HISTORY OF TAMA COUNTY IOWA

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CHAPTER XXV

"CRYSTAL TOWNSHIP"



This Territory comprises Congressional township 85 north, range 15, west of the fifth principal meridian. It is bounded on the north by Grant township, on the west by Spring Creek, on the south by Howard and on the east by Perry. It is well watered by numerous streams. Four Mile creek enters from the north on section 3, and flowing toward the southeast, passes through section 2, and leaves from section 12. Wolf creek enters the township from the west on section 18, flowing east through that section to 17, thence to sections 16 and 10, then following, meanderingly, the line between sections 11 and 14, makes exit from section 12. Salt creek risees in the southern part of the town, on section 33, and flowing toward the east, passes through sections 26 and 25, making exit from the latter section. Crystal creek is in the southwestern part of the township. One branch rises in Spring Creek township and another on section 19. They make confluence on section 19. It then flows in a southerly direction through section 30, thence in a southwesterly course across the corner of section 31, back to Spring Creek township. The emigrant road going west used to cross this stream on the northwest quarter of section 30. It was a very bad crossing and teams were frequently stalled here, and settlers in the neighborhood were called upon to help with their teams to pull them out. On this account this place was called the "dug-out"

Along Wolf creek there is some natural timber. There is also a grove in the northern part, on section 3, known as "Four Mile grove," while numerous large and beautiful plantations of trees add to the scenic effect. The township is mostly prairie and the surface south of Wolf creek lies nearly level, while that north of the stream is rolling and hilly. The soil is generally the rich dark loam for which this part of the State is noted, except in the northern portion where there is a clay mixture.

The township was named by Mrs. C. L. Davis, from the crystaline purity of the air. In this, as well as in other townships in this section of the county, wheat was once the main product, but at the present time it is not considered a paying crop, and the farmers are devoting their attention to other Cereals and the raising of stock. There is no railroad in the township, but there are three live towns within short distance, and easy of access, Traer, Gladbrook and Garwin. The inhabitants are mostly American and Scotch, with a few Germans, and all are an enterprising, industrious class of citizens.


EARLY SETTLEMENT
 

The first settlement in this township was made in 1854 by Nelson Felter, who came here from Cook county, Illinois, and settled on the northwest quarter of section 15, where he built a log house and covered it with boards. It was in this humble abode the first white child was born in the township. Mr. Felter occupied his farm until 1882, when he moved to Marshalltown, where he now lives. Nelson Felter was born in Schoharie county, New York, August 15, 1913. He was married September 18, 1834, to Miss Calphrenia Powers, a native of Otsego county, New York. In 1854 he came to Tama county and immediately purchased land on section 15, of what is now Crystal township. He erected on his land a log cabin--the first in the township--which he occupied until 1869, when he built a frame house. He reared five children--Matthew C., Rachel E., Jane, Harvey L. and Lyman. The wife and mother died May 23, 1881, and the subject of our sketch was again married, October 25, 1882, choosing for a help meet, Mrs. F. H. Brown.

John W. McKune came here from Lee county, Illinois, in June, 1855, traveling overland with teams, bringing thirty head of cattle with him. He located on the southwest quarter of section 14. The family lived with Mr. Felter through the summer while he broke some of his land and built a log house into which they moved in the fall. He made this his home until the time of his death, which occurred June 27, 1870. His widow now lives in Perry township with her daughter. John W. McKune was born in Orange county,New York, in 1803. When he was nine years old his parents removed to Susquehanna county, Pennsylvania. There he was joined in marriage, May 8, 1831, with Miss Frances Stuart, of Great Bend, Pennsylvania. Four children were born to them: George, Hannah E., Augusta and john E. In 1844, he settled in Cattaraugus county, New York, where he lived until 1846. During that year he removed to Lee county, Illinois, where he purchased a farm and lived for nine years. He then sold his property there and came to Iowa for the purpose of settlement. Upon reaching this county he purchased land on section 14 of what is now Crystal township. He took much care in improving his land, and made his home on it until called away by death, June 27, 1870. He was a kind husband and father, a good neighbor, and was deeply respected by all. he was a mamber of the first town Board of Trustees and afterwards held other offices of trust. His widow now makes her home with her daughter, Mrs. L.E. Wood.

Mr. McKune's eldest son, George, was born in the town of Windsor, Broome county, New York, June 21, 1833. he came west with his parents, making his home with them until the time of his marriage, December 24, 1860. His wife was Miss Eliza Stewart, daughter of James and Louisa (Vanleiw) Stewart. They have been blessed with seven children: Fred, Frances, John, Libbie, George, Abbie and Nellie. Immediately after his marriage, Mr. McKune settled on his farm in the northeast quarter of section 23, of Crystal township. He has erected good farm buildings on his place and set out shade and fruit trees. He is now engaged in stock raising in connection with farming. At present he is a member of the town Board of Trustees, is postmaster at Crystal postoffice, and has held other offices of trust at different times.

John E., the youngest son of John W. and Frances McKune, is a native of Susquehanna county, Pennsylvania, where he was born March 2, 1840. He lived with his parents until October of 1861, at which time he enlisted in Company G, 14th Iowa Volunteers, and started off to fight for his country's honor. He participated in the battles of Fort Donelson and Shiloh. During the latter engagement he was taken prisoner and died in 1862, while in the rebel prison at Macon, Georgia.

Hannah, the eldest daughter, is now the wife of J.C. Wood and lives in Buckingham township. Augusta, the third child born to them, married L.E. Wood and is living in Perry township.

 

Another settler in 1855, was JONATHAN S. BISHOP, a native of Logan county, Ohio, who came here with his family from St. Joseph county, Michigan. They started from that place the 24th of April with three yoke of oxen and one yoke of cows. They visited on the way in Illinois and in Washington county this State, and arrived in Crystal township the 10th day of June, and settled on the east half of the northeast quarter of section 31. His family lived in the wagons until fall. During the summer he broke some of his land and drew some lumber from Muscatine and erected a frame house. He continued to improve his land until the fall of 1862, when he joined the Union army. He died in the service, September 8, 1863. Two of his sons are now residents of the township.

 

JOHNATHAN S. BISHOP was born on the banks of the Little Miami, in Logan county, Ohio, October 20,1818. His youth was spent in school and assisting his father on the farm. When twenty years of age he began learning the wheelwrights trade. During 1839, he was in Springfield, Illinois, building carts, which were to be used in dragging stone to the site where the State capitol was to be erected. April 20, 1840, he was married, at Urbana, Ohio, to Miss Mary McGahan, a native of Erie county, Pennsylvania, and born July 7, 1813. They were blessed with four children, only one of whom is now living - John B. M. The subject of this sketch continued to work at his trade in Ohio until 1845, when he removed to Cass county, Michigan, where he bought a farm and also a saw mill. His wife died there March 25, 1851, and he soon after sold his property and removed to St. Joseph county, working at his trade in the town of Constantine.

 

Subsequently he was married in that county to Mrs. Polly Ray Ketchum, widow of Loren Ketchum. She was born November 28, 1821, Cattaraugus county, New York. Three children were born to them: Charles A., Harriet E. and Laura A. In 1853, Mr. Bishop removed to White Pigeon, Michigan, and two years later, came to Tama county, Iowa. He entered land on section 31, of Crystal township, upon his arrival here, and immediately began improving it. In September of 1862 he enlisted in Company F, 28th Iowa Volunteers, being mustered in as corporal. He was detailed as his Company's representative in the color guard. He was flag bearer at the battle of Champion Hills, where he was slightly wounded in the arm. The flag staff was shattered over his head and the flag badly damaged. He participated in the battle of Port Gibson and the siege of Vicksburg, and was with the regiment in its march to New Orleans. In August of 1863 he was detached from his regiment and joined the 11th Louisiana. Shortly after, he was taken sick with typhoid fever and died in the regiment camp, September 8th, 1863. Mrs. Bishop died at their home August 18th, twenty days before her husbands death occurred.

