Obituaries
submitted by: Julia Johnson - julia.johnson63@gmail.com
 
 

[ADAMS, LESLIE M.]
Bedford Free Press (Bedford, Iowa), Thursday, September 10, 1908
Leslie M. Adams, infant son of Mr. and Mrs. J. [ohn] M. [anford] Adams, died Saturday evening, August 29, after an illness of nineteen days, aged one year, seven months and seventeen days. The funeral service was conducted at the residence Tuesday, September first, at ten o'clock, by Rev. Osburn of the Baptist church of New Market, the music being furnished by the members of the Baptist choir. The floral offerings were beautiful. The bereft family have the sympathy of all. Mr. Adams was formerly postmaster at Ladoga and has many friends in that locality who extend their sympathy. 

[ANDERSON, EDWARD T. "ED", 1880-1909]
Bedford Free Press (Bedford, Iowa), Thursday, 11, 1909
Ed Anderson Dead
Word was received here that on Saturday, Mr. Ed Anderson died at his home in Cambridge, Iowa. It seems that he commenced coughing about [?] o'clock in the afternoon and no relief could be secured from it and by evening he passed away. Mr. Anderson for several years was a druggist at Blockton and after selling out of there came to Bedford to work for Frank Wright in the drug store. He remained with him until last June when he went to Cambridge to accept a position in a drug store at that place. Mr. Anderson was a reliable and steady young man, having made friends both here and at Blockton, who will learn of his sad death with extreme regret.

[ANDERSON, GRACIE, 1909 - 1909]
Bedford Times-Republican (Bedford, Iowa), Thursday, July 1, 1909
Rev. George E. Purdy was called to Athelstan Saturday to preach the funeral sermon at 2:30 p. m. of Gracie, the 3 months and 10 days old daughter of Alfred Anderson and wife who died Friday after an illness of seven days. The funeral took place at the Baptist church at Athelstan and interment was made in Platteville cemetery. The little one died of ailments incident to childhood. The parents have the sympathy of friends and neighbors in the death of this, their first born. –Blockton News.

[BAILEY, DESMOND]
Bedford Times-Republican (Bedford, Iowa), Thursday, March 11, 1909
Tarried But a Little While
Desmond, the little daughter of Mr. and Mrs. A. [mi] B. [ird] Bailey, who reside in the north part of town, died Friday, March 5, of tuberculosis, age 1 year, 5 months and 20 days. The funeral services were held at the home at 9 a. m. Sunday conducted by Rev. Dudley. Interment was made at Memory cemetery in Page county.
[Note: Iowa, Deaths and Burials, 1850-1990, gives the gender as male.]

[BALLOU, ORLANDO]
Bedford Times-Republican (Bedford, Iowa), Thursday, July 22, 1909
John Boyd received a letter this week telling of the death of his brother-in-law, Orlando Ballou, which occurred at Freewater, Ore., July 14. Mr. Ballou has visited in Taylor county and is known to numerous persons in this county. He is also a distant relative of George Ballou of this city.



[BOOTH, JANE A. NOBLE]
Bedford Times-Republican (Bedford, Iowa), Thursday, April 8, 1909
Chas. Darling, carrier on route one, received word yesterday of the death of the wife of his half-brother, John O. Booth, at Orleans, Nebraska. Mrs. Booth died very suddenly Monday. She had been up and around, doing her work and apparently in good health. After her work was finished, she sat down to rest and almost instantly was dead. The cause of her death, if known, was not stated in the letter.

[BOWER, JOHN C., 1840 – 1909]
Omaha Daily Bee (Omaha, Nebraska), Wednesday, June 2, 1909
John Bower
ST. PAUL, Neb., June 1. – (Special.) – John Bower, who for the last twenty-nine years has owned and operated a livery barn in this city, died suddenly yesterday morning at the age of 70 years. He had been in failing health during the last two months and death was due to weakness of the heart. Mr. Bower was born in Green county, Pennsylvania and came to this city in 1880. He leaves two children, Ralph Bower of this city and Miss Bessie Bower of Los Angeles, Cal. The body will be interred in Elmwood cemetery tomorrow afternoon.

[BOWER, JOHN C., 1840 - 1909]
Bedford Times-Republican (Bedford, Iowa), Thursday, June 3, 1909

Mr. and Mrs. A. B. Fordyce of Jefferson township and Lew Bowers left Monday for St. Paul, Neb., to be present at the funeral of John Bowers, brother of Lew Bowers and Mrs. Fordyce. Mr. Bowers was, at one time, a resident of Taylor county but left here nearly 36 years ago and will therefore be remembered by the older residents only. His death was very sudden, but no further particulars were given in the message received by the relatives here.

[BOWER, JOHN C., 1840 - 1909]
Bedford Free Press (Bedford, Iowa), Thursday, June 24, 1909
A. B. Fordyce from Platteville was in town Saturday. He and Mrs. Fordyce had but recently returned from St. Paul, Nebr., where they had been to attend the funeral of the latter's brother, John Bower [Bower]. The deceased at one tie lived near Conway and was well known here. He dropped dead suddenly while on the streets of his hometown.

[BROWN, NANCY SKINNER]
Bedford Times-Republican (Bedford, Iowa), Thursday, June 10, 1909
Jas. Skinner, of Laharp, Kan., a brother of Mrs. Nancy Brown, E. T. Brown of Haskins, Ia., a brother-in-law, and Mrs. Retta Cottrell of Ames, Ia., a sister, returned homes Wednesday after attending the funeral of Mrs. Brown. Hiram Skinner, her brother, of Stuart, Ia., returned home Monday. – Clearfield Enterprise.



[COLWELL, DICK'S INFANT, - 1908]
Bedford Free Press (Bedford, Iowa), Thursday, February 11, 1909
A Little Black Angel
Under the above heading the Shenandoah Sentinel Post has the following in regard to a former resident of Bedford:
Just before Christmas twins arrived at the home of Dick Colwell, the colored porter of the Hunt Hotel. One died at birth, the other still lives, the joy and hope of that humble home. The dead baby was taken in hand by S. G. Allured, undertaker with Clovis & Gage, who embalmed it and prepared it for the grave. It was, however, not buried then but kept several weeks waiting the turn of life or death of its little mate. As it lay in the white casket robed in daintiest of white garments, its round, well-shaped head and finely featured face pillowed as if in a sweet sleep, the whole formed a most beautiful picture. It was "Mammy's po' lil' black lil' lamb." The casket alone was suggestive of death—all else was life.

[COREY, ELMER]
Bedford Times-Republican (Bedford, Iowa), Thursday, July 1, 1909
Killed By a Train Elmer Corey of Creston, Found by Tracks Near Prescott
Creston. – Elmer Corey, son of Nate Corey, an old resident of this city, met tragic death early Wednesday about three miles east of Prescott. His lifeless body was found lying between the tracks on the main line of the Burlington with the head crushed and bruised on the left arm and leg. While it is the general opinion that the came to his awful death by being struck by some train, yet just what train killed him or the circumstances in connection with his death will probably always remain a mystery.
The unfortunate young man has for the past several years been engaged in comedy work in the vaudeville world and has only been in Creston on occasional visits during that time. His untimely and horrible death is a shock to his people and friends here, and the bereaved have the heartfelt sympathy of the entire community.

[CORWIN, CLEMENZA VAN SKYOCK]
Star Press (Muncie, Indiana), Sunday, January 22, 1933
Mrs. Clemenza Corwin, 86, died early Saturday morning at the home of her niece, Mrs. P. B. Swhier, on South Commerce street. Death was caused by a stroke of apoplexy she suffered Friday. She was the widow of the late Stephen Corwin. For the past three years she had made her home with Mrs. Swhier. She is survived by one brother, Elias VanSkyock of New Mt. Pleasant. The funeral will be held at the Portland M. E. Church at 2 o'clock Monday afternoon. Burial will be in Green Park Cemetery.

[CORWIN, CLEMENZA VAN SKYOCK]
Muncie Evening Press (Muncie, Indiana), Tuesday, January 24, 1933

Corwin Funeral Is Held at Portland
Portland, Ind., Jan. 24. – Funeral services were held Monday afternoon at the M. E. Church for Mrs. Clemenza Corwin, who died Saturday at the home of a niece, Mrs. P. B. Swhier, South Commerce St. Death was due to a stroke of apoplexy. Surviving are one brother, Elias Van Skyock of southwest of Portland and several nieces and nephews.

[CORWIN, STEPHEN]
Bedford Times-Republican (Bedford, Iowa), Thursday, July 8, 1909
Stephen Corwin – Stephen Corwin was born April 2, 1845 in Jay county, Indiana, and departed this life at his home in Athelstan, Ia., June 26, 1909, aged 64 years, 2 months and 24 days. He enlisted as a volunteer in Co. K, 16th Indiana Volunteer Infantry and afterwards in Co. K, 16th Indiana Volunteer Cavalry and was afterwards honorably discharged, having served a little over three years. He was united in marriage to Clemenza Vanshyock [VanSkyock] November 20, 1866 and moved to Worth county, Mo., in 1876 and has resided in the vicinity of Athelstan until his death. To this union was born four children, three dying in childhood and William C., dying July 23, 1894, being 25 years of age. He is survived by a wife and one brother and other relatives. He united with the Methodist church in Jay county, Indiana and afterwards with the Baptist church at Athelstan. Besides his relatives he leaves many friends to mourn his departure. Funeral services were conducted by the Rev. W. M. Hunt from the residence in Athelstan Sunday and interment was made in the Isadora cemetery. – Sheridan (Mo.) Advance.

[CRAIG, WILLIAM]
Bedford Free Press (Bedford, Iowa), Thursday, June 24, 1909
Wm. Craig, an old soldier living in the vicinity of New Market died at his home Wednesday evening last and the funeral services were held at the M. E. church of that town on Friday afternoon, conducted by Rev. Watson. Mr. Craig has been suffering for some time from a second stroke of paralysis and death finally came as a relief.

[CRAIG, WILLIAM]
Bedford Times-Republican (Bedford, Iowa), Thursday, June 24, 1909
William Craig, an old soldier, died Wednesday evening at 7 o'clock at the age of 76 years. Funeral services will be held at the Methodist Episcopal church Friday afternoon at 2 o'clock conducted by Rev. Mr. Watson. Death followed a second stroke of paralysis. – New Market Herald.

[CRAIG, WILLIAM]
Clarinda Herald (Clarinda, Iowa), Thursday, June 24, 1909
NEW MARKET – Wm. Craig died Wednesday, June 15, at his home two miles east of New Market. Mr. Craig was 76 years of age and died of paralysis. The funeral services were held at the Methodist church Friday afternoon at two o'clock, conducted by Rev. Watson. Interment in Memory cemetery.

