Obituaries
submitted by: Julia Johnson - julia.johnson63@gmail.com
 
 
 

[ANDERSON, HENRY NORDINE]
Bedford Times-Republican (Bedford, Iowa), Thursday, December 1, 1904
H. N. Anderson Found Dead
Manager of the Anderson Toll Line Dies Suddenly this Morning From Heart Failure
H. [enry] N. [ordine] Anderson, the manager of the telephone company known as the Anderson Toll Line, died suddenly at about daylight this morning. While the coroner has not yet examined the body, all indications point to death from heart failure.
Mr. Anderson and C. C. Corson have been at the county farm since Tuesday putting in the new furnace in the addition recently completed. This morning about daylight he went out to the barn. In perhaps an hour and a half, becoming uneasy on account of him not returning, Corson went to look for him and found him dead in one of the cow sheds. The body was already cold and in all probability,  he died within ten minutes of leaving the house.
There are no marks on the body and no indications of a struggle, showing that he passed away suddenly and without pain.
The coroner has been notified and is on his road but has not yet arrived.
Mr. Anderson has resided in Bedford several years, coming here from Missouri. He was well known in the community and was respected by all. He leaves a wife and five children to mourn their loss.

[ANDERSON, HENRY NORDINE]
Bedford Times-Republican (Bedford, Iowa), Thursday, December 8, 1904
Body of H. N. Anderson Taken to Rosendale, Mo.—Sketch of His Life
After short funeral services conducted by Rev. Barackman, at the house at 1:45 this afternoon, the body of H.[enry] N. [ordine] Anderson, who died suddenly yesterday, was taken to Rosendale, Mo., on the 3:45 train.
Regarding his death the examination by the officials revealed but little additional information. He had been at the county farm since Tuesday assisting to install a new heating plant. Yesterday morning he got up apparently in the best of health and ate a hearty breakfast; then he and C. C. Corson went down to the barnyard. Corson returned to the house shortly, expecting Anderson to follow. After an hour or more Corson became uneasy and went to investigate. On his return to the barn he met the man employed at the farm and they went together to make a search. After a short time, the body of Mr. Anderson was found in a calf pen, and from all appearance life had been extinct for perhaps an hour. The officials and physicians were summoned, and the conclusion arrived at that death was caused by strangulation; that he had fainted and fell over in the thick dust, which entering the throat had clogged the air passages and choked him to death.
When the sad news was conveyed to his bereaved wife and fatherless children, the scene was one which none could witness with dry eyes. When last they had seen the loving husband and idolized father, he was full of life and love; they had no intimation that such a fate was in store for him and little dreamed that when next they would see him his eyes would be closed in death.
The messenger who brought them the awful news found them smiling and happy and to speak the words which he knew would plunge the once happy family into the depths of agonizing grief was a task the strongest and most hardened would shrink from and the kind friend whose stern duty compelled him to reveal the sad tidings will remember that awful moment as long as life endures.
Henry N. [ordine] Anderson was born in Butler county, Pennsylvania, in 1860 and it was there he grew to manhood. In 1880 he concluded to seek his fortune in the great West and coming to Missouri settled at the little town of Rosendale. For three years after going there he engaged in school teaching. He then purchased a hardware and furniture store and for sixteen consecutive years he conducted this business. About three years ago he disposed of his Rosendale business and moved to Bedford, where he engaged in the telephone business, continuing therein up to the time of his death.
In 1886 the deceased was united in marriage to Miss Nellie Stanfield at Rosendale. To this union was born five children, all of whom, together with the faithful wife, are left to mourn their loss.
The deceased was of a retiring disposition. He talked but little, but every word was well considered and evil against his fellow man he never uttered. It can be truthfully said, "his word was his bond," and falsehood and deception were foreign to his nature.
In his death a wife loses a kind and faithful husband, his children a loving and beloved father and the community an honest and honorable man.

[ANDERSON, HENRY NORDINE]
Bedford Times-Republican (Bedford, Iowa), Thursday, December 8, 1904
H. M. Long and Wm. Scane returned yesterday evening from Rosendale, Mo., where they had gone to accompany the remains of H. N. Anderson. A large number of friends met the cortege at the Rosendale depot. The funeral was held at 10 o'clock today. Mrs. Anderson will probably remain with friends there for a week before returning home.

[ANDERSON, JIM, - 1903]
Bedford Free Press (Bedford, Iowa), Thursday, July 2, 1903
BLOCKTON – Jim Anderson who returned several weeks ago from southern Missouri sick with malarial fever died Thursday night. Rev. Wm. Golding conducted the funeral Friday and the remains were interred at Rose Hill cemetery.

 

[ASH, RUTH ORAL]
Bedford Times-Republican (Bedford, Iowa), Thursday, March 10, 1904

Ruth Ash Passes Away
Died Today at 12:30 After Nearly a Year of Suffering—Interment at Clearfield Cemetery
Today at half past twelve the angel of death descended upon Bedford and took from our midst the beloved daughter of our superintendent in the prime of her youth. Miss Ruth Ash had been a sufferer for nearly a year, in which time strenuous efforts were made to bring her back to health and happiness, but she gradually failed and grew weaker until the end came today.
For a long time she lay in the hospital at Creston, but she was brought home two months ago and had been gradually sinking until the end came today. Her affliction was what the doctors call exophthalmic goiter, which is a disease not well understood. In plain terms, it is an affection of the heart and circulation which wears the patient's nervous energy away and exhausts their strength. Ruth Ash had this in exaggerated form. At no time since last August has her pulse been below 120 and has been at the 200 mark for long periods of time. The patient was affected by a nervous cough which gave her much pain. Dr. Beauchamp who had charge of her case did everything in his power for the sufferer. Consultations were held with local physicians and doctors from distant points, but all to no avail.
There will be a short funeral service at the house Friday at 8 o'clock conducted by Rev. E. W. Miles. The Presbyterian choir will furnish the music. This service will be followed by a drive across country to Clearfield where another service will be held at 2 o'clock. Interment will be in the Clearfield Cemetery.
The bereaved family has the sympathy of the entire community in their loss.



[CROW, JOHN'S FATHER]
Bedford Times-Republican (Bedford, Iowa), Thursday, March 24, 1904
Dead and Buried
John Crow, who wandered into Bedford two weeks ago and tarried at the Bedford House a few days as dining room boy, then left on short notice, received a letter this morning from Sidney, Nebraska, bearing the shocking news that his father is dead and buried. It seems that his parents were unable to find the boy until too late to see his father.
John has a face that is full of tenderness and is a young man of good character. He has a wandering disposition and that has brought him a great sorrow. He left this afternoon for his home, but what is a home made desolate by such a death?
The Times and his Bedford friends extend their sympathy.

[CROY, FRANK JUDSON]
Creston News Advertiser (Creston, Iowa), Tuesday, November 17, 1953
Frank J. Croy, 76, of Diagonal, Dies
Diagonal – Frank J. [udson] Croy, 76, longtime resident of Diagonal, died at 4:30 p. m. Monday at a hospital in Clarinda. He had been ill for the past two months.
Funeral services will be held at the Christian church here at 2 p. m. Thursday. Rev. Harold Reel will officiate. Burial will be in the Diagonal cemetery. His body is at the Crew funeral home here.
Mr. Croy was born in Indiana but lived in Diagonal community most of his life. For many years he was the janitor at the bank here.
Surviving him are his widow, Ethel; and three daughters, Marjorie at home, Mrs. Olive Benson of Diagonal and Mrs. Della Johnston of Humeston.

[CROY, IVA ETHEL PARK]
Creston News Advertiser (Creston, Iowa), Saturday, April 29, 1967
Ethel Croy, 76, Diagonal, Dies
Diagonal – Mrs. Ethel Croy, 76, a longtime resident of Diagonal, died at the Ringgold county hospital at Mount Ayr last night.
Funeral services will be held at 2 p. m. Monday at the Diagonal Christian church. Rev. Gareth Burch, the pastor, will officiate. Burial will be in the Diagonal cemetery. Her body is at the Varner-Crew funeral home at Diagonal.
Mrs. Croy is survived by a daughter, Marjorie Croy of Diagonal and two stepdaughters, Mrs. Neil Benson of Diagonal and Mrs. Della Johnson of Humeston. Her husband preceded her in death.
Mrs. Croy had lived in the Diagonal community for about 50 years.



[DAVIS, MARY JANE GILLELAND]
Bedford Daily Republican (Bedford, Iowa), Wednesday, April 6, 1904
Death of Mrs. Mary Jane Davis
Mrs. Mary Jane Davis, (born Gilleland) died at the home of C. W. Gilleland at 7:30 last evening, of congestion of the brain.
Mrs. Davis was the widow of Milton Davis, who died about 8 years ago. She was born in Pennsylvania and at the time of her death was 80 years of age.
The funeral services will be conducted by Rev. Gardner, at the residence of C. W. Gilleland, 3 miles southeast of Bedford, at 10 o'clock a.m., on Wednesday April 7th. Interment will be at the Fairview Cemetery.

[DAVIS, MARY JANE GILLELAND]
Bedford Free Press (Bedford, Iowa), Thursday, April 14, 1904
"Auntie" Davis Dead
Died, at the home of her nephew, W. C. Gilleland, Ross township, at 7:30 p. m. Tuesday, April 5, Mrs. Mary Jane Davis, familiarly known as "Auntie" Davis at the ripe old age of 80 years. The funeral services were conducted at her late home Thursday by Elder Gardner and the body was laid to rest by the side of her husband in Fairview, he having died eight years ago. "Auntie" Davis was an old resident of the county and had lived in Ross township for over fifteen years. She was a faithful and consistent follower of the Lord Jesus Christ and was a member of the Presbyterian church. Her life was full of kindly deeds and her loss will be keenly felt.

[FRANCIS, RICHARD'S INFANT, - 1904]
Bedford Times-Republican (Bedford, Iowa), Thursday, January 21, 1904
The infant child of Mr. and Mrs. Richard Francis, who reside east of town, was buried in the Bedford cemetery yesterday. The services were held at the residence yesterday at 2 o'clock p. m., Elder Lee Furgeson officiating.


[FRANKLIN, AB]
Bedford Times-Republican (Bedford, Iowa), Thursday, September 8, 1904
Funeral of Ab Franklin
The funeral of Ab Franklin who died at Lenox yesterday, will be held tomorrow (Thursday) at 2 p. m. at Lenox. This will permit friends from Bedford who wish to attend to go up to Lenox on the noon train and return in the evening. The masonic lodge will conduct the exercises.
Mrs. Franklin's death was very sudden. He got up in the morning apparently in the best of health and spirits. After talking to the family awhile he went out doors and soon was heard to cry out. He was helped into the house, complaining of feeling very weak. A doctor was summoned but he died before the physician could reach him.
The cause of his death is not definitely known. It was supposed to be either heart disease or else the rupturing of a large blood vessel.

[FRAZIER, FRANCIS EMMA COX]
Bedford Times-Republican (Bedford, Iowa), Thursday, January 18, 1923
Mrs. Sam King of Hopkins was called here Tuesday by the death of her aunt, Mrs. J. [ames] A. Frazier.

FRAZIER, FRANCIS EMMA COX]
Bedford Free Press (Bedford, Iowa), Thursday, January 18, 1923
Mrs. Francis Frazier Dead
Mrs. Francis Frazier, 62 years of age, died very suddenly at her home here Tuesday morning. Death came as the result of a ruptured blood vessel in the brain. She took sick the evening before and never gained consciousness. The funeral will be held this afternoon at 2 o'clock at the home conducted by Elder Leslie Cobb and burial made in the Ladoga cemetery.