CHARLES A. BISHOP, youngest son of Jonathan S. Bishop, was born at Constantine, in St. Joseph county, Michigan, August 26, 1852. He was in his third year when his parents settled in this State. His education was received in the district schools of Crystal township, and at the High School of Toledo. February 2, 1876, he was united in marriage with Miss Maggie Watt, daughter of Joseph Watt, of Westmoreland county, Pennsylvania. They have two children: Frank R. and Arthur A. In 1875 the subject of this sketch purchased a farm of section 32 of Crystal township. During 1882 he erected on it his present large frame residence.

 

VALENTINE SHULTZ a native of the "Keystone" State, started from Michigan, and arrived in Crystal township June 8, 1855, and settled on the west half of the north-west quarter of section 32, where he built the second log house in the township, and lived in it until the time of his death, in 1868. His widow now lives in Garwin.

 

ASA HOAG, who was a native of the empire State, came here from St. Joseph county, Michigan, in 1855, and settled on the northeast quarter of 29, where he erected a board shanty. On the way here his wife lost her reason, and on that account he sold out in 1856 and returned to Michigan, where he was killed about a year later by a falling tree.

 

In the fall of 1855, MRS. MARGARET MORTON also a native of the empire State came with her family from Lee county, Illinois, over land with ox teams, crossing the Mississippi river at Fulton. They were eleven days on the road and settled on the southeast quarter of section14.

 

Mrs. Margaret MORTON, one of the first settlers of Crystal township, is a daughter of Jonathan and Dorotha (Smith) Peterson, and was born January 11, 1817, in Cortland county, New York. September 1, 1836, she was joined in wedlock with JOHN MORTON, who was born in Tompkins county, New York, May 2, 1815. He was reared on a farm in his native county, and when a young man, learned the trade of wagon making. The same year in which he was married, he opened a wagon shop in Allegany county, and continued in business there until 1842, when he removed to Lee county, Illinois. There he was employed in farming for a while, and then opened a wagon and plow shop, which business he followed until the time of his death, October 6, 1854. He left a wife and seven children to mourn his loss; two of those children have since followed him to that "brighter shore." The five now living are Persis, Ann N., Luceba, Newman W. and Almeda. In the fall of 1855, Mrs. Morton started, with her family, for the west. Upon reaching Iowa, she proceeded to this county, where she had previously purchased land in the southeast quarter of section 14, Crystal township, and where she has ever since made her home.

 

Her oldest son, JONATHAN MORTON, was born in allegany county, New York, February 4, 1838. He made his home with his mother until January of 1864, when he enlisted in Company A, 14th Iowa Volunteers. His regiment joined General Banks'command and participated in the Red River expedition, in which campaign, at the battle of Pleasant Hill, he was wounded. He was in several other engagements, remaining in the service until the spring of 1865, when he was taken sick, from exposure, and never recovered. He was discharged in June, of that year, and returned home, where, after many weary months of pain and sickness, he died on the 24th day of February, 1866. Her daughter, Persis, is now the wife of M. C. Felter. Ann N., formerly a teacher in the public schools of this county, is now deputy postmaster of Crystal post office, and is also Secretary of the School Board. She has a general store on the northeast quarter of section14, Crystal township. Luceba was married to George W. Buchanan, July 3, 1864, and is now residing with her family in Union county, Oregon.

 

NEWMAN W., the only son now living, is a native of Lee county, Illinois, when he was born October 18, 1848. He was seven years of age when his mother settled in Iowa. His education was received in Crystal township,. He was married at Beaver City, Furnas county, Nebraska, on the 31st of January, 1880, to Miss Laura E. Evans, a native of Bureau county, Illinois. They have one son - Claude Henry. Mr. Morton now occupies the old homestead.

 

Almeda was married December 26, 1876, to John Estle, who died May 12, 1882, leaving his wife and two children, Tony Ray and Anna Mable, to mourn his untimely death.

 

WEST WILSON a native of Scotland came here from Connecticut n 1854, and entered land on sections 12 and 13, after which he returned to Connecticut. In 1856 he moved here with his family and has since made this his home.

 

West Wilson was born in Ayreshire, Scotland, Septmeber 19, 1820. He was reared on a farm and attended the public schools of his native parish, completing his education under the tutorage of Mr. Land, Professor of Greek and Hebrew, in Edinburg University. After completing his education, he engaged in farming until 1846, when he came to America, and settled in New London county, Connecticut, where he rented a farm and engaged in the vegetable and dairy business. In 1854, he came to Tama county, and entered land in township 85, range 15, now known as Crystal township. He then returned to Connecticut and continued his former business until 1856, when he again came to Iowa and settled on his land. He has improved his farm and erected a good set of buildings. In 1874, he engaged in the grain business in Traer, and in 1879, he opened up a branch business in Morrison, and again in 1882, engaged in the same business in Reinbeck. Mr. Wilson was married in 1845 to Margaret Drynan, a native of Ayreshire, Scotland. She died in 1860, leaving nine children, eight of whom are now living--Janet, Jane, Margaret, James, Agnes, William, Henry and Catherine. Grace died when three years of age. His second wife, to whom he was married in 1863, was Barbara Kennedy, a native of Ayreshire. Four children bless this union--Sarah, John W., Christiana and Dallon K. In 1880, Mr. Wilson made a visit to his native land, and his friends in Tama county had the privilege of reading in the Traer Clipper, many interesting letters written by him during his travels. Mr. Wilson was the first to introduce shorthorn cattle in northern Tama. He has engaged quite extensively in raising this breek of cattle, and in the fall of 1882 sold ninety-five head. Mr. wilson was also one of the instigators of the Toledo Agricultural Society, and of the Northern Tama Acricultural Society. He has always been on the alert to do anything for the good of his county, and it was mainly through his influence that most of the Scotch and English settled here. Mr. Wilson is possessed of excellent business qualifications, and has been successful in accumulating a competency.  He is known and respected all over the county.

J.S. Townsend, a native of Westmoreland county, Pennsylvania, came in 1854, and entered the northwest quarter of section 27. After entering his land he returned to Pennsylvania. In 1856, he returned with his family, coming on the cars as far as Iowa City. There he hired a team to take him to Linn county, where he had friends. he there bought a pair of horses and drove to his new home. He has made great improvements and is one of the largest farmers in the township.

C.L. Davis, a native of Connecticut, came here from St. Joseph county, Michigan, in 1856, and bought land on sections 29 and 30. He bought a board shanty of Mr. Hoag, and lived in that until fall. In the meantime he had cut some trees and hauled the logs to Bruner's mill, on Deer creek, and had them sawed. He built a frame house, 16x24 feet, with a lean-to, in which he lived until 1868, when he built the house in which he now lives.

Washington Brown, a step-son of Valentine Shalbz, came here with him and entered the east half of the northwest quarter of section 32. He remained in the country until 2864, when he went to Dickerson county, Kan., where he is now engaged in farming.

Robert Wylie came in 1854, and enterd land on section 24, after which he returned to Cedar county. In 1855 he came back to his land, did some breaking and built a house, but spent the winter in Cedar county. In the spring of 1856 he again returned, bringing his family.