[CRUM, RICHARD HARRY]
Bedford Times-Republican (Bedford, Iowa), Thursday, July 22, 1909
Richard Harry Crum – Richard Harry Crum, aged 4 years, 1 month and 20 days, son of Mr. and Mrs. Harry Crum, died Sunday afternoon of acute peritonitis, after an illness of less than a week. The funeral service was held at the home Tuesday afternoon, all of the pastors of local churches taking part.
The opening prayer was by Rev. McMasters of the Baptist church, the sermon by Rev. W. M. Dudley of the Methodist Episcopal church, a tribute by Rev. G. A. Hendrickson of the Christian church, followed the sermon, and the closing prayer was by Rev. S. E. Henry. Music was furnished by a chorus consisting of Miss Pearl Darnell, Roxie Reid, Floy Wisdom, Kate Darling and Messrs. Guy Thompson and George Reid.
The Pythian Sisters accompanied Mrs. Crum to the grave in Fairview cemetery and after the interment decorated the grave with flowers.

[CRUM, RICHARD HARRY]
Bedford Free Press (Bedford, Iowa), Thursday, July 22, 1909
Richard Harry Crum – That death loves a shining mark was amply exemplified Sunday when little Richard Crum was called to his heavenly home. The little fellow was in his usual health until but a few days prior to his death, when he was taken seriously ill and all that loving hands and medical skill could devise proved unavailing. The child passed away Sunday afternoon.
He was the son of Mr. and Mrs. Harry Crum and was born in Bedford, being four years, one month and twenty days old at the time. He was a bright young boy and filled the home with sunshine continually, and his going leaves an aching void in the hearts of loving parents, brothers and sisters.
The funeral service was held from the home Tuesday afternoon. The opening prayer was offered by Rev. D. McMasters and the sermon was preached by Rev. W. M. Dudley, followed by an address by Elder G. A. Hendrickson and Rev. S. E. Henry gave the closing prayer. The music was furnished by a chorus composed of Missses Pearl Darnell, Roxie Reid, Kate Darling and Messrs. Guy Thompson, Roy Wisdom and Geo. Reid.
The bereaved have the sympathy of all.



[DRAKE, LUCY WYANT]
Bedford Times-Republican (Bedford, Iowa), Thursday, May 27, 1909
Death at Conway
Mrs. Lucy Drake Passes Away After a Long Illness
Mrs. Lucy Drake, nee Wyant, died at her home in Conway, Thursday, May 20, at 3:30 p. m. after an illness extending over a period of many months. The funeral services were held at Conway on Friday at 1 p. m. conducted by Rev. S. E. Henry of Bedford. Interment at Lexington cemetery.
Mrs. Drake was born and reared in Taylor county and all her life this has been her home. She was 45 years of age at the time of her death and has been married for several years. She is survived by her husband and numerous more distant relatives among whom are Mr. and Mrs. C. F. Allen of Bedford.

[DUGAN, ELIZABETH RACHEL GRESHAM ROSEBERRY]
Lincoln Evening News (Lincoln, Nebraska), Saturday, April 17, 1909
Sad Accident Aged Woman Run Down by Union Pacific Freight at Osceola
While attempting to cross the track ahead of an extra freight Saturday, Mrs. Elizabeth Dugan of this city met her death in a shocking manner, the accident occurring at the Union Pacific crossing on State street, north of the square, says the Osceola Record. The body of the aged lady was hurled into the ditch at the side of the track and when picked up life was extinct. The base of the skull was found to have been fractured by the impact, aside from which few marks were to be seen.
Mrs. Dugan started to come downtown in the afternoon and when she crossed the bridge a few rods north of the crossing, she heard the approaching train. Evidently thinking that she could make the crossing in time to pass ahead of the train she hastened along and passed Lynn Snider, the 12-year-old son of Cashier Snider of the First National Bank, who was the only one aside from the train crew that saw the accident. Lynn states that he called to Mrs. Dugan that she could not get across, but she probably did not hear as the wind was blowing a gale from the south. He says the engine had reached the crossing by the time Mrs. Dugan reached the track and that she was caught by the pilot and hurled from the track, as above stated.
The freight train was an extra west bound carrying about thirty cars and at the time of the accident had been slowed down till it was not running faster than twelve miles an hour. The engineer and fireman and the head brakeman who was on top of the train, saw the lady approaching the track and were witnesses of the accident. They stopped the train as quickly as possible and hurried back. All of the train men were horror struck at the tragedy, the engineer being especially affected. He states that this is a number of cases of the kind with which the fates have identified him and he expressed his determination to quit the road. The train crew were blameless, and the company exonerates them.
The sad death of Mrs. Dugan caused much excitement in the city where she has lived so long and where she is known and loved by everybody.
Kind friends tenderly took up the lifeless body and loving hands bore her to her late home on Gospel Ridge.
The funeral was held Monday afternoon from the M. E. church, Rev. M. C. Brooks preaching the sermon and the remains were laid to rest in the Osceola cemetery.
Elizabeth Rachel Gresham was born in Tennessee, August 10, 1838 and died at Osceola, Neb., April 10, 1909. When eleven years of age she moved with her parents to Illinois where she was united in marriage to William Roseberry, who was a soldier in the civil war and lost his life as a result of being poisoned with gas at Quincy, Ill., his death occurring in 1865. In the year 1882 she moved to Nebraska and in March 1888 she was united in marriage to Thomas Dugan, whose death took place January 4, 1893. At the early age of eleven years she was converted and joined the church of her choice and continued to be a member until her death. Two daughters remain to mourn her sad death, Mrs. J. H. Roseberry of Shelby and Mrs. Walter E. Lambertson of Osceola. The only son, Robert Roseberry, died at Gridley, Ill., four years ago this spring as a result of being struck by a train. She has one surviving sister, Mrs. James Roseberry of Stennett, Ia. The pall bearers were W. H. Weeden, S. G. Pleasant, G. T. Ray, W. O. Mickey, H. M. Powers and Keene Ludden.
The entire community was shocked and saddened by the tragic death of this good lady which came in terrible contrast to the quiet and peaceful life which she has lived in the community. Universal sorrow is manifest, and the bereaved ones have the sincere sympathy of the community in their sad hour.

[DUGAN, ELIZABETH RACHEL GRESHAM ROSEBERRY]
Bedford Free Press (Bedford, Iowa), Thursday, April 29, 1909
A Sad Death
The following item from the Osceola (Nebr.) Record will be of interest to our readers as Mrs. Dugan will be remembered here. She has visited her stepdaughter Mrs. Abe McMillen at former times:
While attempting to cross the track ahead of an extra freight Saturday, Mrs. Elizabeth Dugan of this city met her death in a shocking manner, the accident occurring at the Union Pacific crossing on State street, north of the square. The body of the aged lady was hurled into the ditch at the side of the track and when picked up life was extinct. The base of the skull was found to have been fractured by the impact, aside from which few marks were to be seen.
Mrs. Dugan started to come downtown in the afternoon and when she crossed the bridge a few rods north of the crossing, she heard the approaching train. Evidently thinking that she could make the crossing in time to pass ahead of the train she hastened along and passed Lynn Snider, the 12-year-old son of Cashier Snider of the First National Bank, who was the only one aside from the train crew that saw the accident. Lynn states that he called to Mrs. Dugan that she could not get across, but she probably did not hear as the wind was blowing a gale from the south. He says the engine had reached the crossing by the time Mrs. Dugan reached the track and that she was caught by the pilot and hurled from the track, as above stated.
The freight train was an extra west bound carrying about thirty cars and at the time of the accident had been slowed down till it was not running faster than twelve miles an hour. The engineer and fireman and the head brakeman who was on top of the train, saw the lady approaching the track and were witnesses of the accident. They stopped the train as quickly as possible and hurried back. All of the train men were horror struck at the tragedy, the engineer being especially affected. He states that this is a number of cases of the kind with which the fates have identified him and he expressed his determination to quit the road. The train crew were blameless, and the company exonerates them.
The sad death of Mrs. Dugan caused much excitement in the city where she has lived so long and where she is known and loved by everybody.
Kind friends tenderly took up the lifeless body and loving hands bore her to her late home on Gospel Ridge.
The funeral was held Monday afternoon from the M. E. church, Rev. M. C. Brooks preaching the sermon and the remains were laid to rest in the Osceola cemetery.

 


[FAUCETT, MILES M.]
Bedford Free Press (Bedford, Iowa), Thursday, May 6, 1909
Mrs. L. [ewis] F. [rancis] Phillips received a message Monday announcing the death of her brother, Miles Faucett, at Chicago. The funeral was held in that city Tuesday. – Gravity Independent.

[FORD, ELLEN SEXTON]
Bedford Free Press (Bedford, Iowa), Thursday, February 18, 1909
Mrs. Ellen Ford Dead
Mrs. Ellen Ford died at her home in South Bedford at 1:30 Friday morning February 12, aged 78 years. Mrs. Ford has been ill for a short time with pneumonia, from the results of which she peacefully passed away. The funeral services were held at the Catholic church in Bedford on Saturday, Rev. Father Glen of Lenox officiating. The remains were taken to Lenox on the noon train and interred in the Lenox cemetery. Messrs. M. Long, R. Vickery, G. M. Bradley, Jas. Dougherty, W. H. Scane and Patrick Lundy who acted as pall bearers, accompanied the remains to Lenox for burial.
Mrs. Ford has been a most excellent mother and good Christian woman. For the past 34 years she has been a widow but attending to the wants of her family of children. She has raised them to be good citizens respected and esteemed by all. Her work on earth has been well done. She leaves to mourn three sons and one daughter. They are Daniel, Patrick, John and Celia.
The bereaved children have the sympathy of all in their hour of sorrow.

[GILLIHAN, JAMES LEVI]
Bedford Free Press (Bedford, Iowa), Thursday, April 29, 1909
Thos. Duncan received a telegram last Saturday announcing the death of his son-in-law, Mr. Gillihan, who lived at Albion, Neb. We did not learn the particulars regarding his death.