FRAZIER, FRANCIS EMMA COX]
Bedford Times-Republican (Bedford, Iowa), Tuesday, January 23, 1923
Obituary – Francis E. Cox was born in Guilford county, North Carolina, May 13, 1860; died at her home in Bedford, Jan. 16, 1923, aged 62 years, 8 months and 23 days.
She was the youngest of eight children born to Jacob and Nancy Blackburn Cox, all having preceeded her except two brothers and one sister, James L. Cox, Gravity, Ia.; Roswell K. Cox of Garland, Kans.; and Mrs. G. F. Davidson, Bedford. Her father died in Guilford county, N. C. in 1865. She then came with her mother, brothers and sisters to Iowa, settling for a while near Bedford, later moving to a place near Gravity. Her mother died in 1886.
She was married to James A. Frazier at Bedford, Ia., Oct. 17, 1901. After their marriage they lived for some time on a farm near Gravity, later moving to Bedford where she has since resided. When a young woman she became a member of the Church of Christ.
She had been a sufferer since childhood from asthma, but the immediate cause of her death was paralysis.
Funeral services were held at the home Thursday afternoon at 2:00 o'clock, conducted by Leslie R. Cobb. Interment in the Ladoga cemetery.

[FRAZIER, JAMES A., 1851 - 1958]
Bedford Times-Press (Bedford, Iowa), Thursday, October 16, 1958 p. 8
James A. Frazier – James A. Frazier was born of humble parents on a farm near Menasha, Wisconsin on October 13, 1851 and died at the O'Dell Nursing Home in Bedford, Iowa, Wednesday morning, October 8, 1958, at the age of 106 years, 11 months and 20 days.
At the age of five years the Frazier family moved to Rollo, Illinois where Mr. Frazier entered country school and his parents farmed for 26 years.
He moved to Taylor county immediately after the turn of the century and to Gravity where he engaged in farming in 1905. He came to Bedford a few years later.
On October 17, 1901—one day before his fiftieth birthday, Mr. Frazier married Miss Frances E. Cox of North Carolina in a service performed at the Methodist parsonage in Bedford.
The couple made their home in and near Bedford where the deceased lived out his remaining half century. Mrs. Frazier died in 1923 at the age of 71 years. Mr. Frazier continued to maintain the home, doing his own house work but leaving intact and undisturbed one room in the home which he fondly designated "Mother's Room."
Mr. Frazier prided himself in his civic interests, being intensely proud of his advanced years. Always willing to participate in community affairs, the highlight of his career was his selection, as Bedford's oldest citizen, to serve as honorary marshal during the town's Centennial.

He leaves no immediate relatives.
Funeral services were held at the Shum Funeral Home, Friday, October 10, conducted by Rev. Anthony Blankers of the Methodist church. Burial in Ladoga cemetery.

[FRAZIER, JULIA BRIDGET BOOTH]
Bedford Times-Republican (Bedford, Iowa), Thursday, October 6, 1904
Gone to Her Reward
Julia Booth was born in Wyoming county, N. Y., Dec. 25th, 1825 and died Sept. 27th, 1904 at Gravity, Iowa.
Sept. 22nd, 1846 she was married to James Frazier and the young couple moved out to the frontier state of Wisconsin and after a few years they moved to Polo, Ill. Here they lived nearly a quarter of a century and reared a family of four children, three of which survive. In 1882 they sold and came West, to Gravity, Ia. In 1889 after forty-three years of happy married life the husband died leaving the companion of his youth to finish the journey alone. Mrs. Frazier united with the Baptist church at the age of sixteen but later united with the Presbyterian church in which communion she died. She was an invalid and great sufferer for many years but bore all with Christian resignation. At last the weary wheels of life stood still and she saw her "Pilot face to face" for she had "Crossed the bar." The children left are Chas. E. [llison] and J.[ames] A. Frazier and Mrs. Ella Davis of Hemet, Cal.
On the 29th of Sept. 1904 the funeral services were conducted at her old home east of Gravity amid many sorrowing friends, Pastor Gamble of the Christian Church officiating. The body was laid to rest by that of her husband in the cemetery at Ladoga. – Communicated.

[FRAZIER, JULIA BRIDGET BOOTH]
Bedford Times-Republican (Bedford, Iowa), Thursday, October 6, 1904
Visit Ends in Sorrow
Mr. and Mrs. James Frazier of Gravity and Mrs. E. A. Davis and two daughters, Misses Ruth and Dorothy, of Hemet, Cal., were in the city today and made this office a welcome call. Mrs. Davis had been at the World's Fair and returned this way to visit her mother and other relatives. She found her mother in the usual health although she had been an invalid for years and enjoyed a pleasant visit with her for nearly a month which was terminated a week ago in a sorrowful manner, the Angel of Death coming suddenly and calling the mother hence. It was a sorrowful ending of a pleasant visit, but the daughter is surely thankful that if the grim reaper must come, that she was permitted to have one last visit and be with her mother to the end.


[FULTON, JESSE'S SISTER, - 1904]
Bedford Times-Republican (Bedford, Iowa), Thursday, May 12, 1904
A message has been received conveying the news of a sad coincident connected with the death of Uncle Jesse Fulton. His youngest sister, who resides in Pittsburgh, Pa., and who was apparently in the best of health, dropped dead Sunday morning.

[HANES, MARGRET ANN DAIN]
Bedford Times-Republican (Bedford, Iowa), Thursday, June 2, 1904
Mrs. Thomas Hanes, mother of the wife of Rev. T. J. Ream, died Saturday evening at her home in Garden Grove, Iowa. Rev. and Mrs. Ream left on yesterday evening's train to attend the funeral and will return the latter part of the week. 

[HANES, MARGRET ANN DAIN]
Bedford Free Press (Bedford, Iowa), Thursday, June 2, 1904
--The sad news reach Bedford by wire last Saturday that Mrs. Thomas Hanes, mother of Mrs. T. J. Ream, had died at her home at Garden Grove, Iowa. She had been ill for some time but up to the week previous to her death she had become much improved and so her death came quite unexpectedly. Rev. and Mrs. Ream left on Sunday night train to attend the funeral.

[HANKINS, AMERICA ANN ARMSTRONG]
Bedford Times-Republican (Bedford, Iowa), Thursday, June 16, 1904
[Thomas Benton] Hankins returned today on the noon train from Corbin [Carbon], Indiana, where he was called by the illness and death of his mother. Mr. Hankins reached his mother's home on May 28th and she died the next day and was buried on the 31st.

[HANKINS, AMERICA ANN ARMSTRONG]
Bedford Free Press (Bedford, Iowa), Thursday, June 16, 1904
--T. [homas] B. [enton] Hankins was called to Corbin [Carbon], Indiana, last week by the illness of his mother. He arrived just in time to see her and bid her goodbye before the spirit took its everlasting flight.

[HENSHAW, LYDIA MAY MCKIM]
Bedford Times-Republican (Bedford, Iowa), Thursday, August 11, 1904
Obituary – Lydia May Henshaw—nee McKim—died at her home in northeast Bedford on Thursday, August 4th, of consumption.
The deceased was born May 8, 1869, in Henry county, Ill. On February 14, 1889, she was married to Cooley Henshaw and they removed the same year to Taylor county. Of her immediate family her husband, three children, her parents, four brothers and six sisters survive her.
The funeral was held at the residence at 10 o'clock today, Rev. Jones officiating. Interment at Lexington cemetery.

[HICKENLOOPER, CHARLES]
Bedford Times-Republican (Bedford, Iowa), Thursday, April 14, 1904
Chas. Hickenlooper died at Albia Wednesday at the advanced age of 80 years. He was a brother to S.[imon] B. [ourke] Hickenlooper of Blockton and an uncle of N. O. Hickenlooper, the Blockton postmaster. The family has been well known in the county for many years.

[HUBER, MONA BURRELL]
Bedford Times-Republican (Bedford, Iowa), Thursday, December 8, 1904
Attorney R. T. Burrell was called to Lenox Thursday by a message announcing the death of his sister, Mrs. Bruno Huber.

[HYDE, WILLIAM WALTER]
Bedford Free Press (Bedford, Iowa), Thursday, November 20, 1904
THE PASSING OF A PIONEER
After years of intense suffering and unusual affliction, W. [illiam] W. [alter] Hyde passed into eternity Sunday night. Nearly seven years ago he became gradually afflicted with locomotor ataxisand finally was unable to walk. Four years ago last spring he became blind, and over two years ago took to his bed, which he has never been able to leave since. Totally blind and unable to move around, his life indeed was one of physical suffering and mental agony almost unutterable and finally a merciful providence released him from his sufferings.
The funeral sermon was preached at the home yesterday afternoon at 2 o'clock by Rev. Thompson. The choir: Sid Webb, Mrs. Chas. Ethington, Mrs. R. Fuller, Bruce Flick and Chas. ----; pianist, Miss Alice Dunning. The Masons then took charge of the remains and bore them to Fairview Cemetery where the usual rites and ceremonies of the order were performed, deceased being one of the oldest members of the local lodge. The pall bearers were G. M. Bradley, J. W. Tate, W. F. Evans, Frank Walker, R. Vickery, Geo. Ridgeway.
William W. [alter] Hyde was born in Pawpaw, Dekalb county, Illinois, April 22, 1846. He married Miss Isabella Nisbet in Earlville, Ill., December 8, 1873, and together they came to Iowa in the same year. They first went on a farm yet owned by the family; came to Bedford and lived a short time, returned to the farm and finally moved to town fifteen years ago, where they have since lived. Mr. Hyde was for a number of years a member of the Bedford Hardware company, retiring about seven years ago, and afterwards rapidly declined in health. Mr. and Mrs. Hyde were the parents of four children, two dying in infancy, two remaining, Misses Iva M. and Minnie. During the sickness of the husband and father all that loving hands could do was done by the devoted and faithful wife and daughters, and they have the sympathy of a large circle of friends in their bereavement.

[HYDE, WILLIAM WALTER]
Bedford Times-Republican (Bedford, Iowa), Thursday, November 24, 1904
His Suffering Ended
All that was mortal of one of Bedford's most useful citizens was laid to rest today, when the body of W. [illiam] W. [alter] Hyde was placed within the tomb.
The deceased was born in Paw Paw, Ill., on April 22, 1846. His early life was spent in the state of his nativity but in early manhood he emigrated to Iowa, settling in Taylor county in 1872.
For a year thereafter he worked on a farm, afterwards engaging in the real estate business in Bedford. Later he followed farming for a number of years and during the rest of his active life was engaged in various business enterprises.
During all his life spent in Bedford up to the time when he became disabled by disease, the deceased was considered as one of the our foremost and most respected citizens. He served for some time as a member of the school board and was entrusted by the public with other offices of responsibility, the duties of which he performed conscientiously and faithfully. None stood higher in the estimation of his neighbors and no one had more true and devoted friends.
But his active life ended seven (to him) long years ago, when he suffered an attack of paralysis, from the effects of which he never recovered. At first he was able to move around by the aid of a cane, later crutches became necessary, soon he became bedridden, and afterwards that awful affliction of blindness left him little in this world but pain, suffering and sorrow.
While with a true Christian resignation he accepted the inevitable and bowed to the will of the Allwise, still life to him had no beauties or attractions. Death, which to the strong and happy seems so awful to contemplate, to him was a happy relief; a welcome change from a world of agony and pain to one of joy, happiness and perfect felicity.
The funeral took place today at the home, attended by a large concourse of friends and relatives. Rev. Thompson delivered the sermon. The obsequies were in charge of the Masonic lodge, of which the deceased was a member for many years.
The following relatives attended the funeral: James Nisbet and wife, Mrs. James Harper, of Rollo, Ill.; G. W. Firkins of Senica, Kans.; Mrs. W. J. Chapman, of Rollo., Ill.; A. R. Harper and wife of Maryville, Mo.

