HISTORY OF TAMA COUNTY IOWA

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CHAPTER XII

"POLITICAL"


In this chapter it is the design to present all the items of interest connected with the political history of Tama county, the principal issues which occupied the attention of the people during the various campaigns since the organization of the county, both local and general so far as is possible, and following this a complete abstract of the votes polled at every election. There is always a fascinating interest manifested in the political history of a Nation, State or country, and especially is this true in a free land, where, in the eyes of the law, all are upon an equality; where it has been shown that even the humblest--the rail-splitter or the towpath boy--can attain the highest honor that can be bestowed upon an American citizen. We delight to see merit rewarded; we are pleased with the onward progress of one from the humble walks of life, as step by step he mounts the ladder of fame. Even if we do not reach the highest pinnacle, we flatter ourselves that possibly our children may.

There is an excitement about a political campaign which all enjoy, and, although to the disgrace of the party using, personalities are often indulged in, as a general thing all yield gracefully to the verdict of the people, and submit themselves unto “the powers that be.” This is well, and speaks well for the American people.

The First Political Convention

As there were a number of important offices to fill in 1853, it was decided to hold a convention, and nominate candidates. Accordingly one was called in July, 1853. No party lines were drawn, and it was a “mass meeting” of all who had any interest in political matters. It was to be held in Bruner’s mill, a short distance from the present site of Toledo; but when the citizens got together they found that the mill as yet had no roof on, and the sun was beating down in a way which made it uncomfortably warm. So the convention adjourned under the shade of a tree near by, where they proceeded to business. There was some controversy regarding the nomination of candidates; some claiming that there was no need of it, when J. H. Hollen mounted a stump and in a short and spirited address said: “There is no need of nominating candidates. Let those who wish to run announce themselves as candidates and ‘let the largest pole knock the persimmons.’” But after some further discussions it was decided to nominate candidates for all the offices except County Judge, and this was done. John Ross was nominated for Treasurer and Recorder, and Miron Blodgett for Sheriff. The former was a Whig and the latter a Democrat. The convention being strictly non-partisan. By common consent it was resolved that J. C. Vermilya, a Whig, and J. H. Hollen, a Democrat, should be the candidates for County Judge. The fight for this office was very warm. Vermilya was successful by a majority of four votes.

The April election in 1854 was for local officers, School Fund Commissioner and Drainage Commissioner, the principal attention concentrating upon the former office. Noah Myers, an influential man in early times and quite a politician, announced himself as a candidate for the office. He was opposed by J. H. Hollen and a number of other persons, however, and a “people’s convention” was called to nominate an opponent. Noah Myers, as soon as he heard of the “people’s” move, commenced work in earnest, and when the convention met it was found that a majority of those present, were for Myers. Quite a hot time ensued, in which the anti-Myers men declared that it was dishonorable to pack conventions. Finally, after considerable wrangling, Myers was nominated, his side being in the majority. He was elected without opposition. Anthony Wilkinson was elected Drainage Commissioner. Further than this, political matters did not enter into the campaign. The “people’s convention” was held at the house of Christian Bruner.

At the August election, in 1854, a Clerk of Courts and Prosecuting Attorney were to be elected. The Democrats and Whigs both held conventions, on the same day at Toledo, the former nominating Franklin Davis for County Clerk and Alford Phillips for Prosecuting Attorney. The Whigs chose as their standard bearers Thomas A. Graham for Clerk and James C. Marshall for Prosecuting Attorney. In a few weeks David D. Appelgate announced himself as an independent candidate for Clerk of Courts and Mr. Davis, the Democratic candidate, withdrew. The election was held, and returns declared D. D. Appelgate and A. Phillips successful. John Connell, a Whig, was elected to the legislature from the district of which Tama county formed a part. His nomination was a neatly operated piece of stratagem. The district comprises the counties of Poweshiek, Jasper, Benton and Tama, each having a larger population and vote than Tama county, and it was, of course, not the intention of the other counties to give the nomination for this office to a man from the least important county. The convention was held at West Irving. Each of the other counties had their man and the Tama county delegates were instructed for John Connell. A number of ballots were taken, each holding to their man, when the Tama county delegates divided and made two other counties feel good towards them by giving a complimentary vote to their candidates--doing it when there was no possibility of it nominating. These counties returned the favor by giving Connell a complimentary vote, which chanced to be at a time when Tama county went solid for Connell, and with their votes it nominated him.