[HAMBLIN, ALLEN WOLCOTT]
Bedford Times-Press (Bedford, Iowa), Thursday, March 28, 1974
Final Rites Here for Bedford's Allen W. Hamblin
Funeral services for Allen Wolcott Hamblin, 82, of Bedford, well known retired newspaperman and civic leader, were held March 22 at the United Christian Presbyterian Church in Bedford with Rev. Ray McCain officiating. Mr. Hamblin died March 19, 1974 at Colonial Manor Nursing Home in Bedford. Interment was at Fairview Cemetery, Bedford.
Allen Wolcott Hamblin was born March 24, 1891 at Sharpsburg, Iowa to Harriett Wolcott and Horace K. Hamblin. At the age of 10 he moved to Bedford with his parents and lived in the same house at 1004 West Street for the rest of his life.
He was graduated from Bedford High School and Coe College in Cedar Rapids in 1916 with a Bachelor of Science degree. From 1917 until 1919 he served in the United States Navy with the rank of chief yeoman.
In 1919 he married Grace J. Sailor at Cedar Rapids, Iowa. He became a partner in the Bedford Free Press with Calvin (Birdie) Brice and from 1921 to 1960 when he retired he was editor and publisher of the newspaper, with the name changed to Bedford Times-Press in 1932.
His column "In Our Town" reflected his keen interest in people and places and was long one of the most popular features of the newspaper. In 1957 he was honored by the Iowa press Association, which bestowed on him the title "Master Editor-Publisher."
Always active in community affairs he served 13 years on the City Council, four years on the school board and was active in Lions Club and the Presbyterian Church, where he was an elder and Sunday School superintendent. He was also a member of the American Legion, Masons and a number of press associations.
Allen was known by employees, family and friends as a very warm, generous person and as such he started many young men on their business careers in his printing office. He also helped send several local boys through college, encouraging them to study journalism.
Allen's sense of humor is another outstanding characteristic for which he will be remembered.
He is survived by his wife, Grace; his son, Henry S. Hamblin, of LaGrange, Ill.; his daughters, Dora Jane Hamblin of Trevignano, Italy and Mary Hamblin Ovrom of Keosauqua; a daughter-in-law, Barbara; a son-in-law, Arthur Ovrom; grandchildren, Nancy Evans of Iowa City; Kathlyn of Macomb, Ill.; Allen, Paul and Daniel Hamblin of LaGrange; Lisa, Fred, Jennie, Dodie and Paul Ovrom of Keosauqua; two nieces and several cousins.

 

Bedford Times-Press (Bedford, Iowa), Thursday, March 21, 1974

Allen W. Hamblin Dies Here Tues.
Allen W. Hamblin, former Bedford Times-Press owner and Iowa Master Editor died Tuesday afternoon. Services for this well-known newspaperman are pending at press time.
His survivors include his wife, Grace, a son and two daughters, Henry Hamblin, Dora Jane Hamblin, Mrs. Art (Mary) Ovrom and 10 grandchildren.
The family requests no flowers. Memorials may be made to the United Christian-Presbyterian Church.




[HARLAN, AARON D.]
Times-Democrat (New Orleans, Louisiana), Monday April 12, 1909
A. D. Harlan, Lake Charles.
Special to the Times-Democrat.
LAKE CHARLES, La., April 11. – The remains of A. [aron] D. Harlan, one of the best-known citizens of Lake Charles, who died at his home in Richard street yesterday afternoon, were sent to Iowa Station last night, where the funeral services were held this morning. Mr. Harlan was a victim of tuberculosis. He was at one time parish treasurer and well known over Southwest Louisiana. The deceased is survived by his wife and four sons, Scot, Ray, George and Forest.

[HARLAN, AARON D.]
Bedford Times-Republican (Bedford, Iowa), Thursday, April 29, 1909
A. [aron] D. Harlan, who will be kindly remembered by the pioneers of Taylor county and the early residents of Lenox, died at Lake Charles, La., April 10, 1909. Mr. Harlan had been in a hospital for treatment in North Carolina for tuberculosis, but the disease was too advanced to yield to treatment, so he returned home to die. His sister, Mrs. Mary Davis from Gravity, Iowa, was with him at the time of his death. – Lenox Time Table

[HASTINGS, THOMAS BRIGHTLY]
Hamburg Reporter (Hamburg, Iowa), Thursday, August 23, 1923
FARRAGUT – C. [harles] L. Hastings attended the funeral of his brother, Thomas Hastings, of Bedford, Iowa, last Monday. Mr. Hastings will be well remembered in Farragut.

[HATFIELD, CHARLES HENRY]
Daily Oklahoman (Oklahoma City, Oklahoma), Sunday, May 1, 1955
Caddo County's First Educator Is Dead at 84
HYDRO, April 30 – Services for C. [harles] H. [enry] Hatfield, 84, who died Thursday at the Clinton hospital, will be at 2:30 p. m. Sunday in the First Christian church in Hydro. He was a pioneer resident of Caddo county and organized the first school in the county in 1901. He served as superintendent at that time.
He was also postmaster here on two occasions, served as a rural mail carrier and had a total of 16 years with the postal department. He helped organize and was a charter member of the First Christian church here.
He was also a former president of the Hydro Fair association and a previous president of the local chamber of commerce. He was born in Bedford, Iowa.
A local leader in the Democratic party, he was justice of the peace when his failing health forced him into retirement about two years ago.
Survivors are two sons, Albert, Rome, Ga. and Harry, Hydro; three grandchildren.



[HATFIELD, HARRISON HENRY]
Republican News Journal (Newkirk, Oklahoma), Friday, December 30, 1927
Harrison H. Hatfield Buried Here Monday
Harrison H. [enry] Hatfield, a resident of Newkirk twenty-seven years, died Friday. Funeral services were held Monday at the Christian church with the Rev. H. O. Langston in charge. Burial was in the Newkirk cemetery.
Mr. Hatfield was born August 1, 1860 in Marshall county, Ill. He was married November 4, 1885. He is survived by his wife and one son, Deuward Hatfield.

[HATFIELD, MINNIE AUGUSTA WILLIAMS]
Taylor County Herald (Bedford, Iowa), Thursday,  June 1, 1933
Minnie Williams – Minnie Augusta Williams, daughter of Harvey A. [lbert] Williams and Annie M. [alvena] Williams, was born August 1, 1875 in Taylor county, Iowa and died at Hydro, Okla., May 15, 1933 at the age of 57 years, 9 months and 14 days.
She was educated in the schools of Taylor county and high school of Blockton, Iowa.
She was united in marriage to Charles H. [enry] Hatfield, June 22, 1898, in Bedford, Iowa, where they made their home until going to Hydro in October 1901, shortly after the opening of the new country.
She was the mother of four children, Albert L. of Wapato, Wash., Harry V. of Hydro and a son and daughter who died at birth.
Always of a serious turn of mind she gave her life to her Saviour while quite young, joining the United Brethren church near Blockton, Iowa. She obeyed her Master in Christian baptism in August 1898 placing her membership with the Church of Christ at Bedford, Iowa. She was a charter member of the church at Hydro, Okla., and always took an active part in the service of the church and other Christian activities as long as her physical ability would allow.
She was ever ready and anxious to serve those who needed her assistance and her final illness was brought on by her anxiety to help the church she loved, when she was not physically able.
She leaves to mourn her going her aged mother, Mrs. H. A. Williams of Hydro, her husband, Charles H. Hatfield and two sons, Albert and Harry, two brothers, Dr. S. E. Williams of Hydro and Emmett Williams of Sioux City, Iowa and one sister, Mrs. Mabel Stevens of Hydro; three grandchildren, Loreane, Betty and Jack, children of Albert L. at Wapato, Wash. and many friends who are numbered only by the extent of her acquaintance.
[Reprint of obituary originally published in the Hydro Review, Hydro, Oklahoma and also reprinted in the Blockton News, June 1, 1933.]

[HATFIELD, MINNIE AUGUSTA WILLIAMS]
Blockton News (Blockton, Iowa), Thursday, May 25, 1933
Mrs. Chas. H. Hatfield Dead
Word was received here a few days ago of the death of Mrs. Charles H. Hatfield at her home at Hydro, Oklahoma, her death occurring Monday night, May 15. Mrs. Hatfield was formerly Miss Minnie A. William, daughter of Mr. and Mrs. H. A. Williams, former residents of this place. The funeral services were held at the Christian church in Hydro on the 17th and burial was in the Masonic cemetery at the same place.

[HATFIELD, MINNIE GILMOUR]
Bedford Times-Press (Bedford, Iowa), Thursday, January 19, 1939
Mrs. Minnie Hatfield Former Resident Dies
Mrs. Minnie Hatfield, 77, at one time a resident of the Bedford community, died at her home in Tulsa, Okla., Saturday, Dec. 24, following a week's illness. Her husband, Frank Hatfield, preceded her in death by only a few months. The funeral services were held at Newkirk, Okla. and burial also made there.
Mrs. Hatfield is survived by a daughter, Miss Lucy Hatfield of Tulsa and also by a son and his family.

[HEALY, SARAH BUXTON]
Bedford Times-Press (Bedford, Iowa), Thursday, April 8, 1909
Obituary – Sarah Buston [Buxton] was born in Magnolia Co., Ill., September 6th, 1851, died at the home of her son William Healy, west of Bedford, March 31st, 1909, being at the time of her death 57 years, 6 months and 25 days old.
She was united in marriage to Mr. Henry E. Healy in Washington, Ill., Oct. 21st, 1871, who preceded her to the land beyond some three years ago. The deceased has been a constant sufferer for a long time and death came as a sweet relief to her to remove her from the scenes of earthly pain. Some time ago she suffered a stroke of paralysis which finally terminated in death.
Her home has been near Bedford for over 22 years and while she lived here made many friends who regret her death. Death comes as a sweet relief to the weary body. God has been good to the human family after all. The pain is our lot and sorrow encompasses us, yet death is the safety valve. We would not desire to live always. Earth would become a phantom to us. Earth to earth is better than eternal wandering and the grave with its peace is better than to sit forever amid decaying worlds and dying stars.
She leaves to mourn her loss a son, one daughter, two brothers and one sister. One brother arrived from Kansas in time to attend the funeral which was held from the home of her son at 2 o'clock Friday, conducted by Geo. A. Hendrickson, assisted by a quartette of singers from the church, after which the body was laid away in the new cemetery at Bedford.   C.
[Illinois Statewide Marriage Index and Henry Healy's obituary give the marriage year as 1872.]

[HUGHES, GEORGE, SR., - 1909]
Bedford Times-Republican (Bedford, Iowa), Thursday, May 6, 1909
Death of Geo. Hughes, Sr.
Passes Away at Seattle at the Age of 84 Years
On Friday evening George Hughes received a telegram from Seattle, Washington, conveying the sad intelligence of the death of his father, George Hughes, sr., which occurred at that place at 6 a. m. Deceased was 84 years of age. He had been ill only a short time and his death was caused by old age.
Mr. Hughes formerly and for many years was a resident of Albion, Nebraska, but upon the death of his wife about two years ago he removed to Seattle and has since been making his home with his son at that place.
Mr. Hughes was the father of ten children all of whom with the exception of one survive him.

