Obituaries
submitted by: Julia Johnson - julia.johnson63@gmail.com
 

[ADAMS, EDDIE, - 1901]
Bedford Free Press (Bedford, Iowa), Thursday, January 10, 1901
A Sudden Death
Word reaches us of the death of Eddie, the three-year-old son of Mr. and Mrs. Albert Adams, at Platteville, which occurred last Friday. The little fellow was sick only a few hours with what the doctors pronounced heart disease, when his spirit returned to God who gave it. The funeral sermon was preached Sunday by the M. E. minister at Blockton. Interment in Platteville cemetery.

[ALDRICH, W. H., -1900]
Bedford Free Press (Bedford, Iowa), Thursday, March 1, 1900
--Word has reached us of the death of W. H. Aldrich in Chicago from heart disease. Deceased was a cousin of Frank and Dr. M. B. Dunning of Bedford.

[ALLCOTT, H. LIDA]
Bedford Free Press (Bedford, Iowa), Thursday, March 2, 1899
Passed Away
By telephone we learn that Miss Lida Allcott died at her home in Ottumwa Monday morning, aged 20 years, 10 months and 5 days, her death resulting from pneumonia. She was well known in Bedford, having resided in Jackson township for a number of years.

[ANDREWS, LAURA EATON]
Bedford Free Press (Bedford, Iowa), Thursday, February 15, 1900
BLOCKTON – Mrs. Andrews, wife of Dr. Fred Andrews, died at Eustis, Nebraska Friday evening. The remains were brought here and buried. Many old friends from adjoining towns were present notwithstanding the inclement weather.

[BROCK, ALICE]
Bedford Free Press (Bedford, Iowa), Thursday, May 4, 1899
Formerly of Bedford
Miss Alice Brock was born in Bedford, April 19, 1880 and died at Akron, Ohio, April 25, 1899. She was a young lady of high attainments and a liberal education, and her bright prospects and hopes were doomed to an early ending. She was the niece of Mrs. Harve Garner of Bedford.

[BROWN, STILLMAN D. "STILL"]
Bedford Free Press (Bedford, Iowa), Thursday, October 18, 1900
An Old Pioneer Passed Away
Still D. Brown, one of the oldest and most respected of Taylor county's old pioneers, died at his home near Ladoga Sunday afternoon, October 14, at 1:30 o'clock, at the age of nearly 66 years. The funeral exercises were conducted at the home by Rev. Marshall, of Gravity. Interment in Clearfield cemetery.
[Note: He is buried in Clarinda Cemetery, Clarinda, Page County, Iowa, not Clearfield, as stated in the death notice.]

[BROWNING, WILLIAM "WILLIE," JR., 1885 - 1900]
Bedford Free Press (Bedford, Iowa), Thursday, March 8, 1900
Boy Killed at New Market
NEW MARKET, March 1, 1900. – Our town was startled Thursday morning about 11 o'clock with the report that Willie Browning was killed. It seemed from the report of Hugh McAnany, who was at work with him in the new shaft, that the top man said that he could not hoist any more dirt until the pulley was fixed, as it was not safe. Willie said he would go up and go to town and get a new pulley. Mr. McAnany said, "No, don't you do it; if it is not safe to hoist dirt it won't hold you." But the boy went and when within ten feet of the top the pulley gave way which let out the slack in the rope and in some way the boy fell out of the bucket, falling 90 to 100 feet and striking on his head. Mr. McAnany, from the bottom of the shaft, saw the accident and said the boy groaned but twice after he struck the bottom. Willie was a good, steady and hardworking boy and his untimely death is a great shock to the community. He was converted at the late revival meetings in the M. E. church and with many others joined the church. The bereaved family have the sympathy of the community in this their great sorrow.

[BROWNING, WILLIAM "WILLIE," JR., 1885 - 1900]
Bedford Free Press (Bedford, Iowa), Thursday, March 15, 1900
Held an Inquest
At an inquest held at New Market on Friday, March 9, 1900, by the county coroner to investigate the causes leading to the death of Wm. Browning, Jr., deceased, mention of which was made last week, the following verdict was returned:
The said jurors upon their oaths do say that said person came to his death on March 1, 1900, while at work in his father's coal mine, by falling from bucket while being hoisted from shaft and that his death was an unavoidable accident and we exonerate all persons connected with the coal works from felonious connections with it.   John L. Bunker, Jonas Williams, J. S. Harris} Jurors
M. B. Dunning, Coroner

[BUNDERMAN, JOHN'S CHILD, - 1899]
Bedford Free Press (Bedford, Iowa), Thursday, November 30, 1899
HOLT – There was a sad and fatal accident occurred in the northeast part of this township last Friday evening. One of John Bunderman's boys accidentally stuck a pitchfork tine into the eye of his small brother, the tine penetrated the brain. The little fellow lingered until 2 o'clock next morning and then passed away. His remains were interred in the Lenox cemetery on last Sunday. The family have the sympathy of the entire community.




[CANNON, ALVA, 1900 – 1900]
Bedford Free Press (Bedford, Iowa), Thursday, April 19, 1900
Gone to Join the Angels
Last Friday the spirit of Alva, the 3 weeks old babe of Mr. and Mrs. Jno. Cannon, one mile east of town, left its tenement of clay and soared aloft to the God who gave it, where sickness and death are not known. The funeral services were conducted at the home at 11 o'clock Saturday by Elder J. W. Walters. The little body was laid to rest in the Bedford cemetery.

[CARSON, JAMES F.'S INFANT – 1899]
Bedford Free Press (Bedford, Iowa), Thursday, February 2, 1899
Gone to Eternal Rest
Last Thursday afternoon at 2 o'clock the spirit of the darling four months old babe of Mr. and Mrs. J. [ames] F. Carson left its tenement of clay and winged its happy flight back to God who gave it. The funeral exercises were conducted by Rev. Ware at the family residence, after which the little body was laid to rest to await the resurrection morn.

[CLAWSON, DAVID F.]
Bedford Free Press (Bedford, Iowa), Thursday, April 20, 1899
David Clawson Dead
At the home of his daughter, Mrs. A. J. Fertig, Benton, Iowa, on Wednesday, April 12, occurred the death of David F. Clawson, aged 70 years, 9 months and 8 days. The funeral occurred on Thursday after which the body was laid to rest in Bethel cemetery.
David Clawson was born in Indiana, July 4, 1828. About two years ago he suffered a severe attack of paralysis from which he never fully recovered. The third attack brought him to his death.
His daughter, Mrs. John Hindman of Bedford and son Lon, of Siam, attended the funeral.

[COLLINS, DENCY KELLOGG]
Bedford Free Press (Bedford, Iowa), Thursday, May 17, 1900
A Sad and Sudden Death at Blockton
Blockton mourns the death of one of its best and most warm-hearted citizens. Friday, May 4, Mrs. I. W. Collins went to St. Joseph to have a difficult and exceedingly dangerous surgical operation performed. She had suffered for a number of years from a complicated disease of the womb and everything was resorted to that skill and money could afford for her relief but to no avail, until an operation was finally decided upon as a last resort. She went to St. Joseph, outwardly appearing in ordinary health and submitted to the surgeon's knife. Alas! The worst fears of all were realized. The operation was performed by Dr. Jacob Geiger Tuesday afternoon from the effects of which she never fully rallied and was the direct, immediate cause of her death, she passing away Wednesday night.
Deceased was the beloved wife of I. W. Collins of Blockton She was a woman possessed with many amiable qualities and noble impulses, a generous disposition and a Christian spirit and had a large number of warm friends who feel almost prostrated over her untimely demise. Her husband is left alone, no children having been born to them. He is a brother to Rev. A. H. Collins, pastor of the M. E. church at Bedford. The bereaved ones have the sympathy of a large number of friends. The funeral occurred at Kirksville, Mo.



[CONE, MARY ELIZABETH WALLACE]
Axtell Anchor (Axtell, Kansas), Friday, January 27, 1899
In memory of our departed friend
Mary Eliza Cone was born near the city of Moberly, Mo., on the 30th day of March, A. D. 1840 and died at Asheville, N. C., Jan. 20, 1899. Her maiden name was Wallace. She was the youngest of a family of nine children—three girls and six boys. She was married to our friend, M. [organ] H. Cone, on the 19th day of October 1863, at Bedford, Iowa and during all the years of her wedded life she was a kind, affectionate and loving wife, her home being one of the happiest and all who entered there received a hearty welcome and her sweet presence will be greatly missed by all who knew her. She has gone to her silent rest full of years and noble deeds, honored and loved by many of the noblest and best of all nature's handiwork. . . [Rest of memories not transcribed.]

[CONE, MARY ELIZABETH WALLACE]
Bedford Free Press (Bedford, Iowa), Thursday, February 2, 1899
---G. [eorge] W. [ashington] Wallace and wife, Isaac Wallace and Mrs. Della Westfall were called to Axtell, Kansas last week by the death of Mrs. Mary E. [lizabeth] Cone, sister of the Messrs. Wallace. She died at Ashville, N. C., where she had gone for her health. The remains were taken back to Axtell for burial.

[CORSON, REBECCA "BECCA"]
Bedford Free Press (Bedford, Iowa), Thursday, September 13, 1900
Monday morning George Crum received a message stating that his wife's sister, Mrs. Rebecca Carson [Corson], was killed Sunday at Ashland, Ill., by being run over by the cars. Mr. Crum left at once for that point.

[CORSON, REBECCA "BECCA"]
Bedford Free Press (Bedford, Iowa), Thursday, September 20, 1900
Thrown From Buggy and Killed
A distressing accident occurred about a mile north of Ashland at an early hour Sunday morning. A Chicago & Alton passenger train, due at Ashland at 9:30 o'clock, crashed into a buggy in which Rebecca and Rupert Corson were riding and the former was instantly killed. Her brother sustained injuries that will likely prove fatal.
The young people were on their way to Ashland to attend Sunday school when the accident happened. As they approached the railroad crossing, the young people listened for trains, but hearing no sounds, proceeded to cross the track. As the buggy reached the track the train was seen coming at a high rate of speed some distance away. The occupants endeavored to hurry the horse across the tracks, but it became frightened and making a sharp turn, started down the tracks in the direction from which the train was coming. Before the young people could jump the train was upon them.
Miss Corson was thrown high in the air and her neck was broken by the fall. She also sustained a fracture of one arm and an ugly wound was inflicted on the left temple. When the train was stopped, and the crew went back, the girl was dead. Her brother was hurled over a fence, 35 feet from the track. He sustained injuries about the head and body and was internally injured.
The dead girl and injured boy were taken to Ashland on the train. Medical aid was summoned for the lad and all through the day physicians were at his side. Sunday night he was removed to his home.
Rebecca Corson and Rupert Corson, Jr., are the children of Rupert Corson, a prominent farmer living about three miles from Ashland. The girl was 21 years old and her brother was several years younger.
Dr. Burnham of this city was summoned to see young Corson and does not believe that his injuries are serious.
The funeral of Miss Corson will be held Tuesday afternoon at the Bethel church in Ashland. —Springfield State Register. These people referred to above are relatives of J. R. Crum of Bedford.

