IAGenWeb Project - Clayton co.


History of Clayton County, Iowa
1882
Chapter II


Legislative Proceedings

Acts of the Board of County Commissioners * County Court * Board of Supervisors


Acts of the Board of County Commissioners
(page 264-277)

The first meeting of the Board of County Commissioners was on the 6th day of October, 1838, at Prairie La Porte, now Guttenberg. No business was transacted save that of organization, and the appointment of Dean Gay, Clerk of the board. An adjournment was then had till the 13th of October, when they re-assembled at the same place.

The first business transacted by the board was the appointment of John W. Griffith, Assessor for the ensuing year, and George W. Jones, Allen Carpenter and Baldwin Oldstead, Road Commissioners.

The county was divided into four election precincts, the first commencing at the southeast corner of range one west, thence west to the southwest corner of ninety-one, thence north to the northwest corner of said town, thence east to the channel of the Mississippi.

The second "commencing at the southeast corner of fraction range two, thence west to the southwest corner of four west, thence north to the northwest corner of four west, ninety-three north, thence east to the channel of the Mississippi line." The third commencing "at the southeast corner of range three west, ninety-four north, thence west to the southwest corner of fraction six west, ninety-four north, thence following the Black Hawk line to the obtuse angle of six west, thence following the purchase line to the Mississippi River." The fourth commencing at "the southeast corner of four west, thence west on the county line to the southeast corner of six west, thence north to the purchase line, thence following said line to the southwest corner of fraction six west, thence east to the northwest corner of four west, ninety-three north, thence south to the southwest of four, ninety-two north, thence east to the northeast corner of range three west, ninety-one north, thence south to the county line."

The court ordered all elections in the first precinct to he held at the house of Henry Holtzbecker; in the second precinct at the house of Harman Graybill; in the third precinct at the house of Jesse Daudly; in the fourth at Boardman's mill. The court left it to the discretion of those living in any precinct not of sufficient number to organize an election to cast their votes at the nearest precinct adjoining their place of residence.

Ambrose Canada was appointed Commissioner of Common Schools for the first precinct, Harman Graybill for the second, Jesse Daudly for the third, Mr. Downie for the fourth.

The first proceedings do not give the names of the county commissioners, who were Robert Campbell, William D. Grant and George Culver.

The third meeting of the court was held at Prairie La Porte, Nov. 20, 1838, Robert Campbell and William D. Grant being present. A tax was levied upon the property of the citizens of the county, and the collector ordered to collect the sum by the first day of January following.

David Springer, Henry F. Lander and Henry Holtzbecker were appointed judges of election for the first precinct; John Gillett, Patton McMullen and Baldwin Olmstead for the second; Jesse Daudly, Allen Carpenter and C.S. Edson for the third. For the fourth precinct no judges were appointed, it being probable that there were not a sufficient number of voters living within its boundaries to organize an election.

The fourth meeting of the board was held at Prairie La Porte, Jan. 7, 1839, all the members being present.

A new election precinct was found to include the townships of ninety-one and ninety-two, range four west, to be known as the fifth election precinct, the elections to be held at the house of George Culver, the judges of election to be George Culver, William W. Wayman and Baldwin Olmstead.

On the 21st of January the commissioners again met, but transacted no business of public interest.

During vacation the first application was made for license to retail "ardent spirits," and the clerk entered upon the records of the court the following minutes:
"Peter Legree made application for permit to retail ardent spirits on the 19th of March, and I granted the same according to the last act of the Wisconsin Legislature. Done at Prairie La Porte, March 19, 1839.
Dean Gay, Clerk of Board County Commissioners.

Why the permit was granted according to the act of the Wisconsin Legislature is unknown, and it can only be surmised that the clerk did not have access to the Iowa statutes, and that his act must be done according to some law made and provided, and the Wisconsin law was as good as any.

Needham Dudley was appointed Assessor for 1839, but not qualifying, George Culver was appointed and performed the duties for the year.

On the 29th of May, W.D. Grant and Robert Campbell met and surveyed the lands for the location of the county seat. At the same time they appointed judges of election for each of the five precincts.

L.B. Tomkins was appointed Clerk of the Board of County Commissioners, and entered upon the discharge of his duties, vice Dean Gay.

On the first of July "James A. McClellan made application for vending goods and liquors, and it was granted according to the last act of the Iowa Legislature."