The April election, 1855, was for Commissioner and Register Des Moines River Improvement and Register State Land office. The Whig ticket was successful in this county, as it was in the State, the largest majority for any candidate being 73 and, the lowest 72. This was the last campaign in which the Whig party figured in the State. The question as to the adoption of a prohibitory liquor law in the State, was also submitted to the people, and in Tama county it received a majority of 37. The highest vote polled for any question in the county was on the liquor law, being 289, a gratifying increase.

The election in August, 1855, was for county officers. A Whig convention was held and J. C. Vermilya nominated for Judge; T. J. Staley, for Treasurer and Recorder; William Garner, for Sheriff; W. A. Daniels, for Surveyor, and F. Davis for Coroner. Garner and Davis, were Democrats; the rest, Whigs, but not much attention was paid to a candidate’s political views. No Democratic convention was held but K. D. Shugart, took the field as an independent candidate for Treasurer and Recorder; James C. Marshall, as a candidate for Surveyor against Dr. Daniels, and Geo. W. Free, for Sheriff. The principal contest was for Treasurer and Recorder, and Surveyor. The candidates for the former office, were both Whigs, but Staley had the inside track by having the nomination and having been deputy in the office. He was bitterly opposed and many stories were circulated to defeat him, but without avail. Staley was elected by a majority of 67 over Shugart. The fight for Surveyor was also pretty warm. Both Daniel and Marshall were Whigs; the former having the advantage of a nomination. The latter was much opposed on account of his infidel views. The people at that day were very religiously inclined, and the thought of voting for a man who had ridiculed their belief, was not to be thought of. Shortly before the election, J. C. Marshall, delivered a lecture at the old court-house upon this subject, so that it was fresh in the minds of the voters. Marshall ran well, however, only being defeated by a majority of 66. John Connell received 50 complimentary votes for Coroner, and remarked afterwards, that he would like to be coroner “just long enough to sit on the dead bodies of those who had voted for him.”

At the election held in April, 1856, the bridge tax question was to be voted on, and a School Fund Commissioner to be elected. The bridge tax carried by a majority of 76. For Commissioner there were three candidates--L. S. Frederick, Jeremiah Hardin, and Jonas P. Wood.

The fight was purely sectional. Frederick was a Whig from Spring Creek; Hardin, a Democrat, from Toledo, and Wood, a Whig, from Buckingham. There were 586 votes cast, of which Frederick got 225, Hardin 185, and Wood 170; Frederick's majority, 40.

Former issues dividing the political parties had disappeared in 1856, and new issues were being rapidly formed. The Whig party had ceased to exist, and on its ruins had been erected two other parties one having for its central truth opposition to the further extension of slavery, and the other that American born citizens must rule America. These parties had, of course, absorbed many of the members of the old Democratic party. The American party not being opposed to slavery, or, at least, making no opposition to it, either in the States in which it existed, or the newly formed territories, where it had been made subject to admission by the repeal of the Missouri compromise, had become a numerous body in the South, with many adherents in the North. The Republican party, basing its claims for popular suffrage upon its advocacy of freedom in the territories, was not permitted an existence in the Southern States, and of necessity was confined to the North. The first State convention by the newly organized Republican party was held at Iowa City, February 22, and placed a ticket in the field for State officers, and adopted a platform in accordance with the principles of equal rights and firm opposition to slavery. The Democratic convention met at the capitol, June 26 nominated a ticket and adopted a platform in accordance with that adopted by the National Convention at Cincinnati. The nominations of James Buchanan and John C. Breckenridge were enthusiastically confirmed. J. C. Fremont was the Republican candidate for President.

In Tama county the newly organized Republican and Democratic parties each had regular tickets in the field to be voted on at the August election. There were two county offices to be filled--Clerk of Court, and Prosecuting Attorney; the Republicans, by nomination, offered David D. Appelgate for the former, and Timothy Brown for the latter office. The Democrats nominated James H. Hollen for Clerk, and E. B. Bolens for Prosecuting Attorney. Appelgate was elected by a majority of 217. The election of Prosecuting Attorney furnished an historical item, to get at the bottom of which the reader must go back in date to the spring of 1856, when Tim Brown was boarding at Alford Phillips'. It seems that Brown had been boarding with Phillips, and, as the story goes, on one occasion, a Chicago man sent Phillips a number of cans of peaches as a present. Mrs. Phillips, soon after their arrival, promised the boarders they should have them for dinner; but Phillips forbade her opening the cans and she dare not disobey, so the boarders did without the peaches.