[COTTER, EDMOND J., SR., 1812 – 1899]
Bedford Free Press (Bedford, Iowa), Thursday, May 18, 1899
HOLT – Died, at the residence of his son, E. J. Cotter, on Thursday, May 11, Edmond Cotter. He was born in the county of Cork, Ireland, January 15, 1812. He came to America in 1833 and settled in Franklin county, New York, resided there until 1866, when he moved to Dubuque county, Iowa and to Taylor county in 1873, where he has resided ever since. He was married in 1843 to Miss Ellen Scanlan, who died January 15, 1886. Mr. Cotter leaves three sons and two daughters—G. [arrett] W. [illiam], J. [ohn] J. [oseph], E. [dmond] J. and Miss Maggie, of this place and Miss Mary of St. Louis. He was of a kind, unassuming disposition, a friend of all and an enemy of none. His remains were taken to Corning for burial followed by a large concourse of his neighbors. The burial services were held in the Catholic church by Rev. Father Sheridan and the remains interred in the Catholic cemetery.

[COTTER, EDMOND J., SR., 1812 – 1899]
Adams County Free Press (Corning, Iowa), Thursday, May 18, 1899
Edwin Cotter, Sr., died at his home near Holt Center on last Thursday at about 2 o'clock in the afternoon, at the age of 87 years. His death was due to old age entirely, we believe. For about twenty-five years Mr. Cotter has lived in the township where he died, and up to a few months before his death, was unusually strong for one of his advanced years. His mental faculties were entirely unimpaired up to his death. A family of five grown children mourn his loss, his aged wife having died about eight years ago. A large procession accompanied the remains to Corning where funeral services were held in the Catholic church, and the remains consigned to their last earthly resting place in the Catholic cemetery. One of nature's noblemen, an honest upright man, has gone to rest.

[COULTER, JOHN, - 1899]
Bedford Free Press (Bedford, Iowa), Thursday, September 28, 1899
HOLT – John Coulter, an old resident of this twp., but more recently of Corning, died very suddenly at the residence of his son-in-law, Arthur Leonard, on last Thursday morning. Mr. Coulter had come out here to do some work on his farm on Wednesday and was taken ill that evening and died next morning at 8 o'clock. His remains were interred in the Corning cemetery on Saturday.

[COULTER, JOHN]
Adams County Union-Republican (Corning, Iowa), Thursday, September 28, 1899
Obituary – Death's last call came very suddenly to John Coulter last Thursday morning at the home of his daughter, Mrs. Arthur Leonard, in Taylor county. After an active life, being a hard and thorough worker, he has finished at last. Mr. Coulter, hale and hearty, came from Ireland with his young wife some thirty years ago and began life's battles in America with a brawny arm and a strong heart ready to surmount all obstacles. He always had a cheerful word for all. Mr. Coulter was sixty-six years of age and leaves a wife, two sons, Charles and Robert, also two daughters, Mrs. Arthur Leonard and Mrs. Charles Preston, who reside near Corning. Death was caused by an attack of cholera morbus. After years of pleasant acquaintance, it became the duty of Rev. A. Y. Cupp to preach the funeral sermon at the Christian church in this city last Saturday, after which the remains were laid to rest in the Walnut Grove cemetery. The funeral was a very large one, Mr. Coulter having lived a great many years in this community.

[COULTER, MARGARET ANN MORROW]
Adams County Union-Republican (Corning, Iowa), Wednesday, February 21, 1906
Obituary – Mrs. Margaret Coulter died at the home of her daughter, Mrs. Charles Preston, Wednesday evening, February 14, 1906, after an illness of some weeks. Funeral services were held at the Church of Christ in Corning Friday at 1 p. m., conducted by her pastor, Rev. J. W. Ackley. The body was laid to rest beside that of her husband in Walnut Grove cemetery.
Deceased was born September 21, 1833, in County Claire [Clare], Ireland, and while a small child moved with her parents to Scotland. In the year 1856 she was married to John Coulter and they came to America in 1863, locating near LaSalle, Illinois. The family moved to Taylor county, Iowa, in 1873. Of the eight children born to them, four are living: Mrs. Chas. Preston, Mrs. Arthur Leonard and Robt. J. and Chas. E. Coulter. The husband died September 21, 1899. Mrs. Coulter was a faithful member of the Fairview Christian church. Her age was 72 years, 4 months and 23 days. A noble woman is gone. The mourning friends have the sympathy of all.

[DERRICKSON, JOHN E., 1878 - 1899]
Bedford Free Press (Bedford, Iowa), Thursday, December 28, 1899
A Young Man Dies
Wednesday, December 27, at 1 o'clock p. m., occurred the death of John, son of Mr. and Mrs. K. E. Derrickson, aged 21 years. John had suffered for some time with cancer, the cause of his death. We are told he died relying on the blessed promises of his dear Savior. The funeral will be conducted tomorrow at 11 o'clock by Rev. Collins. Interment in Bedford cemetery.

[EDWARDS, CAROLINE "CARRIE" HAY MORGAN]
Bedford Free Press (Bedford, Iowa), Thursday, June 7, 1900
She Hung Herself in the Coal Shed
Mrs. Carrie Edwards Committed Suicide at Her Home in Lenox by Hanging Herself. –Left a Letter
Yesterday morning Dr. M. B. Dunning, coroner, received a telephone message to go to Lenox to hold an inquest over the body of Mrs. Carrie Edwards, who had committed suicide by hanging. The coroner at once responded.
The particulars, as we understand them, are as follows: In 1891 Caroline Hay married Arthur Morgan, who is now dead. In 1897 she married John Edwards, who clerks in a hardware store at Lenox. Ever since this latter marriage she has been having trouble and she and her husband have separated several times. A little over a week ago she ran her husband out of the house with a hatchet and has since lived alone with her youngest girl. Yesterday morning the child came out of the house and told the neighbors that her mother was gone and that she had no breakfast. Deputy sheriff called at the house and upon investigation found the woman hanging by a rope in the coal shed, her body cold and stiff. She had driven two spikes in the ceiling and made careful and sure preparations for self-destruction. She made the rope fast around her neck, fastening the other end to the spikes in the ceiling and climbing a step ladder swung herself into eternity. She slowly strangled to death. It seems that she had no special cause to desire death, but the probabilities are that she was mentally deranged. She had been in an insane asylum on two different occasions. She owned her own home and had it well furnished. $9.87 was found in the house.
The Coroner's jury, consisting of J. B. Dunn, G. L. Goodale and S. B. Overmire, returned a verdict in accordance with the above. The following letter was written by the dead woman.
"Decoration eve. Am suffering with a sprained ankle. Am all alone with poor little Georgia. If I should die be sure to give me a decent burial and let Georgia go to her papa if he wants her.
Carrie Edwards
P. S. – There is money in my pocket book in my pattern case up on the north wall in the little bedroom. I have suffered so much in the last year both in mind and in body and I am not able to work and have been mistreated and lied about so much I cannot bear it any longer. I have tried to keep up for my child's sake but feel now that she will be better off without me."

[FARRELL, AMY HOLTON]
Bedford Free Press (Bedford, Iowa), Thursday, December 7, 1899
Mrs. Joshua Farrel Dead
Word reaches us that Mrs. Joshua Farrel whose husband died about two weeks ago, took suddenly ill and died on Monday. Particulars later.

[FARRELL, AMY HOLTON]
Bedford Free Press (Bedford, Iowa), Thursday, December 21, 1899
A Sudden Death
Mrs. Joshua Ferrell Lingers but a Short Time Before Joining Her Husband on the Other Shore
Amy Holton Farrell was born in Pike county, in the state of Ohio, September 1, 1833 and passed away at 5 o'clock a. m., December 4, 1899.
She was 66 years, 3 months and 4 days old. She was united in marriage to Joshua Farrell at the place of her birth on the 22d day of December 1853 and came to Wayne county, Iowa, in 1855 and from thence to Taylor county in 1858 and has resided here continuously since that date.
She was the mother of 9 children, two of whom with the husband and father welcomed her from the dripping waters of the Jordan of death. She left 7 children to mourn her loss, who will ever cherish her memory. They are B. [enjamin] F. [ranklin] Farrell, Ella D. Davison, Nancy M.[ellgonia]  Snodgrass, Elizabeth J. [ane] Thompson, Mary R. [osetta] Lowry, W. [illiam] B.[enner] Farrell and Eva E. Farrell.
Her decease was sudden and unexpected; death came as a thief in the night, but her lamp was trimmed and burning when she heard the bridegroom's voice. Her husband, Joshua, had preceded her to the spirit world just twelve days; it was the longest time they had ever been separated since their marriage; for 46 years they had journeyed hand in hand through this vale of tears and through all the coming cycles of time their bodies will repose side by side in the silent city but their disembodied spirits are now united on the banks of the river of life.
Mrs. Farrell was a Christian. She was converted in her early youth. Her Christian experience was like the Rose of Sharon, blooming in beauty in the spring time of life, a rose that never lost its beauty and sweetness until the king of death had blown his breath upon its petals. She was a member of the M. E. church and what is now the New Market class for 40 years. Through adversity and prosperity, through sickness and through health she was the same modest, meek and unassuming, God loving woman. "O let me live the life of the righteousness that my end may be like hers."