The jurisdiction of Clayton County extended a great distance, as will be seen by the following order of the commissioners under date July 13, 1839:
"On the petition of F. Andros, license is hereby granted Lewis Massey, of St. Peters, to keep a ferry across the Mississippi one mile above Fort Snelling, for one year from date hereof, for the sum of $10."

The license of a tavern and grocery keeper was higher than in many other counties in the Territory at this time, as Herman Greybill was assessed in the sum of $55 for keeping the same one year at Prairie La Porte.

At the August election, 1839, Patton McMullan, H.F. Lander and William W. Wayman were elected County Commissioners.

The first meeting of the new board was held Aug. 12, 1839. No business was transacted save organization.

Charles E. Bensell was appointed Clerk of the board, "during the option of the commissioners," at a mutiny held in September.

S.B. Olmstead, William Walker and Herman Greybill were appointed Road Commissioners for one year, and the following named School Commissioners for the same time: Precinct No. 1, Ambrose Kennedy; No. 2, Harman Graybill; No. 3, Jesse Daudly; No. 4, John Downie; No. 5, Horace Mallory.

On the 8th day of October, 1839, the following order was entered upon the records of the court.
"Ordered. That notices be circulated and posted, for the purpose of letting out the building of a court-house and other buildings at Prairie La Porte, the county seat."

This order was annulled at a meeting held October 19.

The commissioners were determined, if possible, to have good roads, and to that end "it was ordered that each free male white citizen of the county of Clayton be compelled to work five days on such roads as the supervisor of each precinct they reside in shall order."

At a meeting of the board held Nov. 12, 1839, Charles E. Bensell resigned, and H.D. Bronson was appointed to fill the vacancy as Clerk of the Board.

On the 5th of December the following order was made:
"It is ordered that there be a court-house built on the public square at Prairie La Porte, by the first of September next, size and quality of building to be hereafter mentioned. Also, that the sale of town lots take place on the first Monday in April next. Also that the furnishing materials and building said court-house on the public square in Prairie La Porte to be finished by the 15th of September.
"Resolved, Further, That the sale and building be advertised in the Iowa News for three months."

The citizens of what is now the State of Minnesota desired to have a part in the government of the county, and vote at such election as might be ordered, therefore the following orders were made:
"Ordered, That the settlement at the outlet of Lake Pepin compose an election precinct, to be called the sixth precinct, and that Charles Sweet, Oliver Cratt and James Wells be appointed the first judges of election."
"Ordered, That the settlement at the mouth of the St. Peters River compose an election precinct, to be called the seventh precinct, and that A.J. Bruce, Franklin Steele and H.H. Sibley be appointed the first judges of election."

The third election precinct, the boundaries of which have heretofore been given, was abolished by the board, and a new district formed, comprising townships ninety-four and ninety-five north, of range three and four west, to be known as the third precinct.

The commissioners could not wait for the completion of the court-house, and therefore the following appears upon its records:
"The board having taken into consideration the necessity of erecting a building to be used as an office for the county, and in which the books and papers of the county can be safely deposited."
"Resolved, That the erection of such building is necessary, and that the board proceed to make the contracts for the erection thereof."
The board then proceeded to contract with Robert Hetfield for the delivery of the stuff necessary for the erection of a county building, and with David Hastings for the construction thereof."

On the 10th of July, 1840, H.D. Bronson resigned the office of Clerk of the board and Alfred Northam was appointed to fill the vacancy.

At a meeting of the board held Aug. 3, William Walker applied for a license to keep a ferry across the Mississippi River, at or near the mouth of Turkey River. A license was granted, and the board fixed the following fees:

For each person ...
For each horse or mule ...
For each wheel carriage, for each wheel ...
For every head of cattle ...
For every head of swine or sheep ...
For every cwt. of freight over five cwt ...
$0.25
50
25
50
12
10

Thomas P. Park was also granted a license for a ferry across Turkey River, at a point where Mead's branch entered the same, and authorized to receive the following rates of ferriage:

For each person ...
For each horse or mule ...
For wheel carriages, each wheel ...
For every head of cattle ...
For every head of swine or sheep ...
For every cwt. of freight over five cwt ...
12
25
12
25
6
5

The claim of Robert Hetfield for material for the county building amounting to $73.50 was allowed, and of David Hastings for erecting the same, $23, was also allowed. Thus Clayton's first county building cost $96.50.

