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Transcribed for the internet by MaryAlice Schwanke

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RECOLLECTIONS OF FIELD SERVICE

WITH THE

TWENTIETH IOWA INFANTRY VOLUNTEERS;

OR,

WHAT I SAW IN THE ARMY;



- EMBRACING ACCOUNTS OF -

MARCHES, BATTLES, SIEGES AND SKIRMISHES, IN

MISSOURI, ARKANSAS, MISSISSIPPI, LOUISIANA,

ALABAMA, FLORIDA, TEXAS, AND ALONG THE

NORTHERN BORDER OF MEXICO.

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BY CAPT. C. BARNEY

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DAVENPORT:

PRINTED FOR THE AUTHOR AT THE GAZETTE JOB ROOMS

1865



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Copyright secured according to Law

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PREFACE

The war has ended! Pleasant words to all. Again as one Nation – one and inseparable – will we continue to flourish, growing in prosperity and strength, until all crowned nations, whether empires, kingdoms, principalities or dukedoms shall acknowledge that a Republican form of government, fostered by the great principles of Liberty, Equality and Justice, is ever destined to thrive until it can never, never be dissolved.

Now that the din of war has ceased and the smoke of battle cleared away, it is not inappropriate that brief sketches or histories of the doings and exploits of the various regimental organizations which formed the component parts of the Great Army of Freedom be given. The author of this small work having been a member of the Twentieth Iowa Infantry Regiment, and participated in most of the marches, travels, skirmishes, battles, sieges and charges in which it took part during three years of service, has deemed that a record of such would prove of interest not only to those who were there, but their friends now and in the future. With this view he has carefully

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prepared the “RECOLLECTIONS OF FIELD SERVICE,” confining himself to actual occurrences and noteworthy incidents faithfully described, preferring solid facts and realities to embellished fiction.

While accomplishing what is chronicled in these pages the regiment naturally met with some sad losses. Many an honored member of its ranks at the organization now sleeps the sleep that knows no waking. They fell, martyrs for their country's sake, bravely sustaining the dear old flag that now again so proudly floats over every State in the Union. Dropping a sympathetic tear to their sacred memory, let us remember that “they live in Fame though not in life.”

I now therefore give these pages to the public, trusting they will meet the approbation of all. Having been written in part amid the scenes they imperfectly describe, some faults may be observed, but as the writer disclaims all pretensions to a “high style” of authorship, he hopes his friends will overlook them.

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INDEX

Preface

CHAPTER I

The War – Organization of the Regiment – Its Composition – Mustering In - “Red Tape” - Flag Presentation – Order to March – Arrival at Camp Herron -Bounty – Men on a “Rampage” in Davenport – Embarkation for St. Louis - Incidents on the way – Benton Barracks – Venders of “Pi-zan-Cakes” - Orderedto Rolla

CHAPTER II

Missouri and the Rebellion – The Pacific Railroad – Rolla and its Surroundings - Catching Mules – Ordered to Springfield – On the March – Arrival at the Little Piney – Confiscating Rebel Beef – Receive our Tents, and learn the mystery of making “Slap-Jacks” - Waynesville – Crossing the Gasconade River – March to Lebanon – Gen. F. J. Herron – Mill Springs – Arrival at Springfield

CHAPTER III

General Appearance of Springfield – Brigade Formed – Gen. Totten – A Rough “Joke” - On the March – Camp “Mush” - “Fac-Simile” Currency - “Guss” a Financier – March to Mt. Vernon – Exciting Rumors – A Night March – Battle of Newtonia – Arrive too Late – Incidents of the Battle – March to Gadfly and stick fast in the Mud – Incidents of a Rainy Night – Morning and Breakfast - March to Cassville

CHAPTER IV

Cassville – The State Election – March to Pea Ridge – Excitement and a Night March – Turnips vs Orders – Find the Rebel Camp but not the Rebels – Mysterious Movements – Another Night March – Stealing a quilt – Gallantry of an Officer – Mudtown and Croos-Hollows – Osage Springs – Unofficial Account of the Campaign

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CHAPTER V

Another Night March – Fayetteville Occupied – Disappointment - “Jayhawking” a Neccessity – Pillaging – Inexplicable Conduct of our Commanders – Sudden Evacuation of the Place – Our Sick Abandoned, who fall into the hands of the Rebels – Return to Missouri – Keithsville Burned – March to Marionsville

CHAPTER VI

Marionsville – Its Characteristics – Hardships Endured by a Loyal Family - A Forced March – Battle Ground of Wilson's Creek – Continue the March - “Violation of Orders” - Men fall exhausted by the roadside – Arrive at Ozark – Why the March was made