[JARED, ROBERT BRUCE]
Bedford Times-Press (Bedford, Iowa), Thursday, May 18, 1944
Obituary – Bruce Jared
Bruce Jared was born Nov. 14, 1856 in Paris, Illinois and died Thursday, May 11, 1944 at Bedford, Iowa at the age of 87 years, 5 months and 27 days.
He was the son of Marshall and Mary Ann Jared and lived with his parents until he was 20 years of age when he came to Taylor county where he had since lived.
On April 21 1881 he was married to Josephine Scrivner. To them were born six children, two of whom preceded him in death: Elva Wolverton and Ora Jared. Mrs. Jared died January 4, 1943.
The surviving children are Viola, Mrs. William Robinson of Bedford, Frank Jared of Sacramento, Calif., John Jared of Ames and Mabel, Mrs. E. J. Hartman of Charles City, Iowa.
Aside from these he leaves one brother Delbert Jared of Bedford and also grandchildren and great grandchildren.
The funeral services were held Sunday afternoon at the Wetmore Funeral Home, conducted by Rev. O. H. Hallgrimson. Burial was in the Fairview cemetery.



[JEFFERSON, EVELYN LEVADA RHINEHART]
Daily Oklahoman (Oklahoma City), Friday, October 28, 1955
Mrs. Evelyn Jefferson – Rites will be 2 p. m. Friday in Garrison funeral home for Mrs. Evelyn Jefferson, 77, pioneer Oklahoman, who died Wednesday night from an attack of pneumonia at her home, 1304 Oxford way. Interment will be at Memorial Park cemetery.
Born in Bedford, Iowa, she and her husband, the late J. [oseph] H. Jefferson, came to Oklahoma in the run of 1889. Jefferson died in 1946. She was a member of the Methodist church.
Survivors include a daughter, Mrs. R. R. Sheriff and a son C. W. Jefferson, both of the home; another son, C. D. Jefferson, Denver, Colo., and five grandchildren.

[JOHNSON, ELI F., 1859 – 1909]
Bedford Times-Republican (Bedford, Iowa), Thursday, July 8 1909
Although not unexpected yet it came as a shock to the town when it was reported on the streets that E.[li]  F. Johnson had died Saturday night of last week. He had been having heart trouble for some time and was taken with an attack which only lasted about half an hour and passed away before medical aid could reach him. – New Market Herald.

[JOHNSON, ELI F., 1859 – 1909]
Clarinda Herald (Clarinda, Iowa), Thursday, July 8, 1909
NEW MARKET – Eli Johnson died Saturday, June 26, at his home in this city, of heart disease. The funeral services were held at the Methodist church, Monday afternoon at three o'clock, conducted by the pastor, Rev. Watson. Interment at Memory cemetery.

[KEENER, RUBY D. BAGBY]
Bedford Times-Republican (Bedford, Iowa), Thursday, July 1, 1909
Howard Hensley and N. S. Sawyer were at Clarinda Sunday attending the funeral of Mr. Hensley's niece, Mrs. Ruby Keener, nee Bagley. Mrs. Keener lived at Bedford many years and was well known to many people living in this vicinity.

[KEENER, RUBY D. BAGBY]                  [RAMSEY, CHARLES]
Bedford Times-Republican (Bedford, Iowa), Thursday, July 8, 1909
Doubly Bereaved Husband and Daughter of Mrs. Charles Ramsey Stricken
Mrs. Ora W. Keener, formerly of Bedford, died at Clarinda, June 26. She was born at Bedford and has many relatives and friends in this vicinity, among the being her uncle, Howard Hensley, who attended her funeral.
Regarding her death the Clarinda Herald says:
The entire community was shocked last Saturday morning to learn of the death of Mrs. Ora Keener, at her home in this city. Mrs. Keener had been in poor health for over a year and the death was caused by stomach trouble and attendant complications. The funeral services were held at the home Sunday afternoon at four o'clock, conducted by Rev. J. W. Abel, and interment made in the Clarinda cemetery.
Ruby D. Bagby was born at Bedford la., July 4th, 1877, and died in Clarinda June 26th, 1909 at the age of 31 yrs., 9 mo., 12 days. She was married to Ora W. Keener, Feb. 16th, 1898. To this union one child was born, Stanley Lovelle Keener. She leaves to mourn her death, her husband and child and mother, Mrs. Chas. Ramsey, and many friends and relatives. She joined the Christian church in Bedford when a girl. A few years later after coming to Clarinda she cast her lot with the Methodist church."
On Wednesday following the death of Mrs. Keener, her stepfather, Charles Ramsey, also passed away, the wife and mother being thus doubly bereaved.
The funeral was held at the home Friday afternoon at 3 o'clock, conducted by Revs. Cameron and Abel.
Mr. Ramsey was for many years engaged in business at Bedford and throughout the county. The cause of his death was Bright's disease and his health had been very poor for many years.

[KENWORTHY, THOMAS WILLIAM]
Valley Times (North Hollywood), Tuesday, May 24, 1955
KENWORTHY, Thomas W., of 805 N. Brighton St., Burbank, age 83, passed away May 22. Native of Kentucky. Lived in California since 1908. Survived by 1 daughter, Mrs. Beulah Morrow of Burbank; 4 sisters, Pearl William of Redondo Beach, Lillie Brown of Canoga Park, Daisy Pearson and Hanna Dennis, both of Bakersfield; 1 brother, Arthur Kenworthy of Kansas City. Services Wednesday, May 25, 2 p. m., Fillbach Funeral Home chapel with Rev. Henry L. Searle officiating. Interment Grand View Memorial Park.


[LANDES, HANNAH SUSAN STONESTREET]
Bedford Free Press (Bedford, Iowa), Thursday, February 11, 1909
Obituary – Hannah Susan Stonestreet was born in Pendleton county, West Virginia, Oct. 29, 1843 and died at her late residence in Gravity Feb. 4, 1909, age 65 years, 3 months and 5 days.
When 13 years of age she moved from the place of her birth to Fayette Co., Ohio, where she was married Feb. 18, 1863 to Samuel L. Landis to this union were given 10 children, four having crossed the river of death. Those living are Mrs. Rebecca C. Robinson and Mrs. Hester E. Wright, Portland, Indiana; Mrs. Cora Hughs, Blockton, Iowa; Mrs. Rosa Meredith, Gravity, Iowa and two boys, Marion W. of Clarinda, Iowa and Abraham R. of Bedford, Iowa.
With her family she removed in 1868 from Ohio to Indiana, thence in 1894 to Iowa, thence from Iowa to Nebraska in 1906 and back to Iowa, the place of her death, 1908.
She had been in declining health for several years, although her death was not expected by her friends so soon, until Ollie's last illness, from which time she became violently worse with a consciousness of her death soon. She told her son Ollie just before his death that he would not be alone but a few days till she would be with him, hence she made all necessary arrangements for her coming death with her family, that she desired them to know before she became unconscious, which condition lasted about 2 hours, when death relieved her of her suffering.
Sister Landis had been a devoted Christian for 40 years, having been a member of the German Baptist church, all of which time she never hesitated to manifest the principles of her faith in a Savior, both in word and deed. She leaves of her original family two brothers and one sister. Those of her relatives from abroad are Isaac N. Stonestreet, a brother from Cullison, Kansas, and Mr. and Mrs. I. H. and Hester Robinson of Portland, Ind.
The Landis relatives deserve a great deal of sympathy. No one but themselves and their God know how great is their grief and how heavy the burden of care that has been patiently born by them during the long continued illness of Ollie and his mother who died in less than a week of one another, completely disorganizing and breaking up two homes in the same community.
Her funeral services were conducted by the writer in the Christian church at 2 o'clock on the following Friday, assisted by Rev. Palmer, pastor of the M. E. church, after which her remains were laid to rest in the Gravity cemetery.    W. L. Dunlavy.

[LATHROP, JULIUS T.]
Bedford Times-Republican (Bedford, Iowa), Thursday, May 20, 1909
Four Score and Ten
J. T. Lathrop Passes Away at His Home in Illinois
Mr. and Mrs. J. [esse] B. Shepherd, who reside near Siam, returned home Sunday morning from Roseville, Ill., where they were called by the death of Mrs. Shepherd's father, J. [ulius] T. Lathrop, who passed away at 4 o'clock Wednesday morning.
Mr. Lathrop was 90 years of age and his death was due to old age and general debility. He is survived by his widow and one child, Mrs. Shepherd. Mr. Lathrop has visited several times in Taylor county but not of recent years, the last time being some 16 years ago.
The funeral services were held on Thursday evening and interment was made at the old cemetery near his old hometown.

[LAWGER, CHARLOTTE C. "LOTTIE" LYON]
Bedford Free Press (Bedford, Iowa), Thursday, February 25, 1909
GUSS – With deep regret and sorrow we hear of the death of Grandma Langer of this place. During the last four years she has been living here with her daughter, Mrs. Wright, and has impressed all with her sincere and practical Christian character. She had no enemies; all were her friends. Her influence in the neighborhood has been exceedingly good and will be much missed.

[LAWGER, CHARLOTTE C. "LOTTIE" LYON]
Villisca Review (Villisca, Iowa), Thursday February 25, 1909
GUSS – Mrs. Lottie Lawger died at the home of her daughter, Mrs. Thos. Wright, Sunday afternoon after an illness of only three and one-half days. She was afflicted with neuralgia of the stomach. Mrs. Lawger was a good faithful Christian and gave a good example to those around her of what a good Christian woman can be. Funeral services were held Tuesday, Rev. Carlson performing the last sad rites. Interment was made in the Guss cemetery beside the body of her husband who passed on before her several years ago. To Mrs. Wright and family and Walter Lawger and family we extend our sympathy.

[LAWGER, JOHN J.]
Villisca Review (Villisca, Iowa), Thursday, March 2, 1905
J. [ohn] J. Lawger suddenly died at his home near Guss Friday afternoon at 3 o'clock. He had only been sick for a couple of days and all were surprised to hear of his death. Deceased was born in Sweden and came to this country in 1868 and had lived near Guss since 1871. He was 76 years of age, a member of the Lutheran church, a good neighbor, husband and father. He leaves a wife and two children. The funeral was held in Guss Sunday, Rev. Coe of Nodaway officiating and burial was in the Guss cemetery.