Tim Brown got rather mad at this way of doing, and in talking to several friends in town told them he was going to "take up a collection to pay Phillips for opening the cans and permitting the boarders to smell of the peaches, it would be such a treat in this western country; thought it wouldn't cost more than the peaches were worth, as they didn't cost Phillips anything." Brown went somewhere else to board, and war was declared between Phillips and him. When Brown was nominated by the Republicans for prosecuting attorney, Phillips took exceptions and determined to defeat him. At this time Nathan C. Wieting was boarding at Phillips' and Phillips insisted that Nathan should run. Mr. Wieting finally, in more of a joke than anything else, said he would. Upon this Phillips started for the country and quietly canvassed the whole county against Brown, stating that he had turned him from his home on account of his morals; that he swore so fearfully he could not stand it; and capped the sheaf by saying that Brown was so accustomed to swearing that he kept it up in his sleep and kept the rest of the household awake by the noise he made. When the returns came in, the vote stood Wieting, 240; Brown, 209; and E. B. Bolens, the Democratic nominee, 141. Not much attention was paid to county affairs, and this was considerable of a surprise, the energies of all having been devoted to the presidential candidates. The total vote at this election was 592. How true this yarn is the historian is unable to state. It was related by a number of the early settlers and is here presented as showing how it is possible for great events to hinge upon little things.

The election in April, 1857, was for County Assessor, Sheriff, and Drainage Commissioner. There were three tickets in the field, Republican, Democratic and Independent. The Republicans were successful by majorities ranging from 109 to 123. The vote was increased to 682 at this election.

The August election, 1857, was for county officers and the constitutional amendment. The contest this year assumed the appearance partly of the north against the south part of the county. The affairs of the county, in coming from the new and rude state of affairs to solid regular work, as would be expected, became in rather poor condition; county orders were not worth 75 cents on the dollar, and no one sought them at 60 cents. This was in no way due to the management of affairs, but the expenses of the county far exceeded the revenue. There was but little valuation to tax, and expenses in getting the organization in running order, were much more heavy than when things were running smoothly. The Republicans met in convention and nominated Leander Clark, of the northern part of the county for County Judge; A. J. Wheaton, for Treasurer and Recorder; George Raines, for Sheriff; and Horace Jacobs for Surveyor. The Democrats nominated W. C. Salisbury, for Judge; Jeremiah Hardin, for Treasurer and Recorder; Thomas Murray, for Sheriff and Charles Irish, for Surveyor. After the Republican convention was held, the friends of Judge Vermilya announced their intention of running him for County Judge. Hard work was done, and the election day was a warm one. The total vote polled was 800. The Republicans elected their candidate for County Judge by a majority of 161, and Treasurer and Recorder by a majority of 102. The Democratic candidates, Thomas Murray for Sheriff, and Charles Irish for Surveyor, were elected by majorities of 93 and 195.

An election was held in October, 1857, for Governor and Representative in the General Assembly. A light vote was polled, Ralph P. Lowe, Republican, for Governor, receiving 303 votes, against Ben M. Samuels, Democrat, 174. T. Walter Jackson was elected Representative.

The office of County Superintendent of schools was created by the new constitution adopted in 1857, and candidates were voted for at the April election, 1858. Woodhull Helm, Republican, was in the field, against Peter McRoberts, Democrat. Mr. Helm was elected and thus had the honor of being the first County Superintendent. His majority was 620, out of 687 votes cast.

The October election in 1858 was for State officers and Clerk of Court. Nothing of special interest transpired, the Republicans being successful by a majority of about 266. The total vote was 783.

In April, 1859, the question of donating $40,000 to secure the location of the state Model Farm and Agricultural College in Tama county, was submitted to the people, and carried by a majority of 249 out of 639 votes polled. This did not secure the college, however, it being finally located in Story county.

In October, 1859, there were both State and county officers to be elected, and the contest was so sharp that it will long be remembered in Tama county. For county officers there was no unusual stir, the Republicans being successful except for the Sheriff, and Thomas Murray, the Democratic candidate, was elected to this office over Eli Harmon, Republican, by a majority of 197. The principal contest was over State Senator. The vote of Tama county for Governor stood: S. J. Kirkwood, Republican, 600; Augustus C. Dodge, Democrat, 295. Abram Tompkins, Republican, was elected Representative by a majority of 526.