CHAPTER VII

Another Rumor and Another March – Go to Finley, when another Rumor brings us back – Bivouack in the Mud – The Chaplain turns “Jayhawker” - “Guss” gets Poisoned – March to Camp Lyon – A Change of Commanders – Thanksgiving Day – Ordered to Arkansas – A Forched March of One Hundred and Twelve Miles in Three Days

CHAPTER VIII

The First Alarm – Approaching the Battle Field – Confusion of Wagon Trains - Panic among the Arkansas Cavalry – Getting into Position – Feeling the Enemy – Battle of Prairie Grove – Disasters on the Left – Charge of the 20th Iowa – Terrible Artillery Firing – Critical Situation – Arrival of Blunt – Night and Victory – The Day after the Battle – Rebel Hospitals – Wounded Men eaten by Hogs – Burying our Dead

CHAPTER IX

Pursue the Enemy across Boston Mountains – Capture of Steamboats and Supplies – Van Buren – Property Destroyed – Arrival of Gen. Schofield – Return March – Withdrawal from Arkansas – On Recruiting Service – Journey Home-ward – Battle of Springfield – Presentation of a new Flag by the Ladies of Davenport – Rejoin the Regiment at St Louis – Promotions and Changes

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CHAPTER X

Movements of the Regiment during the months of January, February, March and April – Arrival in St. Louis – The Army Reviewed by Gen. Curtis – Remove to Pilot Knob – Draw Shelter Tents – Dissatisfaction with them – March to St. Genevieve – Embark for Vicksburg – Condition of Troops on board a Transport - Voyage down the River and arrival at Young's Point

CHAPTER XI

Operations previous to our Arrival – Cross the river at Warrenton – Take our position with the Besieging Forces – On duty in the Rifle Pits – Unsuccessful Assault by the Seventeenth Corps – Capitulation of the Garrison – Terms of Surrender – Entering the Works – Appearance of the City – Mule Meat – Fourth of July Celebration – Hunting a Camp

CHAPTER XII

Embark on board Transports for Port Hudson – Order changed, and we go on an Expedition to Yazoo City – Capture of that place – Loss of the Gunboat De Kalb – Ordered to co-operate with Sherman against Jackson – March to Black River and Canton – Gen. Sherman's movements against Johnston, and capture of Jackson – Return to Yazoo City, and Voyage to Vicksburg – A great haul of Contrabands and Cotton

CHAPTER XIII

Remove to Port Hudson – Increase of Sickness – Appearance of the Fortifications – The 19th Army Corps and the Negroes – Voyage to Carrollton – Beset by peddlers, and what we did about it – New Orleans – Salutary effects of Gen. Butler's rule in the city – How he administered Martial Law – Incident of the slave market – Major-General N. P. Banks – The Labor System and the Negros – Expedition to Morganzia – Capture of Lieutenant – Colonel J B Leake and his Command by the Rebels – Return of the division to New Orleans

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CHAPTER XIV

Expedition to the Coast of Texas – A Storm at Sea – Arrival at Brazos de Santiago – In mistake we Shell the Mexican town of Bagdad – Disembark at Point Isabel – Men Drowned – Revolutions at Matamoras – Expedition and capture of the Works on Mustang Island – On detached service – Expedition and capture of Madisonville – Activity of Cotton Speculators – Gen. Banks' Red River Expedition – Disasters caused by Cavalry blunders and cotton dealers – Failure of the campaign – Return of Gen. Banks

CHAPTER XV

Rejoin the Regiment at Mustang Island – Resignation of Major William G. Thompson – Scouting Expedition on the coast – Capture the commander of a Blockade Runner – Out in a storm – Expedition of Lamar and St. Marys – Capture of a Rebel Gunboat officer, a schooner and a town – Refugees, and some of their characteristics

CHAPTER XVI

Ordered to Brownsville – Evacuation of the Island – On the way – The Rio Grande River – Character of the Inhabitants on its Banks – Arrival at Browns-ville – On duty there – Alarms and Skirmishing – Forts Armstrong and Brown – Fourth of July – Evacuation of Brownsville and voyage to New Orleans

CHAPTER XVII

Re-embark for Mobile Bay – Capture of Fort Gaines – Fort Powell blown up by the Enemy – Our Fleet passing the Forts – Capture of the Rebel Ram Tennessee – Siege of Fort Morgan – Bombardment – The Fort on Fire – Its Surrender

CHAPTER XVIII

Return to New Orleans – Ordered to Morganzia – Expedition to Simmsport – Skirmishing with Guerrillas, and Burning of Simmsport – Return to Morganzia, and embark for White River – Arrival at Duval's Bluff

CHAPTER XIX

Voyage to Pensacola, Florida – Operations against Mobile - “Poor White Trash” - Assault and capture of Fort Blakely – Occupation of Mobile by our forces – On duty as Provost Guard – Promotions and changes – Mustered out – Return home – Conclusion