Robert Wylie was born in Westmoreland county, Pennsylvania, Feb. 8, 1807. He was reared on a farm. May 30, 1830, he was joined in marriage with Miss Isabella Ralston, who bore him nine children, six of whom are now living, Margaret J., John B., Mary, Isabella, Sarah and Matthew. Mr. Wylie made his home in his native State until the fall of 1854, when he came to Iowa for the purpose of finding a good location for settlement. He left his family at Tipton, Iowa, and came on to Tama county, where he soon entered 320 acres of land in sections 27 and 28 of what is now Crystal township. He then returned to Tipton, but the following spring made another trip to this county, and while here made arrangement to have broken several acres of his land and also erected a house. In the spring 1856 he removed his family here, since which time they have been prominent residents of the county. During the year of 1872 his dwelling was destroyed by fire, and he immediately afterwards erected the large frame house, in which he lived until the time of his death--June 6, 1876. His widow, two daughters and a son now live on the homestead. When quite young Mr. Wylie joined the Presbyterian church in his native state. Subsequently he was one of the first elders of the Salem Presbyterian church, of which he was one of the original members. He enjoyed the respect and confidence of the people and filled many offices of trust in the township. Two of his sons now live in the township. His son, John B. Wylie, was born Feb. 19, 1834. He made his home with his parents until the fall of 1866, when he was married to Miss Margaret McQuilkin, a native of West Moreland county, Penn., where she was born Aug. 3, 1843. She bore him six children, four of whom are now living--Lillie Beele, Robert H., Mary E. and William Orr--and died in Crystal township, Feb. 8, 1881. Mr. Wylie is an elder in the Salem church, of which he has been a member since its organization. At the first town meeting he was elected an officer of the same, and he has been kept in some responsible position of trust most of the time since.

Orin Burright, a native of the "Buckeye" State, came here from Illinois in 1856, and first settled on section 3, where he built a house and lived a short time and then moved to the northwest quarter of section 15. In 1865, he moved to Toledo, where he now lives.

John Buchanan, a "Hoosier" by birth, came here in 1856 and settled on the east half of the northwest quarter of section 23. Afterward he sold and moved to Indian Village. He now lives in Oregon.

William Guilford, a native of the old "Bay" State, came here from vermont in 1856, and located on the northwest quarter of section 30. In 1864, he went to Howard township, and afterward went to Toledo where he engaged in the hardware business. He nowlives in Storm Lake.

Abraham Quinn, a native of Pennsylvania, came from Illinois in 1855, with a team bringing his family and driving through some cattle. He left his family in Monroe county while he came and entered the east half of the southeast quarter of section 2. In September, he moved his family here and made this his home until 1877, when he moved to Oregon. His oldest son Peter, now occupies the old place. Abraham Quinn was born in Pennsylvania, in 1809. When a young man his parents moved to Ohio and settled in Franklin county, where they were among the first settlers. Abraham assisted his father in clearing up the farm, which was in a heavily wooded country. In 1835, Mr. Quinn was married to Miss Sarah Ann Hartsock, a native of Pennsylvania. They settled on a farm in Plain township, Franklin county, and made that their home until 1855, then came to Iowa, locating in Tama county, in what is now Crystal township. He purchased 120 acres of prairie land on sections 1 and 2, and some timbered land on section 3. He built the first frame house and lived in the township until 1877, when he moved to Oregon, where he now lives a resident of East Portland. Mrs. Quinn was born in Pennsylvania in 1812, and died in Crystal township, Tama county, September 17, 1864. Mr. and Mrs. Quinn were the parents of five children: Peter, Elizabeth A., Jane Ellen, Mark Leroy and John W. The daughters are both living in Grant township of this county. John W. is married and lives in Oregon, and Mark L., died in infancy.

The oldest son, Peter Quinn was born in Franklin county, Ohio, March 15, 1837. He attended the public schools in Ohio and Illinois, making his home with his parents until 1864. On August 31, 1864, he enlisted in the 1st Iowa Cavalry, Company C, and was soon transferred to Company M. He joined the command at Little Rock, Arkansas, and was with the regiment until the close of the war, being honorably discharged June 13, 1865. He returned to Crystal township, Tama county, and November 30, 1865, was mareied to Miss Agnes, daughter of Gilbert and Sarah McMillan, of the same township. Mr. and Mrs. Quinn have been blessed with seven children: Sheridan G., Wilson A., David W., James M., Freddie J., Maggie M. and Peter R. On his return from the war, Mr. quinn settled on the southeast quarter of section 2, where he has since lived. Mr. Quinn is the proprietor of the Crystal Creamery, which he established in 1880.

Another man who came here to seek a home in 1855 was Gilbert McMillan, a Scotchman, who had come from the old country but a few months previous, and had made a short stop in Connecticut. He selected 120 acres on section 2, then went to Buckingham and lived until the spring of 1857, when he settled on his land and now makes this his home. Probably no man in the country is more fond of a joke than he, and it takes a good man to "get ahead" of him. It is said that J. Vertrees is the only person that ever did, and it happened in this way: Mr. McMillan had "considerable many hogs", and very little corn or feed of any description for them, and Mr. vertrees had corn in abundance, but ofhogs none. Meat was scarce in the neighborhood, and, in consideration of the hard work to be done, a necessity. In order to secure a supply, or make provision for the future, something must be done. There were the hogs and here the corn, a plan to get the two together would make pork. So Vertrees made a proposition to McMillan to take some of the shoats and feed them for one-half the pork. To this McMillan readily assented and vertrees drove home the "porkers." In a few days he killed one of them, and wishing everything fair, called in Solomon Walls to divide it, which he did as carefully as possible, splitting exactly in the centre from the end of the nose to the tip of the tail. It was thin enough for a lantern, and without fat enough to cook it in. Vertrees carried McMillan's half to him, when it suddenly dawned upon McMillan that there was something wrong about that contract, but notwithstanding his loss of hogs, he was not the man to "squeal" and enjoyed the joke as well as anybody. One day his neighbor, Chapman, was at his house when he was feeding his stock and said to him, "You have more stock than you need." "Mac" replied "yes, that is true," and pointing out two steers said, "You may have those two for all I care." Chapman knew well the propensity of his neighbor for joking, and knowing of course that McMillan would not think for a moment that he would actually take the cattle and drive them away, he concluded to play a joke by taking him at his word. It was a hot day in August, and he started the steers. They ran out on the prairie, and continued to run, with Chapman after them, until man and beast were both exhausted and mad. But finally, after much trouble and vexation, he succeeded in getting them well on the road toward home. When passing a neighbor's house, the man came out and asked, "what he was doing with those steers." He replied, "I am driving them home from McMillan's." "But," said the man, "they are my steers." Then Chapman saw "where the joke came in," and went home a very tired, but a wiser man.

Gilbert McMillan was born in the parrish of Colmonel, Ayreshire, Scotland, June 16, 1816. His father was a farmer and stock-raiser. Gilbert received his education in the public school at Barr Hill, and continued to make his home with his parents until twenty-six years of age, when he was united in marriage with Miss Sarah Wilson, daughter of James and Jane (Lusk) Wilson. They have eight children: Agnes, Jennie, Maggie, David, James, Janet, Peter and Grace. At the time of his marriage the subject of our sketch rented a farm in the parish of Colmonel, and there lived until 1855, when he left his native land and came to America. He landed at New York city on the 24th of February, and immediately proceeded to Connecticut, where he visited friends until the following June, when he came to Tama county, Iowa, for the purpose of settlement. He entered 120 acres of land in the northeast quarter of section 2, of what is now Crystal township, but spent the first year on a rented farm in Buckingham township. In the fall of 1856 he purchased 40 acres of land adjoining his farm, upon which he moved a small frame house that he had purchased in Buckingham township. After living here for some time he built an addition, and continued to occupy the house in which he now resides. Mr. McMillan now owns 260 acres of improved land and 70 acres of timber land.