[JOHNSTON, RILEY]
Bedford Times-Republican (Bedford, Iowa), Thursday, January 14, 1904
Another Sudden Death Riley Johnston, Southwest of Siam, Is Suddenly Called Away—Two Deaths in Less Than a Week's Time
Riley Johnston, residing southwest of Siam, died suddenly at his home Wednesday evening. The death was supposed to result from heart failure, the usual circumstances surrounding the case. He was up and around and apparently feeling in his usual state of health.
This is the second sudden death occurring in that vicinity in less than week, that of Elisha Wheeler, west of Siam, occurring on New Year's morning. 
We are not informed as to the funeral arrangements.



[MANKER, CHARLES W.]
Bedford Times-Republican (Bedford, Iowa), Thursday, December 15, 1904
Dr. G. [eorge] F. [inley] Manker has received a message conveying the sad intelligence of the death of his brother, Dr. C. [harles] W. Manker at Elliott, Wednesday. Dr. G. F. Maker left for Elliott today. The funeral will take place at 3 p. m. Saturday.

[MARSH, BENJAMIN BOURNE]
Bedford Times-Republican (Bedford, Iowa), Thursday, July 28, 1904
Obituary – the Oakland Acorn of July 7th contains the obituary of B. B. Marsh, father of Mrs. D.[avid] K. McConkey of this county, who died June 22, 1904 and being unable to publish the article in full, we take from it the following facts:
B.[enjamin] B. [ourne] March, deceased, was born in Butler county, Ohio, April 16, 1834 and at the time of his death his age was 70 years, 2 months and 12 days. At an early age he removed with his parents to Decatur county, Ind., where he was married Nov. 1854 to Miss Mary Lowry and to them was born two children. In 1858 he removed to McLean county, Ills., where in 1862 he enlisted in the 94th Ill. Inft., serving until his discharge Aug. 9, 1865.
Soon after he was discharged, he moved to Iowa and from there to Osage county, Kans.; then in 1901 he moved back to Iowa; in 1904 locating at Oakland where he died.
The deceased was from early age a member of the Christian church and was always a conscientious, earnest Christian.
For many years he was a member of the I. O. O. F. and his funeral was in charge of the Oakland lodge of this order. The funeral was held at the home July 1st and was largely attended, the G. A. R. Post and the W. R. C. being present in a body.



[MCKINLEY, John L.]
Bedford Times-Republican (Bedford, Iowa), Thursday, November 17, 1904
The funeral of J. L. McKinley, deceased, was held Saturday at 11 a. m. at the home of his son, Geo. McKinley, conducted by Rev. W. B. Thompson. The attendance was as large as the rooms would accommodate. Immediately after the funeral the cortege left for Gravity where the body was put on the train and shipped to Clarinda and interred by the side of that of his wife.

[MCKINLEY, JOHN L.]
Bedford Free Press (Bedford, Iowa), Thursday, November 17, 1904
Died, at the home of his son, George McKinley, on Thursday night, November 10, J. [ohn] L. McKinley, aged 75 years, 1 month and 21 days. The funeral services were conducted at the home Saturday morning by Rev Thompson, after which the remains were taken to Clarinda for interment by the side of his wife, who preceded him some time ago The deceased leaves three sons, George S., Bedford; William, Alamosa, Col., J. A. Cripple Creek; and one daughter, Mrs Maggie Pierson, Pitkin, Colorado.

[MCKINLEY, JOHN L.]
Bedford Times-Republican (Bedford, Iowa), Thursday, November 17, 1904
J. [ohn] L. McKinley died Thursday night at 11:30 at the home of his son, George, in Bedford, Iowa, of heart disease after an illness of two weeks, age 75 years, 1 month and 21 days.
The deceased was born in Juniata county, Pennsylvania, Sept 19th, 1829, and remained there until he attained manhood's estate. In 1853 he removed to Indiana, where he remained four years, when, hearing of the golden promises that about that time were being made to those who would emigrate to Kansas, he decided to try his luck on the frontier, and so moved west and settled near Topeka. After three years experience on a homestead in what was then "Bleeding Kansas" he decided it was no place in which to rear his family and came back to Iowa. Later he spent a few years in Missouri and then in March 1867 located at Clarinda, where he spent the balance of his active business life.
During all his mature life he was a miller by trade and worked at this business in all the different states where he located. For nine years, he run the Shambaugh mills, which are located near Clarinda, and are known all over the southern part of the state. A few years ago, he decided to retire from the milling business, and owning a farm near Clarinda, he moved on it and remained there until three years ago when he came to Bedford where he has since made his home with his son, George.
Fifty-one years ago in Pennsylvania, he was united in marriage to the wife who was his constant companion and true helpmeet, during all the after journeys of his life and up to Aug 3, 1896, when the Angel of Death called her hence. Nearly half a century they journeyed together, bearing each other's burdens, sharing each with the other their joys. Death alone tore them asunder, and death has again united them in the land of eternal sunshine, where sorrow and partings are unknown.
During their wedded life, six children came to bless their home. Two were called away in infancy, and four remain to mourn their loss. The eldest is George, who resides in Bedford and with whom the father spent his last days. A daughter, Mrs Maggie Pierson, lives in Pitkin, Colo., William resides at Alamosa, Colo and J. A. at Cripple Creek in the same state.
The funeral services will be held tomorrow at 11 am, conducted by Rev Thompson. Immediately thereafter the cortege will depart for Clarinda, where the body will be interred beside that of his wife.



[MERRYMAN, ROY]
Bedford Times-Republican (Bedford, Iowa), Thursday, September 8, 1904
Death of Roy Merryman
H. W. Douglas left last night for Guthrie Center where he goes to attend the funeral of his grandson, Roy Merryman, the little son of Rev. and Mrs. Merryman. This is the second and last son of Mr. and Mrs. Merryman's to be called away and the bereaved parents and loving relatives have the heartfelt sympathy of a host of friends in this vicinity.
The little boy died Saturday night at 10 o'clock and the funeral was today.

[MILLER, LESLIE Q.]
Bedford Times-Republican (Bedford, Iowa), Thursday, November 3, 1904
Gone to Join the Angels
Little Leslie, the infant son of Mr. and Mrs. Charles Q. Miller, residing five miles west of town, died Friday afternoon and was buried Sunday at the Titus cemetery.
The funeral services were conducted at the house Sunday morning at 10 o'clock by Rev. Barackman.
Though the little babe had been here but a short time, his baby fingers had wound themselves like tendrils around the mother's heart and none but a mother can know the sorrow and heartache the parting has brought.
Only two weeks had elapsed since the baby came, and from birth, pain and suffering had been its lot, but on the little invalid the mother has lavished all the love and adoration of which a mother's heart is capable, its ill health and plaintive murmuring making it all the dearer to her.
From the first it was evident that not for long would baby Leslie be of this world. His life was too fragile for the chilling winds of this unfriendly world, and so the all wise Savior called it home before his pure white soul was tarnished by contact with the blighting winds of sin and evil. He is gone but in his mother's heart his image still remains; from her arms he is gone but up in heaven the crown of the Master has gained another jewel which shines, immortal, its luster undimmed by earthly accrued sin.

[MONTGOMERY, CONRAD LEE]
Ottumwa Daily Courier (Ottumwa, Iowa), Friday, January 5, 1934
Well-Known Resident of City Is Dead
Conrad L. [ee] Montgomery, 67 years old, a special agent for the Saint Paul Fire & Marine Insurance Co., died at his home, 501 North Jefferson street, at 12:15 p. m. today.
He is survived by his wife, Mrs. Emma Montgomery; one daughter, Mrs. Evon Walker of Ottumwa; two sons, Harry G. Montgomery and Arthur L. [ee] Montgomery of Ottumwa; his father, Harland Montgomery, of Bedford, Iowa; two brothers, Frank Montgomery of Pasadena, Calif., and William of St. Joseph, Mo.; two sisters, Mrs. Dora Lorimer of Pasadena and Mrs. Grace Miller of Des Moines and three grandchildren.
The body was removed to the Johnson funeral chapel. Funeral services will be held at 1 p. m. Sunday at the First Christian church, conducted by the Rev. Eugene Charles Beach, pastor. Burial will be made in the Ottumwa cemetery.

[MONTGOMERY, CONRAD LEE]
Bedford Times-Press (Bedford, Iowa), Thursday, January 11, 1934
C. L. Montgomery Dies In Ottumwa
Conrad L. [ee] Montgomery, 67, son of H. [arlan] Montgomery and for many years a resident of Bedford, died at his homes in Ottumwa Friday. The funeral services were held at the First Christian church in Ottumwa Sunday afternoon conducted by Rev. Eugene C. Beach. Burial was in the Ottumwa cemetery.

[MONTGOMERY, CONRAD LEE]
Bedford Times-Press (Bedford, Iowa), Thursday, January 11, 1934
H. [arlan] Montgomery arrived home Monday from Ottumwa where he was called last week by the illness and death of his son, Conrad Montgomery.

[MONTGOMERY, FRANK, 1873 – 1936]
Bedford Times-Press (Bedford, Iowa), Thursday, June 11, 1936
Frank Montgomery Dies in California
Frank Montgomery, 63, a former resident of Bedford, died at his home in Arcadia, Calif., Wednesday, June 3, following a brief illness with pneumonia. The funeral services were held the following Friday and burial made at Arcadia.
Mr. Montgomery is survived by his wife; his father, Harlan Montgomery of Bedford; a sister, Mrs. Dora Lorimer of Pasadena, Calif.; a half-sister and half-brother, Mrs. Grace Montgomery Miller of Des Moines and Dr. William Montgomery of St. Joseph.

[MONTGOMERY, JENNIE V.]
Bedford Times-Republican (Bedford, Iowa), Thursday, May 19, 1904
Obituary – Little Jennie V. Montgomery, whose death was noted in a previous issue of this paper and whose funeral took place at her home the 30th of April, was the youngest daughter of Mr. and Mrs. C. [onrad] L. [ee] Montgomery. She was born at Marion, Iowa, February 9, 1898, and died April 28, 1904.
All her short life has been one of suffering, requiring the almost constant care of a devoted father and mother who did everything possible to prolong her life. She was a bright little girl, whose wise little sayings were a constant wonder and delight to her relatives and friends. The patience with which she endured her final suffering and the calm and peaceful way she met death, was something wonderful in one so young.
She leaves a loving father, mother, brother, sister and grandfather, whose idol she was, beside other relatives and a host of friends.

Precious baby girl, although her tiny body rests in Oak Shade cemetery, her pure soul is with the Saviour who alone can soothe the sorrow of those who mourn for her.
Sweet little Jennie V.,
   Like sweet music pealing
Far o'er the blue sea,
   Oft comes o'er me stealing
Sweet memories of thee. – B.
The above is from a Marion, Ia., paper the name of which was not on the clipping. The father of the little child, Jennie, was C. L. Montgomery, who is the son of Harlan Montgomery of this place. He formerly resided at Bedford and he has many friends here who will be sorry to learn of the death of his little daughter and whose warm sympathy goes out to the sorrowing parents.