At a meeting of the board held Feb. 1, 1841, the assessor was ordered to assess the people at St. Peters, and at all intermediate points between the county seat and that place.

Daniel Justice, at the April term of the Commissioners' Court, was fined the sum of $2 for contempt of court.

Under date of July 6, 1841, the following was placed upon the records:
"We, the undersigned, through the medium of the records of the Board of county Commissioners, do declare and make known that we herewith resign, each of us, the office of County Commissioners of Clayton County, reserving the right to perform the duties of said office until our successors are duly elected, and qualified for said office according to law.

H.F. Lander,
Elisha Boardman,
W.W. Wayman.

No reason is assigned for the act of the commissioners, and so far as the records go one is left in the dark as to why their resignations were given.

On the 23d of August the court assembled, and after discharging some business it was "ordered that the court adjourn that their successors may enter upon the discharge of the duties of county commissioners." Their successors were Eliphalet Price, A.S. Cooley and Thomas C. Linton. Charles L. Lagrave was appointed Clerk of the board.

The new board, desiring to have a full nderstanding of the financial condition of the county, had the books "posted," as will be seen from the following:
"Whereas the books of the Board of County Commissioners have been posted up to this date from the 8th day of October, in the year 1839, it is herewith declared by record that the expenditures amount to the sum of $3,054.72, and the receipts for the same period of time to the amount of $2,096.59, making the indebtedness of the county $959.13, at this present date."

At the October term of the court the assessor was instructed not to assess any property more than fifty miles beyond the bounds of Clayton County.

At the February, 1842, term E.B. Lyon was appointed Clerk of the board.

The first bounty offered for wolf scalps was at the March, 1842, term; $1.50 was offered for black or gray wolves; under six months, 75 cents; prairie wolves, $1.00; under six months, 50 cents.

In April, 1842, E.B. Lyon resigned the position of Clerk of the board and Robert R. Reed was appointed to fill the vacancy.

The following enactment bears date July 4, 1842:
"Be it enacted by the Board of County Commissioners of Clayton County, that from and after the passage of this act, the polls in Boardman precincts shall be opened at the house and residence of Elisha Boardman and not at the Dry Mill as before."

At the February term in 1843 the indebtedness of the county was found to be $625.28.

On the second day of October, 1843, the board met for the first time at the new county seat, Jacksonville, now Garnavillo.

The indebtedness of the county was found by the board to be $1,040.99.

By a record of the board, under date April 3, 1844, it is learned that James King has a contract for the erection of a court-house, that he had completed the same, and it was accepted by the commissioners, the amount paid being $675. Neither the articles of agreement nor the specifications are a matter of record.

At a sesion of the board held April 4, 1844, the boundaries of the various precincts were defined as follows: "Millville precinct (No. 1), commencing at the northeast corner of the county line on the Mississippi River, thence running due south to the southeast corner of said county, thence due west to southwest corner of township ninety-one, range three west, thence due north to the northwest corner of said township, thence due east to the channel of the Mississippi River, thence down said river to the point of beginning." The elections of said precinct were directed to be held at the school-house in Millville. "Jacksonville precinct (No. 2), commencing at the southeast corner of fractional township ninety-two, range two west, thence due west to the center of township line dividing townships ninety-one and ninety-two, range four west of the fifth principal meridian, thence due north to the center of township ninety-four, range four west, thence due east to the Mississippi River, thence down said river to the place of commencing." The elections were appointed for the court-house at Jacksonville. "Bloody Run precinct (No. 3), commencing on the Mississippin River at the southeast corner of the center line of township ninety-four, range three west of the fifth principl meridian, thence due west to township line dividing township line ninety-four, range four and five west, thence due north to northeast corner of township ninety-four, range five west, thence due west to the neutral line, thence running northeast on said line to the northwest corner of township ninety-five, range four west, thence due south two miles, thence due east on section line to the Mississippi River, thence down said river to the place of commencing." The elections, it was determined, were held at the house of Lowdowick Mirale, in said precinct. "Yellow River precinct (No. 4), commencing at the Painted Rock on the Mississippi River, thence down said river to the corner of township ninety-five, range three west of the fifth principal meridian, thence down said river two miles, thence due west on section line west side of township ninety-five, range four west, thence due north to the neutral line, thence following said line to the place of commencing at the Painted Rock." The house of Thomas C. Linton, on Yellow River, was designated as the place for holding elections. Boardman precinct (No. 5), commencing at the center of the south side of township ninety-three, range four west of the fifth principal meridian, thence due west to the northh-east corner of Fayette County, thence due north to the neutral line, thence following said line until it intersects Bloody Run precinct (No. 3), thence due east to the northwest corner of township ninety-four, range five west, thence due south to the center of said township line, thence due east to the center of township ninety-four, range four west, thence due south to the place of commencing." The elections were to be held at the school-house in Poney Hollow. "Wayman precinct (No. 6), commencing at the southeast corner of township ninety-one, range four west of the fifth principal meridian, thence due west to the neutral line, thence following said line with its angles until it intersects the corner of Boardman's precinct (No. 5), opposite the north corner of Fayette County, thence due east to the center of township lline dividing townships ninety-two and ninety-three, range four west, thence due south to the township line dividing townships ninety-one and ninety-two, range four west, thence due east to the northeast corner of township ninety-one, range four west, thence south to the place of commencing." The house of W.W. Wayman was designated as the place for holding elections.