[LAWGER, JOHN J.]
Villisca Review (Villisca, Iowa), Thursday, March 2, 1905
Mr. Lawger, an old settler of Taylor county, died the 24th at his home 2 miles west of Guss. Funeral was preached Sunday at the M. E. church by Rev. Coe.

[LAWLER, ALBERT]
Bedford Free Press (Bedford, Iowa), Thursday, June 24, 1909
A. Lawler Suicides
Polk Township Farmer Ends Life
Presumed That He Became Mentally Deranged From Brooding Over Financial Difficulties
Albert Lawler, a farmer residing on the Hittel farm in Polk township, committed suicide Monday about noon. It is thought that the rash act was committed while momentarily insane, brought on by brooding over financial difficulties. He committed the deed by hanging himself with a rope, suspended from a tree near the house. No one saw him commit the deed, but it was discovered within twenty minutes after.
Mr. Lawler for fourteen years lived near Maple Grove church just across the line in Missouri. Four years ago, he rented the Joe Leach farm and two years later bought the Hittle farm, where the tragedy was enacted. He had not been well for the past three months and during the cyclone of about six weeks ago that passed over the southwest part of the country, he lost his barn and his house was unroofed. He had no insurance and he brooded considerably over this loss and his family had heard him make threats that he would someday end his life. On Monday he had been around the house in a moody condition and he was prevailed upon to go to the field and pull weeds while two sons were plowing. After getting at his work he seemed to be more cheerful than usual. When the noon hour arrived the two boys went on ahead to put the teams up and they noticed their father coming on behind, as they supposed to his dinner. When they arrived at the house, they found he had not yet come in, so they called for him. Receiving no answer, they began looking for him and his form hanging from a maple tree near the barn soon met their horrified gaze. One of the boys held his father up to relieve the strain while the other cut the rope but it was too late as life was extinct.
Coroner Paschal was summoned and soon arrived but after hearing the testimony of the members of the family it was decided that an inquest was unnecessary.
Mr. Lawler was fifty years of age and a man held in high esteem. He was an ardent worker in the M. E. church and was considered an honorable and straightforward man by all. He was a fond and loving father and husband and the rash act can only be accounted for by brooding over financial troubles, as stated. He leaves a wife and nine children. Two daughters are married, one Mrs. Roy Owens and the other Mrs. M. Yeager. The heartbroken widow, who is now left to brave life's battles alone and the children and other relatives have the sympathy for all.

[LEWIS, ELIZABETH "ELIZA" MAHAN, 1828 – 1909]
Bedford Times-Republican (Bedford, Iowa), Thursday, April 22, 1909
A message has just been received from Hon. L. T. McCoun, who is at Danville, Indiana, stating that Mrs. McCoun's sister, Mrs. Eliza Lewis, on account of whose illness Mr. and Mrs. McCoun went east, died at 1:30 a. m. Monday. Mr. and Mrs. McCoun arrived at Danville on Saturday. Mrs. Lewis was conscious after their arrival and was able to converse with them up to a short time previous to her death.



[MAULSBY, IRWIN]
Des Moines Register (Des Moines, Iowa), Tuesday, May 25, 1909
Maulsby Funeral Today
Services at University Place Church of Christ
The funeral of Irwin Maulsby who died Sunday morning at his home, 1104 Twenty-fifth street, will be held this afternoon at 2 o'clock from the University Place Church of Christ. Rev. C. S. Medbury will conduct the services assisted by Rev. J. Madison Williams, who will speak of Mr. Maulsby's life.
Mr. Maulsby was 74 years of age and had lived in Des Moines fifteen years. He was a pioneer resident of Redfield, Ia., having been one of the leading citizens of that town for many years.

[MAULSBY, IRWIN]
Bedford Times-Republican (Bedford, Iowa), Thursday, June 3, 1909
Mr. Maulsby, Mrs. Ira Hall's father, died at his home in Des Moines Sunday morning and was buried Tuesday afternoon. Many of the people in Lenox will remember Mr. Maulsby as he has been here many times visiting his daughter. Mr. and Mrs. Hall had been called to Des Moines several days previous to his death. – Lenox New Times.

[MCKUNE, MARION FRANCIS "FRANK"]
Evening Journal (Washington, Iowa), Friday, May 14, 1909
Death of Frank McKune Sr.
Prominent Citizen of Eureka Neighborhood Dies at Noon Today—Funeral Sunday
Frank McKune, Sr., for many years a prominent resident of the Eureka community, died today at noon at his home near Eureka. Mr. McKune had been in ill health for the past three or four years and during the last few months he had steadily failed in health. He had been unable to do any work since last September. He is survived by his wife and three sons. The sons are Frank, Jr., John and Daniel. The funeral service will be held Sunday afternoon at 2 o'clock in the Eureka church. A more extended obituary notice will be published in tomorrow's Journal.

[MCKUNE, MARION FRANCIS "FRANK"]
Evening Journal (Washington, Iowa), Saturday, May 15, 1909
Obituary of Frank McKune
Marion Francis McKune was born in Washington county, Iowa, near Wayland, Feb. 27, 1859 and died at his home at Eureka at 12:05 p. m. May 14, 1909, aged fifty years, two months and seventeen days. He was married to Rozilla Alice Tucker August 1, 1882, to whom were born three boys: Thompson Franklin and Johnny Cleveland, both married and living nearby; Manual Bryan, the youngest son, at home. Bertha Jennison McKune, whom the family raised from eight years old to be one of the most highly respected young ladies of the community in which she lived, is now married to a respected machinist of Burlington, Iowa, where they now live. Sadie Cooper lives in the family now and is an extra good girl whom they have raised from nine years to be one of the most obedient of children. She loved Mr. McKune as any Christian could love her own father and stayed by him to the last. God certainly and surely provides a rich reward for such a child.
Mr. McKune surrendered all to his Master some fourteen years ago and to the last was a member of the Eureka M. E. church. He told his wife he was ready to go if it was God's will and not to worry about him but be reconciled to His command. Mr. McKune was a man of a large kind heart, always ready to help those in need or afflicted. Kind words and deeds are never lost. Many recalled the aid and sympathy he so faithfully rendered the year of 1902, when the Brick school house near his home was blown down and so many young people were injured. He cared for them as only a father could. Actions speak louder than words. By their fruits ye shall know them.   A Friend.

[MCKUNE, MARION FRANCIS "FRANK"]
Evening Journal (Washington, Iowa), Monday, May 17, 1909
Funeral of Frank McKune
The funeral service of the late Frank McKune was held yesterday afternoon at 2 o'clock in the Eureka church, the service being in charge of the Rev. J. Priestnal and the Rev. U. S. Smith, the Methodist choir of this city assisting. After the service in the church, thirty-two members of the A. O. U. W., to which order the deceased belonged, marched to the cemetery, where the A. O. U. W. grave service was used. The pall bearers were Samuel Hout, Nate Jones, John Teeter, Harry McCall, Lyman Bunce and Dr. C. W. Stewart. There was a very large attendance at the funeral, the deceased having enjoyed a wide and honorable acquaintance in Washington county.

[MCKUNE, MARION FRANCIS "FRANK"]
Washington Democrat (Washington, Iowa), Wednesday, May 19, 1909
Francis Marion McKune, south of town in the Eureka neighborhood, died Friday, May 14, after a long and painful illness. He began going down several years ago and never felt well, although for a good while he kept going and kept at work. He suffered greatly. An autopsy showed an enlarged liver and especially diseased kidneys. They were five times as big as they ought to have been. He was very much emaciated, and his death was mercy to him. Frank McKune is a mighty good fellow. He was a hard worker and went about his business modestly and attended to his own affairs and did his duty in his niche with fidelity and credit. He was a member of the A. O. U. W. lodge of this town and they attended his funeral Sunday afternoon in a body, and it was the largest funeral held in those parts in years. Ninety-five vehicles were in line. He carried $2000 insurance in the order. He was also a Methodist and Rev. U. S. Smith and Rev. Priestnal conducted the religious services at the Eureka church. The Methodist choir from this town assisted. The pall bearers were members of the order. They were Sam Hout, Harry McCall, Nate Jones, John Teeter, Lyman Bunce and Dr. C. W. Stewart. He leaves a wife who was a daughter of the late Tommy Tucker and three sons, Frank, John and Bryan. They are a nice bunch of boys and will be a great comfort to the forlorn mother. The Democrat loses a good friend in the death of Frank McKune. He was born Feb. 27, 1859.

[MCKUNE, MARION FRANCIS "FRANK"]
Bedford Times-Republican (Bedford, Iowa), Thursday, May 27, 1909
W. T. and L. D. McKune returned Monday evening from Washington county where they were called by the death of their brother, Frank, at his home there. The funeral was held from the family home Saturday. – Gravity Independent.



[MITCHELL, ANNA RYAN]
Bedford Times-Republican (Bedford, Iowa), Thursday, July 1, 1909
Children Find Mother Dead
Run Into House in Midst of Play to Find Themselves Motherless
Lenox, June 30. – Mrs. James Mitchell, who lived near Lenox, was found upon the floor of her house, dead, Tuesday morning. The children were playing about the yard and when they went into the house for the purpose of asking some childish question, they found their mother lifeless.
Mrs. Mitchell had been doing her morning's work and had been as well as usual, so far as anybody knows.

The daughter, Kathryn, who graduated from the high school this spring, and was in attendance at the summer school in Bedford, was summoned at once.




[MORROW, BEULAH MILDRED KENWORTHY]
Times-Advocate (Escondido, California), Wednesday, November 10, 1982
Beulah Morrow
ESCONDIDO – Beulah Morrow, a homemaker, died Sunday in Rancho Bernardo Convalescent Hospital. She was 84 and a native of Iowa.
She is survived by her son, Gordon of Escondido; three grandchildren, Diane Peterson and Larry Morrow, both of Escondido and Donna Denham of Alaska; and three great grandchildren.
Services were scheduled for 3 p. m. today at Kingdom Hall of Jehovah's Witnesses in Escondido, Alex Whaley officiating. Burial will be in Oak Hill Memorial Park. Poway-Bernardo Mortuary is in charge of arrangements.



[ORR, MALINDA ANGELINE BISHOP]
Bedford Times-Republican (Bedford, Iowa), Thursday, May 6, 1909
Attending Sister's Funeral
I. [saac] L. [ewis] Bishop left here Tuesday noon for Murray where he was called by the death of his sister, Mrs. M. [artin] V. [an Buren] Orr, who passed away at 2 p. m. Monday. The funeral services were held at Murray yesterday and the body was then taken to Osceola for interment.
Deceased was 62 years of age and had been ill three weeks.
Mrs. Andy Spencer of Bedford is a sister of Mrs. Orr but was prevented by illness from attending the funeral.