[MOODY, EDNA MAY, 1904 – 1904]
Bedford Times-Republican (Bedford, Iowa), Thursday, July 14, 1904
Death of Little Edna May Moody
A message was received last evening from Enid, O. T., conveying the sad intelligence of the death of little Edna May Moody, one of Lon L. Moody's motherless twin babes. She died yesterday morning and the funeral will be held today.
The mother, Edna May Patrick Moody, died a month or more ago, just after the little twins first saw the light of day. To the bereaved father this added sorrow makes his burden of grief heavy indeed, but his load will be made lighter by the knowledge that they sympathy of innumerable friends of his boyhood days goes out to him and their prayers that he may be comforted are even now being heard at the throne of grace.
On earth the tiny hands will ne'er caress and smooth the brow of a despairing parent and her sweet lips will never lisp the name of father and to him the thought is untold anguish. But God is good and Allwise and even while passing under the rod we realize that the little darling, pure and cherubic, passed beyond this vale of sorrow with a soul white as snow and that even now, close by the side of Jesus, surrounded by seraphic throngs, she is nestling in the arms of an angel mother who, for all we know, may have been standing with hands outstretched, waiting to receive her child. God in His infinite mercy knows best, and He said, "Suffer little children to come unto me and for bid them not, for of such is the kingdom of heaven."

[MOODY, EDNA MAY, 1904 – 1904]
Bedford Free Press (Bedford, Iowa), Thursday, July 14, 1904
--The sad news reached Bedford that one of the twin girls of Lon Moody, Enid, O. T., died on Tuesday. This child has never been strong and having no mother it did not survive very long. Mr. Moody is indeed passing through deep waters of affliction and has the sincere sympathy of numerous friends.

[MOODY, EDNA MAY PATRICK]
Bedford Free Press (Bedford, Iowa), Thursday, June 16, 1904
Death of Mrs. Lon Moody
Ever since the birth of twins about two weeks ago the life of Mrs. Lon Moody has hung in the balance and anxious friends sought information with fearful hearts until finally the end came Sunday night, June 12, at 10 o'clock, bringing woe and despair to the broken hearted young husband, the parents and other relatives and friends. The funeral was conducted at the late home in Enid, O. T., by Revs. Watter and Hale. The parents, Mr. and Mrs. J. M. Patrick and J. E. Moody, were present at the time of her death. Thus it is that a bright young life has been snuffed out, leaving two pretty babes and many mourning ones to wonder over the mysteries of the world.

[MOODY, EDNA MAY PATRICK]
Bedford Times-Republican (Bedford, Iowa), Thursday, June 16, 1904
Mrs. Lon Moody Dead
Mrs. Lon L. [otus] Moody, nee Patrick, died at her home in Enid, Oklahoma, Sunday night at [?] o'clock. The funeral services were held in the church there at 2:30 today (Tuesday), conducted by Rev. Watter, of the Presbyterian church, and Rev. Hale, the Baptist minister. Interment was at the Enid cemetery. The attendance was large and kind friends did everything possible to lighten the blow to sorrowing husband and parents.
For some time, Mrs. Moody has been ill and when a week ago two little babes were born, the ordeal was too great for the mother, and she gave her life for the babes. For several days her friends have known that there was no hope that her life could be spared. Her father and mother and husband's brother went from here to be at her bedside, and friends have anxiously waited for messages hoping some favorable word might come. But the hope was vain and the only consolation the sad message brought was that she sank peacefully asleep without a struggle and without pain. The two little motherless mites of humanity for whom she gave her life, are healthy and rugged and give promise to live to be a comfort to the bereaved father.
Before her marriage the deceased was Miss Edna Patrick, daughter of Mr. and Mrs. J. M. Patrick of this place. She was born and raised here and no young lady in the city was more respected or had more friends. About three years ago she was married to Lon L. Moody and they immediately removed to Enid, Oklahoma, at which place they resided until the time of her death.

[MOODY, EDNA MAY PATRICK]
Bedford Times-Republican (Bedford, Iowa), Thursday, June 23, 1904
Mr. and Mrs. J. M. Patrick returned today from Enid, Okla., where they have been for the past two weeks during the last sickness of their daughter, Mrs. Lon Moody. They report the little twins, a boy and girl, in good health and growing rapidly.

[NEEDHAM, WILLIAM]
Bedford Free Press (Bedford, Iowa), Thursday, April 21, 1904
Death Makes Sudden 
This community surely seems to have its share of sudden deaths, reminding all of the certainty that no one is exempt from the angel of night. Tuesday morning Wm. Needham a resident on the Jim Mason farm, northeast of Bedford, was strong, rugged and in good spirit. Before 9 o'clock he was a corpse, no warning being given that the death messenger was so near. Death was caused by heart failure. He was a man of excellent reputation and had many friends. He leaves a wife and several children. The remains were taken to Randolph for burial.

[NEEDHAM, WILLIAM]
Bedford Times-Republican (Bedford, Iowa), Thursday, April 21, 1904
William Needham Dead
An Old and Highly Respected Citizen of Taylor County Passes Away at an Early Hour This Morning
Death came this morning to William Needham, suddenly and without warning. He had been in good health and was apparently strong and rugged, and the family never had a thought when they arose this morning that death was to visit them and that before two hours had passed the wife was to be a widow and the children fatherless.
While the rest of the family was eating breakfast, Mr. Needham went into the other room and laid down; hearing a peculiar noise, they rushed in and found him unconscious. From this condition he never aroused and in about an hour and before the physician who had been hastily summoned could arrive, he passed away. The cause of death was heart failure.
William Needham was sixty years of age and he lived on what is known as the Jimmy Mason farm, northwest of here, on the New Market road. He has lived in that neighborhood for 6 or 7 years and was well known as a hardworking and industrious man of good character and repute. He leaves a wife and several children, three of whom remain at home.
The funeral services were held at the house at 1 o'clock p. m. Wednesday, conducted by Rev. E. W. Miles of Bedford, after which the body was taken to new Market and from there on the evening train to Randolph, in Fremont county, where interment was made.

[NEEDHAM, WILLIAM]
Bedford Times-Republican (Bedford, Iowa), Thursday, April 21, 1904
Mrs. A. L. Duncan of Randolph, Iowa, daughter of Wm. Needham, who died yesterday, came in on the morning train. She went on to New Market where she will meet the remains of her father and accompany it to Randolph, Iowa.



[PAYTON, ADA LORETTA]
Bedford Times-Republican (Bedford, Iowa), Thursday, December 22, 1904
Death of Ada Payton
Ada Payton, age 18 years, daughter of Mr. and Mrs. J. W. Payton, died at Clarinda this morning at 12:20 of quick consumption. She had been sick for several months, having been taken first with whooping cough, consumption developing later.
The deceased was well known in Bedford, she having spent the greater part of her life here, moving with her parents to Clarinda only two or three years ago. Her father is the brother of John and Melchor, and the son of William Payton, besides whom many other relatives, more distant, reside in this vicinity.

[PETERMAN, MARGARET JANE KELLY]
Bedford Times-Republican (Bedford, Iowa), Thursday, October 13, 1904
Mrs. Peterman, After Years of Suffering, Passed Away at 12:30 p. m. Yesterday
Mrs. W. P. Peterman died at her home in North Bedford at 12:30 p. m. Tuesday, October 11th, of cancer, aged 61 years, 2 months and 14 days.
Margaret J. Kelly was born July 27, 1843, in Johnson county, Ind. When 13 years of age she accompanied her parents when they removed to Iowa and settled in the western part of Taylor county, near Hawleyville. On September 17, 1865, she was united in marriage to W. [illiam] P. [arker] Peterman. They settled near the home of her parents and lived there until 1880 when they removed to Bedford, where they lived until the time of her death.
During all her adult life she has been a devoted Christian and a conscientious active member of the church. In 1863 she united with the M. E. church and was immersed and remained a member of that denomination for six years, when she and her husband both united with the Church of Christ at a service conducted by Elders N. E. Corey and Joseph Peregrine. During all the rest of her life her spiritual home was with this church, her membership at the time of her death and for many years previous being in the Berea congregation five miles south of the city.
Early in the year of 1902 the first evidence of the disease which was later to cause her death was discovered. Shortly after she went to St. Joseph and an operation was performed which it was then hoped would make her again well and strong. But the relief was only temporary. As soon as this fact was apparent, other physicians were consulted and everything possible was done to check the growth of the malignant tumor that was eating away her life.
Early this year she was taken to the Creston hospital, her friends still hoping her life might be spared or at least prolonged for many years. But the hope was vain; no human aid could avail and for a long time the physicians have known that their utmost efforts could only make the road to the tomb a trifle less painful. She herself seemed to have recognized this even before her loving friends would give up hope.
During all her sickness and through all her suffering she has displayed the utmost fortitude and consideration for the feelings of others; cheerful through it all, even to the end, meeting pain and agony uncomplainingly and without a murmur and facing her inevitable doom with a courage and fearlessness equaled only that of the Christian martyrs.
The married life of she and her husband has been an ideal one. Wrapped in each other's love no shadow has ever crossed their threshold. With never a thought that did not include her companion, and not a joy unshared by him, while together they bore life's burdens. Life to the bereaved husband looks bleak and comfortless and would be unbearable were he not buoyed up by the knowledge that she is even now safe with her Savior, waiting to meet him in the land where sorrow and parting are unknown.
No little ones ever came to bless and gladden their fireside and her mother's love has been lavished on the poor and unfortunate. Always among the first to find and succor the helpless and needy, many are the ones who in sickness and sorrow she has comforted and befriended and who have reason to bless her name.
Of the immediate relatives of the deceased who survive her, beside her husband, are her three brothers only. N.[ewton]  D.[ickey] Kelly who resides here, S.[amuel] P.[atterson]  Kelly of Villisca and T. J. Kelly of Washington county, Kansas, all of whom were here at the time of her death.
The deceased has been for years an active member of the W. R. C. and the Bedford corps will conduct [words unreadable].
The funeral will be held at the residence today at 2 p. m. conducted by Rev. Wm. Cobb. Interment in Fairview cemetery. From 9:30 [?] to 1:30 p. m. tomorrow the casket will be opened to allow the friends to look for the last time on the face of the departed.

[PETERMAN, MARGARET JANE KELLY]
Bedford Times-Republican (Bedford, Iowa), Thursday, October 13, 1904
J. P. Peterman, wife and daughter arrived here this afternoon, having been summoned by a message conveying the sad intelligence of the death of Mrs. W. [illiam] P. [arker] Peterman.

[PETERMAN, MARGARET JANE KELLY]
Bedford Free Press (Bedford, Iowa), Thursday, October 13, 1904
Death of Mrs. Peterman
After long years of suffering, Mrs. W. [illiam] P. [arker] Peterman died at her home in Bedford at 12:30 on Tuesday, October 11. Mrs. Peterman was a patient sufferer and has gone to her reward where death and sickness are unknown. Her bereaved husband has the sympathy of many friends in his bereavement. The funeral services will be conducted at the home this afternoon at 2 o'clock by Elder Wm. Cobb. Interment in Fairview.

[PETERMAN, SARAH ELIZABETH WESTWOOD]
Clarinda Herald Journal (Clarinda, Iowa), Monday, April 12, 1937
Former Dallas Lady in 80s Dies in Ohio

Dallas Twp., April 17 – Mrs. W.[illiam] P. [arker] Peterman, aged 84, passed away in Bucyrus, O., April 7. She and her husband lived in Dallas in the 70s and 80s. They owned the 80 acres now owned by Albert Holland and Ora Cade.