April 10, 1845, a new precinct was established, called the Bemis precinct, with the following boundaries: "Township ninety-one north, range five west, and the west half of township ninety-one north, range four west." All elections held in said precinct were to be held at the house of Horace Bemis, in said precinct.

Jan. 7, 1846, another precinct was established, and bounded as follows: "Said precinct includes fractional township ninety-two north, range two west, and township ninety-three north range two west of the fifth principal meridian." The house of Christian Wise was designated as the place for holding the elections, and the name of Guttenberg was given to the precinct.

Instead of an assessor for the entire county, one was appointed for each precinct.

In October, 1844, John Baufill was allowed $200 for lathing and plastering the court-house.

On the 5th day of November, 1845, the county commissioners resolved upon the erection of a "public gaol," according to the following specifications: "It shall be built of hewed square oak timber, laid close together; the walls are to be one foot thick and twelve feet high; the room fourteen feet square in the clear on the foundation, and nine feet in the clear between the floors; the floor to have a trap door three feet long and two feet wide; the oak planks on the sides, and the bottom floor the same way. These planks are to be filled with nails not more than one inch and a half apart on the side next to the wall, then spiked fast to the the wall with four-inch spikes, the spikes not more than fourteen inches apart; the bottom floor to be finished in the same way. There are to be two grates fourteen inches square to be put in the walls of the room as high as the upper floor will admit, to be made of one-inch bar iron, the frame of the grate to be made of heavy flat bar iron; there is to be left on the frame of the grate a zell, or tenant, of three inches above and below to sink it in the timber, and then to be well spiked on to the wall. The upper floor is to be laid with one-inch plank; the trap-door is to be made of double two inch oak plank doubled and rivieted together with twenty-four rivets, fastened to the floor by long, stong staple hinges, a bolt three-fourths of an inch thick to run through the floor riveted to the hinge, the hinge to extend across the door, then to fasten by two staples and two substantial locks, the keys to fit their own locks only. The house is to be sided up or inclosed with good oak or basswood siding. It shall be shingled with good oak or pine of fourteen-inch shingles, not laid more than four and a half inches to the weather. The gable ends and roof are to be close sheeted before siding or shingling. there is to be a god door in the gable end with a clasp staple and lock. There is to be a good stong flight of stairs to be built on the out-side at one end, leading to the door of the gable end, running by the side with railing and a platform to be left at the top of the stairs, three feet square. The above building is to be well under pinned with a stone wall, at least one foot thick; the corner or end of each round of timber is to be pinned with one-and-a-half inch pins, and the plates are to be pinned in fur places in each log."

At a meeting held Jan. 6, 1846, bids for the erection of the "gaol" were opened. The following were the bids: Alfred Kinney, $557; Benjamin F. Forbes, $385; Abraham Vandoren, $500; David Clark, $248. The last was accepted by the board, Mr. Clark taking one-half the amount in town lots, and the other half in cash from the sale of lots.

The books being posted, it was found the indebtedness of the county, Jan. 8, 1846, was $2,306.69.