[FARRELL, JOSHUA]
Bedford Free Press (Bedford, Iowa), Thursday, November 30, 1899
Joshua Farrel Dead
One of the Oldest and Most Highly Respected Citizens of Taylor County Passed Away
Joshua Farrel was born in Ross county, Ohio, Aug. 30, 1828 and passed away at his home in New Market, Iowa at 4:15 a. m. on Nov. 21, 1899, aged 71 years, 2 months and 21 days. He was buried in Memory cemetery at noon Nov. 22. His end was peaceful and painless. He retained his mental faculties up to the hour of his decease, recognizing members of his family to the last moment. He was in many respects a remarkable man. In person he was tall and commanding and patriarchal in appearance. He possessed a good English education and was well informed on all the topics of his time as well as in politics and religion and in his younger life was a public speaker of great force and power. He was a farmer by inclination and occupation, believing the life of a farmer to be the true source of wealth, contentment and happiness. He was retiring in disposition, honest, industrious and frugal and dispensed charity where the objects of his bounty were worthy of his beneficence. In politics he was a democrat and the honest candor with which he stated his views won and retained for him the respect of those who differed from him. In religion he was a protestant Methodist, having experienced religion at the early age of nineteen. He first united with that branch of the church but in removing to Iowa in 1858 he and his wife cast their lot with the M. E. church. Through a long business career, when the tide of fortune was against him, the God whom he had acknowledged in his youth never did forsake him. Oft in the still watches of the night, his loved companion heard him call on the Lord for succor in distress. On the bank of the river of death he left a statement of hope and encouragement for his children. He said to his daughter Eva: "Do not weep, all is well with me." This simple yet sublime statement is a tower of strength to the Christian, that time cannot efface.
Joshua Farrel and Amy Holton, who survives him, were married in Pike county, Ohio, Dec. 22, 1853. Nine children were born to them, seven of whom reached the years of maturity. James Jesse died in infancy in 1863. Joshua Adolphus died in 1877, in his seventh year. His remaining children, Benj. F. [ranklin] Farrel, Ella D. Davison, Elizabeth J. [ane] Thompson, Nancy M.[ellgonia] Snodgrass, Mary R.[osetta] Lowry, Wm. B. [enner] Farrel, Eva E. Farrel and his beloved companion, were at his bedside when the death angel came. Joshua Farrel removed from Ohio to Wayne county, Iowa, in 1855, and from thence to Taylor county in 1858 and settled on his farm south of New Market, where he resided continuously for more than 40 years. He possessed the confidence and esteem of all who knew him, and it can be truly said that he lived respected and died lamented. He was made a master mason in Taylor county lodge No. 156 and rose to the degree of R. M. He was greatly attached to the institution. It was his request that after his death a chapter from the bible should be read, a hymn of praise be sung and a prayer offered for the protection and consolation of his family in his home, and that his remains be taken in charge by the Masonic fraternity and interred with the beautiful rites and ceremonies of Masonry. The funeral services at the house were conducted by the Rev. Daniel Pruitt of the M. E. church. Those at the cemetery were conducted by Covenant Lodge No. 453, by master Randolph, of Taylor lodge, No. 156, acting as master of ceremonies. The bereaved family have the sympathy of the entire community in this hour of affliction.
[Note: The last name is spelled Farrell on his headstone.]

 

[FINN, RICHARD D., - 1899]
Bedford Free Press (Bedford, Iowa), Thursday, August 24, 1899
Richard Finn Dead
Richard Finn, of Lenox, died Friday and was buried in the Catholic cemetery at Lenox Saturday. For many years Mr. Finn lived a few miles northeast of here and was well known to many of our readers. He was well respected, economical and industrious, acquiring enough property several years since to quit active labor and at which time he built a comfortable home in Lenox, but retained the farm on which he first settled on coming from Allamakee county about twenty-five years ago. He was upwards of sixty-five years of age and leaves a wife and seven grown up sons and daughters to grieve for the loss of husband and father. – Clearfield Enterprise.

[FREDERICK, ISABELLE "BELLE"]]
Bedford Free Press (Bedford, Iowa), Thursday, April 13, 1899
An Awful Death
Miss Belle Frederick Ground Beneath the Wheels of a Freight Train at Clarinda
Tuesday morning of this week miss Belle Frederick of Corning was crushed to death beneath the wheels of a freight train. She was a delegate to the cabinet meeting of the Epworth league. After alighting from the train at Clarinda, she attempted to pass behind a freight train. Just then the train backed up, knocking the young lady down. The cruel wheels passed over her breast, crushing her into a terrible mass. She died immediately. A special train conveyed her lifeless form back to the home of her widowed mother.
Miss Frederick was the daughter of J. M. Frederick, ex-county treasurer of Adams cunty and was a young lady of high attainments and beloved by all. She was a student in the Corning high school and would have graduated in June.

[FURR, GUY A.]
Bedford Free Press (Bedford, Iowa), Thursday, July 26, 1900
Another Soldier of Old Co. I Killed
Sergeant Guy Furr, Formerly a Member of Co. I, Who Re-enlisted Met Death on the Battle Fields of the Philippines

Word reaches us of the death of Guy Furr, a former member of Co. I of Bedford. He met death facing the foe at Guinobatan, Luzon, June 30. When Co. I returned home, Mr. Furr re-enlisted in the service as sergeant in troop B, 11th cavalry. He was a nephew of J. L. Hall of Bedford, and a former resident of Conway.

[FURR, GUY A.]
Bedford Free Press (Bedford, Iowa), Thursday, August 9, 1900
Official Word Received
We are indebted to Mrs. Jay L. Hall for the following official letter regarding the death of Guy Furr, mention of which has been made in a previous issue of the Free Press. When word first reached here, it was hoped by his friends that the report was untrue. The letter explains itself.
August 4, 1900, Mrs. Jay L. Hall, Bedford, Iowa: In reply to your letter of the 26th, ulto., making inquiry relative to Guy A. Furr, Sergeant Troop B, 11th Cavalry, U. S. Volunteers, this office regrets to state that under date of the 19th ulto., the commanding general cables us that the soldier was killed in action June 30, 1900, at Guinolatan, P. I.
The relatives of the soldiers will no doubt be notified of his death by the commanding officer of the troop by mail. . . .
Very respectfully, Thomas Ward, Assistant Adjutant General

[FURR, GUY A.]
Bedford Free Press (Bedford, Iowa), Thursday, August 16, 1900
A Good Soldier and Christian
In its write up of the obituary of Guy Furr, who was recently killed in the Philippine islands, the Stanberry Sentinel says:
Guy A. Furr is the eldest son of Mr. and Mrs. G. G. Furr, who live in north Stanberry. He was born in Breckenridge, Mo., February 13, 1875. He was not only a soldier of his country but also a soldier of the cross. He was converted when 12 years old, uniting with the Baptist church in this city. He went to Bedford, Iowa, in September 1897 to reside indefinitely and transferred his membership to the Baptist church of that city, where it remained until his death. After going to Manila, he was one of the charter members of the first union organization of Christian soldiers in Manila. The object of this organization was to promote the gospel among the unconverted soldiers and also others who came under their influence.
Guy's confidence in God was unwavering and in writing to his parents, brother and sister, he always assured them that he asked God's blessing on him regularly and especially when he was about to go into an engagement. He assured them that if he should fall in battle, he was ready to go. How many are they that go down without a hope? Guy has heard the hosts of angels praise Him; he has sung with those who have gone before—the songs of redeeming love. He has seen Him as He is. Then can we say, "Lord thy will be done."

[GALLAGER, MARSHALL W., - 1900]
Bedford Free Press (Bedford, Iowa), Thursday, March 15, 1900
Committed Suicide
Not long ago M. [arshall] C. Gallagher committed suicide by hanging himself to the rafters of a sod shanty near McCook, Neb. He was a former well-known citizen of Taylor county, having resided at Lenox, at which place his wife was visiting at the time of his death. He left a note stating he died happy and said the medical fraternity could have his body. Without doubt he was demented.

[GERHART, LYDIA ARMINTHA HAGAN]
Bedford Times-Press (Bedford, Iowa), Thursday, January 18, 1940
E. E. Hagan's Sister Mrs Gerhart Dies
Mrs. Armintha Hagan Gerhart, 84, died at her home in St. Joseph, Mo., Tuesday, Jan. 2. The funeral services were held in St. Joseph the following Thursday afternoon and burial was in the Mt. Moriah cemetery.
Mrs. Gerhart was a former resident of Taylor county, having taught school near Holt in 1873. She is survived by one sister, Mrs. Ida Gelnitz [Geiwitz], with whom she made her home and by one brother, Elmer. E. [llsworth] Hagan of Bedford. Mr. Hagan attended his sister's last rites.

[GIBSON, DAVID, - 1900]
Bedford Free Press (Bedford, Iowa), Thursday, March 15, 1900
E. Gibson Dead
The Free Press made note in its last issue that E. [David] Gibson, father of Mrs. Collins, was very sick at his home in Bloomfield. He died last Friday. Rev. and Mrs. Collins were present at the time of his death.

[GIFFORD, R. G.]
Bedford Free Press (Bedford, Iowa), Thursday, April 20, 1899
Accidental Death
Word was received this morning that R. G. Gifford, an engineer on the Northern Pacific was killed Saturday, being struck on the head by a post while leaning out of his engine. His home was in Livingston, Montana and his wife was Mattie Shoemaker, daughter of A. C. Shoemaker, at one time a resident of Bedford. Mrs. Gifford is the lady that Miss Grace John is now visiting.

[GIFFORD, R. G.]
Bedford Free Press (Bedford, Iowa), Thursday, April 27, 1899
How Engineer Gifford Died
A letter from W. M. Shoemaker at Biggsville, Ill., explains how Engineer Gifford was killed:
Biggsville, Ill., April 23. – Scott Skinner, Creston: My sister, Mrs. Gifford, wishes to inform you of the sad death of her husband, that occurred near Logan, Montana, on April 15. He was on his run near home, when it is supposed he got out on the step to lean out and look back under the tender to see about a hot box that had been giving trouble and as he leaned out his head struck a post that stood near the track and resulted in his instant death. His remains were brought here and laid to rest. Mrs. Gifford and two little daughters, aged two and four, will make their home with her grandmother.

[GILMORE, MARY JANE DIXON]
Bedford Free Press (Bedford, Iowa), Thursday, September 21, 1899
-- Last Thursday Mrs. Node Gilmore also died at her home near Sharpsburg.

[GOLDING, MARY AMANDA]
Bedford Free Press (Bedford, Iowa), Thursday, September 27, 1900
From Earth to Heaven
Wednesday at midnight, September 19, the five months old girl baby of Mr. and Mrs. Ed Golding was transplanted from this world of sorrow and suffering to its home above. Little Mary Amanda was taken sick with cholera infantum Wednesday morning and lingered only a few short hours. The funeral was preached by Elder J. W. Walters, after which the little body was laid to rest in the Bedford cemetery. The bereaved family have the sympathy of their many friends in their hour of affliction.