[PETERMAN, WILLIAM PARKER]
Bedford Times-Republican (Bedford, Iowa), Thursday, August 5, 1920
William P. Peterman – William P. [arker] Peterman was born in Crawford county, Ohio, April 26, 1838, died at his home in Bedford July 31, 1920, aged 82 years, 3 months and 5 days. In the year 1854 he, with his parents, moved to Iowa, locating in the northern part of Taylor county. Sept. 17, 1865, he was united in marriage to Margaret Kelly, who preceded him in death in 1904. In 1905 he was united in marriage to Mrs. J. R. Bucyrus, Ohio, who, with two brothers, John Peterman and Jacob Peterman of New Market, Iowa, survive him.
At the age of 28 years he confessed faith in his Redeemer and lived in the hope of the gospel until the end.
At the beginning of the Civil war he was a member of the Nodaway Ranger home guard at Hawleyville under the command of Capt. Rumbaugh. He later joined the 25th Missouri regiment under the command of Gen. Peabody and was taken prisoner by the force of Gen. Price at Lexington, Mo. After his release he joined the 23rd Iowa regiment being 1st sergeant of Co. F. He served with this regiment until he was mustered out of service July 26, 1865. He was one of the charter members of Sedgwick Post G. A. R., having served in all the offices of that organization.
In 1880 he moved to Bedford and in 1889 he engaged in the hardware business which he followed until his retirement from public life. For several years he was overseer of the poor, taking great interest in the work. He held this position until shortly before his death.
Quietly and peacefully in the early morn he fell asleep. A loving and devoted husband, a brave soldier, a noble man has gone to his reward.
Funeral services were held at the home Tuesday afternoon at 2:30 p. m., conducted by Leslie R. Cobb, assisted by E. E. Lowe. Interment in the Fairview cemetery.

[PIERCE, NELLIE E. WAIT]
Waterloo Courier (Waterloo, Iowa), Thursday, March 3, 1904
Motherless Babes
Mrs. H. L. Pierce Dies Today, Leaving Two Little Ones
After being bedfast only since last Sunday, Mrs. Henry L. Pierce, wife of the well-known traveling salesman, passed away about 1 o'clock this afternoon at her home, 417 West Park avenue, of typhoid fever.
The death is particularly sad because two infant children, one about two and a half years old and one nine months, are left motherless.
Mrs. Pierce was about 27 years old and the family have lived here for about three years, occupying the tenement that E. L. Hildebrand built.
The physicians did all they could to save the lady's life but in spite of their efforts she continued to grow weaker and weaker and this afternoon she suffered several severe hemorrhages. The case has been desperate from the very first. Although ailing for a week and not feeling well, Mrs. Pierce kept up and only took to her bed on Sunday. Since then her temperature has been very high, about 105 and nothing that the nurse and physician could do succeeded in lowering it. All of the remedies known to medical science were tried but without success, both in attempting to secure a lowering of the fever and in stopping the hemorrhages which followed one after another until death was inevitable.
The funeral arrangements have not been made yet.
The husband, left desolate and lonely, has the sympathy of all the people in this hour of his bitter grief.

[PIERCE, NELLIE E. WAIT]
Bedford Times-Republican (Bedford, Iowa), Thursday, March 10, 1904
A Sudden Death A Former Bedford Citizen Passes Away After a Short Illness
C. Corson of this city received a message yesterday announcing the sudden death of his niece, Mrs. H. [enry] L. Pierce at her home in Waterloo, Iowa. Mrs. Pierce was the wife of H. [enry] L. Pierce, son of P. H. Pierce of this city. They resided in Bedford about six years ago but during the past three years they have resided at Waterloo, Iowa. Mrs. Pierce took sick last Saturday, and the end came suddenly yesterday at noon. She was aged 27 years. She leaves two small children. The funeral, we understand, will take place at Genoa, Ill., her old home. The bereaved husband has the sympathy of the entire community in his great loss.

[POWELL, MARY ANN CRAWFORD]
Des Moines Register (Des Moines, Iowa), Tuesday, July 19, 1904, p. 5
POWELL – July 18, 1904, at 5 :25 o'clock a. m. at the home of her son, R. A. Crawford, Mrs. Mary A. Powell, who died in her 80th year.
The funeral will be held at 11:30 Wednesday with interment at Altoona.

[POWELL, MARY ANN CRAWFORD]
Bedford Times-Republican (Bedford, Iowa), Thursday, July 21, 1904
Mrs. Dr. Bates left on the noon train today for Des Moines. She goes in response to a telegram announcing the sad intelligence that her aunt, Mrs. M. [ary] A. Powell of that place, died this morning.

[RAFF, EMMA FLETCHER]
Bedford Times-Republican (Bedford, Iowa), Tuesday, March 13, 1906
Death of Mrs. Raff
Passes Away After An Illness of Short Duration
Mrs. Emma Raff died at her home in the north east part of the city on Friday, March 9th, at 6:30 p. m., aged 57 years, 7 months and 10 days.
Emma Fletcher was born in Mt. Vernon, Ohio, on June 29, 1848 and that was her home for thirteen years. In 1861 with her parents she moved to Webster county, Iowa. Six years later she returned with her parents to Ohio, settling at Chelsea in that state, where she was married to Marcus Raff. The young couple soon after their marriage decided to make their home in Iowa and therefore moved back to Webster county, where the bride had formerly lived. Here they resided until 1882 when they came to Taylor county, where the rest of their lives were spent. Nine children came to bless their union; of these, three have been called away. The husband and father has also preceded his companion to that brighter world, his death having occurred two years ago.
Mrs. Raff was stricken with paralysis on February 24, and ever since that time it has been apparent that her days on earth were numbered.
Funeral services were held at the home at 11 a. m. yesterday, conducted by Revs. Jones and Barackman. At 1 o'clock the cortege started toward Gravity from which place the body was shipped to Yorktown, in Page County. This morning it was taken to Norwich cemetery and there laid to rest beside the husband and children who have gone before.
The children of the deceased who are yet living are as follows: Mrs. Minnie Bennet and Joe Raff who reside near Gravity; Max, whose home is at Phoenix, Arz.; John, Calvin and Etta, who have been living with their mother in Bedford.

[RAFF, EMMA FLETCHER]
Bedford Free Press (Bedford, Iowa), Thursday, March 15, 1906
Mrs. Emma Raff – Mrs. Emma Raff was born in Mt. Vernon, Ohio, June 29, 1848, and died at her home in Bedford Friday morning, March 9, 1906, being 57 years, 7 months and 10 days of age.
In 1861 she moved with her parents to Webster county, Iowa, and after a few years residence returned to Ohio where she was married to Mr. Marcus Raff. They then removed to Webster county, Iowa and in 1882 came to Bedford. Nine children arrived to bless this union, six of whom survive her. About two years ago her husband was called to his reward and the orphaned children have the sympathy of all.
Two daughters and four sons survive her. They are Mrs. Minnie Bennett and Joseph Raff, Gravity; Max, of Prescott, Ariz.; John, Calvin and Etta of Bedford.
Mrs. Raff was stricken with paralysis about a month ago, since when her decline has been gradual but sure and no earthly power could stay the onslaughts of disease.
The funeral services were conducted by Revs. Jones and Barackman and the remains were taken to Yorktown, Iowa for interment.

[RAFF, JAMES]
Bedford Times-Republican (Bedford, Iowa), Thursday, July 7, 1904
Death of James Raff
Died: At the home of his mother 3 miles north of Bedford, on July 4th, 1904, James Raff, age 34 years, 5 months and 11 days.
The deceased was born in Tama county, Iowa, on January 23, 1870. During the last few years of his life, the condition of his health has made traveling a necessity and in the vain hope of prolonging life and regaining strength he has moved his residence from place to place. Just recently he returned, with his wife, to his mother's home; that grim and merciless monster, consumption, had already fastened its fangs upon him and although he made a brave fight and kept up his courage to the last the inevitable end came and he passed away at noon on the anniversary of our nation's birth.
Everything possible was done by devoted wife and loving relatives, who for months have realized that all they could do was to smooth his pathway to the grave. But the deceased himself never gave up, believing all the time that he would eventually rally, though when the end came it found him ready and he passed into eternity feeling sure of a loving reception in the arms of a blessed Savior.
He leaves to mourn his death a devoted, loving wife, whose gentle ministrations made his last days pleasant; a mother, who loved her son as only a mother can; five brothers and two sisters.
The funeral services were conducted Tuesday morning by Rev. Jones, after which the body was taken to Gravity and from there shipped to Norwich where it was interred by the side of his father.

[RAFF, MARCUS]
Bedford Free Press (Bedford, Iowa), Thursday, April 21, 1904
Death Was Self-Inflicted
Marcus Raff, Laboring Under Great Mental Strain, Shoots Himself; Dies in a Short Time
There's deep sorrow and tearful eyes in a home once filled with love, life, peace and happiness. One of the most dreadful things that can enter a home has taken place in the sacred precincts of the home of Marcus Raff and a widow and fatherless children mourn the loss of a loving husband and a kind father, whose life has been snuffed out in so tragic a manner.
Last Saturday at the noon hour the son, John Raff, went to his father's bedroom upstairs to call him to dinner and was horrified to find that parent lying apparently lifeless on the floor with blood and brains flowing from a wound in the right side of his head a short distance above the ear. A 32 calibre revolver lying near told the awful story. No shot had been heard by the family and the revelation was a sudden shock that well nigh paralyzed them all. Dr. Beauchamp was hastily called but the wounded man did not regain consciousness and died at 3 o'clock.
Mr. Raff had been in ill health for some time, having been under the doctor's care. This coupled with the fact that a son was soon to arrive home in the last stages of consumption, so preyed on his mind as to cause a mental derangement and it is thought that in this irresponsible condition, he fired the fatal shot. It is indeed a sad affair and the sorrowing ones have the sympathy of the entire community in so great a loss.
Coroner Brown was summoned from Lenox and an inquest held, and a verdict rendered according to the above facts.
Funeral services were conducted at the home at 2 o'clock Monday by Rev. Barackman. The body was laid to rest in the family burying ground at Norwich, a town about 8 miles west of Clarinda.

[RAFF, MARCUS]
Bedford Times-Republican (Bedford, Iowa), Thursday, April 21, 1904
Marcus Raff Commits Suicide An Old Resident, Temporarily Deranged, Sends a Bullet Crashing Through His Brain—Ill Health and the News That a Son Was Being Brought Home to Die, the Cause
Just after noon today, Marcus Raff, an old and respected citizen, whose home is two miles northeast of Bedford, took his own life by sending a .32 calibre bullet crashing through his brain. The suicide was a man of about sixty years of age and has several grown up children. One son has been in Mexico for some time and word was recently received that he was very low with consumption and that he was being brought home to die. Mr. Raff's health had been poorly for several months and it is supposed that the bad news regarding the son's condition unbalanced his mind.
Nothing strange, however, had been noted in his actions, and there was no reason to believe he ever thought of taking his own life. After dinner today he went upstairs to his room and shut the door. Presently a pistol shot rang out and when the family, their minds filled with a nameless fear, burst in the door, he was found stretched out on the floor where he had fallen, the blood and brains oozing from a bullet hole over the ear and near at hand lay a pistol that had slipped from his nerveless grasp after he had fired the fatal bullet.
At 2:00 o'clock p. m. he was still breathing but unconscious, and there is not the slightest hope for recovery.
Later. – Death came at 3:30 p. m. The coroner has arrived and will hold an inquest.