In 1847, at the April term of the County Commissioners' Court, the county was divided into townships in order that it might avail itself of its share of the school fund of the State. The following is the record of boundaries:
Township No. 1, Millville. --Fractional Township 91 north, range 1 and 2 west, and fractional Township 91, range 1 and 2 east.
Township No. 2, Mallory. --Township 91 north, range 3 west and the southeast quarter of Township 91 north, range 4 west.
Township No. 3, Lodomillo. -- The west half of Township 91 north, range 4 west, and Township 91 north, ranges 5 and 6 west.
Township No. 4, Hewitt. -- Township 92 north, ranges 5 and 6 west, with Fayette County attached thereto, east half of township 92 north, range 5 west, attached to Volga Township.
Township No. 5, Volga. -- Township 92 north, range 4 west, northeast quarter of Township 91 north, range 4 west, southwest quarter of Township 92, range 3 west, and the east half of Township 92 north, range 5 west.
Township No. 6, Jefferson. -- Southeast quarter of Township 92 north, range 3 west, and fractional Townships 92 and 93 north, range 2 west.
Township No. 7, Garnavillo. -- North half of Township 92 north, range 3 west, Township 93 north, range 3 west, the south half of Township 94 north, range 3 west, and the east half of Township 93 north, range 4 west.
Township No. 8, Boardman. -- The west half of Township 93 north, range 4 west, Township 93 north, ranges 5 and 6 west, the south half of Township 94 north, range 5 west, the southwest quarter of Township 94 north, range 4 west, and the southeast quarter of Township 94 north, range 4 west.
Township No. 9, Mendon. -- The north half of Township 94 north, ranges 3, 4 and 5 west, and the south half of township 95 north, ranges 3,4 and 5 west.
Township No. 10, Monona. -- The north haof of Township 95 north, ranges 3, 4 and 5 west, and Township 96 north, range 3 west.

At a meeting held April 11, 1848, the east half of township 92 north, range 5 west, was ordered stricken from Hewitt Township and added to Volga Township. At the same meeting sections 1, 2, 11, 12, 13 and 14 of township 92 north, range 3 west, and sections 1, 12, 13, 24, 25 and 36 of township 93 north, range 3 west, were taken from Garnavillo and added to Jefferson.

At the same time the townships were formed the county was divided into commissioners' districts. The townships of Millville, Mallory, Lodomillo and Sperry formed District No. 1; Volga, Jefferson and Garnavillo, No. 2; Boardman, Mendon and Monona, No. 3.

At the April session, in 1848, a new jail was resolved upon, the first having been burned, and plans and specifications entered upon the records. At the May term the contract was awarded to David Clark, for the sum of $1,480. the building included a house for the use of the jailor.

At the January meeting, in 1849, the indebtedness of the county was found to be $1,533.60. This indebtedness was further increased to $3,412.06.

From this time until the commissioners were legislated out of office but little business was transacted by the board, save auditing bills, establishing new roads and changing boundry lines of old ones. The following named served as Commissioners for the time mentioned:

1838-9. -- William D. Grant, Robert Campbell, George Culver.
1839-40. -- William W. Wayman, H.F. Lander, Hatten McMellen.
1840-1. -- Same.
1841-2. -- William F. Wayman, H.F. Lander, Elisha Boardman.
1842-3. -- Eliphalet Price, A.S. Cooley and Thos. C. Linton.
1843-4. -- A.S. Cooley, James King and Daniel M. Barber.
1844-6. -- A.S. Cooley, James King and Luther Patch.
1846-7. -- A.S. Cooley, John Downie and Joseph B. Quigley.
1847-50. -- A.S. Cooley, James Tapper and John W. Potts.


~~~

County Court
(page 277)

By an act of the Legislature, the office of county commissioner was abolished, and the office of county judge created. The duties devolving upon the Board of County Commissioners were transferred to the county judge.

Elias H. Williams was the first County Judge, and was elected in August, 1851.

Eliphalet Price succeeded Judge Williams in 1855, and served two years.

O.W. Crary was the successor of Judge Price in 1857, and was succeeded by John Garber, 1859, who served two years.

But little legislative business of general interest was transacted by the county judges, further than will appear in connection with other events in the history of the county, record of which may be found in this volume. It was under the administration of the county judges that the county-seat contests took place, as will be seen under the head of "County Seat Contest."