The country was now becoming deeply moved over questions which stirred the popular heart as none had ever done before. The storm had been gathering ever since the repeal of the Missouri Compromise; the struggles in Kansas had deeply intensified the feelings of the people of the North, and John Brown's attempt upon Harper's Ferry had been skillfully managed so as to arouse and heat the people of the South. That the Territories of the United States should forever be consecrated to freedom was the solmen (sic) determination of a large majority of the people of the North, and that the boundaries of the institution of slavery should not be further enlarged. The South, seeking its perpetuation by means of enlarged political power, determined that it should not be restricted, but should have enlarged privileges. The questions dividing parties were thus chiefly sectional, and pointed directly to war. In this state of public mind the Republican party met in National convention at Chicago, for the purpose of placing in the field candidates for the office of President and Vice-President. The names of Seward, Lincoln, Chase, Blair and Bates were proposed for the chief office. In the convention it was plain to see who was the favorite of the lookers-on. Every mention of Lincoln's name was received with cheer after cheer. Three ballots were taken, on the last Mr. Lincoln received a majority of the whole votes, and was made the unanimous choice of the convention, amidst the most intense enthusiasm, Hannibal Hamlin, of Maine, was selected as the candidate for Vice-President.

The Democratic National Convention was called to meet at Charleston, South Carolina. The friends of Stephen A. Douglas were active in urging his claims to the nomination for the Presidency, many of the delegates from the Northern States being instructed to use all honorable means to that end. The claims of Douglas were stoutly contested by the leaders of the Democracy of the south, and it was evident some time before the convention assembled that it would be difficult to come to an agreement, especially as the rule of the Democratic National Convention (sic) required a two-thirds vote to nominate. Meeting in the city of Charleston, April 23, 1860, the convention remained in session ten days, at the expiration of which time no nominations were made, many of the delegates, from the Southern States withdrawing. After taking fifty-seven ballots it was found impossible for any candidate to receive a two-thirds vote of the entire body, so many delegates having withdrawn. Adjournment was then had to Baltimore June 19. At this latter place the convention met pursuant to adjournment, but even here no agreement could be reached between the factions. After six days' meeting Stephen A. Douglas was nominated for President and Benjamin Fitzpatrick, of Alabama, for Vice-President. The nomination of Douglas was received with very great enthusiasm. Mr. Fitzpatrick declining, Herschel V. Johnson, of Georgia, was substituted. Mr. Johnson accepted the nomination.

That portion of the convention which seceded held a convention June 23, and nominated John C. Breckinridge of Kentucky, for President, and Joseph Lane, of Oregon, for Vice-President. A "Union" convention was also held, at which John Bell, of Tennessee, was nominated for President, and Edward Everett, of Massachusetts, for Vice-President.

With four presidential candidates in the field, the exciting questions growing out of the institution of slavery and the threats of disunion by a portion of the south in the event of the election of Lincoln, tended to make the campaign one of great interest. "Wide-Awake" clubs and organizations of "Hickory Boys" on the part of Republicans and Douglas Democrats, respectively, tended to increase the excitement. Large and enthusiastic meetings were held by each party in all the leading towns and cities, and even in many of the smaller villages. The names of the "Rail-Splitter" and the "Little Giant" evoked the greatest enthusiasm.

The Republican State Convention met in Iowa City May 23, nominated a State ticket, and adopted a platform endorsing the action of the National Convention at Chicago, endorsing its nominations and favoring rigid economy in state matters. The Democratic convention met at Des Moines July 12, nominated a State ticket, and passed resolutions endorsing Douglas and Johnson. The "Union ticket" was strongly condemned.

In this county the fight was waged as hard as in any county in the State. There were but two county officers to be elected--Clerk of the District Court and Coroner consequently there was but little to detract from the great National questions. Abraham Lincoln received 775 votes in Tama county, and Stephen A. Douglas 413; majority for Lincoln, 362. D. D. Appelgate received a majority of 349 over C. R. Ward for Clerk of Court.

The war for the union was in progress during the political campaign of 1861, and issues growing out of the war were rapidly forming. The Republicans were first to meet in convention, assembling in Des Moines July 31, and nominating a candidate for Governor, and other State officers, and adopted a platform heartily supporting the Government in its assertion of the right to coerce, denouncing the doctrine of secession, maintaining the supremacy of the Constitution, and declaring in the most forcible language that the rebellion should be put down at any cost. The Democratic State Convention passed resolutions also unequivocally condemning the action of seceding States, but declared it to be the legitimate result of the successful teaching of the "irrepressible conflict," and also denying in to the right of the Government to perpetuate the Union by force of arms. State sovereignty was endorsed, and declared the opposite doctrine to be fraught with disastrous consequences. The campaign in Tama county afforded but little interest, the all-exciting questions of the war filling the mind of every voter. A light vote was polled. The Democrats had three regular nominees for local offices. The Republicans were successful by large majorities. The total vote was 916.