Charles Lee Davis made his settlement in Crystal township, in the spring of 1856. He bought land on sections 29 and 30, and also purchased a little shanty to live in until he could get a more substantial house erected. He cut logs, hauled them to the saw mill on Deer creek, and that fall built a frame house, 16x24 feet, with a lean-to attached. In this house he lived until 1868, when he erected his present dwelling. He was born in Windham county, Connecticut, August 27, 1813, and is a son of Thomas and Prudence (Denison) Davis. When he was but three years old, his parents removed to Genesee county, New York.

 

CHARLES LEE DAVIS made his settlement in Crystal township, in the spring of 1856. He bought land on sections 29 and 30, and also purchased a little shanty to live in until he could get a more substantial home erected. He cut logs, hauled them to the saw mill on Deer creek, and that fall built a frame house, 16x24 feet, with a lean-to attached. In this house he lived until 1868, when he erected his present dwelling. He was born in Windham county, Connecticut, August 27, 1813, and is a son of Thomas and Prudence (Denison) Davis. When he was but three years old, his parents removed to Genesee County, New . . . . Page 707 18, 1853, and died Oct. 24, 1865. Ann Eliza, the eldest daughter, was born Jan. 30, 1843, and died Oct. 29, 1865. Margaret L. was born March 10, 1847, and died Nov. 1, 1865. John M. was born March 20, 1851, and died Nov. 1, 1865.

 

SOLOMON WALLS, a native of Ohio, came from Ogle county, Illinois, in 1857 and settled on section 3, where he lived until 1859 when he moved to section 15, where he now lives. He was born in Knox county, Ohio, January 10, 1832. He made that county his home until 1852, when he removed to Ogle county, Illinois, where he was subsequently married to Miss Mary E. Burright, daughter of Orrin Burright. During 1857 they removed to Tama county, Iowa, and settled in section 3, of Crystal township. Two years later, he purchased land on section 15, where he has since made his home. Mr. and Mrs. Walls have six children: Laurinda, William Henry, Charles E., Milan D., Hortense E. and Cordie. Mr. Walls is a prominent member of the Methodist Episcopal Church, of Crystal, and has been its class leader for many years.

 

JOE VERTREES, a native of Illinois, came in 1858, and settled on section 3. During the war he returned to Illinois. He now lives in Shelby county, Iowa.

 

Dr. S. C. ROGERS, the only practicing physician that ever settled in this township, was a native of Massachusetts. He came here from New York in 1859, and settled on section 16. He went to the army as surgeon, and after the war he sold his property here and settled in the east.

 

S. M. CHAPMAN, a native of Kentucky, came here in 1859, and settled on the northeast quarter of section 2. During the war, he went to the southern part of the county. Stewart Burright came here in 1859, and settled on section 3. He enlisted in the army, and upon his return settled in Shelby county.

 

In 1865 the WHANNEL family came to Tama county, and have ever since been prominent and respected citizens. In their respective townships will be found sketches of the different members of this family, and in this connection are presented personal sketches of those who are residents of this township.

 

PETER WHANNEL, eldest son of John and Margaret Whannel, is a native of Ayreshire, Scotland, where he was born February 3, 1833. He received his education in the public schools of his native parish (Colmonel), and afterwards came with his father and family to the United States, settling in Knox County, Illinois, where they continued to live for a number of years. Immediately after the family were settled in their new home, the subject of our sketch hired out as a farm hand in the neighborhood of his parents home, and for the first year's labor received the small sum of $165. Subsequently he, in company with his father and three brothers, rented land which they farmed while in that State. During the time, they managed, by economy and unceasing toil, to save $1,500; however, by the failure of the bank in which it was deposited, all was lost with the exception of a paltry 20 per cent recovered by them several years afterwards. The father died August 29, 1864, and the following year the family came to Tama county, Iowa, buying 640 acres on sections 6, 7 and 8 of Crystal township, of which only 50 were improved. Mr. Whannel now owns a well cultivated farm of 560 acres, on which he has erected good, substantial farm buildings. His residence is located on section 6, and was erected in 1865. August 26, 1864, he was united in marriage with Miss Janet Young, a native of Ayreshire, Scotland, and daughter of Samuel and Janet Young. Seven children have been born to them: Janie E., Margaret K., Samuel L., Mary H., Janet C., Thomas A. and Marion A. Mr. Whannel is also largely engaged in stock raising in connection with farming. Mr. Whannel has three brothers whose farms join his: Thomas, in Crystal township, and John and Robert in Grant township.

 

THOMAS WHANNEL, the second son of John and Margaret Whannel, was born in the parish of Colmonel, Ayreshire, Scotland, April 27, 1835. He received a liberal education in the public schools of his native parish, and subsequently came, with his parents, to America. For some years after their settlement in this country, the subject of our sketch was engaged in farming in the state of Illinois; at first working as a laborer at ten dollars per month, and later, in company with his father and brothers, farming rented land. With them he suffered by the failure of the bank in which their hard earned money was deposited. In 1865 he came to Tama county, Iowa, with his father's famlily (sic), and settled in Crystal township, where he now owns 480 acres of improved land; he also owns 400 acres in Wright county of this State. February 9, 1870, he was joined in wedlock with Mary J., daughter of Andrew and Elizabeth (Kelly) McCormack. They have been blessed with six children: Andrew, James M., Mary E., John H., Robert W. and Edward. In 1869 Mr. Whannel erected his present residence on section 7 of Crystal township. He, with his brothers, came to this county poor, but by patience, perseverance and industry, they now rank among the largest and best farmers of Tama county.

 

JOHN STEVENSON settled in Tama county, Iowa, on section 36, Crystal township, in 1865, and there made his home until his death, which occurred January 8, 1876. Mr. Stevenson was a native of Scotland, born in Ayreshire, June 12, 1808. He was joined in wedlock with Miss Marion Wier, a native of Ayreshire, Scotland, born in December, 1811. They were blessed with ten children, eight of whom are now living. Mr. Stevenson continued to live in Scotland until 1853, when they emigrated to Canada, settling on a farm in Peterboro county. During 1865 he sold his homestead there, and, crossing to the United States, came to Iowa, where he soon purchased land on section 25, of Crystal township, this county. He settled on it and continued to improve the same until the time of his death. His widow now occupies the homestead. Mr. Stevenson's third son, James, is also a native of Ayreshire, Scotland, having been born there November 23, 1843. He was eight years of age when his parents emigrated to Canada, and twenty-two years old when they settled in Iowa. He made his home with his parents until 1870, when he was united in marriage with Mary J., daughter of Samuel Steen, of Pennsylvania. They have three children - Ella E., Jessie J. and Samuel W. Mr. Stevenson's farm is in the southwest quarter of section 25, Crystal township. He is now largely engaged in stock raising in connection with farming.

 

Among those who have come into the township since 1865, and are now prominent settlers, may be mentioned Johann COHRT, John B. BRUSH, Edward DODD, E. B. HARLAN, D. W. BAKER, John SHARP, Claus Fredrick JACOBS, Heinrich CLAUSEN, Edwin MOORE, E. W. HARRISON, James FINK, William BELFOUR, Robert McPHERRAN, John SWAN, Peter PLOEN, Edwin LYNDE, William McTURK, Robert COWAN, William HOUGHTON, John HARMSEN, Jonathan and Joseph ALLARD, and others.

