

State of Iowa vs H.M. Vorwald on a charge of maintaining a liquor nuisance. Defendant plead guilty and was sentenced to six months in the county jail and fined $500. Vorwald represented that this was his first liquor law violation so the judge suspended jail sentence. Later, however, it was found that Vorwald had been convicted of a liquor law violation at Manchester, July 18, 1922 and so he was taken into custody again and is now lodged in the county jail to serve out his sentence.

State of Iowa vs Harry Abel. Defendant plead guilty to the charge of illegal possession of intoxicating liquor and was sentenced to three months in the county jail and fined $300.

James Shadle plead guilty to the charge of maintaining a liquor nuisance and was fined $300 and sentenced to three months in the county jail. Sentence was suspended during good behavior and he was paroled to Sheriff Chris Larson.

Lawrence Schultz, accused of illegal possession of intoxicating liquor was sentenced to the county jail for three months and fined $300. His sentence was suspended during good behavior and he was paroled to C.M. Brooks of McGregor.

~Clayton County Register, May 26, 1927

Arrest McGregor Man on Liquor Charge

Ernest Adney, of McGregor, was arrested Monday and brought to the county seat on a charge of illegal possession of intoxicating liquor. He was taken before Justice of the Peace P.J. Maher, who bound him over to the action of the October session of the grand jury, under $500 bond. In default of his bond he is confined in the county jail.

~Clayton County Register, August 18, 1927

- 1928 -

District Court Criminal Causes

State of Iowa vs Farncis Evans. Bootlegging. Submitted to jury. Verdict of not guilty returned.

State of Iowa vs J. Dorweiler. Charged with operating a liquor nusiance. Defendant pleads guilty. Sentenced to the count jail for three months and to pay a fine of $300 and costs. Bond on appeal, $1,000

State of Iowa vs Irwin Hines and Morris Hines, charged with possessing intoxicating liquor. Submitted to jury. Jury finds Irwin Hines guilty as charged. Sentenced to pay a fine of $300 and costs and be confined in the county jail for three months. Bond on appeal, $1,000.

~Clayton County Register, May 31, 1928

- 1929 -

Liquor Law Violators

Victor Prescot of McGregor is charged with bootlegging and bound over to the grand jury. Unable to furnish bail, he is in the jail. Thomas Sauerbry, of Lodomillo township is charged with keeping a liquor nuisance. Lawrence Gottschalk, Dean Kent were charged with driving a car while intoxicated and bound over to the grand jury. Chas. Wilson of Elkader and Oliver Rodenberg of Guttenberg have been charged with the same.

~Clayton County Register, September 5, 1929

District Court

The docket for the December session of the district court contains several new criminal cases, including Ransom Meisner, county attorney's information for bootlegging and Thomas Sauerbry, illegal possession of intoxicating liquor.

~Clayton County Register, November 28, 1929

- 1930 -

District Court Criminal Causes

State of Iowa vs H.J. Opperman. Defendant enters plea of "not guilty" to charge of illegal possession of intoxicating liquor.

~The Clayton County Register, Feb. 27, 1930

Opperman Arrested Again

Edgar Opperman, whose place near Strawberry Point was raided last week, was taken before Judge H..E. Taylor of Waukon, Friday. This was Opperman's second offense in violation of the liquor laws and Judge Taylor assessed him with a fine of $600 and costs, which the defendant paid.

~The Clayton County Register, August 28, 1930

Jail Another Bootlegger Here

Sheriff C.P. Larson has lodged another alleged liquor law violator in the county jail here to await the disposition of his case by the district court. Omar Meyer, 28, of Buena Vista, was taken into custody last Saturday, when his place was raided and 16 pints of alleged hootch were found. He was brought to Elkader and charged with maintaining a liquor nuisance. He had his preliminary hearing before Justice of the Peace George Ehrhardt, who bound him over to the grand jury under $1,000 bonds. Being unable to raise this amount, Meyer is being held in the county jail until the grand jury meets again.

~The Clayton County Register, November 20, 1930

- 1934 -

Huge Still

A huge still and more than seven hundred pounds of mash, in various stages of alcohoization, were confiscated by Sheriff L.J. Palas and state and federal agents this week on the Lee Errthum farm in Millville township, near the Buena Vista line. Sheriff Palas as assisted by State Agent Hewitt and Federal Agent Thompson. Acting on information received at the sheriff's office Saturday, the men went to the Errthm farm. Mr. Errthum was absent at the time but was apprehended at the neighboring farm and taken into custody. Later he was released on bonds. His wife greeted the officers at the home and promptly fainted, but guided by the stron odor of the mash, the men made their way to an upstairs room and found the plant. Besides the 700 gallons of mash, they took 100 pounds of corn sugar, 15 gallons of alcohol and several jugs of hootch. There was also a 50 pound cooker.

~Guttenberg Press, November 15, 1934

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~Unless otherwise credited, the news articles were compiled and transcribed by S. Ferrall for Clayton co. IAGenWeb~

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