The union army had met with several reverses during the year 1862, and a gloomy feeling pervaded the minds of the people, having its effect upon the canvass for State officers. The Democrats met in convention at Des Moines and adopted a platform in which they expressed themselves as in favor of using all constitutional means for the suppression of the rebellion, and opposed to any scheme of confiscation and emancipation; opposed to a suspension of the writ of habeas corpus; declaring the superiority of the white over the black race, and opposed to the purchase of slaves. The Republicans, in their platform, adopted at Des Moines, resolved that it was the duty of every man to help maintain the Government, condemned the course of secession sympathizers, and asked all favorable to giving the national administration honest support to co-operate with them.

In Tama county the vote was still lighter than in 1861. Republicans had a full ticket in the field, but the Democrats made no nominations. T. K. Armstrong was an independent candidate for County Judge against T. A. Graham, the Republican nominee, and was defeated by a majority of 44. Leander Clark, the Representative of the county in the General assembly, had gone into the army, and W. F. Johnston was elected to fill the vacancy so caused. The total vote was 681.

In 1863, the Democracy met at Des Moines on the 8th of July, and nominated a candidate for Governor, and other State officers. Questions growing out of the war still afforded issues between the parties. The writ of habeas corpus had been suspended by the President; martial law had been declared in some of the States not in rebellion, and the proclamation of emancipation had been issued. These measures the Democracy in convention and by resolution opposed, while the Republican convention, which convened June 17th, favored each. In Tama county the campaign was devoid of interest. There were two tickets in the field, a regular Republican, and a People's, and a much larger vote was polled than any time since the Presidential election of 1860. Every candidate on the Republican ticket was elected, receiving a large majority on the home vote, which was increased by the soldiers in the field, the latter voting almost unanimously for that ticket. It is but justice to the candidates on the people's ticket to state that most of them were nominated by the convention without their knowledge, and it is claimed that many of them voted the straight Republican ticket. The total vote polled was 1,199.

During 1863, the report was circulated that an organization had been effected in Tama county of the Knights of the Golden Circle, and it was believed by many. This order originated in Indiana. It was in sympathy with secession, rebellion and riot. In Tama county during the election it was whispered that the organization in the county had 700 armed followers. This rumor caused the organization of a counter society, known as the "Union League," among Republicans. Nothing was ever done openly by either of the societies, and when or how they were ever disbanded is not known. It is also claimed by good authority that there was nothing in the rumor regarding the Knights of the Golden Circle, and it undoubtedly was imaginary.

In 1864, Abraham Lincoln was re-nominated by the Republicans; associated with him on the ticket was Andrew Johnson, the Union Governor of Tennessee. The Democrats put in nomination Gen. George B. McClellan for the Presidency and George H. Pendleton, of Ohio, for the Vice-Presidency. The Republicans of Iowa held a convention at Des Moines, July 7, and adopted a platform confirming the re-nomination of Abraham Lincoln, and paying high tributes of praise to the loyal soldiers and soldiers' wives who were daily making sacrifices that the Union might be saved. The Democratic State Convention met at Des Moines July 16, selected a State ticket, but adopted no platform. A peace convention, however, was held at Iowa City, August 24, which adopted resolutions denouncing the war and its further support, and rejecting the equality of the Negro with the white man. This was the darkest period of the war, and although the feeling was intense, yet it was not manifested so much in the campaign as usual.

In Tama county there was an increase of the vote over 1863, amounting to a total of 1261. The congressional contest through this county between Josiah B. Grinnell and Ira C. Mitchell was very heated. On one occasion during the campaign the two candidates were engaged in a joint discussion in the Methodist church at Toledo. During J. B. Grinnell's speech there was some disturbance caused by some one in the audience calling "Boots! Boots! Free speech!" etc. "Yes," Mr. Grinnell finally replied, "you believe in free whisky, too!" But this did not stop it. When Mr. Mitchell replied, his speech was full of bitterness and sarcasm regarding the Republicans and the war, which he claimed they had caused; asked the mothers if they wished to send any more of their sons and husbands to be slaughtered on southern soil. He here paused a moment, when the audience were electrified at seeing Mrs. Doctor Baidy take the floor. Her youngest brother had just a day or two before left to join the army, and she had stood his talk as long as possible. She began with a scathing rebuke, declaring him a liar in his statements, and a traitor to his flag and country and would up by stating that she was willing that her dear ones should go to conquer and subdue the rebels and she would risk taking care of herself and defending her home from the traitors and comrades who remained behind. When the meeting broke up a friend of the lady whispered to her that she had better be careful as a lot of secession women were waiting at the door to whip her. Mrs. Baldy stepped to the door, and said loud enough to be heard by all:--“If any one wants anything of me, let them come on,--I’ll throw them right over the meeting-house!