 

JOHANN COHRT, one of the first German settlers of Crystal township, was born at Hollingstedt, Schleswig, Germany. He received a good education in his native town, and there lived until 1856, when he emigrated to America. Upon being landed at New York city, he proceeded directly to Davenport, Iowa, and from there, removed to Illinois, where he was employed during that winter chipping wood, for which he received $1 per cord. He then hired out as a farm hand, and for his first years labor received $170; the second year he worked for twelve dollars per month, except during harvest time, when he received $1.50 per day. August 13, 1858, he was married to Rebecca Tenkk who was born August 26, 1840, in Holstein, Germany. She is a daughter of Peter and Maggie Tenkk. In 1859 Mr. Cohrt farmed land six miles from Davenport, Scott county, on shares. The next year he removed to Liberty township, same county, where he bought 80 acres of wild land; on it he erected a house and continued to improve the land until 1866, when he came to Crystal township of this county and purchased the west half of section 16. He lived on the northwest quarter six years and then built his present residence in the other quarter. He is also engaged in stock raising in connection with farming. Thirteen children have been born to Mr. and Mrs. Cohrt, eleven of whom are now living--Claus, Mary, Peter, Annie M., John, William, Henry, Emma, Matilda, Clara and an infant named Theodor. Teresa, a twin sister to Matilda, died when in her fifth year; and just eight days later, Caroline died, aged abut three years.

 

JOHN B. BRUSH is a native of Sussex county, New Jersey, born July 26, 1817. His education was received in his native county, and there his youth and early manhood was spent. He passed the winter of 1846-7 in Buffalo, New York, and proceeded to Illinois, buying land in DeKalb county of that State. Two years later he sold his property there and removed to this State, making his first settlement in Center township of Clinton county, where he was one of the pioneers, the township not being organized until three years later. He purchased government land, and during the years he lived there, improved it and made of it a comfortable homestead. In 1866, he sold the farm, came to Tama county, and bought the southeast quarter of section 22, Crystal township, which land was then wild prairie. The same year he completed the house in which he now lives, and in 1881 erected a barn 32x46 feet, with an ell 18x30 feet. Mr. Brush now owns 320 acres of improved land and 40 acres of timber land, and also a residence in the town of Traer. March 23, 1850, he was united in marriage with Miss Phebe C. Cole, also a native of Sussex county, New Jersey, and a daughter of Josiah W. and Hannah (Wickham) Cole. They have seven children: Walter J., Jane H., Emma A., Sarah F., Oscar W., Charle C. and Judson W.

Edward Dodd settled in Tama county in 1866. He spent the first year in the employ of West Wilson, of Crystal township, and then purchased, in that township, 120 acres of unimproved land on section 17. During the same year he broke a number of acres, and in 1868 raised his first crop. In January, 1873, he was united in marriage with Miss Janet Wilson, a daughter of West Wilson. They have been blesssed with five children: Henry West, Thomas Wright, James Wilson, Maggie Drynan, and William Andrew. Mr. Dodd now owns 280 acres of improved land, on which have been erected good farm buildings. In 1872 he built his present residence. he is a native of Ayreshire, Scotland, born March 29, 1838. He made that country his home until 1856, when he came to the United States. After landing in New York, he proceeded to Michigan where he was employed in farming until 1863, then removed to Illinois, remaining in the latter State until the year of his settlement in this county. Mr. and Mrs. Dodd are members of the Tranquility Church.

E. B. Harlan is a native of Putnam county, Indiana, where he was born Novenber 25, 1843. His early years were spent in school and on the farm. During August of 1862, he enlisted in the 89th Indiana Volunteers and went to Kentucky, where he was taken prisoner by Morgan, in his raid through the State. he was immediately paroled and returned to his home. April 26, 1863, he was united in marriage with Miss Susanna Etter, who also was born in Putnam county. In 1864, he purchased a farm in Washington township of that county, and there lived until the fall of 1868, when he sold his property and came to Iowa. he worked a rented farm near Tama city, this county, the first year and then bought a farm on section 15, Crystal township. There he lived four years then sold the place and purchased his present farm on section 5. During 1882, he erected the house in which he now lives, and at the present time owns 400 acres of improved land. Mr. and Mrs. Harlan have been blessed with nine children, six of whom are now living: David Franklin, Mary Ann, Joseph R., Lizzie, Rosa and Noah Robert. Their son Johnny died in infancy; Etta May died at seven years of age, and Rebecca died when five years old.

Daniel Webster Baker is a native of Orleans county, Vermont, born on the 10th of January, 1847. He was reared on a farm receiving his education in the disctict schools. October 9, 1863, he left home, went to Montpelier, that State, and on the 12th of that month started for Cedar Rapids, Iowa, arriving on the 15th, and on the 18th started for Tama county. He reached Toledo the same day and stopped for a few days with George Guilford, an old acquaintance, who, on the 21st of October, took Mr. Baker to the farm of John B. Sharp, in Spring Creek township, where he remained until about the 1st of December. Then Mr. Baker went to Wm. Guilford's, whose farm he cultivated the following year, and in August, 1864, purchased the David Hunnewell place in Howard township, where he remained, engaged in farming, until April, 1868. He then sold his farm and purchased the one which he now occupies in Crystal township, and removed to it on the 7th of April. During his first year in Howard township, Mr. Baker taught school for one term in the old log school house in the Gallagher district, and has frequently since taught singing school in that and adjoining townships. In 1864, Mr. Baker was married, by Judge T.A. Graham, to Miss Elisabeth Sharp, who came to Iowa from Vermont, in July of that year, in company with Wm. Guilford and wife, who were returning from a visit to friends in that State. This marriage has been blessed with two children: Hattie G., born January 24, 1868; and John W., born June 9, 1870. Mr. Baker is a Republican, and although not a politician, has held various township offices. when the Grange movement spread over this portion of Iowa, he took an active part, and was one of the officers of that lodge.

John Sharp is one of the oldest men in Crystal township. He was born June 3, 1798, seven miles from Manchester, England. When fourteen years of age he learned to weave, and six years later, learned to drae patterns for the print Mills, which occupation he followed while in his native country. In 1830 he came to the United States. AFter stopping in the State of New York six or eight months, he fourneyed on to the town of Poultney, Vermont, where he was employed in weaving broadcloth. There he remained six months, and then decided to return to England; therefore made preparation, and started for Montreal, where he intended taking ship. On his way he stopped at Greensboro, Vermont, to visit friends, and they induced him to buy a farm in that vicinity, and settle there. He complied with their wishes, and made that his home until his removal to Tama county, Iowa, in 1867. He settled in Spring Creek township, where he lived for some years, and then took up his abode with his son-in-law, D. W. Baker, of Crystal township.

Claus Frederich Jacobs, is a native of Holstein, Germany, born January 13, 1837. He attended school until fifteen years of age, and from that time until his departure for America in 1855, was employed on a farm. Upon landing in New York city, he journeyed westward until he reached Winona, Minnesota, where he soon became engaged in a saw mill. Not long afterwards he removed to Davenport, Iowa, where he remained four years, employed on public works. At the end of that time he rented land in Scott county, and began farming on his own account. In 1860 he was married to Margaret Schmidt, who bore him four children--Only one of whom, Henry, is nowliving--and died in 1867. He was married to his present wife, Miss D. Meier, 1869. they have been blessed with eight children, four of whom are now living: Dora, Willia, Annie and Bennie. In 1869, Mr. Jacobs came to this county and purchased wild land on section 35, of Crystal township. Since that time he has improved the land, set out a grove, and in 1879 built a barn 24x32 feet, and two years later, erected his present large frame residence. In 1873, the family was stricken with scarlet fever, and within nine days' time, three of their children were taken from them by death.

Heinrich Clausen is a native of Germany, born in Klein Dennewerk, Schleswig, February 7, 1831. His early life was spent in school, and later, he worked on a farm. During 1869 he emigrated to America, making his first settlemane in Jackson county, Iowa, where he was engaged in farming. Subsequently he removed to this county, and rented a farm on section 30 of Crystal township. Five years later he purchased a farm on section 9, and in 1876 built the frame house in which he now lives. His marriage with Miss Catherine Michalsen occurred in 1856. they have three children: Hans, Henry and John.