[RAFF, MARCUS]
Bedford Times-Republican (Bedford, Iowa), Thursday, April 21, 1904
The funeral services over the body of Marcus Raff were conducted by Rev. Barackman at the home of the deceased about two miles northeast of town at 2 o'clock p. m. today. A sad procession then started to convey the body to Norwich, a little town 8 miles west of Clarinda and at the cemetery there, the last sad rites will be performed, and the body committed to the earth.

[REEVES, ISAAC FINLEY]
Bedford Times-Press (Bedford, Iowa), Thursday June 8, 1939
Isaac Reeves Dies This Morning
Isaac Reeves, a longtime resident of Bedford and community, died at the Matheny home at Platteville at 2 o'clock this morning, Thursday, June 8.
The funeral services will be held at the Wetmore Funeral Home a 2 o'clock Saturday afternoon with burial in the Lexington cemetery.

[RICHARDS, JOHN W., 1833 - 1904]
Bedford Times-Republican (Bedford, Iowa), Thursday, March 3, 1904
A Former Resident Dead
John W. Richards, who died a few days ago at his home in Osceola, was at one time a Bedford merchant. He is remembered here by the men who were in business forty years ago and is held in high esteem by all who knew him.
John W. Richards was born October 1, 1833, at Enfield, Massachusetts. In 1854, at the age of 21, he came west, stopping at Bentonsport, in Van Buren county, Iowa, where for one winter he taught school. In the spring of 1855, he came to Osceola where he entered the store of Howe & Richards as a clerk. The store in which he worked was the pioneer store of Osceola. It was located in a log building near the northeast corner of the public square. There are now but few of the survivors of that early day who remember the store and its proprietors and the clerk. In 1862 he went to Bedford, Iowa, and engaged in mercantile business but the death of George W. Howe soon recalled him to Osceola, and he became a member of the firm of S. & J. W. Richards.



[ROUNDS, JAMES T., 1850 – 1904]
Bedford Times-Republican (Bedford, Iowa), Thursday, August 18, 1904
Well Known Citizen Dead
From Bedford Friday Republican
On Thursday morning at a little after midnight, James Rounds of New Market passed away. For nearly a year he had been in poor health but was confined to his bed but a few days before his death.
The funeral was to have been held this afternoon at the M. E. Church in New Market, Rev. Phillips officiating, but on account of relatives from Montana being unable to arrive in time, it has been postponed and no definite hour has been decided upon. Mr. Rounds had lived in New Market a good many years and was well known throughout the county.
He was a man but little past middle age and had four grown children who survive him. One son lives in New Market, while two of his boys and one daughter reside in Montana. All the absent ones are on the road and will be present at the obsequies.

[ROUNDS, JAMES T., 1850 – 1904]
Clarinda Journal (Clarinda, Iowa), Friday, August 19, 1904
The New Market Herald of August 12 says: "About 11 o'clock Wednesday evening, James Rounds died at his home in this city. He had been ill almost a year and a large part of that time confined to his bed. Diabetes was the cause of his death. Mr. Rounds leaves a large number of friends and acquaintances over the county, he having been our city marshal for a number of years until ill health demanded his retirement.

[ROUNDS, SUSAN A. THOMPSON]
Page County Democrat (Clarinda, Iowa), Thursday, April 28, 1904

Word came to this city Tuesday of the death of Mrs. J. [ames] T. Rounds of New Market, wife of Mr. Jas. Rounds. She had been in poor health for some time. They were both well known in this vicinity where they were born, he being a son of Mr. and Mrs. Sol. Rounds and she a daughter of Mose Thompson. James is in poor health as a result of typhoid fever some time ago.

[ROUNDS, SUSAN A. THOMPSON]
Clarinda Herald (Clarinda, Iowa), Friday, April 29, 1904
East River Gleanings
The funeral of Mrs. Jim Rounds, who died Tuesday morning at her home in New Market, was held yesterday and the remains interred in the Memory cemetery.

[ROUNDS, SUSAN A. THOMPSON]
Bedford Free Press (Bedford, Iowa), Thursday, May 5, 1904
--Mrs. Jim Rounds died at her home in New Market on Tuesday of last week. Her death was unexpected, she having been sick only a few days.

[RUMBLE, EMMA AMANDA KEISTER]
Des Moines Tribune (Des Moines, Iowa), Friday, July 26, 1940
Des Moines Deaths
RUMBLE – Mrs. Emma A. 1511 Harding road, died Friday at home.

[RUMBLE, JAMES PERRY]
Des Moines Register (Des Moines, Iowa), Thursday, November 25, 1915
James Perry Rumble – James Perry Rumble was born July 1, 1838 in Virginia. He was brought to Washington county, Iowa, by his parent in 1839. He died Nov. 19 at the Methodist hospital following an operation. He had served three years in the civil war with the Fourth Iowa Cavalry and for twenty years since he was engaged in agriculture. He leaves a wife, Emma A. [manda] K. [eister] Rumble and one daughter, Mrs. J. [ohn] S. [ylvester] Burkhard of Tulsa, Okl.

[RUTLEDGE, DARIUS BARTON]
Bedford Times-Republican (Bedford, Iowa), Thursday, May 21, 1931
Well Known Bedford Man Passed Away
Was Charter Member of Bedford I. O. O. F. Lodge
D. Rutledge, 80 years old, stepfather of W. [allace] D. Leppo of this office, passed away at the home of his daughter, Mrs. R. C. Slater in Omaha, Nebr., Tuesday. The funeral services were held at the Gentleman Mortuary in Omaha Wednesday afternoon and interment was made in the West Lawn cemetery.
Mr. Rutledge with his family came to Taylor county from Illinois in March 1880 and resided at Conway for many years. After the death of his wife, Mrs. Susan Leppo Rutledge, in 1903, he moved to Bedford where he resided for some time. He then moved to Kansas and remained there until a year and a half ago when he went to Omaha to live with his daughter. He had been ill for the past eight months. He is survived by the daughter, Mrs. Slater, and also three sons, Harry Rutledge of Silverton, Oregon; A. C. Rutledge of Sand Springs, Okla.; and Wallace D. Leppo of Bedford. Mr. Rutledge was a charter member of the Bedford lodge of the Independent Order of Odd Fellows.

[RUTLEDGE, ESTHER ANN FOUTS]
Boston Globe (Boston, Massachusetts), Thursday, November 12, 1942
RUTLEDGE – In Dedham, November 10, Esta Ann Rutledge, age 86 years, mother of Rev. Lyman V. Rutledge. Funeral services strictly private.

[RUTLEDGE, HARRY]
Bedford Times-Press (Bedford, Iowa), Thursday, September 10, 1942
Harry Rutledge Dies
Harry Rutledge, a resident of Conway many years ago, died at his home in Vancouver, Washington, Wednesday, September 2. He was a half-brother of W. [allace] D. Leppo of Bedford.


[SAUNDERS, NELLIE]
Bedford Times-Republican (Bedford, Iowa), Thursday, August 4, 1904
A Baffling Disease
Miss Nellie Saunders died at home in Lenox Thursday of tuberculosis of the bowels. Her disease has been a baffling and mysterious one to the physicians. The peculiarity was the ravenous appetite of the patient. It seemed nothing would appease it. She craved many kinds of things, not usually considered edible and would eat corn, grass and other articles of their nature unless restrained. The disease was not satisfactory diagnosed until after death when a postmortem examination proved it to have been tuberculosis of the bowels.

[SCANE, HENRY WAYLAND, - 1904]
Bedford Free Press (Bedford, Iowa), Thursday, April 14, 1904
Wayland Scane Gone Home
The Infant Son of Mr. and Mrs. Will Scane Dies of Bronchial Pneumonia—Was a Bright Boy
Last Friday morning at 9:50 the angel spirit of little Henry Wayland Scane passed peacefully from this world to the Father who gave it. For one year, three months and three days, the little child was the joy of happy parents who now have twice been bereft of their cherished hope of a loving child.
Little Wayland was taken away by bronchial pneumonia and was sick only thirteen days. It seemed a hopeless struggle from the first, although the little one rallied for a while under the skillful treatment of attentive physicians and the care of anxious parents. But the improvement was of short duration.

The remains were taken to Lenox on the noon train Monday where the funeral services were held, the Rev. Father Noonan officiating. Interment was in the Lenox cemetery.

[SCANE, HENRY WAYLAND, - 1904]
Bedford Times-Republican (Bedford, Iowa), Thursday, April 14, 1904
Little Wayland Is Dead
Passes Away After Thirteen Days Illness—The Remains Will Be Taken to Lenox Monday Noon for Interment
After thirteen days of suffering little Henry Wayland Scane passed peacefully away, at 9:50 a. m., today, aged 1 year, 3 months and 3 days. The remains will be taken to Lenox for interment Monday noon.
Little Wayland was the only child of Mr. and Mrs. Wm. Scane, and the idol of their hearts. He was a more than ordinarily bright child and had just arrived at that age when childhood seems the sweetest, and when to the loving parents it seems hardest to give them up. This is the second time in the short married life of the heart broken parents that the Angel of Death has come and taken away the flower of the family, the darling of their home and it is hard for them indeed to bow beneath the rod and say, "Thy will not mine be done."
Little Wayland was taken sick thirteen days ago. From the very first he seemed to have been called to go. He was ministered to by the loving hands of willing friends and the best medical skill obtainable, while the parents, so great was their anxiety, they scarce left his side. For a while he rallied and it was hoped the prayers would be answered and that grim death would pass him by, but it was not to be, despite all efforts of friends and doctors and despite the prayers and yearnings of the mother's heart that seemed strong enough to defy dissolution itself, he gradually sank lower and lower until at lastthe pure and innocent soul was borne away on angel wings to the realm where parting and sorrow are unknown. Our Savior has said: "Come unto me, little children, for of such is the Kingdom of Heaven." Little Wayland is gone. No more on this earth will his laughing welcome greet a returning papa or his innocent prattle lull to sleep a loving mamma, but on the other shore he will be waiting to greet them. Pure, innocent and uncorrupted, his soul is one of the brightest jewels in the crown of Him who said, "Suffer them to come and forbid them not."

[SCANE, HENRY WAYLAND, - 1904]
Bedford Times-Republican (Bedford, Iowa), Thursday, April 14, 1904
Funeral of Little Wayland Scane
The funeral services of little Wayland Scane who died yesterday, will be held at Lenox Monday at 1:30 p. m., Rev. Father Noonan officiating. The casket will be opened at the residence of the parents, Monday, from 8:30 to 11 o'clock a. m., after which the remains will be taken to Lenox on the noon train. The interment will take place at the Lenox cemetery.

[SCHOENENBERGER, MARY LOUISA THINNES]
Bedford Free Press (Bedford, Iowa) Thursday, May 12, 1904
Schoenenberger, Mary Louisa Thinnes
--Mrs. G. [eorge] C. [linton] Acker was called to her old home in Madison county last week by the last illness of her mother, who died soon after her arrival. Mrs. Acker has the sympathy of many Bedford friends in her hour of sorrow.

[SCHOENENBERGER, MARY LOUISA THINNES]
Bedford Times-Republican (Bedford, Iowa), Thursday, May 12, 1904
Word was received here today of the death of Mrs. Schoenenberger, mother of Mrs. G.[eorge] C. [linton] Acker, at her home in Madison county near Lorimor. She was 73 years old and had been in ill health for some time. Mrs. Acker left on Sunday and was with her when death came.