[HAGAN, HENRY BELL, 1831 - 1873]
Bedford Free Press (Bedford, Iowa), Thursday, January 11, 1900
After Twenty-Seven Years the Body of N. D. Hagan Taken Up After Sleeping in Mother Earth That Long
After lying in the silent tomb for twenty-seven years all that was left of the mortality of N. D. Hagan was brought to the light of day on Friday, January 5, 1900. On June 4, 1873, Mr. Hagan departed this life at his home in Corning, the cause of his death being quick consumption. On June 5 his body was interred in Holt cemetery, five miles north of Gravity. On Friday of last week what remained of the body was exhumed and taken to St. Joseph and interred in Mt. Mora cemetery. At the same time the remains of his wife were placed beside his in the same grave, she having died in Dakota only a short time ago.
It will perhaps be interesting to know the condition of the body after being buried 27 years. Every particle of flesh had "returned to dust from whence it came." The bones were intact, while the clothing was in a fair state of preservation. The goods could readily be recognized as broadcloth. The coffin was badly decayed but held together sufficiently to lift the bones out with. The hair had fallen from the head but was yet well preserved. There was not a particularly offensive odor emanating from the remains. All was placed in a new coffin and is now probably taking its long last sleep until the final resurrection morn.

[HAGAN, MARIAH LOUISA TAYLOR]
St. Joseph Gazette-Herald (St. Joseph, Missouri), Wednesday, November 15, 1899, p. 3
Mrs. George Geiwitz, wife of the well-known South Tenth street druggist, received a telegram yesterday afternoon informing her of the death of her mother, Mrs. M. [ariah] L. [ouisa] Hagan of Dickinson, North Dakota. The remains will probably be brought here for burial. 

[HAGAN, MARIAH LOUISA TAYLOR]
St. Joseph Herald (St. Joseph, Missouri), Friday, November 17, 1899, p. 1
City News
Death of Mrs. M. [ariah] L. [ouisa] Hagan, mother of Mrs. J. [ohn] M. [George] Geiwitz and a cousin of Zachary Taylor.

[HAGAN, MARIAH LOUISA TAYLOR]
St. Joseph Herald (St. Joseph, Missouri), Friday, November 17, 1899, p. 3
Hagan – Mrs. M. [ariah] L. [ouisa] Hagan died at Dickinson, N. D. Remains will arrive here Friday noon and the funeral will take place at the residence of her daughter, Mrs. J. [ohn] G.[eorge] Geiwitz, 1015 Olive street, Saturday afternoon at 2 o'clock.

[HAMILTON, DAVID, 1818 – 1900]
Bedford Free Press (Bedford, Iowa), Thursday, August 16, 1900
An Old Settler Gone
David Hamilton, aged 87 years, died at the home of his son, S. [amuel] D. [avid] Hamilton, in Washington township last Wednesday, August 8, at 11:50 p. m. Mr. Hamilton was one of Taylor county's oldest and most respected citizens. Funeral services were held at the home of S. D. Hamilton, conducted by Rev. Kirkendall of Gravity. The remains were interred in the Gravity cemetery.

[HANFORD, FREDERICK]
Bedford Free Press (Bedford, Iowa), Thursday, April 13, 1899
An Old Settler Passes Away
Sunday, April 9, 1899, at 4:50 p. m., F. [redrick] Hanford died at his residence in this city at the ripe old age of 81 years and 6 months. Mr. Hanford has for a long time been one of the familiar figures in Bedford, having been in the coal business here for a period of 22 years. He was a man universally respected by all who knew him, and his death will be greatly deplored by his many friends and acquaintances. F. Hanford was born in Rochester, N. Y. September 1817. He came to Bedford with his wife twenty-two years ago where they have since resided. He leaves a wife, also a son, who lives in Rochester and a daughter whose home is in Nashville.
The funeral exercises were conducted at the residence Tuesday afternoon at 2 o'clock by Rev. A. H. Collins, assisted by Revs. Walters, Griffith and Cobb. The remains were interred in the Bedford cemetery.
The sympathy of the entire community goes out to the lonely widow in her sad bereavement. May she look to a higher power for consolation.

[HESS, ELIZA SAYLOR BOYD, 1801 - 1900]
Bedford Free Press (Bedford, Iowa), Thursday, March 1, 1900
Revolutionary Daughter
Tuesday J. S. Boyd received a message that his mother, Mrs. Eliza Boyd-Hess, had died at her home in Brecksville, Ohio, at 9 o'clock that day. Mrs. Hess was born April 5, 1801 and was active and healthy up to the time of her death. She was among the last of the revolutionary daughters. Miss Jessie Boyd left yesterday to attend the funeral, being joined at Des Moines by her brother Bruce.

[HOPSON, CHARLES PETER]
Bedford Free Press (Bedford, Iowa), Thursday, September 20, 1900
Death of C. P. Hopson
C. [harles] P.[eter] Hopson, an old citizen, died last evening at 8:30 in his apartments over Dr. Rawls' office of organic heart trouble. The funeral will take place tomorrow forenoon at 10 o'clock at the Methodist church, interment in Graceland. Deceased had been in poor health for several weeks but was able to be about town although not able to work. C. [harles] P. [eter] Hopson was born in New York, Sept. 1, 1835, and moved to Creston in 1883, residing here since that date. He was a painter by trade and was well known by the citizens of Creston. A. A. Hopson and wife of Omaha and J. [ames] E. [lliott] Hopson and wife of Bedford came in today to attend the funeral. A. A. Hopson is a son and J. [ames] E. [lliott] Hopson is a cousin. Miss Tessie Hopson, bookkeeper for the Advertiser, is a granddaughter.

[HOWE, MARY ANN RIGSBY SALEN]
Bedford Free Press (Bedford, Iowa), Thursday, March 16, 1899
Obituary – Mary Ann Rigsby was born in Kentucky, March 1, 1820. She was married to Mr. L.[eget] S. Salen on January 16, 1834. To this union seven children were born, only two of whom remain living: R. [obert] J. [ohnson] Salen, living four miles west of Bedford and Thomas Salen who resides in Colorado. Mr. Salen died March 19, 1853. Mrs. Salen was married to A. [aron] Howe March 11, 1866. Mr. Howe died a few months ago. Now the widow has followed her companion. Her illness was very short—being as well as usual a day or two before she died—March 8, 1899. Mrs. Howe, as well as her husband, was a member of the Bedford Baptist church and lived as far as the writer can learn a consistent Christian life.
The funeral services were held at the home of her son, R. J. Salen, Friday, March 10, at 10:30 a. m. A goodly number of friends and neighbors were present at the services which were conducted by her pastor, Rev. D. W. Griffith. The interment took place at the Bedford cemetery.
"Blessed are the dead who die in the lord. Yea, saith the Spirit, for they rest from their labors and their works do follow them."

[HUNTER, JOHN, 1832 – 1900]
Bedford Free Press (Bedford, Iowa), Thursday, June 21, 1900
Another Old Citizen Passes Away
John Hunter, One of Taylor County's Oldest and Most Respected Citizens, Dies at His Home in Gay Township
Another one of Taylor county's most respected citizens has been called from the cares and toils of earth. John Hunter quietly dropped to sleep at his home in Gay township on Saturday afternoon, June 16, 1900, at 6:10 o'clock.  February 16, 1900, he suffered a stroke of paralysis and on the 18th the second stroke came. He was very low for some time but finally gradually improved, until Monday evening, June 11, when he was taken suddenly worse and slowly weakened until the end came, which was quiet and peaceful. The funeral exercises were conducted at the Gay Center school house on Monday morning at 11 o'clock by Rev. G. W. Maine of Afton and Rev. Carl Brown, Blockton, after which the interment was made in the Platteville cemetery. The funeral was one of the largest ever attended in Taylor county, which demonstrated the high regard, respect, love and veneration in which the deceased was held.
Obituary – John Hunter was born in England April 5, 1832. When 10 years old he came to America, locating in Sangamon county, Ill., where he lived until 1862. March 12, 1862, he was married to Miss Mary J. [ane] Weir. They moved to Christian county, Ill., where they resided until 1873, when they came to Taylor county. Here they have made their home ever since where Mr. Hunter has accumulated quite a competence by industry, economy and honesty. He was always a good neighbor, a kind, considerate, loving father and husband, and had a large circle of true friends. Mr. Hunter leaves a wife and six children to mourn his demise. Mr. and Mrs. Hunter were the parents of eight children as follows: F. [rank] M., Paul, Mrs. Howard Payton, Cora, Charles and Lillie, the three latter being still at home. Eunice died when 15 years old and Hepburn at the age of 1.

[HUNTER, JOHN, 1832 – 1900]
Bedford Free Press (Bedford, Iowa), Thursday, June 21, 1900
PLATTEVILLE – Uncle John Hunter, of Gay, was buried in the Platteville cemetery Monday at one o'clock. It was one of the largest funeral processions that ever passed through the town. Mr. Hunter was an old settler and had a large acquaintance all over the county who were always his friends. He was of a genial, jovial nature, always happy and trying to make others happy around him. To know him was to respect and honor him. He leaves a large family who have the sympathy of the entire community.

[JENKS, MYRON, - 1899]
Bedford Free Press (Bedford, Iowa), Thursday, August 31, 1899
Death at Blockton
Little Myron, the infant son of C. M. Jenks and wife, died at Blockton Monday morning, Aug. 28 at 9 o'clock. The Free Press extends friendly sympathy to the parents in their sad bereavement.

[JOHNSON, RACHEL ASHFORD]
Bedford Free Press (Bedford, Iowa), Thursday, September 6, 1900
Gone to Her Reward
Rachel Ashford was born in Woodford county, Ky., August 9, 1844 and died at her home in Bedford September 1, 1900 at 8:30 p. m. She was married to Elder J. E. Johnson, January 3, 1865. She was a member of the colored Baptist church of this place, having been converted at Hawleyville, Iowa in 1867 and has been a faithful, devoted Christian ever since. "Aunt Rachel," as she was familiarly known, had been a sufferer for a long time. Nine years ago, she began to fail and has with all these years of suffering been patient and a ministering angel to others in affliction. She will be missed not only by her faithful companion but by the entire community. She was a good woman and has gone to her perpetual mansion. The funeral services were held at the Presbyterian church, conducted by Rev. D. W. Griffith of the First Baptist church after which the remains were interred in Fairview cemetery.