[RHINEHART, BENNETT]
Bedford Times-Republican (Bedford, Iowa), Thursday, March 18, 1909
Old Veteran Called
Bennett Rhinehart Passes Away at Walter, Oklahoma
Bennett Rhinehart died at the home of his daughter in Walter, Oklahoma, on Saturday, March 13, aged 77 years, one month and six days, after an illness extending over a period of several weeks.
Deceased was born in Greene county, Pennsylvania, February 7, 1832. He grew to manhood in the land of his nativity and on August 15, 1858, was united in marriage to Miss Katherine Leonard. The young couple settled down on a farm and lived in peace and contentment until the war broke out. When the call for volunteers came, the husband enlisted in the 15th Pennsylvania cavalry and served for 13 months. Then his health failed, and he was compelled to accept a discharge and for three years thereafter he was an almost helpless invalid.
In February 1869 Mr. and Mrs. Rhinehart left their Pennsylvania home and departed for the West, finally settling in Taylor county on a farm four miles east of Bedford. Here all the rest of Mr. Rhinehart's life was spent, except a few years he lived in Platteville, until two years ago when with his wife he went to Oklahoma to make their home with their children.
During the married life of Mr. and Mrs. Rhinehart, ten children were born to them. Four died in infancy, the remaining six being: Mrs. Emma Howard and Mrs. Evelyn Jefferson of Oklahoma City, J. [ames] A. Rhinehart of Lawton, Oklahoma, Mrs. Ida Smith of Walter, Oklahoma, Bennett Rhinehart Jr. of Anamosa and Mrs. F.[rank] E. [dgar] Wysong of this city.
The funeral was held from the home of the daughter, Mrs. J. [ohn] W. [illiam] Smith of Walter, Oklahoma, on Tuesday and interment was made at the Walter cemetery.

Deceased was converted in early life and united with the Cumberland Presbyterian church, but after coming to Taylor county he united with the Christian church and continued a member until his death.
Bennett Rhinehart was one of the sturdy pioneers of Taylor county and belonged to that class of rugged, honest men to whom the present generation owes so much. While he was pronounced in his opinions and having once made up his mind was not easily changed, he was always willing to admit that his opponent was honest in his belief even if that belief was a mistaken one. He was a firm believer in the Golden Rule and applied its teachings to his everyday dealings with his fellow man and left behind him a life record upon which there was no stain of dishonor.

[RHINEHART, CATHARINE FRANCES LEONARD]
Bedford Times-Republican (Bedford, Iowa), Thursday, May 9, 1912
Mrs. Bennett Rhinehart – Mrs. Bennett Rhinehart died at the home of her daughter, Mrs. J. [ohn]W. [illiam] Smith, near Walter, Okla., April 23, aged 71 years. She was taken with an attack of grippe and owing to her age was not able to rally from the effects of the disease, her illness only lasting about nine days.
Katharine Frances Leonard was born in Green County, Penn., Dec. 29, 1840 and was married to Bennett Rhinehart, Aug. 15, 1858. To this union ten children were born, four dying in infancy. The surviving children are Mrs. Ida Smith and James Rhinehart of Walter, Okla., Bennett E. Rhinehart of Anamosa, Ia., Mrs. Emma Howard, Mrs. Frank Wysong and Mrs. Joseph H. Jefferson of Oklahoma City, Ok. Mrs. Rhinehart with her husband and children removed from Pennsylvania to Bedford in February 1869, where they continued to reside until 1907, when they went to Oklahoma City, where Mr. Rhinehart died in March 1909. Mrs. Rhinehart has since lived with her children.
The funeral services were conducted at the home of J. W. Smith by the Christian church of which Mrs. Rhinehart was a member.
Mrs. Rhinehart possessed a beautiful Christian character and was ever a kind and indulgent parent. She was of a modest and retiring disposition, but always ready by word and deed to assist those in need of sympathy and none who ever knew her could but help to count her as a friend.

[Note: Her first name is spelled Catharine on her headstone.]

[ROGERS, JAMES A., - 1909]
Bedford Times-Republican (Bedford, Iowa), Thursday, March 18, 1909
D. R. Rogers returned home last week from Nelson, Nebraska, where he was called to attend the funeral of his uncle, James A. Rogers, who died March 3rd. The deceased was a veteran of the civil war and was for many years a resident of Taylor county. Although it has been some time since he moved to Nebraska, he will be well remembered by the older residents, all of whom will regret exceedingly to learn of his death.

[ROGERS, JAMES A., - 1909]
Bedford Times-Republican (Bedford, Iowa), Thursday, March 25, 1909
Called Home
Again, the powerful hand of death touched another home and from it taken an honored soldier, true and loving husband and father, a good citizen and devoted Christian. James A. Rogers was born in Logan county, Ohio; came west in early youth with his brother Abraham L. Rogers to Schuyler county, Mo. Here he was united in marriage with Miss Angelina Leedon in October 1853. To this union three children were born. When his country issued a call for volunteers, Mr. Rogers was among the first to offer his services and die, if necessary, for his country. He served three years and one month in the 2nd M. S. M. Cav. Co. C and was mustered out of the service in 1865 and two years later moved with his family to Taylor county, Iowa, where they made their home for a number of years. On December 6th, 1878, his wife died and soon after he and his two children came to Nelson, Nebraska, where he has since made his home until his death. On January 13, 1895, he was married to Mrs. Huldah Deyo of Nelson, Nebraska, where they made their home up to the time of his death, March 3, 1909. His wife and only son and stepson were at his bed side at the time of his death. The casket containing the remains was escorted to the Christian church at two o'clock Saturday afternoon by the old solders and the ladies of the Relief Corps where the body lay in state until three o'clock beneath the stars and stripes and [was] profusely covered with floral tributes. Elder Martin conducted the funeral services assisted by Rev. Price. The remains were laid to rest in the Nelson cemetery.  [Poem not transcribed.]

[SCHADER, ELIZABETH KRAUS]
Bedford Times-Republican (Bedford, Iowa), Thursday, July 22, 1909
Mrs. Alec Cameron of Dunlap, Ill., and Frank Kraus of Princeville, Ill., were in the city yesterday. They have been at Lenox for some day having been called there by the death of their mother and sister, Mrs. Schrader [Schader]. They came to Bedford yesterday on business with relation to the settlement of the estate.

[SEIBERT, SAMUEL FRANKLIN]
Bedford Free Press (Bedford, Iowa), Thursday, April 15, 1909
On Tuesday L. L. McGregor was over from Gravity and managed the disinterment of the remains of S. [amuel] F. [ranklin] Seiberts from the Bedford cemetery and removed to the Gravity cemetery. Mr. Seiberts was buried here some 28 years ago, and the removal of the body is done by his wife, now Mrs. Ambrose.
[Note: The last name is spelled Seibert on his headstone.]

[SHAFFER, DAVID]
Bedford Times-Republican (Bedford, Iowa), Thursday, May 20, 1909
Death From Appendicitis
David Straffer, Former Resident of Taylor County, Dies at Red Oak
David Shaffer, at one time a resident of Taylor county, died at his home in Red Oak on Friday. The funeral was held at the home Sunday and interment was made at the Red Oak cemetery. Mr. Shaffer's death was due to appendicitis. Up to a few days prior to his death he was in apparent good health. Suddenly he was taken violently ill and as he could not be moved to a hospital a surgeon from Omaha was summoned. A consultation was held and although the physicians decided that the chance for his recovery was not good, an operation offered the only hope, and this was performed. Any hope the surgeons may have entertained was vain for Mr. Shaffer died within a short time.
Mr. Shaffer's wife is the sister of Frank Greeley and he has other relatives and many old friends in Taylor county.

[SHANHOLTZER, LILLIE MAE SHERWOOD]
Bedford Free Press (Bedford, Iowa), Thursday, March 18, 1909
Death of Mrs. B. F. Shanholtzer
Mrs. B. F. Shanholtzer died Sunday night at St. Luke's hospital, Denver, after having undergone an operation in hopes of saving her life. Up to within a few hours of her death, the doctors expressed hopes of her recovery, but on Sunday her condition became worse and her loved ones were hurriedly summoned to her bedside. With her when the last came were her husband, mother, father and brother.
Lillie May Sherwood was born in Union county, Iowa, on July 30, 1874. She moved with her parents to Taylor county the following year where she grew to womanhood and was married to B. [enjamin] Frank Shanholtzer on June 28, 1893 at her parents' home near Clearfield. In the winter of 1902, she professed her faith in Christ and united with the Methodist Episcopal church and through her many times of suffering expressed herself as so close to Him and He was her source of strength and comfort. In 1907 she came with her husband to Brush, Colo., where she has since resided, and where she was an earnest worker in the Methodist church. She died Sunday night between 9:00 and 10:00 o'clock at St. Luke's hospital, Denver, aged 34 years, 6 months and 28 days.
During her short residence in Brush, Mrs. Shanholtzer had made hosts of friends who mourn her loss. She always had a cheering and helpful way, which despite the state of her health, made everyone with whom she came in contact feel that she was their friend.
The funeral services were held from the M. E. church Tuesday afternoon, and a beautiful and touching tribute was paid to the departed by her pastor, the Rev. Seckner. The business houses were closed, and the church was crowded to pay their respect. The interment was made at the Brush cemetery.
Rev. Seckner paid tender tribute to the memory of the departed one, also comforting words from the text, "We shall not all sleep, but we shall all be changed." The singing was beautiful and appropriate, consisting of her favorite songs, "There's a Stranger at the Door," and "Face to Face." A very large crowd of sympathetic friends were in attendance at the funeral. Services were concluded at the cemetery with a few words, leaving the sorrowing ones with the assurance that they would someday meet on the other shore where there will be no more weeping for "He shall wipe all the tears from their eyes." – Clearfield Enterprise.