Edwin Moore is a native of Stillwater, Saratoga county, New York, born April 1, 1836. His early life was spent in school and on the farm. September 10, 1857, he was united in marriage with Miss Ervyette Teal, a native of Duchess county, New york, and a daughter of Jacob Teal. They have but one child--Ella A., who is now teaching school. During 1863, Mr. Moore settled in Illinois, where he was employed in farming until his removal to Iowa, in 2872. Soon after his arrival here, he purchased a farm on section 29, of Crystal township, Tama county, and immediately bagan making improvements. he has set out fruit and shade trees, and erected good farm buildings, which includes the substantial farm-house inchich he lives.

E. w. Harrison is a native of Illinois, born in DeKalb county, August, 24, 1842. His parents were George and Elizabeth Harrison, natives of England. Upon coming to this country, they first settled in New York State, and from there removed to DeKalb county, Illinois, where their son Uriah was the second white child born in DeKalb township. The subject of this sketch received his education in the graded schools of DeKalb village. In October, 1862, he enlisted in Company C, 14th Illinois Volunteers,; his regiment went South and joined the Army of Tennessee, but after some time, was transferred to the Army of the Cumberland. It was the first regiment to enter Knoxville, and paricipated in the siege of Atlanta, besides being in several minor engagements. July 30, 1865, Mr. Harrison was honorably discharged with the rest of the regiment, and returned to his home, where he became engaged, in company with is brother, as a manufacturer and dealer in harness. During 1869, he sold his property and business there, and came to Iowa. The first season in the State was spent by him in breaking prairie land in the counties of Calhoun and Carroll, after which he came to Tama county, where, in the fall of 1870, he was united in marriage with Miss Philena Mann, who died January 16, 1872. His present wife, to whom he was married in 1873, was Lorinda A., daughter of Solomon Walls. Six children have been born to them: Daniel S., George P., Clara E., Grace E., Ralh e., and Charles S. In the spring of 1873, Mr. Harrison moved to Kansas, remaining until the fall of 1874, when he returned to Iowa. He purchased his present farm in Crystal township, in the fall of 1877.

James Fink was born in Holstein, Germany, August 3, 1817. He attended school until sixteen years of age; then for four years he worked at farming. In 1837, he commenced wagon making, serving three years, then joined the army. After serving a few weeks he was discharged on account of an impediment in his speech. After this he worked at his trade two years; then opened a wagon shop, and carried on the business until 1866, when he came to America, landing in New York on the 28th of May. He came west as far as Scott county, Iowa, and in August of the same year rented a farm for three years. After the expiration of said lease, he came to Tama county, and settled on his brother's farm for one year, in Spring Creek township. After this he bought land in Crystal township on sections 15 and 22. He has at present 400 acres of well improved land and fine farm buildings. He has five children--Peter, Claus A., Annie S., Betsy C., and James. Three of these children--Claus, Annie and Betsy--are all of one birth, and are the only triplets in Tama county. His oldest son, Peter, was born June 3, 1849. He attended school until seventeen years of age, then was employed as clerk until he moved with his parents to America. he met with a small accident while crossing the bridge to the vessel. The chain broke and He, with two others, plunged head-foremost forty feet into the water. He was rescued without damage, but got a free ducking. He remained at home until 1879, and February 15, of that year, he married Miss Catherine Dow Schmidt. their union has been blessed with two children--Tilly Margarita and Rosa L. He lives in Lincoln township, and has a farm of 240 acres.

William Balfour is a native of Lincolnshire, England, born May 25, 1845. There he received his education in the private schools, and when thirteen years of age emigrated with his parents to America. They settled on a farm in Rock Island county, Illinois, and subject of our sketch continued to make his home with them until March of 1864, when he enlisted in Company I, 28th Illinois Volunteers. He joined his regiment at Spanish Fort, Alabama, and continued with it until honorably discharged in March, 1865. He then returned to his home where he was employed in the coal mines until 1872, at which time he came to Tama county, Iowa, and purchased land on section 25 of Crystal township. He immediately settled upon it, and before many years had passed his farm was under good cultivation. In 1867 he was united in marriage with Miss Rachel J. Coulter, a native of Summit county, Ohio.

Robert McPherran was born on the 2d of September, 1835, in Franklin township, Huntingdon county, Pennsylvania. Until sixteen years of age, his life was spent in school and on the farm. He was then employed by his brother as overseer of a construction force on the pennsylvania railroad. In that work he was engaged two years and then returned to his home, and one year later, removed to Illinois, where he was employed for two years in the same capacity on the Mississippi River railroad. At the end of that time he again returned to Pennsylvania, where he was married, december 29, 1858, to Miss Catherine A. Miller, a native of Mifflin county, that State, born April 16, 1838. They immediately settled on a farm in Mr. McPherran's native township, and there lived until 1873, when they sold their property and came to Tama county, Iowa. Mr McPherran purchased wild land in the northeast quarter of section 36, Crystal township, where he immediately settled and began making improvements. Since that tiem his land has been well cultivated, and he has erected good farm buildings, which includes his present large frame residence. Mr. and Mrs. McPherran have been blessed with eight children--Florence, born March 19 1860; Samuel S., born August 2, 1861, died in infancy; Harrison M., born April 13, 1863; Walter E., born January 11, 1865; Ada Maud, born December 30, 1866; John W., born May 3, 1868; Hurbert B., born August 6, 1870, and Frank B., born December 1, 1873.

John Swan is a native of Perghshire, Scotland, where he was born August 22, 1839. He was reared on a farm, and continued to live in his native parish until twenty-five years of age, when he went to Dundee, where he was enbineer in a linen factory eight years.
he then emigrated to America, landing in the State of Virginia, where he engaged in farming (in Nausemond county) about four years, raising cotton, peanuts, sweet potatoes and water melons. In 1876 he came to Tama county, Iowa, and settled in Crystal township, buying land in the northwest quater of section 4. Since that time he has improved his farm, and among other buildings erected the house in which he now lives. Mr. Swan was married in 1859 to Miss Adelaide Lawson, who bore him nine children and died in 1876. Three of these children are now living--John, Jane and Adelaide. During 1880 he was united in marriage with Mrs Sarah McDurrell, who died June 16, 1882.

Peter Ploen was born February 25, 1839, in Holstein, Germany. He attended the public schools of his native place until sixteen years old, and at the age of seventeen emigrated to the United States. Upon landing at New York city he came directly to Iowa, where he was employed in farming in Scott county. For his first year's labor he received $140, and for his second year $100. In 1863 he was joined in wedlock with Miss Sophia Berten, a native of Holstein, and subsequently rented a farm, which he worked until 1872, when he removed to Marshall county, where he leased a farm for four years. At the expiration of that time he came to Tama county, and bought land in the southeast quarter of section 27, Crystal township. His farm isnow under good cultivation, and he has erected all of the buildings now upon it. Mr. and Mrs. Ploen have five children living--Meta, Henry, Carrie, Adolph and Charlie. Their son Edward died at two and a half years of age.


ORGANIC.
 

This township was formed in 1857 by an order issued by J. C. Vermilya, then County Judge, to J. S. Bishop, directing him to call an election. It was a separation from Buchingham township, and the formation of Crystal. The first township election was held at the house of Nelson Felter, April 6, 1857, on the northwest quarter of section 15, when the following named persons were elected: J. S. Townsend, Township Clerk; John W. McKune, Robert Wylie and Orrin Burright, Turstees; John B. Wylie and John Buchanan, Constables; robert Wylie and West Wilson, Justices of the Peace; Nelson Felter, Supervisor of Roads. Township affairs seem to have been properly managed. Nothing unusual has occurred to mar the general good feeling, and the elections have been much the same from year to year. In 1882 the following were elected which constitute the present life of officers:
Clerk, Edwin Lynde; Assessor, Robert Cowen; Trustees holding over, George McKune, Wm. McTurk; Trustee elected, J. B. M Bishop; Justices, John McClain, Wm. McTurk; Constables, John Winters and Wm. Houghton; Road Supervisors, Districr No. 1, Gilbert McMillan; District No. 2, Thomas McTurk; District No. 3, E. W. Harrison; District No. 4, Henry Wwise; District No. 5, James Fink; District No. 6, John Klesspie; District No. 7, William Stevenson; District No. 8, Peter Ploen; District No. 9, E. Eby.