[KILFOY, CECIL, 1899-1900]
Bedford Free Press (Bedford, Iowa), Thursday, February 1, 1900
An Infant Dead
Last Saturday the two months old boy of Mr. Kilfoy, six miles east of Bedford, died. The mother was buried only a short time ago. The funeral was preached by Rev. Griffith of Bedford.

[KING, LOUISA WEESE]
Bedford Free Press (Bedford, Iowa), Thursday, June 8, 1899
-- Mrs. W. [illiam] E. [lbert] King, living near Blockton, died at her home last Monday morning. It is stated that during the storm last Sunday afternoon she became so thoroughly frightened that the shock was really the cause of her death. Sunday night she was quite sick but felt better the next morning. With the assistance of Mr. King, she started to walk across the room when she fell dead in her husband's arms. She leaves a large family of children to mourn her sad death. She was a member of the Christian church at Blockton.

[LAFLUER, LUCINDA CARR]
Bedford Free Press (Bedford, Iowa), Thursday, December 21, 1899
Laid to Rest – The death angel has again visited another home in Nodaway township and claimed as its victim Mrs. Lucindia [Lucinda] LaFluer, who suddenly died of apoplexy in Villisca, Iowa, December 8, having gone there that day with her husband to transact business. Soon after their arrival she suddenly became very ill from which condition she never recovered. The remains were taken back to her home, 3 ½ miles southwest of Iveyville and kept till the following Wednesday evening awaiting the arrival of her two daughters, Mrs. Emma Power and Mrs. Hattie Adams, from Minnesota and Missouri. The funeral services were held at the family residence, conducted by W. L. Dunlavy, after which the remains were laid to rest in the Methodist Grove cemetery.
Mrs. LaFluer was born in Lawrence county, N. Y., in April 1836. Six children were born to the happy union—four girls and two boys, one son and one daughter having preceded her to the better land. In 1865, in company with her family she moved to their farm in Nodaway township, where she has since resided. She made a profession of religion and united with the Baptist church about thirty years ago. Five years later she united with the Christian church with which she has been a constant and consistent worker ever since Her presence from the community will be greatly missed and many mourn her departure.

[LEAVENS, GEORGE]
Bedford Free Press (Bedford, Iowa), Thursday, June 1, 1899
Mr. Geo. Leavens died at the home of his parents in Mason Twp., Saturday evening, after a lingering illness. The funeral services were conducted at the residence by Rev. Bunting of New Market. The remains were followed to their last resting place in Memory cemetery by a number of friends and relatives.  [Poem not transcribed.]

[MARTIN, LELAND]
Bedford Free Press (Bedford, Iowa), Thursday, October 11, 1900
At Rest
Died at the home of its parents, Mr. and Mrs. A. [braham] L. [incoln] Martin, near Ladoga Oct. 5, 1900, little Leland, aged 14 months. For about three weeks he had suffered untold agony. All that loving hands and medical aid could do was done but of no avail. Leland was a sweet little child and had come into the home to brighten it, but now he sleeps in Jesus. Our tears flow but we long for that glad day when earthly things have passed away, when God shall wipe away all tears from our eyes and there shall be no more death, neither sorrow nor crying, neither shall there be any more pain.
The funeral took place from the Christian church of Gravity October 6 at 2 p. m. conducted by Rev. Murphy, assisted by Rev. Ruperts and Dunlavy, after which the remains were carried to its last resting place by Kent Wallace, Harley Wallace, Carl Brown and Carl Ledgerwood. He leaves a father, mother, two brothers and three sisters, besides many other relatives and friends to mourn. And when here he was blooming and gay but now he is called for and taken away. Ah! Little did we think he'd be called for so soon, but oh his morning sun had gone down at noon. [Poem not transcribed.]

[MATHEWS, DAVID M., 1857 – 1899]
Bedford Free Press (Bedford, Iowa), Thursday, September 28, 1899
--Word has been received of the death of D. [avid] M. Matthews, a brother of S. J. Matthews of Bedford, at his home in Colorado Springs.
[Note: The last name is spelled Mathews on his headstone.]

[MCALPIN, VESTA AGATHA]
Bedford Free Press (Bedford, Iowa), Thursday, July 12, 1900
--Word has been received of the death of Vesta, the little daughter of Dr. and Mrs. D. E. McAlpin, which occurred on Tuesday.

[MCLEAN, EMMA JEAN FITZGERALD]
Bedford Free Press (Bedford, Iowa), Thursday, April 26, 1900
Mrs. McLain Died
The last issue of the Free Press made mention of John Derrickson and wife being called to Elliot by the illness of Mrs. Derrickson's sister, Mrs. Emma McLain. She died Thursday of last week and was buried in the Clarinda cemetery Friday. Mrs. Derrickson has the sympathy of her Bedford friends.
[Note: The last name is spelled McLean on her headstone.]

[MCFARLAND, EBENEZER "NAZER"]
Bedford Free Press (Bedford, Iowa), Thursday, November 2, 1899, [p. 1]
Obituary - Ebenezer McFarland was born December 21, 1829, near Newark, the county seat of Licking county, Ohio and lived there till manhood. He came to Iowa with his parents in the spring of 1852. Married Elizabeth McFarland June 25, '54. Three children were born to them. The oldest died in infancy and the other two are O. [rlando] H. McFarland and Mrs. Willard Shearer. He leaves his wife, two children and two grandchildren to mourn his loss. He died Oct. 26, 1899, aged 69 years, 10 months and 5 days. On September 24 last he fell in his room and broke his right ankle after which he was confined to his bed. This was the immediate cause of his death, as he had been in poor health all summer and not able to lie down.
Nazer McFarland, as he was familiarly called, was the fifth child of Moses and Sarah McFarland, who came from a sturdy Scotch-Irish stock. Moses was brought up in Pennsylvania and moved to Ohio where he reared his family and then emigrated to Iowa, with a family of eleven children when the country was yet new.
Nazer was a worthy representative of his family and having secured a good education for those days at Janesville, he came to this state well prepared to be one of its strongest citizens, both mentally and physically. He lived on a farm in Page county five miles southwest of Siam, where he nearly always held some office of trust within the gift of his neighbors, besides being called upon to perform services beneficial to individuals and to the public.
In the prime of his life an accident befell him which afflicted him the rest of his life. And this together with his retiring disposition deprived him of a prominence among men and a worldly success which his ability and manly qualities would have forced him into. In the private life he led he was always the same genial, courteous, honorable gentleman, no man could be more so.
Each one of his friends has lost a very dear friend that [was] always worthy of confidence and willing and able to help. He was a member of Plumb lodge A. F. and A. M. He left his family well provided for and went to his last resting place with the respect of all who knew him.

[MCFARLAND, EBENEZER "NAZER"]
Bedford Free Press (Bedford, Iowa), Thursday, November 2, 1899, p. 4
Resolutions of Respect
Died, Ebenezer McFarland, at his residence in Page county, Iowa, October 26, A. D. 1899 at 6 o'clock a. m., aged 69 years, 10 months and 5 days and was buried October 27, in the Shear[er] cemetery by Plumb Lodge No. 285 A. F. and A. M. in accordance with the usages and customs of our ancient craft, of which he was a member.
The following resolutions of respect are in memory of our departed brother: [Resolutions not transcribed.]

[MCGINNIS, JOHN NEWTON]
Bedford Free Press (Bedford, Iowa), Thursday, May 4, 1899
--- The funeral of John McGinnis was held Monday at 2:30 p. m. at the Baptist church, Summit Camp no. 286, Modern Woodmen of America, having charge of the obsequies. Rev. Wm. Pearce, pastor of the church, preached the sermon, full of tenderness to the bereaved ones. The remains were interred in Graceland. – Creston Advertiser. Deceased was a brother of W. C. McGinnis of Bedford.

[MCMAHILL, JOSEPH M, 1898 – 1899]
Bedford Free Press (Bedford, Iowa), Thursday, August 24, 1899
--Joe, the youngest son of H. C. McMahill and wife, died last Saturday.

[MEREDITH, FANNIE MAY]
Bedford Free Press (Bedford, Iowa), Thursday, October 11, 1900
Passed Over the River
Sunday night at 9 o'clock, October 7, the spirit of Fannie May Meredith left its tenement of clay and returned to the God who gave it. Fannie had been sick only a few short weeks. She was taken with a bad cold which developed into quick consumption. She died at the age of 19 years, 9 months and 8 day. The funeral was conducted at the home of her parents, Mr. and Mrs. T.[homas] A. [ddison] Meredith, by Rev. E. N. Ware, on Wednesday afternoon at three o'clock after which the body was laid to rest in Fairview cemetery. The bereaved ones have the sympathy of a large circle of friends.

[MILLER, AGNES MARTINDALE]
Bedford Free Press (Bedford, Iowa), Thursday, October 4, 1900
--S. [hadrach] Weaver and wife, of Miami, I. T., arrived in Taylor county last week to attend the funeral of Mrs. Weaver's mother, Mrs. Agnes Miller, who died at her home near New Market September 25.

[MOODY, MARY B. GILMOUR WILLIAMS]
Bedford Free Press (Bedford, Iowa), Thursday, August 24, 1899
A Shining Light Gone
Mrs. R. M. Moody Called From This Earth to the World Beyond the Sky
Mrs. Mary B Moody was born in Warren county, Illinois, September 29, 1845 and died at her home in Bedford, Iowa, August 20, 1899, aged 53 years, 10 months and 21 days. She was married to Mr. R. [obert] M. [cCormick] Moody January 30, 1878, they having resided in Taylor county ever since.
During Mrs. Moody's life of some twenty years spent in this neighborhood, she gained the admiration of a large circle of friends, being respected and loved by all who knew her. She had been a sufferer for several years, but during the entire time she was patient and uncomplaining. Her affection for her family was marked. She seldom ever went into society, her love for home being very strong. Those who had the best opportunity of knowing her life testify to her quiet and strong hope and confidence in God. She was converted at a Methodist meeting when a girl some seventeen years of age and her hope and trust has been fixed on God ever since. She has always helped and encouraged all the members of her home along religious lines and her life has been an exemplary one. She was a faithful wife, an affectionate mother and in her quiet way, believed on Him who saved her from her sins.
The funeral services took place at her late home in the north part of the city Monday, August 21, at 4 o'clock p. m. A large number of friends were present to show their sympathy and regard for the bereaved family. Services were conducted by Rev. D. W. Griffith, of the Baptist church—the text for the occasion being taken from Matthew, twenty-fifth chapter and thirteenth verse—"Be ye therefore ready for ye know not the day nor the hour when the son of man cometh." The need of watchfulness, because of the uncertainty of life and because of the importance of needed preparation for a change of worlds, was emphasized. The hymns chosen were very appropriate and well rendered by the Baptist choir.
The floral decorations were exceedingly fine. Seldom can one see such skill in the arrangement of flowers as to produce such a pleasing effect. The designs were beautiful and many in number, all being contributed by loving hands.
In the evening a goodly number of friends gathered at the home and at 9:30 the remains were taken to the depot, followed by a number of carriages. Mr. R. M. Moody and daughter, Miss Ina, and sister, Mrs. R. W. Dennis, started with the body on the 10:45 passenger for Kirkwood, Ill., where interment took place Tuesday, August 22. The bereaved family have the sympathy of the entire community.