[SMITH, H. BARTON "BART', - 1909]
Bedford Times-Republican (Bedford, Iowa), Thursday, April 29, 1909
Bart Smith, a brother of Isaac Smith, died in Omaha last Friday and the interment was made in Clearfield Cemetery on Monday. Mr. Smith is remembered by the older settlers of the community, though it is long since he lived here. – Clearfield Enterprise

[SMITH, H. BARTON "BART', - 1909]
Bedford Times-Republican (Bedford, Iowa), Thursday, May 6, 1909
H. B. [arton] Smith, who will be remembered by the pioneers of Taylor county, especially by early residents of Lenox and vicinity, died at Omaha, Nebr., April 15, 1909, and was buried at Clearfield, Monday, April 19. Services at the home were conducted by Rev. Greenley of Clifton Hill Presbyterian church and by M. W. A. Lodge. Mr. Smith was married to Nellie Rupert in 1879 and was 54 years of age at the time of his death. He leaves a wife and two daughters, Mrs. Charles Bemer of Omaha and Mrs. G. W. McDonald of Tucker, Utah. – Lenox New Times.

[SMITH, VENNIE]
Bedford Free Press (Bedford, Iowa), Thursday, February 11, 1909
Died in St. Joe
Mr. and Mrs. F. E. Payton and Mr. Jacob Cole went to St. Joe Sunday to attend the funeral of Miss Vennie Smith. The deceased was a niece of Mr. Cole's and for some time had been a sufferer from tuberculosis of the skin. She will be remembered here by a large number from the fact that she has made frequent visits to Bedford. The St. Joe News-Press on Friday said: As a result of scratching a pimple, nine years ago, Vennie Smith, thirty-four years old, daughter of Mr. and Mrs. J. E. Smith, 3006 Seneca street, died at 11:15 o'clock last night. Miss Smith had contracted lupus vulgaris or tuberculosis of the skin, a very uncommon disease, and one for which the medical profession appears to have discovered no remedy. During the last two years the young woman had been blind, and she could not use her teeth. Prior to her disability she was employed as an operator in the Missouri & Kansas Telephone Company's exchange.

 [STEELE, LOUVISCA HOSKINS]
Jefferson Bee (Jefferson, Iowa), Wednesday, July 14, 1909
Death of Mrs. Steele
Mrs. L. W. Steele, wife of Rev. L. W. Steele, died at the home of her daughter, Mrs. C. M. Redick, at Pocahontas, July 8. Mrs. Steel will be remembered by many Jefferson people, having been a guest in several different homes while attending conventions and Presbyterial gatherings. Rev. Steele is quite widely known in Greene county, having held evangelistic meetings at Paton, Dana, Rippey, Adaza and Churdan and preaching for a Sabbath in all Presbyterian pulpits in the county.

[STEELE, LOUVISCA HOSKINS]
Rolfe Reveille (Rolfe, Iowa), Thursday, July 15, 1909
POCAHONTAS – Mrs. Z. W. Steele, who has been sick at the home of her daughter, Mrs. C. M. Redick the past month, came to the end of her suffering last Thursday, although suffering greatly for several days previously, the end came quietly and peacefully as to one falling asleep. Louvisca Hoskins was born near Tipton, Cedar county, Iowa, March 20, 1851. Departed this life July 8, 1909, at the age of 58 years, 3 months and 18 days. She was married to Rev. Z. W. Steele July 2, 1888, at Coon Rapids, Iowa. She was widely known over Iowa, having with her husband served churches or did evangelistic work in Carroll, Green, Calhoun, Crawford, Pocahontas, Louisa, Audubon, Taylor, Des Moines and Woodbury counties. She was a quiet but faithful earnest Christian worker, who left a lasting impress for good wherever she dwelt. She was a charter member and instrumental in organization of women's clubs at Coon Rapids, Manning and Oakville, Iowa. A husband and daughter with four sisters and one brother mourn her loss. Mr. Steele is receiving many letters of condolence from friends, among them many from young people where he has served. The following extract from a letter, written by a young man will show the esteem in which she was held by her young friends. "Mrs. Steele has always seemed like a mother to me and has helped me so much by her kindly care and good advice. The only mental picture I can conceive of her is with that bright cheery smile with which she always welcomed us and I'm glad that it is so." The funeral services [were held] at the home of her daughter late Friday afternoon and were conducted by Rev. Wight. Burial services were held in the Pocahontas cemetery near the sunset hour. Only friends who knew and loved her were present at the services which were short and simple in accordance with Mrs. Steele's wishes.

[STEELE, LOUVISCA HOSKINS]
Bedford Times-Republican (Bedford, Iowa), Thursday, July 29, 1909
We received word last week of the death of Mrs. Steele, which occurred at her home at Pocahontas, Ia., on July 8. She was the wife of Rev. Z. W. Steele, who was pastor of the Presbyterian church at Conway about two years ago and will be remembered by her many Conway friends who will learn of her death with sadness. She was highly respected and loved by all who knew her. – Conway Record.



[STEWART, JOHN ELWIN, 1873 - 1909]
Bedford Times-Republican (Bedford, Iowa), Thursday, June 24, 1909
John Stewart, a former resident of this vicinity and recently of the town, died at his home five miles east of Redding, Tuesday night. He was the son of Alex Stewart and wife and was born in Middle Fork township, Ringgold county, near forty years ago. He was married to Miss Alma German about eight years ago, who, with his father and other near relatives, survive him. – Blockton News

[TAYLOR, CHARLES LESLIE]
Villisca Review (and the Villisca Letter) (Villisca, Iowa), Friday, October 22, 1920
Drops Dead While at Work
C. L. Taylor Expires Very Suddenly—Had Been Resident of Villisca for Last Ten Years
Stricken Without Warning  Funeral Held at Home Wednesday Morning—Body Is Taken to Clearfield, Iowa, for Burial
C. L. Taylor, for ten years a resident of Villisca, died Monday afternoon at 4 o'clock while at work at the residence of J. R. Collier, two blocks east of the public square, his death resulting from heart trouble.
Mr. Taylor was subject to heart trouble but had not felt any unusual depression at any time Monday and had no warning of his approaching death. He ate his dinner as usual and had been at work all the afternoon, and while on his knees sawing a board he fell forward and expired at once. A physician was called immediately but Mr. Taylor was dead when he arrived. Mr. Taylor's father's death occurred in the same way.
Charles Leslie Taylor was born in Ohio on Dec. 30, 1854 and moved to Missouri when yet a boy. There he was married to Nancy Hook on Oct. 4, 1875 and to them were born five children.
One child died in infancy and one daughter died at the age of 23 years. The surviving children are Mrs. O. E. Wertz of St. Joseph, Mo., Ralph and William Taylor of Montana.
In 1900 Mr. Taylor moved with his family to Clearfield, Iowa, where Mrs. Taylor died April 15, 1909. In November 1910 Mr. Taylor was married to Mrs. Sarah Van Wert in Villisca, who survives him, and he has lived here since that time.
Mr. Taylor was for many years a member of the Methodist church. The funeral was held Wednesday morning at ten o'clock at the home on Third street, Rev. Geo. Kitchen, pastor of the Christian church at Lancaster, Mo., assisted by Rev. E. S. Menoher of the Methodist church of Villisca, conducting the services. The body was taken overland immediately after the service here to Clearfield for burial. The daughter, Mrs. O. E. Wertz and husband of St. Joseph and Mrs. Leslie Rhine and Mrs. Zula Mahan of Aurora, Ill., daughters of Mrs. Taylor, were here to attend the funeral.

[TAYLOR, NANCY HOOK]
Bedford Free Press (Bedford, Iowa), Thursday, April 22, 1909
Obituary – Mrs. C. [harles] L. [eslie] Taylor was born in Wapello county, Iowa, 51 years ago and died at her home in Clearfield, Iowa, Thursday, April 15, 1909.
She was the daughter of Mr. and Mrs. G. W. Hook and with her parents moved to Missouri. While living in St. Clair county, she was united in marriage to Mr. L. C. Taylor and they moved to Taylor county about seven years ago. To them four children were born, three of whom still live. They are Ralph Taylor of Nome, Alaska; Mrs. O. E. Wertz, Bedford, Iowa; William Taylor of Rockwell City, Iowa. Aside from these and a heartbroken husband, she leaves a brother, James, of Maryville, Mo. and a sister, Mrs. Woodbury of Lawrence, Kas., and G. W. Hook [ ?] and of Bedford and Mrs. F. P. Carey of Clearfield, half brother and sister respectively.
The funeral was held at the home Saturday afternoon. G. W. Hook and Mrs. Mertz [Wertz] attended from here. The bereaved relatives have the sympathy of all.

[TAYLOR, NANCY HOOK]
Bedford Times-Republican (Bedford, Iowa), Thursday, April 22, 1909
Mrs. C. [harles] L. [eslie] Taylor died at her home in Clearfield at 4 o'clock p. m. on Thursday of last week. The funeral was held at the home Saturday forenoon at 10 o'clock conducted by Rev. Brown. Deceased was the mother of Mrs. Ed Wertz and the half-sister of Will Hook of Bedford. She has lived in Clearfield for many years and was well-known throughout the county.

[VARDAMAN, BENJAMIN WILSON]
Bedford Free Press (Bedford, Iowa), Thursday, May 6, 1909
Death of Pioneer
The startling news of the death of Benjamin W. [ilson] Vardaman, Sunday morning, was a surprise to all when reported. He had been suffering some with a pain in his right shoulder which had been troubling him off and on during the past winter but nothing serious was expected from it. He was up in town Saturday evening and on going home told his family he was feeling better of the pain. Going to bed at his usual hour he rested well and when the storm came Sunday morning, he got up about 4 o'clock, pulled down a window blind and returned to bed.
Mrs. Vardaman concluded to let him sleep until breakfast was ready, when going to him found him dead, with his right arm over his head, as he often rested.
Mr. Vardaman was born in Quincy, Ill., Nov. 7, 1832, died April 18, 1909, aged 76 years, 5 months and 11 days. He was married to Miss Lavina Randall at Bedford, Iowa, Oct. 16, 1856. Three children were born to them, the first born dying in infancy. The other two, Oscar E., who is thought to be in Chicago and Miss Phila, who is at home with the wife, survive him.
Mr. Vardaman entered the army in the fall of 1862 and was honorably discharged in Sept. 1865, when they came to Mt. Ayr in 1867, where they have since resided, Mr. Vardaman engaging in the jewelry business, in which he was engaged at the time of his death.
Mr. Vardaman was a man of firm convictions, pleasant and agreeable, and was highly respected as a man, a neighbor, friend and citizen; possessing those finer feelings that promote sociability, morality and good companionship. He was a zealous member of the M. E. church, an upright and honored Mason and member of Miller Post, G. A. R. of Mt. Ayr. The funeral will be held from the M. E. church tomorrow, Tuesday afternoon, at 2 o'clock, Rev. W. E. Hardaway officiating. The burial services will be under the direction of Ellis C. Miller Post, G. A. R., and interment made in Rose Hill cemetery. – Mt. Ayr Journal.