[SLOAN, GERTRUDE MARIA TUBBS] 
Bedford Times-Republican (Bedford, Iowa), Thursday, March 10, 1904
Mrs. Sloan, the mother of Mrs. M. [adison] C. McMahill, died at her home in Monmouth, Ill., last Monday morning. Mrs. Sloan was 83 years old. She made several visits to Bedford and made many friends while in our city who will be grieved to hear of her taking away. Mrs. McMahill will return to Bedford Saturday.

[SPACHT, GEORGE H.]
Bedford Times-Republican (Bedford, Iowa), Thursday, October 29, 1931
George H. Spacht Died in Arkansas
Was a Resident of Bedford Until a Few Years Ago
The local Odd Fellows lodge received word last week of the death of one of their members, George H. Spacht, a former resident of Bedford. Mr. Spacht passed away at the hospital in Eureka Springs, Arkansas, Saturday, October 10th. He was 63 years of age. The funeral services were held in Berryville, Ark., the Tuesday following his death, with the I. O. O. F. in charge. Interment was made in the I. O. O. F. cemetery at that place.

 

[SPACHT, SARAH ELIZABETH DEAN]
Bedford Free Press (Bedford, Iowa), Thursday, June 23, 1904
Sudden Death of Mrs. A. Spacht
The certainty of death and the uncertainty of life has again been vividly exemplified in our midst. Thursday of last week Mrs. A. [rthur] Spacht was strong and robust, the picture of health, with every outward promise of living a goodly number of years. Friday she was taken sick but nothing serious was apprehended, abut at 12:15 Monday night she breathed her last. The blow is indeed a bitter one to a loving husband and three devoted children and the sympathy of many friends is extended in this their hour of sorrow. They are commended to "Him who doeth all things well." May they be enabled to say, "The Lord gave, the Lord hath taken away, blessed be the name of the Lord." The children are all grown and are as follows: Frank, George and Mrs. Joe Switzer. If Mrs. Spacht had lived until July 23, she would have been 62 years old. She was a woman of kindly deeds and a generous disposition, trying to live an exemplary Christian life, having for a period of years been a faithful member of the Bedford Christian church.
The funeral services were conducted at the home by Elder Lee Ferguson. Interment in Bowers cemetery.

[SPACHT, SARAH ELIZABETH DEAN]
Bedford Times-Republican (Bedford, Iowa), Thursday, June 23, 1904
Death of Mrs. Spacht
From Tuesday's Daily
Mrs. Arthur Spacht died at her home 1 ½ miles east of Bedford this morning at 12:15 after a brief illness of less than a week, aged 61 years, 11 months and 2 days.
Sarah Elizabeth Dean was born in Ohio, near Columbus, July 19, 1842 and afterwards removed with her parents to Osceola, Iowa, where she was married to Arthur Spacht. Thirty-eight years ago, they moved to Taylor county and since that time have made their home in Clayton and Bedford townships. Three children were born to them who are all grown to maturity. The eldest is Frank who resides in the Indian Territory; the next is George, who lives eight miles west of Bedford and a daughter, Mrs. Grace Switzer, who also lives here. Three brothers and three sisters also survive her. One brother lives in Blockton, one in Kansas and the other in Arkansas. Of the three sisters, one resides in Kansas and two in Nebraska.
About twelve years ago the deceased united with the Christian church and has always been a consistent member, a good wife and loving mother. She was always a healthy, hearty woman and until last Thursday was in good health, having been in town the previous day. In the evening she was taken ill, but not until the next day, Friday, was her condition thought serious. But from this on in spite of all that could be done, she grew gradually worse, until she passed away a little after midnight, a victim to that dread disease, heart failure.
The funeral will be conducted by Rev. Lee Furgeson at the residence Thursday at 1 p. m. and interment made at Bowers Cemetery.

[SPACHT, SARAH ELIZABETH DEAN]
Bedford Free Press (Bedford, Iowa), Thursday, June 30, 1904
Sarah Elizabeth Dean was born in Union county, Ohio, July 18, 1843. She removed with her parents to Clark county, Iowa, in 1860. She was there married to Arthur Spacht on April 21, 1863, and with him removed to Bedford in 1866, where they have since resided. She united with the Newlightchurch at 13 years of age, and since united with the Christian church of Bedford, where she was still a member. She has had born to her four children, Frank J., George H., Josephine and Mrs. Grace Switzer, Josephine having died in infancy.

 

[SWITZER, AUDREY LOUISE WALLACE]

Bedford Times-Republican (Bedford, Iowa), Thursday, December 17, 1925
Audrey Wallace Switzer – Audrey L. [ouise] Wallace was born near Bedford, Taylor county, Ia., on Feb. 16, 1891 and departed this life Dec. 8, 1925, in Denver, Colo., aged 34 years, 9 months and 22 days. At the tender age of 14 years she was converted and joined the Christian Adventist church at Gravity, Ia., where she has remained a faithful member since. She was united in marriage to Robert I. [saac] Switzer at Gravity, Ia., on July 18, 1909. To this union were born three boys: Gerald R. [aymond], W. [allace] Dwayne who preceded his mother just two years ago, and little Robert D., who will never know a dear mother's love. Besides the husband and two boys she leaves to mourn her departure two sisters, Mrs. Osa Lapoe and Mrs. Verda Norris, both of Denver, Colo. She was a patient sufferer, a kind and loving wife, mother and sister and besides the loved ones at home where she is so much needed, she leaves a large circle of loving friends for to know her was to love her. Funeral services were held at Hobbs Chapels on Dec. 8 at Cheyenne, Wyo., and interment was made at Lake View cemetery at that place.

[SWITZER, JOHN RICHARD]
Bedford Times-Republican (Bedford, Iowa), Thursday, October 30, 1913
John R. Switzer – John R. Switzer died at his home in Valley Falls, Kan., Tuesday October 28, aged 36 years. The remains were brought to Bedford and the funeral services were held at the First Baptist church Thursday afternoon, conducted by Dr. J. W. Neyman. Interment was made in the Fairview cemetery.
Mr. Switzer was born in Knox county, Ill., September 14, 1877. He moved to Kansas in the fall of 1886 and in 1890 moved to Iowa. October 5, 1910, he was united in marriage to Miss Bertha Baker. He met his death by the accidental discharge of a gun, which he was repairing. He leaves to mourn his death, his wife, father, Peter Switzer and two brothers, Joseph of Bedford and Robert of Macksburg, Ia. He was a member of the Baptist church.
[Note: The same obituary was published in the Bedford Free Press, November 4, 1913.]

[SWITZER, JOHN RICHARD]
Jefferson County Tribune (Oskaloosa, Kansas), Friday, October 31, 1913
Death by Accidental Shooting
From the Farmers Vindicator
While cleaning his automatic revolver at his home in the south part of Valley Falls last Tuesday morning at about 9 o'clock, John R. Switzer accidentally shot himself in the abdomen. The bullet went through the body without striking a bone or cutting an intestine, an unusual thing the doctors say; but it cut the abdominal aorta, death in a short time resulting from hemorrhage. John was in the room by himself when the shot was heard by his wife in the kitchen and by his father, who was just outside the door. He called to his wife "Oh! Bertha come here!" they both reached the falling body about the same time.
Drs. Marks and Lowry were called, and Coroner Lowry took charge of the body.

An inquest was held Tuesday the verdict of the jury being in accordance with the above facts—a case of death by accidental shooting.
Died, John Richard Switzer was born in Knox County, Illinois, September 14, 1877, and died at Valley Falls, Kansas, October 28, 1913, accidentally shooting himself.
He was married to Bertha Baker at Bedford, Iowa, October 5th, 1910. They had been living at Valley Falls a year or so. His father, Peter Switzer, lived with them.
Accompanied by the wife, his father and Joe Baker, her brother, the body was taken to Bedford, Iowa for burial.

[SWITZER, JOHN RICHARD]
Bedford Times-Republican (Bedford, Iowa), Thursday, November 6, 1913
Mrs. John Switzer and father-in-law, Peter Switzer, who accompanied the remains of John Switzer to Bedford for burial, returned to Valley Falls, Kan., Saturday.

[SWITZER, MARY ELLEN SMITH]
Bedford Times-Republican (Bedford, Iowa), Thursday, February 15, 1912
Mary E. Switzer – Mary E. Switzer died at her home in Bedford at 10 o'clock p. m. Monday, February 12, 1912.
Mary E. [llen] Smith was born in Clinton county, Ohio, October 31, 1853. When she was four years of age her parents moved to Knox county, Ill., where she grew to womanhood. On December 3, 1868, she united in marriage with Peter Switzer. To this union there were born three sons, Joseph and John of Bedford and Robert of Corning.
In 1886 Mr. and Mrs. Switzer moved to Rawlins county, Kansas and in 1890 to Bedford, where they have since made their home. For the past six years Mrs. Switzer had been a continual sufferer and her death is regarded in the nature of a blessing, leavened with sadness.
At the time of her death, Mrs. Switzer was in her sixtieth year of age and had been an active member of the church since her fourteenth year.
Funeral services were held at 2 o'clock p. m. Wednesday, February 14, at the Baptist church, conducted by Rev. J. W. Neyman, the pastor. Interment was in Fairview cemetery.

[SWITZER, MARY ELLEN SMITH]
Bedford Free Press (Bedford, Iowa), Thursday, February 15, 1912
Obituary – Mary E. [llen] Smith was born in Clinton county, Ohio, October 31, 1853. In the year 1857 she moved with her parents to Knox county, Ill., where on December 3, 1868, she was united in marriage to Mr. Peter Switzer. To this union were born three sons, Joseph and John, of Bedford and Robert of Corning. They moved to Rawlins county, Kansas in 1886, where they resided until moving to Bedford in 1890, which has since been her home. Early in life Mrs. Switzer became a Christian. After an extended illness she departed this life on Monday, February 12, at 10 p. m., aged 59 years, 3 months and 12 days. She leaves to mourn her death her husband and three sons, besides a host of friends. The bereaved relatives have the heartfelt sympathy of all.
Funeral services were held from the Baptist church Wednesday at 2 p. m. conducted by Dr. J. W. Neyman. Interment was in Fairview cemetery.

[SWITZER, PETER]
Bedford Free Press (Bedford, Iowa), Thursday, July 3, 1924
Peter Switzer Dead
Peter Switzer, 79 years of age, died at his home in Denver, June 28th, death being caused by an automobile accident, we are told. He was a former resident of this city and his body was brought here for burial in Fairview cemetery. Funeral services were held this afternoon, Thursday, July 3, from the Baptist church.