Edwin Lynde, present Clerk of Crystal township, came to take county March 4, 1869. He first rented land for five years in Crystal township, then purchased a farm in Buchingham township where he lived two years. he then sold, and bought his present place in Crystal township, where he has since lived. Mrl Lynde is a native of New York, born in Essex county, January 17, 1841. His grandfather was a soldier in the Revolutionary war, and after the war was among the first settlers and first inn-keepers of Wiollsboro township, Essex county. His aunt Elizabeth was presented with fifty acres of land because of having been the first white child born in that town; and it was on that land that the subject of this sketch was born and reared. His early education was received in the district school, but later he attended four winters at a select school in town, having to make the trip of three long miles each morning and night. November 7, 1861, Mr. Lynde enlisted in Colonel Berdan's United States Sharp Shooters, went south and joined the Army of the Potomac, sharing in many battles and being wounded in one of the seven day's fight before Richmond. October 9, 1864, he was honorably discharged and he at once returned to New York State, where he was married to Miss Ann E. Lincoln, daughter of Simeon Lincoln, of Essex county. In 1868, Mr. Lynde removed to Vermont, where he remained one year engaged in farming, then came west and settled in Tama county, Iowa. Mr. and Mrs. Lynde have seven children: Jennie, Woodard, Noble, Rolla Cassius, Daniel, Jesse and George.

William McTurk, one of the Trustees and Justices of Crystal township, was born in Ayreshire, Scotland, Aug. 13, 1836. In 1857 he emigrated to America, and upon landing at Quebec, Canada, came directly west to Wisconsin, where he was employed as a farm hand a short time, and then purchased a team and worked land on shares. During 1864 he went to Mitchell county, Minnesota, where he resided two years, and then came to Tama county, Iowa. he soon bought land in Crystal township and on it built a log cabin, in which he lived until 1872, when he erected the framehouse in which he now lives. He was married in Scotland, in 1857, to Miss Annie Donaldson. They have six children, Thomas, John and James (twins), Gilbert, Margaret, and an adopted daughter, Kitty.

 

ROBERT COWAN, the present Assessor of Crystal township, is a native of Westmoreland county, Pennsylvania, born September 8, 1846. When he was nine years old his parents removed to this State and settled in Franklin township, Linn county. His early education was received in the district schools, and subsequently advanced by two terms at Cornell College, Mount Vernon. January 5, 1871, he was united in marriage with miss Mary Townsend, the daughter of John S. and Susan (Dickey) Townsend. The following year he came to this county, settling on section 21, of Crystal township. During 1879 he erected on his farm his present residence. He was elected to the office he now fills in 1881. Mr. and Mrs. Cowan have two children--Shields T. and Robert.

 

WILLIAM HOUGHTON, Constable, is a native of Canada, born in the province of Ontario, March 22, 1834. His father, Phineas W. Houghton, was a native of Vermont. When William was but two years of age his parents moved to the States, locating in New York, where they lived until 1848, when they moved to Michigan. After a two years' residence in the latter State the family moved to Illinois. Mr. Houghton remained at home with his parents until the fall of 1855; then went to Wisconsin and worked one winter in the pineries on the Wisconsin river. In 1856 he went to Minnesota and spent one year in the pineries on the St. Croix river, and while there met with an accident by which he lost the sight of his left eye. He then returned to Illinois and resumed farming until 1864, when, in company with his parents, he came to Iowa and located in Crystal township, Tama county. Here he lived with his parents one year, and then purchased land on section 3, on which he built a log house. In 1868, he bought more land on the same section and erected the frame house in which he now lives. Mr. Houghton was married in 1860 to Miss Samantha Collins. They have fourteen children-Orette, Ada A., Eli, Emma, Luella, William G., Edward, David, Burt Lee, Charles, Annie, James, Thompson and Lizzie. Mr. Houghton was elected Constable of his township in 1880 and again in 1882, being the present incumbent.

 

ITEMS OF INTEREST.

 

The first blacksmith shop in this township was started in 1860 by Mr. Loupee on section 32. Here he farmed and worked at his trade two years, when he went to Howard township. He went to war and later opened a shop in Toledo. In the spring of 1883 he went to Kansas. William Brown opened a shop on section 14 in 1870. In 1876 he sold out and is now engaged in farming in Grant township. His successor sold to Lewis Gethman who rented the building to William Scott. He was succeeded by George Nichols who, six months later, removed to Traer where he now works at his trade. There is a brass band in this township which was organized in October, 1882. There is now a membership of twelve with Albert Fair- child as leader. They meet at the school houses in the Bishop and Wylie districts. There are some good musicians in this organization and it promises well. James Atchinson erected a building on the northeast quarter of section 14, in 1866, and opened a general store. He sold out to J. M. Foster in 1875, who was succeeded by Ann M. Morton, the present proprietor, in the spring of 1882.

George White opened a shoemaker's shop here in 1870, where he worked at his trade until 1875, when he sold the shop to J. M. Foster and abandoned the business.

The first birth in the township was Lyman W., son of Mr. and Mrs. Nelson Felter, born April 13, 1856. He is now a tacher in the public schools of the county.

The first marriage was Lyman Wood to Miss Augusta McKune, June 28, 1857. The ceremony was performed by Leander Clark, Justice of the Peace. They now live in Perry township, and have one child, Abbie.

In 1880, Peter Quinn established a creamery at his residence on section 2. From January, 1882, to January, 1883, 26,000 pounds of butter were made, and sold in New York and Pittsburg. Cream is a gathered in Spring Creek, Perry, Howard, Grant and Crystal townships. This is called "Crystal Creamery."


EDUCATIONAL
 

Crystal township is well represented by schools and school houses, which speaks well for its people. A brief record of each district is here presented, showing the advancement made in educational matters here. The first school house in the township was erected in 1856, and in this Miss Nettie Cyrenus taught the first school.

District No. 1.-The first school here was taught by Miss Janet Wilson in Gilbert McMillan's house, on the southeast quarter of section 2. The second term was taught by Miss Agnes McMillan in the same house. It was made a sub-district in 1862. The first school house was built in 1865 on the northeast corner of the nowthwest quarter of section 11. The first term of school taught in this building was by D. B. Forrey in the winter of 1865-6. The same building yet remains on the old site.

District No. 2-This was made a sub-district in 1876 and the school house was built in 1878. The first term of school was taught by Mrs. Elizabeth Hale during the winter of 1878-9.

District No. 3-This was made a sub-district in 1871, and Peter Whannel was chosen Director. The first term of school was kept in his house, commencing in May, 1873, and was taught by Miss Agnes McNorin, who is now the wife of John Young. There were three terms taught in Mr Whannel's house. The school building was erected in 1874 and a term of school taught therein the same season by Miss Joanna McCosh, who is now the wife of Andrew Ross. The school house is located on the northwest quarter of section 8.

District No. 4-This was made a sub-district in 1870, and O.P. Jones was chosen Director. The school house was built in 1871 on the southwest quarter of section 17. A. Wheatley was the first teacher in this district in the winter of 1871-2.