Josiah B. Grinnell was elected to Congress by a good majority. Lincoln’s majority in Tama county was 485. In county affairs the Republicans were also successful by large majorities. The question of levying a tax for the erection of a court house was submitted at this election, and was defeated by a majority of 241. This proposition was opposed by many in the southern part of the county because they thought they could not afford it. The northern part of the county were still in hopes of having the county seat removed further north, and did not like the idea of building a court house in Toledo and thus permanently settling the question. The vote on the matter stood 703 against, and 462 for.

In October, 1865, the question was submitted to the people as to aiding the construction of the Iowa Central R. R. It carried by a majority of 812.

The Republicans were first in the field in 1865, meeting in convention at Des Moines June 14, nominating a ticket and adopting a platform. The Union Anti-Negro Suffrage party met at the Capital August 23 and nominated a ticket, and adopted a platform in which they resolved, the administration of Andrew Johnson; that they were opposed to negro suffrage; that the soldiers of the late war deserved well of their countrymen, and that their sympathies were with them. The Democrats met in convention the same day, but made no nominations, the party supporting the Soldiers’ ticket as it was known.

Not much interest was taken in the campaign in Tama county, and a light vote was polled, the total being 1295. Republicans and Democrats had full county tickets in the field, and the former were successful by majorities ranging from 358 to 843. The fight for Sheriff was pushed vigorously by W. T. Hollen, the Democratic candidate, and he run nearly 100 votes ahead of his ticket. The vote for Governor stood William. M. Stone, Republican, 863; Thomas H. Benton, Jr., Democrat, 479.

The campaign of 1866 was fought on the issue of reconstruction in the southern states. The Republicans in convention resolved that the people who salalued the rebellion and their representatives in congress had the right to reorganize the states that had been in rebellion. This was denied by some of the Republicans, and the entire Democratic party. The conservative Republicans, or those who were opposed to congressional action, met in convention and nominated a state ticket. The democratic convention adopted a platform, nominated two candidates, and resolved to support the ticket of the conservatives.

In county affairs nothing of interest occurred. There were only two offices to be filled, clerk of court and county recorder. The republicans nominated for clerk David D. Appelgate, and the Democrats W. H. Stoddard; the former was successful by a majority of 446. For recorder the Republicans nominated Jacob Yeiser, Jr., and the Democrats J. M. Hillman; Yeiser received a majority of 633.

The general issues dividing the parties in October, 1867, were the same as in 1866. Full state and county tickets were nominated and put in the field by both parties. The Republicans were successful by majorities of about 450. For drainage commissioner neither party made nominations, and W. S. Turbett, who received 16 scattering votes for the office, was declared elected.

The year 1868 brought with it another Presidential campaign. The Republican National Convention met in Chicago and placed in nomination Ulysses S. Grant, the victorious Union general, associating with him Schuyler Colfax, of Indiana. The Democratic National Convention nominated Horatio Seymour and Francis P. Blair, Jr., for President and Vice-President. The financial question began to be a leading issue, especially with reference to the payment of the bonds in coin or greenbacks, the Republicans favoring the payment in coin, the Democrats opposing. The latter also, by resolution, favored the abolition of the national banking system, and the substitution of United States notes for those of national banks. This was opposed by the Republicans. Full State and county tickets were nominated, and in Tama county the vote was one of the largest ever polled in the county, being 2667. There were two county offices to be filled, Clerk and Recorder. The Republicans were successful by majorities of 1079. The fight was principally upon the office of clerk, and location of candidates entered into it largely.

In 1869 a light vote was polled as compared with that of the previous year. The Republicans were sure of success while the Democrats acknowledged their inability to accomplish anything, save the keeping alive their organization. The total vote in Tama county was 2102.

The Campaigns of 1870 and 1871, were devoid of much interest in both general and local affairs. The official vote, given elsewhere, will show the result.