[SWITZER, PETER]
Bedford Free Press (Bedford, Iowa), Thursday, July 10, 1924
Death of Peter Switzer
In last week's Free Press brief mention was made of the death of Peter Switzer, a former resident of this community, which occurred at his home in Denver, Colo.
Mr. Switzer, 80 years of age, was making his home in Denver with his son Joseph. He had been visiting at the neighbors nearby and was on his way back home when a car driven by Edward Foulk of Denver struck him down as he was crossing the street. The accident was pronounced unavoidable and the driver was not held responsible. It is believed Mr. Switzer's advanced age, poor hearing and eyesight, were responsible for his stepping in front of the car. He was knocked to the pavement and rendered unconscious. He died in a short time as his skull was fractured.
The body was brought here for burial. The services were held last Thursday afternoon at the Baptist church at 2:30 o'clock and burial made in Fairview cemetery.
His son Joseph and wife of Denver attended the funeral here. Their two daughters, Myrtle and Marjorie remained at their home in Denver. Joseph formerly lived in this community, leaving his farm east of Bedford about ten years ago for his present home where he is now engaged in the carpenter business.
Another son, Robert, and his wife and son, Gerald, of Kimball, Nebr., were also here. Robert left Bedford about fifteen years ago and is now farming near Kimball.
The obituary as read at the services follows:
Peter Switzer was born in the state of Indiana July 27, 1844, and died in Denver, Colo., June 29, 1924.
When a lad he moved with his parents to Knox county, Illinois, where he volunteered to serve his country at the age of 16 years, enlisting in Co. I, 72nd Regiment Illinois Infantry, and serving 3 years.
On December 3, 1868, he was united in marriage to Mary Ellen Smith, who preceded him to the better land on February 12, 1912. To this union were born three sons, Joseph E. [verly], of Denver, Colo., John R. [ichard], who has gone on before, and Robert I.[saac] of Kimball, Nebr. He also leaves three grandchildren, Myrtle P. and E. Marjorie of Denver and Gerald R.[aymond] of Kimball.
From Illinois they moved to Rawlins county, Kansas in 1886, where they resided until 1890 when they moved to Taylor county, Iowa, where they resided until the death of his companion, since which time he has lived with his sons in the west.
He gave his heart to God and accepted Christ as his Savior in middle life and became a member of the Baptist East [Mission] church before the church was built and remained a member to the time of his death.
Since making his home in Denver his time has been taken up largely in visiting and casting sunshine upon the sick and afflicted and [he] will be sorely missed by his friends, which one can count by the score, as well as the bereaved ones left.

[SWITZER, PETER]
Bedford Times-Republican (Bedford, Iowa), Thursday, July 10, 1924
Peter Switzer Was Killed by an Auto
Peter Switzer whose funeral was held in Bedford last Thursday, was killed by an automobile in Denver, Colo., on June 29. He was struck while crossing the street by a car driven by Edwin Foulk, a dental student. Witnesses exonerated the driver completely. His obituary follows:
Peter Switzer was born in the state of Indiana July 27, 1844, and died in Denver, Colo., June 29, 1924.
When a lad he moved with his parents to Knox county, Illinois, where he volunteered to serve his country at the age of 16 years, enlisting in Co. I, 72nd Regiment Illinois Infantry, and serving 3 years.
On December 3, 1868, he was united in marriage to Mary Ellen Smith, who preceded him to the better land on February 12, 1912. To this union were born three sons, Joseph E. [verly], of Denver, Colo., John R. [ichard], who has gone on before, and Robert I.[saac] of Kimball, Nebr. He also leaves three grandchildren, Myrtle P. and E. [thel] Marjorie of Denver and Gerald R.[aymond] of Kimball.
From Illinois they moved to Rawlins county, Kansas in 1886, where they resided until 1890 when they moved to Taylor county, Iowa, where they resided until the death of his companion, since which time he has lived with his sons in the west.
He gave his heart to God and accepted Christ as his Savior in middle life and became a member of the Baptist East [Mission] church before the church was built and remained a member to the time of his death.
Since making his home in Denver his time has been taken up largely in visiting and casting sunshine upon the sick and afflicted and [he] will be sorely missed by his friends, which one can count by the score, as well as the bereaved ones left.

[SWITZER, WALLACE DWAYNE]
Bedford Times-Republican (Bedford, Iowa), Tuesday, January 15, 1924
Death Saddens Former Residents
Dwayne, the youngest son of Mr. and Mrs. Robt. Switzer passed away at the home in Parco, Wyo., on Thursday, December 13, after an illness of only a short week, death being due to an attack of rheumatic fever.
Dwayne was born in Macksburg, Iowa and would have been ten years old on March the 5th. His parents came to Kimball to reside when he was two years of age and his brief school life was spent in the Kimball schools, his parents having moved from here about three months ago, locating at Parco. Since residing there the little lad had had made, as he had here, many friends, both among those of his own age as well as those of mature age, who were won by his loving disposition and for whom his passing was a sincere grief, and they will sympathize with father, mother and an only brother, who are left to mourn the going out of his bright little life. Besides his parents and brother is an aged grandfather, who will miss the cheery voice of the little grandson.
Dwayne had become a very energetic and well-liked news boy after locating in Parco and had earned quite a neat little sum of money. Among his recent purchases from his earning was a new suit which arrived just the day before he passed away and in this, his proudly earned suit, he was laid away.
A beautiful floral wreath was placed on the little casket, which was the last remembrance of Dwayne's Parco friends, both old and young.
The little body was taken to Cheyenne, Wyoming on Friday and funeral services were held at the undertaking chapel of Hobbs-Huckfeldt & Tinkbiner and from there was borne to the cemetery where they were laid to rest. Accompanying the bereaved parents to Cheyenne were Mr. and Mrs. Dell Pickett and at Cheyenne they were met by Mr. Switzer's brother Joseph and family and the aged father, Peter Switzer, of Denver, who attended the funeral.
Their friends here will extend to them their sincere sympathy in this time of grief and trouble. – Tri-State Farmer, Kimball, Nebr.
Robert Switzer will be well remembered at Bedford, having grown to manhood eight miles east of town and for a time resided in Bedford.

[TATE, GEORGE]
Bedford Free Press (Bedford, Iowa), Thursday, April 7, 1904
Sad News
Last Saturday Mr. and Mrs. John W. Tate received the sad news of the death of their son George at Hibben, Minnesota, where he was in the barber business. No particulars have been learned as to cause of death. Roy Tate left on the first train for Hibben. The body was taken to the old family burial ground at Oneida, Ill., for interment. Mr. and Mrs. Tate have the sympathy of many friends in their hour of sorrow.

[TAYLOR, ELIZA JANE FREEL]
Bedford Free Press (Bedford, Iowa) Thursday, May 12, 1904
Died at her home in Ross township on Thursday morning, May 5, Mrs. Cyrenus Taylor, aged 79 years and 8 days. The funeral was conducted at the home Friday afternoon by Elder Wm. Cobb. Interment in Titus cemetery. Deceased was one of the oldest settlers of Taylor county, having taken up her home in Ross township with her husband in 1856, who departed this life eleven years ago. They were the parents of ten children, seven of whom are still living.

[TAYLOR, ELIZA JANE FREEL]
Bedford Times-Republican (Bedford, Iowa), Thursday, May 12, 1904
(From Friday's Daily Republican)
Another Old Resident Gone
Mrs. Eliza Jane Taylor, nee Freel, relict of Cyrenus Taylor deceased, died at her home in Ross township, six miles southwest of Bedford, on Thursday morning, May 5th, at 7:50 o'clock, aged 79 years and 8 days.
Eliza Jane Freel was born in Warren county, Illinois, on April 27th, 1825; when quite young she removed with her parents to Lafayette, Indiana, where on November 19th, 1843, she was married to her late husband, Cyrenus Taylor.
Early in the year of 1856, putting their few earthly possessions in a "prairie schooner," the young couple bid farewell to the home of their childhood and started on what was then a perilous journey westward to the frontier state of Iowa. On the last day of April, 1856, having reached what their good judgement told them was a fertile country and a desirable place to make their future home and rear their little ones, they settled on the farm in Ross township, Taylor county, where they remained until the grim reaper gathered them home.
For nearly four decades, husband and wife lived together on the place they first chose for their home; here their children grew to maturity, chose their own life's partners and moved to homes of their own. Together they fought life's battles, endured its vicissitudes and shared each other's joys. Eleven years ago the angel of death came, and the husband and father passed to the brighter world. Since that time Mrs. Taylor has lived with her daughter on the old home place. She has always enjoyed good health and up to a short time ago was unusually rugged for one of her years. On the 11th of February she took sick with lagrippe. She was very ill for a while but recently had got much better and up to last Saturday it was thought she was in a fair way of recovery, but on that day she was taken worse very suddenly and gradually sank lower and lower until Thursday morning, when at about 8 o'clock she quietly passed away.
During their married life ten children have been born to Mr. and Mrs. Taylor, seven of whom survive them. Two are boys; Levy who lives near the old home place and John W. of Spokane, Wash. Of the five girls, two of them live here: Louisa Taylor and Emma Hatfield.
The others are: Martha Wilson, Hopkins, Mo., Hannah Wight, Kiel, Okla., and Nancy Lacy, Miltonville, Kans.
At a very early age Mrs. Taylor united with the Christian church and all her life she has been a consistent member and an earnest devout Christian.
The funeral was held today (Friday) at the family residence at 3 o'clock p. m., Rev. William Cobb officiating. Interment at the Titus cemetery.


[VAUGHN, ROBERT M.]
Bedford Times-Republican (Bedford, Iowa), Thursday, August 4, 1904
Taylor County Boy Killed
Denver, Col., July 29. – Robert M. Vaugh[n] of Clearfield, Ia., a recent graduate of the Colorado School of mines was killed in the Cook mine at Central City today. Vaughn was ascending in the cage with M. A. Swanson, when the accident occurred by which both men were caught in the machinery and fatally mangled, their bodies then dropping to the bottom of the shaft, six hundred feet. Vaughn was working in the mine to gain practical experience. His relatives were notified.
The above dispatch refers to a young man well known in the eastern part of the county. A brief telegram appeared yesterday stating that young Vaughn was probably killed, and the sad rumor is now confirmed. His relatives and many friends here will learn with sorrow of the untimely end of this estimable young man.

[VAUGHN, ROBERT M.]
Wednesday's Items
Bedford Times-Republican (Bedford, Iowa), Thursday, August 4, 1904
Robert M. Vaughn who was killed in Colorado will be buried at Clearfield today at 2 o'clock. A. J. Sowers and family drove over this morning to be present at the funeral.

[WOLFORD, CHRISTOPHER COLUMBUS "LUM"]
Bedford Times-Republican (Bedford, Iowa), Thursday, July 28, 1904
C. C. Wolford Succumbs to Paralysis
C. [hristopher] C. [olumbus] Wolford died Tuesday at Oklahoma City, O. T., of paralysis. Mr. Wolford was formerly a resident of Taylor county, having lived on a farm in Gay township for many years and was known to all the older residents. His wife was a daughter of Robert Harvey of Blockton and sister to W. A. and M. A. Harvey of this place, while many other relatives resides in this county.
"Lum," as he was familiarly known, was a man with many friends. Always energetic and full of life. Even when living what to most men would be a quiet farmer's life, his circle of acquaintance was very large and fifteen years ago there was scarcely a person in Taylor county who either personally or by reputation did not know of Lum Wolford. His enemies were few while his friends were legion.
After leaving the farm he went to Blockton and engaged in the mercantile business; remaining there but a short time, he moved to Enid, Okla., where he made his home up to the time of his death.
For some years he had been on the road for a machinery company and was at Oklahoma City when the stroke came that ended his life.

[WOLFORD, CHRISTOPHER COLUMBUS]
Bedford Free Press (Bedford, Iowa), Thursday, July 28, 1904
--C. [hristopher] C. [olumbus] Wolford, at one time a resident of Taylor county, died of a sudden stroke of paralysis at Oklahoma City. His home was at Enid. His wife was a daughter of Robert Harvey of Blockton and sister to W. A. and M. A. Harvey of Bedford. The old-time friends of the family regret to learn of the death of Mr. Wolford.