~~~

Board of Supervisors
(page 277-280)

The first meeting of the Board of Supervisors was held at the court-house in Elkader, Jan. 7, 1861. It was temporarily organized by calling Frank Smith, of Clayton Township, to the chair, and electing Robert Grant, of Mendon Township, Clerk pro tem. The roll being called, the following names appeared, and qualified as members of the board:

Sperry, A. Bevins
Grand Meadow, P.G. Bailey
Farmersburg, O.W. Crary
Cass, S.G. Chase
Lodomillo, D.W. Chase
Giard, Daniel Dougherty
Mallory, R.B. Flenniken
Volga, Martin Garber
Mendon, Robert Grant
Read, L.R. Gilbert
Millville, Phillip Hunter

Boardman, Buel Knapp
Highland, Daniel Lowe
Marion, Peter N. Lowe
Garnavillo, John C. Mohrmann
Wagner, Ezra Monlux
Monona, P.P. Olmstead
Cox Creek, G.S. Peck
Elk, G.W. Porter
Clayton, Frank Smith
Buena Vista, W. Stoddard
Jefferson, Ebenezer Wood

D.W. Chase was elected Chairman.

The first business of the board after organization was to authorize the building of a bridge across Turkey River at Elkader, and then to appropriate $300 toward the building of a bridge across the Volga River, on the road from Strawberry Point to Elkader.

At the June term of the board, an order was made appropriating $800 to each company of 100 men enlisting in the war for the suppression of the Rebellion. See chapter on War.

At the January term, 1862, the following named new members appeared and took their seat:

Lodomillo, James Newberry
Volga, M. Garber
Read, S.R. Gilbert
Millville, W.W. Gilmore

Boardman, Buel Knapp
Wagner, Ezra Monlux
Cox Creek, H.M. Jones
Jefferson, George Falkenhainer

Martin Garber was elected Chairman for the year 1862.

At the January term the board decided to dispense with the poor house and appointed J.C. Mohrmann, R.R. Read and D.G. Rogers to take charge of the same, and to lease it to some responsible party.

At the June term, 1862, the board passed the following resolution.
"Resolved, that the sum of $2,000 be appropriated by this board out of any money in the county treasury not otherwise appropriated, for the purpose of erecting a county jail at Elkader, provided that the citizens of Elkader shall donate to the county an equal amount in cash, or its equivalent, for that purpose; also a suitable and desirable site for the same."

Buell Knapp, O.W. Crary and Ezra Monlux were appointed a committee to let the contract for building the jail when the citizens of Elkader complied with the conditions mentioned in the resolution.

At the same term the following resolution was adopted:
"Resolved, that $2,000 be appropriated for the erection of a suitable building for the treasurer and recorder and other county officers in the town of Elkader, provided a site for said building and the sum of $1,000 or more are appropriated by the citizens of Elkader for erection of same; also, provided the citizens of Elkader donate to the county eight suitable lots for the erection of county buildings."

Frank Smith, Martin Garber and Buell Knapp were appointed a committee to contract for the erection of a suitable building according to the foregoing resolution.

The board at the same term passed the following resolution:
"Resolved, by the board that $2,000 be and the same is hereby appropriated out of any money in the county treasury not otherwise appropriated, for the purpose of building a room suitable for holding the District Court, and that S.G. Chase, P.P. Olmstead and R.B. Flenniken are hereby authorized to expend said appropriation for that purpose, when $1,000 shall be raised by private subscription."

At the January term, 1864, a petition was presented praying the board to order a vote taken at the next general election for or against removing the county seat from Elkader to McGregor. The petition was referred to a committee consisting of James Schroeder, M. O'Brien and R.C. Place, who reported in favor of granting the prayer of the petitioners -- 2,132 in number. The board therefore ordered the vote to be taken.

At the general election in November of this year the vote was taken and Elkader was victorious.