District No. 5-The first school house in this district was built in 1873, and is located on the northeast quarter of section 21. the first term of school was taught by Miss Jennie Felter in the winter of 1873-74.

District No. 6-The first school-house here was built in 1859, on the southeast quarter of section 14, and the first term of school was taught in the winter of 1858-9, and was taught by Charles Cooper, a student from Iowa College. This building was blown to pieces by a tornado in June, 1865, and the neighborhood was without any school for a time. The present house was built in 1867, located on the west half of the southeast quarter of section 14. It was moved to the east half of the same quarter in 1891. Miss Ann M. Morton was the first teacher in the new house.

District No. 7-The first house built here was in 1870 on the northwest quater of section 36, and is a neat frame building. Miss Belle M. Dickey was the first teacher.

District No. 8-The first school house in this district was built in 1868 on the northeast quarter of section 28, in 1873. The district was divided and the house was moved to the southwest quarter of section 17.

District No. 9-This was made a sub-district in 1856, and a school house was built the same year on the southwest quarter of section 29. The first school was kept in the summer of 1856 and taught by Miss Nettie Cyrenus. This house was sold in 1869 and moved to Grundy county, where it was used for a dwelling. the present house was built in 1869 on the old site and within its walls Judson Pine was the first teacher. This is called the Bishop district.


POSTOFFICES.


The first postoffice in the town was established in 1857, under the name of Crystal, with J. S. Townsend as postmaster. As he was about to move from town, he sent in his resignation, and recommended that R. R. Chambers be appointed postmaster. He resigned to go to the war, and William Wade was appointed in his stead. The office was held at Dr. Rogers' house, on section 16. Wade was succeeded by Nelson Felter, who kept the office about two years, when he was succeeed by West Wilson, who deputized James Atchinson, and he kept the office at his store, on section 14. He was succeeded by george McKune, the present postmaster. Miss A. M. Morton is the deputy, and has the office at her store on section 14.

Fairhaven postoffice was established in 1872, and O.P. Jones was appointed postmaster. He deputized Peter Seick, who kept the office at his house, on section 19. John Harmsen was appointed deputy in 1878, and moved the office to his house on the same section, where it still remains. Mail is received three times each week from Gladbrook and Traer.

John Harmsen, deputy postmaster of Fairhaven postoffice, was born in Hollingstedt, Schleswig, Germany, September 12, 1830. He attended school until sixteen years of age, and when eighteen years old began learning the carpenter's trade, which occupation he afterwards followed while in his native country. In 1868, he emigrated to the United States, and upon landing in New York city, proceeded directly to Davenport, Iowa, where he worked as his trade one year and then came to Tama county, He purchased land on section 17, of Crystal township, and there engaged in farming until 1874, when he rented a place adjoining his, removed to it, and established himself in the saloon business. there he followed that business four years, then returned to his own place, made additions to it, and the same year opened a saloon on it. During 1879 he erected ahall 32x48, 12 feet post, to be used for dancing. At present he keeps a saloon and hotel, besides attending to the duties of postmaster. Recently mr. Harmsen rented his buildings, and soon expects to retire to a farm he has lately purchased on sectgion 20. August 3, 1858, he was married to Miss Kate Clausen. They have six children: Claus, Hans, Ralph, Willie, Hannes and Annie.


RELIGIOUS
 

The first meeting of a religious character in Crystal township, was a prayer meeting at the residence of d. L Dickey, on section 31, during the summer of 1866, and was attended by about a dozen persons, of different denominations. Meetings were afterwards held of this kind in different private houses during the summer season.

A Sabbath School was organized in June, of thatyear, at J. S. Bishop's house, on section 31. D L. Dickey was Superintendent, and there was an attendance of about twenty-five scholars.

This organization still continues; now holding meetings at the Salem church. John A McClain is the present Superintendent.

The first church organization in the township was effected November 3, 1856, at the house of J S. Townsend, on the northwest quarter of section 28, by Rev. Walter L. Lyon, with fifteen members, as follows: Mr. and Mrs. Robert Wylie and three of their children, Margaret, John and Mary; Miss Jennie Ralston; Robert Crawford with wife, with their three daughters, Eliza, Rebecca and Isabella; Mr. and Mrs James Stone and Mr. and Mrs. J S. Townsend. Rev. Luther Dodd was the first pastor, remaining with this congregation until November, 1871. The church was then supplied by different preachers until February 1877, when Rev. James Stickel took charge and continued until 1882, when he was succeeded by Elder Hughes, the present paston. the society now numbers forty-seven members. This was named the Salem Presbyterian Church, by D. L Dickey, in honor of a church in Pennsylvania. In 1864 a church was erected in the southwest quarter of section 28.

There was a Methodist Episcopal class organized at Orrin Burright's house on section 15, in the fall of 1859, by John L. Kelley, with six members, as follows: Orrin Burright and wife, Joseph Vertrees and wife, Solomon Walls and wife. Joseph Vertrees was elected class leader. As soon as the school house was comleted they met there to worship, where Mr. Kelley preached one year. he was succeeded by the following who have preached since that tiem: Revs. Swearington, Wirtz, Ingham, Hankins, Thomas, Holbrook, Fawcett, Baker, Byres, Wilkinson, Bailey, Spry, Snider, Winset, McGee, Palmer, Montgomery and Rev. Hiram Bailey, the present pastor. Meetings are held once in two weeks at the Centre schoolhouse. Edward Lunde is class leader, with about thirty members. A Sabbath school was organized soon after the class, with Solomon Walls as Superintendant. Edwin Lynde is the present Superintendent and meetings are regularly held.

The Methodists held meetings in the Bishop school house, in 1856. Rev. Dutton from Marshalltown officiated. A society was organized here in 1859, by Rev. Kelly, with J.S.Bishop and wife and C. L. Davis and wife, of this town, as members. Other members were from Howard township. J. S. Bishop was class leader and Steward. Meetings were held regularly until 1862. The following named served as pastors for this class: Revs. Fawcett, Hankins and Thomas.


CRYSTAL CEMETERY

 

The land for this abode of the dead was donated by C. L. Davis in 1858, when it was laid out and platted; since that time, one-half an acre has been added to it. it is controlled by the Township Trustees. The lots are free to all residents, nd are sold to non-residents for five dollars each. The first burial here were the remains of Miss Laura, daughter of J. S. and Polly Bishop, who died July 4, 1859. Joseph Allard is sexton in charge.

Joseph Allard's father, Jonathan Allard, was born in New Durham, New Hampshire, August 2, 1802. When he ws but five years old his parents removed to Canada, settling in the province of Quebec. There the subject of our sketch was married, in January of 1824, to Miss Isabella Kenison, who was born in Canada East, November 17, 1805. they were blessed with ten children, seven of whom are now living. In 1861 Mr. Allard returned to the United States. He settled in Stephenson county, Illinois, where he purchased a farm and lived until 1880, when he came to Iowa. He makes his home with his son in Gladbrook.

His son Joseph was born in Shefford township, Shefford county, province of Quebec, Canada, July 21, 1833. His youth was spent in school and on his father's farm. In 1857 he came to the United States, and purchased land in company with his brother, and erected a house in which he lived until his removal to Iowa in 1864. Upon his arrivel here, he bought land on section 32, of Crystal township, Tama county, and erected a house 16x22, 12 feet post; attached, was a kitchen 12x14 feet. the family lived in this humble abode until 1878, when Mr. Allard erected his present residence. In 1875 he built a barn 40x48 feet with a basement. March 27, 1855, he was married to Miss Mary J. Berry, of Shefford county, Canada. They hve been blessed with seven children, six of whom are living--Emily J., Ella May, Amanda M. George A., Carrie A. and Rutherford. Their eldest child, Florence M., died when seven months old.

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