[MOORE, HESTER DUNGAN]
Bedford Free Press (Bedford, Iowa), Thursday, February 2, 1899
Another Death
At 10 o'clock yesterday morning Mrs. Hester Moore died at the home of her daughter in Bedford, aged 86 years, 8 months and 7 days. The funeral exercises will be conducted at the residence tomorrow at 9 o'clock by Revs. Collins and Ware. The remains will be laid to rest in the Shay cemetery near Blockton.

[MORRIS, MILES]
Bedford Free Press (Bedford, Iowa), Thursday, August 22, 1907
A Pioneer Gone
The angel messenger of death came with shocking suddenness to our village Sunday evening and claimed as his victim one of our aged and most respected citizens. Miles Morris was called to answer the summons and after a very brief illness lasting from 1:30 o'clock Sunday morning to 11:15 Sunday night, passed quietly away.
He was on the streets Saturday and seemed in his usual health. Sunday morning, he was taken with a severe attack of cholera morbus which medical skill could not relieve. He suffered severely throughout the day and was finally seized with heart failure causing death almost immediately.
Mr. Morris was one of the pioneers of Taylor county, having come to his farm, three miles northeast of Gravity about 1870, from Abington, Ill. He continued to live on the farm for about seventeen years, when he embarked in the banking business. He was successful in this venture and about 1896 his business had increased to such an extent that in order to give it a better home, he erected the new building now occupied by the Gravity bank. On January 1st, 1903, he sold his business to Crum and Bailey of Bedford and retired from business activity. Moving to California he remained there about a year when property interests here demanded his return. He has since made his home at Gravity where he was living at the time of his sudden death.
He leaves a wife and two sons to mourn his departure; Chas. Morris of Fresno, Calif. and Dale, a child at home, five years of age. As a citizen and friend, Mr. Morris always commanded the highest honor and respect of all who knew him. His dignified and courteous bearing distinguished him at once as a practical business man, yet he always displayed that public spirit and kindly sympathy which made him a leading citizen of his community.
He took an active part in all church work, was a veteran of the civil war, and the loss which his sudden death has brought upon this city will be sadly felt. The deep sympathy of the entire community goes out to the bereaved relatives in this their hour of sorrow.
On account of the operator's strike, much delay was experienced in communicating with his son in California. Word was received Tuesday, however, stating that he had started Monday. Definite funeral arrangements will not be made until his arrival, which will probably be today. A complete obituary notice will appear in our next issue. – Gravity Independent

[MORRIS, MILES] 
Bedford Free Press (Bedford, Iowa), Thursday, August 22, 1907
GRAVITY – The funeral of Mr. Miles Morris was held at Gravity Friday afternoon.
Mr. Chas. Morris arrived Thursday afternoon from Fresno, Cal., to attend the funeral of his father, Mr. Miles Morris.

[MORRIS, MILES]
Bedford Times-Republican (Bedford, Iowa), Thursday, August 15, 1907
An Old Settler Gone
Miles Morris, one of the pioneers of Taylor county, died at his home in Gravity Sunday evening at 11 o'clock.
Mr. Morris was originally from Illinois and enlisted from that state, serving through the war of the Rebellion and making a record as a soldier of which his family may well be proud.
At an early day he moved to Taylor county and settled on a farm near Gravity. He was raised on a farm and followed this vocation during the greater part of his life. In his farming and stock raising operations he was extremely successful and accumulated a great deal of property.
In 1891 he moved to Gravity and engaged in the banking business, establishing the Gravity bank of which he continued the owner for about twelve years. He made the bank a solid and substantial institution and by his aggressive, public spirited methods made it a strong factor in the upbuilding of Gravity. About three years ago he retired from active business life, since that, although his home has remained at Gravity he has spent much time on the coast and in travel.
The name of Miles Morris will be prominent in any history that may be written of the growth and development of his home town. He was a man of enterprise and one who early acquired the accumulating habit. His plans were always well made and were universally successful, but he never advanced his own interests by sacrificing those of others. He was honest and honorable in his methods and took a greater pride in the prosperity of his town and surrounding country than in his own success. In all ways he was a good and valuable citizen and his departure will be mourned by all who knew him in life.
His wife and two sons, Edward and Charles, survive him. Edward resides at Gravity, but the home of Charles is in California.

[MORRIS, MILES]
Bedford Times-Republican (Bedford, Iowa), Thursday, August 22, 1907
Obituary – Our entire community was draped in the mantle of mourning last Monday morning when we learned of the sudden and unexpected death of Miles Morris, one among the oldest and most substantial of our citizens, which occurred on Sunday night, August 11, 1907, after a brief illness of 24 hours.
Mr. Morris was out in town late Saturday evening after his mail and seemed as well as usual. The principal cause of his death, as we were able to learn, was a weak heart.
He was a man of strong convictions—not hasty in arriving at conclusions, but when he did was slow to change; was not the least hypocritical. If he was your friend, you could depend on him with certainty. He was strictly honest and practiced principles of justice toward his fellow men; kind hearted yet not gushing over with emotion; a man of well-regulated habits of life; entertained strong religious convictions, loved the cause of Christ, always had an open pocket book in support of the church and had been an active, consistent worker in the Christian church for many years.
He was born in Montgomery county, Illinois, February 20, 1831. His father, Miles Morris, a farmer, was one of the southern patriots who took part in the war of 1812, enlisting from the state of North Carolina. He was married Nov. 22, 1860 to Sarah Ann Murdock, who preceded him to the better land July 6, 1900. To this happy union was given one child—Charles, born October 1, 1861, who now resides in Fresno, California, but was present at the funeral services.
At the breaking out of the rebellion he enlisted in the service of his country and was honored with the office of sergeant in company I, 83rd Illinois Volunteer Infantry. In 1870 he came with his family from Abingdon, Ill., to Taylor county, Iowa, and settled on his farm near Gravity and engaged in farming and stock raising for 17 years, after which he moved to Gravity and engaged in the banking business which proved so successful that in 1806 [1896] he erected the new bank building which afforded a more commodious and pleasant place for his business.
Jan. 1, 1903, he sold his banking business to Crum & Baily of Bedford and retired from business, since which time he has resided in Gravity with the exception of one year spent in California.
October 10, 1901, he was married the second time to Miss Margaret Neville and to this union was given one child, Edward Dale, a very bright, sweet little boy.
The funeral services were conducted at the Christian church on the following Friday at 2:30 p. m. by the writer and F. D. Sellard, the pastor of the church. A very large and sympathetic audience was in attendance. His sister, Mrs. J. H. Pool, the only living member of the original Morris family, with her husband and two sons, E. G. and John, of Circleville, Kans., were also present.
The remains were laid to rest in the Gravity cemetery awaiting the resurrection morn.  W. L. Dunlavy.


[MORRIS, SARAH ANN MURDOCK]
Bedford Free Press (Bedford, Iowa), Thursday, July 12, 1900
Obituary – The deceased, Mrs. S. A. Murdock Morris, was born in Ohio, June 16, 1837, died at the family residence in Gravity, Iowa, July 6, 1900, aged 63 years and 20 days. She moved with her parents to Knox county, Illinois, about 1845. She made a profession of Christianity and united with the Christian church when quite young, to which denomination she continued a faithful and consistent member during the remainder of her life.
She was united in marriage to Miles Morris in 1860 and to this happy union was born one son, Charles. She had two sisters and three brothers. Purley Murdock, her youngest brother and only member of the family, survives her. He resides at Fresno, California, and reached the bedside of his sister in time to talk with her before she took her exit to the eternal world.
In 1870 she moved with her parents from Knox county, Ill., to Taylor county, Iowa and settled on a farm three miles east of Gravity where she resided until 1889, when she removed to the place of her death. In the death of Mrs. Morris, the community has lost a most noble woman and substantial citizen. She was a woman of strong moral and religious convictions, ever ready to express her opinion freely and fully upon all questions of importance yet in a kind and generous way, always allowing due respect for the honest convictions of others who differed with her. For many years she was one among the most active members of the Gravity Christian church. Although her health was so much impaired that she was oftentimes prevented from doing more in the Master's cause, yet there are "footprints left on the sands of time" by her kindly deeds and words that will not be soon forgotten. She was intelligent, sympathetic and highly refined. She was very industrious, often overtaxing her physical strength, a lover of truth and veracity, an admirer of the beautiful and good. She was an affectionate mother and companion and was loved by all, but she has gone to a better country than this. Although we will greatly miss her and it is hard to submit to the inevitable, yet we must say good bye till we meet in heaven.
The funeral services were conducted by the writer at the Christian church in Gravity on Saturday, July 7, using as a scripture text 2d Cor. 5:1, after which the remains were followed by a large delegation of sympathizing friends and relatives to the Gravity cemetery where they were kindly committed to their last resting place.   W. L. Dunlavy



[MULLIN, MARY BRENNAN]
Daily Iowa State Press (Iowa City, Iowa), Monday, July 30, 1900
The death of Mrs. Mary Mullin occurred at the home of Wm. J. Mullin on West Court street. She was the widow of the late Bernard Mullin, an early settler of this county, and at one time one of the city's most prosperous merchants. Of late years she has been residing with her daughter, Mrs. McCloud of Cedar Rapids. She came here to visit relatives and was sick only two weeks. Her age was 72 years. The funeral will take place from St. Mary's church tomorrow morning at nine o'clock.