The following named comprise the supervisors elected for the years named, from 1863 to 1870 inclusive, it being understood each person was elected and served a term of two years:

1863
Mendon, Willis Drummond
Garnavillo, B.F. Schroeder
Highland, John Paddleford
Cass, L.F. Carrier
Mallory, J.W. Bowman
Monona, Wm. S. Scott
Cox Creek, John Peters
Giard, Daniel Dougherty
Sperry, Henry White
Marion, P.M. Lown
Elk, Elias Hall

1867
Cass, Gilbert Cooley
Elk, Philip Fishel
Mallory, J. Gehen
Highland, John Keeling
Mendon, M. O'Brien
Monona, P.P. Olmstead
Clayton, S.L. Peck
Marion, J.C. Rounds
Giard, James Tapper
Buena Vista, L.E. Tucker
Sperry, Henry White
Garnavillo, G.W. Beach

1864
Lodomillo, D.W. Chase
Read, L.R. Gilbert
Wagner, Ezra Monlux
Cox Creek, G.L. Gifford
Jefferson, James Schroeder
Millville, P.C. Parke
Grand Meadow, P.G. Bailey
Boardman, R.C. Place
Buena Vista, R. Menth
Volga, J. Vanus
Farmersburg, Thos. D. White


1868
Boardman, R.C. Place
Farmersburg, C.F. Hall
Lodomillo, Richard Edmonds
Millville, William Blake
Jefferson, James Schroeder
Read, Michael Uriell
Grand Meadow, H.S. Humphrey
Volga, John Garber
Wagner, R.L. Knight
Cox Creek, Charles Wentzell


1865
Mallory, Philip Hansel
Monona, P.P. Olmstead
Elk, Elias Hall
Mendon, M. O'Brien
Highland, O.R. Paige
Marion, J.C. Rounds
GArnavillo, B.F. Schroeder
Sperry, Oliver Sanford
Giard, James Tapper
Cass, O.H. Sherwood
Clayton, Frank Larrabee


1869
Garnavillo, G.W. Beach
Mallory, J.H. Bowman
Highland, Michael Callaghan
Elk, Elijah Gates
Giard, L.R. Gilbert
Sperry, A.T. Lawrence
Monona, Luther Nichols
Mendon, Amos Pearsall
Clayton, S.L. Peck
Marion, J.C. Rounds
Cass, H.B. Taylor


1866
Monona, Elijah Boley
Grand Meadow, P.G. Bailey
Cass, L.F. Carrier
Buena Vista, B. Chanvet
Lodomillo, D.W. Chase
Volga, P. Costigan
Read, L.R. Gilbert
Cox Creek, C. Wentzell
Wagner, Ezra Monlux
Millville, P.C. Parke
Boardman, R.C Place
Jefferson, James Schroeder
Farmersburg, Thos. D. White


1870
Millville, William Blake
Volga, Michael Eberhard
Wagner, G.A. Gooding
Jefferson, C.P. Goodrich
Farmersburg, C.F Hall
Buena Vista, C.L. Hoffman
Grand Meadow, H.S. Humphrey
Lodomillo, James Newberry
Cox Creek, Fred Peick
Boardman, R.C. Place
Read, M. Uriell

In 1870 the law was changed, reducing the number of supervisors to three for the entire county. The following comprises the list to date:

1871 -- O.W. Crary, P.P. Olmstead and Michael Uriell
1872 -- P.P. Olmstead, Michael Uriell and Gilbert Cooley
1873 -- Michael Uriell, Gilbert Cooley and P.P. Olmstead
1874 -- Gilbert Cooley, P.P. Olmstead and Michael Uriell
1875 -- P.P. Olmstead, Michael Uriell and William Thoma
1876 -- Michael Uriell, William Thoma and Isaac Otis. (William Thoma died in this year and P.P. Olmstead was appointed by the County Clerk, Auditor and Recorder to fill the vacancy.)
1877 -- P.P. Olmstead, Isaac Otis and Andrew Eberhard
1878 -- Isaac Otis, Andrew Eberhard and P.P. Olmstead
1879 -- Andrew Eberhard, P.P. Olmstead and G.H. Scofield
1880 -- P.P. Olmstead, G.H. Scofield and Helmuth Brandt
1881 -- G.H. Scofield, Helmuth Brandt and A.F. Nichols
1882 -- Helmuth Brandt, A.F. Nichols and G.H. Scofield.


-transcribed by Sharyl Ferrall
-source: History of Clayton County, Iowa, 1882, Chicago: Inter-State Publishing Co., 1882. Reproduced by the sponsorship of the Monona Historical Society, Monona, Iowa, reproduction Evansville, Indiana: Unigraphics, Inc., 1975;
pages 264-280.

 

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