The movement known as the Liberal Republican had a large influence, politically, in 1872, having virtually dictated the Democratic nomination for the Presidency, and the platform of principles on which the campaign against the Republican party was dictated. The Liberal Republicans were those connected with the Republican party who were opposed to any extreme measures in the reconstruction of the Southern States, and who believed the time had come when past issues should be forgotten, and new issues formed; that the hand of reconciliation should be offered the South, and a united country, working together to build up the waste places of the South. Many of the most able men of the Republican party, including Horace Greeley, Charles Sumner, Lyman Trumbull, John M. Palmer and others, united in this movement. In May a National Convention was held by the Liberal Republicans, in Cincinnati, which nominated Horace Greeley for President and B. Gratz Brown for Vice-President. The following is a synopsis of the resolutions adopted:
1. Equality of all men before the law; equal and exact justice to all, without regard to race, color or previous condition.
2. Opposition to the re-opening of all questions settled by the 13th, 14th and 15th amendments to the constitution.
3. Demand for the immediate and absolute removal of all disabilities imposed on account of the rebellion.
4. Local self-government; supremacy of the civil order the military, and demand for the largest individual liberty consistent with public order.
5. Denunciation of the existing system of civil service.
6. Demand for a system of federal taxation which should not unnecessarily interfere with the industries of the people; reference of the tariff to the congressional districts.
7. Demand for civil service reform, and for the election of president for a single term only.
8. Maintenance of public credit and denunciation of repudiation.
9. A speedy return to specie payment.
10. Thanks to the citizen soldiers and sailors of the republic.
11. Opposition to further grants to railroads.
12. Cultivation of friendship with all nations; regarding alike dishonorable, either to demand what is not right or to submit to what is wrong.

The Democracy in convention ratified the nomination of Greeley and Brown and adopted the platform of the Liberal Republicans. The Republicans renominated President Grant, and associated with him on the ticket Henry Wilson, of Massachusetts, for Vice-President. The disaffection among the Democrats in consequence of the nomination of Horace Greeley, a life-long political enemy, was so great that a third ticket was nominated, at the head of which was Charles O’Connor, the distinguished lawyer of New York. The Democrats and Liberal Republicans met in State convention and nominated a ticket composed of two Democrats and three Liberal Republicans, and passed a resolution endorsing the nomination of Greeley. The Liberal ticket in this country did not meet with much encouragement, the vote given it being only that number usually polled by the Democratic nominees. The campaign in Tama county was very warm on general issues. Total vote, 2,123; Republican majority about 1,100.

The question of Capitol vs. Labor engaged the attention of the people in 1873. The Republican State Convention met at Des Moines June 25, and after nominating candidates adopted resolutions declaring against monopolies, and urging that the several States should carefully restrict the powers of the railroad companies and other monopolies. Class legislation was also demanded. The Democratic party of the State made no regular nominations this year, but generally supported the Anti-monopoly ticket. A convention was held at Des Moines, August 12, nominated candidates, and adopted resolutions declaring that the old party organizations were no longer useful, denouncing corruption in government affairs, and urging the necessity of political honesty.

In Tama county, the campaign was an exciting one in its results and was a political up-heavily. The Republicans had a full county ticket in the field, with A. N. Poyneer, for Representative; A. J. Wheaton, for Auditor; T. J. Sweat, Treasurer; Knight Dexter, for Sheriff; W. Mowry, for Supervisor; A. H. Sterret, for county Superintendent; W. H. Holstead, for Surveyor, and N. Fisher, for Coroner. The opposition combined upon as Anti-Monopoly ticket, running for Representative, W. G. Malin; Auditor, J. A. Bowdle; Treasurer, Daniel Forker; Sheriff, R. E. Austin; Supervisor, S. W. Hutton; Superintendent, I. F. Giger; Coroner, G. W. Cowles. There was no available candidate for Surveyor, so the space was left blank on the ticket, leaving the Republican candidate without opposition. The canvass was conducted as a “still hunt,” every one working hard, and the principal fight being directed toward what was called the “Toledo Ticket and Court-House Ring.” Every township was carefully and thoroughly canvassed by the “Anti-Monops,” as they were called, and it was announced that if Daniel Forker, was elected they would pay all deputies. This secured many votes from the fact that it promised a reduction of taxation. The election came off in due time and it was found that every candidate upon the Anti-Monopoly ticket was elected except I. F. Giger, for county Superintendent; the Republican candidate, A. H. Sterrett being successful in this case by a majority of 47. The majorities ranged from 33 to 402, the latter being the majority by which Daniel Forker was elected Treasurer over T. J. Sweat. The total vote was polled 2,100.

In 1874, the issues were the same as in the previous year and the Anti-Monopolists made a gallant fight throughout the State, but without success. In Tama county the campaign was pushed with vim, and grew very warm, both the Republican and Anti-Monopoly parties having full county tickets in the field. The Republicans were successful by a majority of about 625. The Anti-Monopolists had made one mistake in failing to fulfill their promise to pay the deputies, and this contributed largely to their defeat.