[MULLIN, MARY BRENNAN]
Daily Iowa State Press (Iowa City, Iowa), Tuesday, July 31, 1900
The funeral of the late Mrs. Mary Mullin took place from St. Mary's church at nine o'clock this morning and the obsequies were attended by a large number of sorrowing friends. A number of persons from out of town were present. Among them were: W. J. Mullin; Miss Minnie Dougherty, Chicago, James Brennan, Davenport; Mrs. Delia Warren, Burlington; Mr and Mrs. I.[mri] L. [incoln] McCloud; George Mullin and family, Mrs. Henry Brecht and Mrs. Murray all of Cedar Rapids.

[MULLIN, MARY BRENNAN]
Bedford Free Press (Bedford, Iowa), Thursday, August 2, 1900
--Lincoln McCloud, of Cedar Rapids, who was here visiting relatives and friends, was called home Monday morning by the death of his mother-in-law, Mrs. Mullen.

[MULLIN, MARY BRENNAN]
Daily Iowa State Press (Iowa City, Iowa), Saturday, August 4, 1900
Mrs. Delia Warren returned to her home in Burlington this morning. She was called here by the death of her sister, Mrs. Mary Mullin.

[NOTT, ELIZABETH VICTORIA KEELER]
Bedford Free Press (Bedford, Iowa), Thursday, June 7, 1900
--Mrs. Elizabeth Nott, mother of Mrs. C. [harles] M. [anley] Fluke, died at New Paris, Penn., where she was visiting relatives. The body was laid to rest in Mt. Pleasant cemetery, near Lewiston, Ill.



[PERRY, WILL, - 1900]
Bedford Free Press (Bedford, Iowa), Thursday, May 3, 1900
A Messenger of Death in His Body
Will Perry Accidentally Shot With a Target Rifle in the Hand of His Companion, Vernon Vancleve.
Friday morning of last week the accidental discharge of a deadly weapon in the hands of Vernon Vancleve has caused much suffering and anxiety in a Bedford home. At that time Will Perry, Cleve Turner, Vernon Vancleve and his brother were in Whittington's timber northeast of town hunting. They had with them a 22-caliber rifle. Young Perry was lying on the grass, while Vernon had the firearm and stood near him. In some manner the cartridge exploded, and the ball entered the body of Perry in the pit of his abdomen. He arose and walked quite a distance then lay down from exhaustion. The rest of the boys started to town to give the alarm. They found C. H. Harrod, A. Spacht and Wm. Cobb at the ice pond. The later went home and telephone for Dr. Dunning, while the two former brought the boy home in a wagon. Dr. Beauchamp was also called, and an examination failed to locate the bullet and the physicians have not yet been able to find its exact location. The boy has been suffering considerably and the chances are about even for him to recover. He is the son of Mr. and Mrs. E. Perry and is 16 years old.
Later. Will died Wednesday morning at 2 o'clock. The funeral services were conducted at the home this morning by Rev. Ware. Interment in Bowers cemetery. 

[RATCLIFFE, CHARLES]
Bedford Free Press (Bedford, Iowa), Thursday, August 23, 1900
Old Settler Gone
Charles Ratcliffe aged about 60 years died at his home near Gravity, Saturday evening, August 18. He was an old and respected citizen of Taylor county, having resided here about thirty years.
[Note: His headstone gives his death date as August 19, 1900.]

[REDBURN, RACHAEL JANE SULLIVAN]
Bedford Free Press (Bedford, Iowa), Thursday, September 6, 1900
Passed Over the River
Mrs. John Redborn [Redburn] was born at Nashville, Tenn., January 23, 1821, and died at the home of her daughter, Mrs. E. M. Stephens, seven miles east of Bedford, September 1, 1900. She was married to Rev. John Redborn [Redburn] December 29, 1840, in Franklin county, Illinois. She became a Christian when a young girl and has been a faithful consistent godly follower of her master ever since. Rev. Redborn died some two years ago and after many months of suffering she has been called to join the loved ones gone before. The funeral service took place at the home of her daughter mentioned above on Sunday, September 2, at 4:30 p. m. the service was conducted by her pastor, Rev. D. W. Griffith She leaves to mourn her three sons and five daughters. The remains were taken Monday morning to Moulton, Appanoose county, Iowa, for interment by the side of her faithful husband who was a true minister of the gospel for sixty years.
[Note: Illinois, County Marriage Records, 1800-1940 and Illinois, Compiled Marriages, 1791-1850 give the marriage date as December 29, 1841.]

[REDBURN, RACHAEL JANE SULLIVAN]
Moulton Tribune (Moulton, Iowa), Friday,  September 7, 1900
Mary J. Redburn died in Bedford, Ia., last Friday, August 31 and was brought to this place and was buried in the Hardin cemetery on Monday following. She was 81 years old. Funeral services were held from the Baptist church conducted by Rev. Stickle.
[Note: Illinois marriage records and census records give her first name as Rachel or Rachael.]

[ROE, LILLIE B. SMITHER]
Bedford Free Press (Bedford, Iowa), Thursday, June 29, 1899
Death at Poor Farm
Mrs. Tillie B. Rowe, who has been at the poor farm for the past year, died Saturday evening, June 24, of tuberculosis. She was about twenty-four years of age and leaves one child—a boy four years old. Funeral services were held Sunday, conducted by Rev. Faucett of Conway, after which the body was interred in the county cemetery.
Through the efforts of James Templeton and J. [ohn] M. Smither, father of the deceased, the orphan will be provided for at the McCrea home, one half mile west of the county farm.
[Note: The name on her headstone in the old Bedford cemetery is Lillie B. Smither Roe.]

[ROLLINS, NICK] 
Bedford Free Press (Bedford, Iowa), Thursday, March 9, 1899
Nick Rollins Dead
Nick Rollins, a son-in-law of F. H. Muller of this city, died at his home in New Market Tuesday morning of quick consumption, having been sick about seven weeks. A number of years ago the deceased conducted a meat market on Main street in this city. He also clerked in Mr. Muller's restaurant. His remains were interred in the Rollins cemetery near Clarinda.

 [SAUM, JACOB V.]
Bedford Times-Republican (Bedford, Iowa), Thursday, August 12, 1915
Jacob Saum Dead
Jacob Saum of Des Moines died this week in a hospital in Utica, N. Y. of cancer of the liver. Mr. Saum was a resident of Bedford many years, having conducted a nursery here.

[SAUM, JACOB V.]
Bedford Free Press (Bedford, Iowa), Tuesday, August 17, 1915
J. [acob] V. Saum, a former resident of Bedford died at a hospital at Utica, New York last week. For several years Mr. Saum has resided in Des Moines and but recently went to Utica for treatment of cancer of the liver.

[SCUDDER, INFANT, - 1899]
Bedford Free Press (Bedford, Iowa), Thursday, February 23, 1899
On Sunday occurred the death of the thirteen months old boy of Mr. and Mrs. Scudder north of Bedford on the Pierce farm. The parents can look up through their tears with the blessed assurance of their darling baby having a home with Christ and the redeemed. The funeral exercises were conducted by Rev. Collins Monday afternoon. Interment in Fairview.

[SLEEP, JOHN'S INFANT, - 1900]
Bedford Free Press (Bedford, Iowa), Thursday, August 9, 1900
"Of Such Is the Kingdom"
Last Sunday at 4 o'clock p. m. the infant daughter of Mr. and Mrs. John Sleep, aged 3 months, departed this life and was buried at the Siam cemetery.

[SOETEN, EVA FARRELL]
Bedford Free Press (Bedford, Iowa), Thursday, July 5, 1900
Mrs. Chas. Soeten Dead
We are sorry to announce the death of Mrs. Chas. Soeten, who died at her home in New Market, Tuesday afternoon of last week. She is the wife of Rev. Chas. Soeten who preached for the Baptist congregation last summer. We extend our sympathy to Mr. Soeten. She was buried in the Old Memory cemetery at New Market Wednesday afternoon. – Gravity Independent  

[SPACHT, CORA A. PATERSON]
Bedford Free Press (Bedford, Iowa), Thursday, April 6, 1899
Mrs. Spacht Dead
At the family home, six miles and a half east of Bedford, on Monday, March 3, occurred the death of Mrs. Frank Spacht, aged 30 years, 4 months and 16 days, having been sick about ten days. She leaves a husband and two children. The funeral services were held at 11 o'clock yesterday. Interment in Clayton cemetery.



[STANLEY, WINDSOR R.]
Bedford Free Press (Bedford, Iowa), Thursday, March 15, 1900
The Body Returned
Today there will arrive at Gravity the body of Windsor R. Standley, one of Co. I boys who fell in the Philippines. The funeral will be held later. Co. I of this city will attend in a body. The bereaved widow has the sympathy of all in her sad bereavement.

[STEPHENS, JAMES F., 1866 – 1900]
Bedford Free Press (Bedford, Iowa), Thursday, January 25, 1900
A Sad Suicide
A Former Taylor County Citizen Kills Himself While in the Streets at Kansas City, Missouri 
Wednesday of last week James K. Stephens shot and killed himself while walking along the streets in Kansas City. He leaves a wife and two small children. At the time of his death he was 33 years old. He had become addicted to the use of intoxicating liquors, which seems to have been the direct cause of his rash act. At one time James Stephens was one of the promising young men of Taylor county and his future seemed bright and hopeful. But, alas! He was so unfortunate as to indulge in the first drink with the result that so often follows such a course. About eleven years ago he was a successful teacher in Holt, in this county, and was one of our best young men. He married a school teacher, a bright, intelligent young lady who, with her fatherless children, have the sympathy of all.
Chas. Stephens, of Bedford, a brother of deceased, attended the funeral which was held in Kansas City on Friday.

[STEPHENS, OSA MABLE "OCIE"]
Bedford Free Press (Bedford, Iowa), Thursday, January 11, 1900
A Young Death
Monday morning of this week Ossie, the 13-year-old daughter of Mr. and Mrs. J. A. Stephens, of Dallas township, passed from this world of sorrow and suffering to the home beyond the skies. Mrs. Stephens is a sister of Mrs. Ben Bailey and Mrs. John Shriver of Bedford. The sympathy of the community goes out to the bereaved ones.
[Note: The first name is spelled Ocie on her headstone.]

[STEPHENS, OSA MABLE "OCIE"]
Bedford Free Press (Bedford, Iowa), Thursday, January 18, 1900
Obituary – Osa Mable Stephens was born in Taylor county, Ia., Dec. 29, 1889, died Jan. 7, 1900, aged 13 yrs 10 ds. She was the daughter of A. [ndrew] J. [ackson] and Elizabeth Stephens. Osa was a bright, beautiful girl and to know her was to love her. She loved her bible and the Epworth League. We will miss her bright happy face. The brightest star of the home has set to shine there no more but risen to shine in the kingdom above forever. Father, mother and two brothers are left behind to mourn her loss. Funeral services were conducted at the home by Rev. D. Pruitt of New Market.