[WAGNER, DONALD FORREST]
Bedford Times-Republican (Bedford, Iowa), Thursday, June 3, 1909
K. G. Herren, Mrs. Katie Wagner and daughter, Helen, Henry Annon and Roy Herren went to Des Moines Monday to attend the funeral of Mrs. Wagner's son Don, who was drowned last Saturday. The body was found at three o'clock Sunday. He was nineteen years of age and captain of the football team. He, with a lady friend, was out boating when the boat became entangled in a net and in trying to loosen it he became entangled and drowned. The young lady came near suffering the same fate. – New Market Herald

[WALKER, JOHN CALVIN, 1853 - 1909]
Bedford Free Press (Bedford, Iowa), Thursday, June 10, 1909
John Walker, who has long been a resident of New Market, died Saturday from tuberculosis. He was at one time engaged in the drug business there.

[WALKER, JOHN CALVIN, 1853 - 1909]
Clarinda Herald (Clarinda, Iowa), Thursday, June 10, 1909
NEW MARKET – John Walker died at his home in New Market Saturday morning of consumption. The funeral will be conducted by Rev. Lewis Watson, pastor of the M. E. church of this city at the residence at ten o'clock a. m., next Wednesday. Interment at Memory cemetery.

[WALKER, JOHN CALVIN, 1853 - 1909]
Bedford Times-Republican (Bedford, Iowa), Thursday, June 17, 1909
Obituary – John C. Walker
John C. [alvin] Walker, to whose memory we at this time pay our last respects, was born in Marion county, Iowa, Jan. 6, 1853, departed this life at his home in New Market, Ia., June 5, 1909, after a period of long and acute suffering. He came to Taylor county, Washington township, Iowa, in 1870, where he lived several years, afterward removing to New Market where he lived until his death. John C. Walker was a son of Jesse and Elizabeth Walker, having seven brothers and one sister, of whom only one brother, Isaac, of Missouri Valley, survives him. On March 6, 1873, he was united in holy wedlock to Mary C. [ atherine] Hankins. To this happy union was born five children, two having died in infancy, the others, O.[ra] G. Walker, New Market; Mrs. Fred A. Swan, Omaha, and Mrs. D. B. Pace, Two Harbors, Minn., being present at the funeral services also. In his death he leaves to mourn his departure a grief-stricken wife o'er whose home a pall of darkness has fallen, who in her declining years will miss the cheer of the merry voice of a beloved husband. His funeral was preached at the late home at 10 a. m. June 9, 1909, by the Rev. Watson. The remains were laid to rest in Memory cemetery. – New Market Herald.


[WILSON, ALLEN LATIMER]
Creston Daily Advertiser-Gazette (Creston, Iowa), Wednesday, March 9, 1921
A. Latimer Wilson Dead Prominent Creston Man Died Suddenly at Family Home Last Night Nationally Known Made Nation Reputation for Himself as Judge of Fine Horses
A. [llen] Latimer Wilson, a prominent resident of Creston since 1889, died at the family home, 508 North Maple street, at ten forty-five last night following a stroke of apoplexy. Mr. Wilson had suffered for the past few months from a rheumatic condition and recently made a trip to the Gulf states, returning from his trip two weeks ago. Shortly after noon yesterday Mr. Wilson complained of feeling ill and lay down on his bed where death claimed him during the night.
Mr. Wilson was a native of Pennsylvania. He was born at Oakland Mills, Juniata County, Pennsylvania on June 20th, 1855 and resided in the east with his parents until he was twenty-one years of age when he emigrated to Walnut, Illinois where he engaged in the retail mercantile business for a number of years.
April 22nd, 1879, Mr. Wilson and Miss Emelou Lindsey were united in marriage and a few years later moved to Bedford, Iowa where the family lived until moving to Creston in 1889.
During the time Mr. Wilson resided in Walnut, Illinois, he drifted away from the mercantile business and became engaged in the raising, buying and selling of fine horses. Upon moving to Bedford Mr. Wilson and his two brothers, L. Banks Wilson and Edgar Wilson, began the business of importing and exporting horses. The business grew and the firm moved their offices to Creston. Later, Mr. Wilson formed a partnership with Frank Stream which was continued until the time of his death.
In his chosen line of work, the buying and selling of fine horses, Mr. Wilson made a national reputation for himself, being in demand at all stock shows as a judge. Mr. Wilson judged over two thirds of the horses at the Pan American Exposition at Buffalo, New York. For fifteen years Mr. Wilson has been a judge at the international Stock Show at Chicago, eight of these years being consecutive. No other judge of fine stock has at any time been selected as a judge for eight consecutive years and Mr. Wilson was justly proud of this achievement.
Mr. Wilson acted as judge at the Iowa State Fair for many years. For two years he has visited the Oregon State Fair at Salem, Oregon in the capacity of judge and last year was called to Portland, Oregon to judge the horses exhibited there.
During the years he was engaged in importing and exporting of horses Mr. Wilson made nine trips to Europe. On each trip to Europe Mr. Wilson took with him his wife or some member of his family, a close business friend or one of his partners. On his last trip to Europe he was accompanied by his daughter, Mrs. Fred Ide. For a number of years Mr. Wilson has been a member of the Shire and Belgian Horse Association of America.
By the death of A. Latimer Wilson Creston loses one of her most prominent citizens, a man who was friendly to all, at all times ready and willing to aid those in distress.
Funeral services will be held from the home on Friday afternoon at 2:30 o'clock. The family request that no flowers be sent.

[WILSON, ALLEN LATIMER]
Creston Daily Advertiser-Gazette (Creston, Iowa), Thursday, March 10, 1921
Obituary – A. [llen] Latimer Wilson was born June 30, 1855 at Oakland Mills, Juniata County, Pennsylvania and passed away at his home in Creston on Tuesday, March 8th. Mr. Wilson resided in Oakland Mills, Pennsylvania until 1876 when he emigrated to Walnut, Illinois where he engaged in the retail mercantile business for several years. While living in Walnut he met and married Miss Emelou Lindsey on April 22, 1879. To this union were born five children, two of whom Howard and Lucien are deceased. The children living are Mrs. Myra Ide, Creston, Iowa; Ralph Wilson, Creston, Iowa; and Mrs. Harriett Huston, Blandinsville, Illinois.
Six years after Mr. and Mrs. Wilson were married, they moved to Bedford, Iowa where Mr. Wilson became engaged in the importing and exporting of horses. Four years after moving to Iowa Mr. and Mrs. Wilson and family removed to Creston where they have made their home until the present time.
Mr. Wilson has six brothers and sisters: L. Banks Wilson, Mrs. Kate Janney and Edgar W. Wilson are deceased. Mrs. Ella Harris resides at Marengo, Illinois; Miss Juniata M. Wilson, of Mifflington, Pennsylvania and Southard Wilson of Denver, Colorado.

[WILSON, EMELOU LINDSEY]
Creston News Advertiser (Creston, Iowa), Thursday, January 5, 1939
Mrs. Wilson Died Today
Mrs. Allen Latimer Wilson, 79, prominent Creston resident for the past 50 years, died this morning at 6:45 at the home of her daughter, Mrs. Fred W. Ide, following a four-month illness. Death was attributed to uremic poisoning.
Mrs. Wilson had been a resident of Creston since 1889, moving here from Bedford. She was active in the Presbyterian church and a member of the Elziver Reading circle and P. E. O.
Emelou Lindsey Wilson was born in Rising Sun, Ind., Nov. 24, 1859, the daughter of Isaiah and Eliza Lindsey. She was married April 27, 1879 to Allen Latimer Wilson in Walnut, Ill. who preceded her in death March 13, 1921.
Surviving are two daughters, Mrs. Fred W. Ide of Creston and Mrs. J. E. Huston of Lincoln, Nebr. and a son, Ralph Wilson of Olin, Iowa. Two children, Howard and Lucien Wilson, preceded her in death.
Funeral services will be held at the Ide home, 809 West Montgomery street, Saturday afternoon at 2 o'clock in charge of the Rev. A. E. Kiser. Burial will be in Graceland cemetery.

[WILSON, LUCIEN, 1886 – 1909]
Bedford Times-Republican (Bedford, Iowa), Thursday, July 1, 1909
Dies at Creston Lucien Wilson, Young Man Well-Known Here Passes Away
Lucien Wilson, son of Mr. and Mrs. A. [llen] Latimer Wilson, died at his home in Creston Saturday night at 9:15 o'clock. While his health had been poor for a long time he was not given to complaining and even his nearest relatives did not realize that his condition was so serious.
He was well-known in Bedford, all his early boyhood days having been spent here and his many friends in this vicinity were inexpressibly shocked and grieved when they learned of his untimely death. That he stood high in the estimation of those who knew him well in later years, is show by the following obituary notice taken from the Creston Advertiser-Gazette:
Deceased was born in Bedford and when yet a boy he came to Creston with his parents and this has been his home every since, with the exception of a few years spent in the west. He was only 22 years of age at the time of his death. He was reared to manhood in this city and as he trod the daily walks of life, the admiration which his steadfast friends and as well every one about him, had cultivated for him in infancy constantly strengthened and the time when death claimed him, was the most promising period in his young career.
After leaving school this young man sought work in the business circles of the city and received his first practical experience with the shoe firm of Brown Bros. and Hood. The members of the firm speak only in the highest terms of his efficiency and trustworthiness and realize, as does everyone who knew him or ever had social or business dealings with him, that his was a life that can ill be spared. At the time of decision to go west he was employed at the Bullard Dry Goods store in this city, leaving for the west shortly after Mr. Bullard sold out. He located in Seattle, Wash., where he secured responsible work for a shoe firm in that city. Since coming home about three or four months ago he has been closely associated with his father in the imported horse business and during his father's absence had full charge of affairs.
To the parents and brother and sisters and other loved ones, is extended the heartfelt sympathy of the community.
Arrangements have been made for conducting the funeral from the home Tuesday morning at 10 o'clock with interment taking place at Graceland cemetery. Rev. James P. Linn, pastor of the First Presbyterian church, will be in charge of the services.

[WILSON, LUCIEN, 1886 - 1909]
Bedford Free Press (Bedford, Iowa), Thursday, July 15, 1909
A. L. Wilson arrived at his home in Creston Monday from Europe. It was a sad home coming for Mr. Wilson for when he left his son, Lucian, was in perfect health. Our readers remember of his recent death. His many old Bedford friends extend to him their sincere sympathy.