[STOUT, EMLEY]
  Bedford Free Press (Bedford, Iowa), Thursday, July 5, 1900
Her Father Has Passed Away
Last Saturday morning Mrs. J. [ames] R. [obert] Crum received a telegram bearing the sad intelligence of the death of her father, Emley Stout, at Ashland, Illinois and left in the afternoon to be present at the funeral. It was only last winter that Mrs. Crum was called upon to lose her mother by death. The family here has the sympathy of many friends in this hour of affliction.


[SWETT, KEZIAH MATILDA STEPHENSON WELTON]
Bedford Free Press (Bedford, Iowa), Thursday, March 29, 1900
PLATTEVILLE – Mrs. Swett, of Illinois, mother of Ben Welton of this place, was buried in the Platteville cemetery last Wednesday. Her first husband was buried at an early day in Illinois and the country has changed so that the whereabouts of his grave is unknown. While visiting Iowa about twelve years ago her second husband died and was buried at Platteville, so her children brought her body and laid it beside her second husband. The bereaved relatives have the sympathy of the community.
[Note: The last name is spelled Sweat on the husband's headstone.]



[THOMPSON, CLYDE C.]
Bedford Free Press (Bedford, Iowa), Thursday, September 28, 1899
Killed By the Cars
Tuesday morning the mangled remains of what was once Clyde Thompson, son of B.[enjamin] F.[ranklin] Thompson, of Conway, were found on the railroad track just above the depot at Conway. The supposition is that Clyde, a boy of perhaps 15 years of age, attempted to climb on the freight train that went up Monday night and losing his hold was thrown under the wheels and killed. As he was not found until Tuesday morning after the passenger train went south, he was probably run over by three trains. His head and body were mashed, and his legs and arms cut off. It was a horrible sight and contained a whole sermon against the bad habit of jumping on and off of moving trains.

[THUMAN, MATILDA ANN MARDIS]
Bedford Free Press (Bedford, Iowa), Thursday, October 18, 1900
Burned to Death
Last Saturday Mrs. Thoman [Thuman] living near Nodaway, on the north county line, while making apple butter, was so badly burned that she died the next morning. All clothing was burned off except her shoes. She died in great agony.

[THUMAN, MATILDA ANN MARDIS]
Adams County Free Press (Corning, Iowa), Thursday, October 18, 1900
Burned to Death
Mrs. Thuman of Nodaway Township the Victim of a Terrible Accident
Mrs. J. W. Thuman, who lives on a farm in Nodaway township five miles southwest of Brooks, was badly burned last Saturday. Her injuries were so serious that on Monday she died after intense suffering. She was making apple butter out doors and while attempting to place an old door in position to keep the wind from blowing the fire her skirts caught fire. She became panic stricken and ran wildly around the yard and it was not until she had been frightfully burned that her husband and mother were able to catch her and smother the flames. The physician was unable to do anything but alleviate her pain and after terrible suffering she passed away Monday morning. The funeral was held from the Catholic church in this city Tuesday afternoon at 2 o'clock, Father Sheridan conducting the services. Mrs. Thuman leaves her husband and six children to mourn her loss and their unusually sad affliction has called forth the sympathy of the whole community. She was forty-six years of age and was held in high respect.

[TOPLIFF, MILES STANDISH]
Bedford Free Press (Bedford, Iowa), Thursday, June 14, 1900
--Mrs. A. [lexander] C. [ooper] Brice was called to Andover, Connecticut last week by the illness of a brother-in-law, M. [iles] S. [tandish] Topliff. He died the latter part of the week. Mrs. Brice will not return for several weeks.

[WHITTLESEY, AZARIAH T.]
Omaha Daily Bee (Omaha, Nebraska), Saturday, July 28, 1900
Council Bluffs News - Colonel A. T. Whittlesey, a veteran newspaper man of this city, died yesterday morning at an early hour at the home of his daughter, Mrs. W. B. Fisher. Death was due to apoplexy. Deceased was born in Indiana in 1834 and for many years was a prominent democratic politician of that state. He was four times elected delegate to national conventions and was private secretary to Governor Thomas A. Hendricks. He had been a resident of this city since 1883 and at one time was editor of the now defunct Globe. He leaves a widow and three grown children, Russel N., and Edson C. Whittlesey, and Mrs. W. B. Fisher. Notice of funeral will be given later.

[WHITTLESEY, AZARIAH T.]
Omaha Daily Bee [Omaha, Nebraska], Monday, July 30, 1900
Council Bluffs News - The funeral of the late Colonel A. [zariah] T. Whittlesey was held yesterday afternoon from the residence of his daughter, Mrs. W. B. Fisher, on Vine street. The services were conducted by Rev. R. Knox, rector of Grace Episcopal church, and interment was in Walnut Hill cemetery. The pallbearers were: C. M. Maynard, A. B. Cook, M. F. Rohrer, L. A. Webber, George S. Davis and O. Ewall.

[WHITTLESEY, AZARIAH T.]
Bedford Free Press (Bedford, Iowa), Thursday, August 2, 1900
--A. T. Whittlesey, a former Bedford citizen and at one time connected with the Taylor County Democrat died at his home in Omaha Sunday. He will be remembered by the pioneer settlers of Taylor County.

[WILKINSON, MAGDALENA "LENA" SCHOENENBERGER]
Bedford Free Press (Bedford, Iowa), Thursday, May 10, 1900
Died at Winterset
Last Saturday Mrs. C. G. Acker received a telegram to go at once to Winterset to see her sick sister, Mrs. S. M. Wilkinson. She arrived too late to see her sister alive, she having died before Mrs. Acker reached there. The bereaved ones have the sympathy of friends and relatives.

[WILSON, MARY HOWARD MEAD]
Bedford Free Press (Bedford, Iowa), Thursday, March 1, 1900
Obituary – Mrs. Mary Howard Wilson was born in New York September 26, 1810. Died at the residence of her son, David C. Wilson near Webber, Kansas, February 21st, being 89 years, 4 months and 25 days. When 19 years old she professed religion and united with the Presbyterian church, after which she identified herself with the disciples or Christian church where she was recognized as a faithful and consistent member for many years by all who knew her.
September 24, 1834, she was married to Stephen Mead who preceded her to the better land in 1840, six years after their marriage. To this happy union was born two children, one having died in infancy, the other Mrs. Lavanche Wilson being present at the funeral services. In 1847 she was married to C. K. Wilson, deceased, the father of the Wilson brothers, I. O., A. W. and W. H. respectively. To this union was born one son David C. Wilson who accompanied her remains from the place of their death. She was the last member of the Howard family to cross the river of death. She had 12 grand and 13 great grandchildren living at her death. She came to Taylor county, Iowa, in 1868 and settled on a farm near Gravity where she resided for about 30 years. She was a woman of strong religious and moral convictions, always ready to assist and express her rights, yet modest and unassuming in action, intelligent, sympathetic, refined and industrious and always ready to lend a helping hand in every good work,, word or deed, but she is gone from among us, her spirit has taken its flight to the place of repose, unseen, unexplored by mortal eyes, but like Abel of old the witness of her silent and quiet life still speaketh and the re-echoes of her words are "meet me in heaven." The funeral services were conducted by the writer at the Christian church assisted by the pastor, Rev. C. E. Umphry, after which the remains were laid to rest in the old Gravity cemetery.  W. L. Dunlavy

[WILSON, MASSA ANN GREEN]
Bedford Free Press (Bedford, Iowa), Thursday, January 11, 1900
Mrs. Wilson Dead
On January 6, at the family residence two miles west of Iveyville, occurred the death of Mrs. M. A. Wilson, aged 76 years, 6 months and 21 days. She leaves a husband and five children. She died with her faith firmly fixed upon the promises of her Redeemer. The funeral services were conducted by Rev. W. L. Dunlavy Sunday afternoon at 2 o'clock, after which the body was laid to rest in the Shearer cemetery.
[Note: She is buried in Methodist Grove Cemetery, Nodaway, Adams County, Iowa not Shearer cemetery as stated in the death notice.]

[WILSON, MASSA ANN GREEN]
Adams County Free Press (Corning, Iowa), Thursday, January 11, 1900
BROOKS – Mrs. Hosea Wilson passed away Saturday afternoon at her home in the south part of the county. She had been sick several months, having been stricken with heart trouble. The funeral was held from her home Sunday afternoon at 2 o'clock; interment was made in Methodist Grove cemetery. Elder Dunlavy of New Market preached the funeral services.

[WINEINGER, ANNA E. "ANNIE" BRANSON]
Bedford Free Press (Bedford, Iowa), Thursday, August 23, 1900
Departed This Life
Mrs. S. [amuel] L. [afayette] Wineinger died at her home nine miles west of Bedford, Wednesday, August 22, at 4 o'clock a. m. She was aged about 35 years. We understand that funeral services will be held at 11 o'clock today at the Christian church in Siam, after which the remains will be buried in the Siam cemetery.

 

[WOOD, NEWRICK "URIC"]
Bedford Free Press (Bedford, Iowa), Thursday, August 9, 1900
Uric Wood Killed
Last Wednesday afternoon at about 1:30 p. m., Uric Wood was run over by a threshing separator and almost instantly killed. The accident occurred 4 ½ miles northeast of Lenox. Mr. Wood was moving the threshing outfit to the residence of J. T. Dunlap when he came to a bridge he thought unsafe to cross with both engine and separator and uncoupling ran the engine across alone. He then hitched a team of mules to the end of the short tongue of the separator and started across the bridge. There being nothing to guide the separator he attempted to do it by holding the tongue when his foot slipped and he fell, one of the trucks passing over his head and breast. He lived but a short time. 
Funeral services and burial took place at Lenox at 11 a. m. Friday. Deceased was a young man about 25 years of age. He leaves a wife and one child to mourn his death.

[WRIGHT, MARTHA ELLEN LINDSAY]
Bedford Free Press (Bedford, Iowa), Thursday, July 27, 1899
Mrs. Wright Dead
Died, at her home in Conway, Friday, July 21, at 5 o'clock p. m., Mrs. Ellen Wright, wife of Simeon Wright, aged 63 years and 7 days. Funeral services were conducted at the Presbyterian church Saturday, July 22, by Revs. Hughes and McLeod. Interment in the Conway cemetery.