A Convention was called to meet at Des Moines June 24, 1875, to be composed of Democrats, Anti-Monopolists and Liberal Republicans. Assembling a ticket was nominated headed by Shepart Lefler for Governor, and a platform of principles adopted covering the principal ground of belief of the three elements represented. The Republicans met in convention and nominated S. J. Kirkwood for Governor. A temperance convention was also held and Rev. John H. Lozier was nominated for Governor. The latter received four votes in this county. The Republican Governor’s majority in the county was 488. In county affairs this year signalized a great effort on the part of the Republicans to regain what they had lost in 1873. They nominated a full ticket, and the campaign was conducted aggressively, the fact of the Anti-Monopolists failing to pay their deputies as promised, being constantly held up to the view of the people. The Anti-Monopoly party placed a full ticket in the field, nominating for re-election all those who had been successful in 1873. For Superintendent of Schools L. Leyenberger, was nominated. The Republicans were successful with their whole ticket excepting for Auditor and Sheriff. To these offices J. A. Bowdle and R. E Austin, the Anti-Monopoly candidates were elected.

The election in 1876 was for National, State and County officers. Rutherford B. Hayes and William A. Wheeler were the Republican candidates for President and Vice-President; while Samuel J. Tilden and Thomas A. Hendricks received the nomination of the Democratic party for the same offices. Peter Cooper was the nominee of the Independent party or Greenbackers, for President. The hard times which began in 1873 had a perceptible effect upon this campaign. The Democratic party; which for some years had been netting upon the defensive, when not allied with some other political body, now assumed the aggressive, and under the banner of “Tilden and Reform,” forced the Republicans in the defensive. On the part of the Democrats the campaign was boldly conducted. In this State the Greenbackers held two conventions, at the first of which they adopted a platform containing their principal tenets. The Republicans adopted as a platform substantially the following points: 1, Unity of the Nation; 2, economy in the administration of the government; 3, a currency convertible with coin; 4, all railway and other corporations to be subject to the law-making power. The Democrats adopted but a single resolution approving the platform of the National Democratic Convention and the nomination of Tilden and Hendricks. The Independents, or Greenbackers, also put in nomination a State ticket.

In county affairs there was no special interest attached to the campaign although both parties had regular tickets in the field. The Republicans were successful by majorities ranging over 1,000.

In 1877 State tickets were nominated by Democrats, Republicans, Greenbackers and Prohibitionists. In Tama county the Republicans were successful by large majorities on all officers except for sheriff, to which office the Democratic candidate, R. E. Austin, was elected by a majority of 130.

In 1878 State tickets were nominated by Greenbackers, Democrats and Republicans. Subsequently a fusion was effected by the Democrats and Greenbackers and a portion of the nominees of each of their State tickets were chosen as the choice of both parties. On the State ticket, Tama county gave the Republicans a majority of about 547. The Republican county officers were also elected without much effort.

The campaign of 1870 was opened May 12, by the Democracy meeting in convention and nominating a State ticket, headed by H. H. Trimble for Governor. A lengthy platform was adopted. The Greenbackers were next in the field, their ticket being headed by Daniel Campbell for Governor. The Republicans met and nominated John H. Gear for Governor, together with a full State ticket. Lastly, the Prohibitionists met and placed in nomination George T. Carpenter, of Mahaska, for Governor. Mr. Carpenter declining, Dr. R. Dungan, of Eldora, was substituted. In Tama county this was a warm campaign. The Republicans were victors by majorities ranging between 458 and 1,000.

The general campaign in 1880 began quite early, especially among aspirants for office, and their friends. The preliminary canvass for the nomination grew quite warm as both Republicans and Democrats were alike confident that they would succeed in the National struggle. James A. Garfield received the Republican nomination for President, and associated with him on the ticket was Chester A. Arthur for Vice-President. Winfield S. Hancock was nominated for President by the Democrats, and with him was William H. English for Vice-President. James B. Weaver and Gen. Chambers for President and Vice-President respectively, on the National or Greenback ticket. The canvass was pushed with vigor, the Democratic and Republican parties each using their utmost endeavors to be successful. The national part, under the lead of Weaver, also endeavored to increase its votes, Mr. Weaver making speeches in more than half the States in the Union. The first State Convention held in Iowa this year was by the Republicans, at Des Moines, April 7. The platform adopted consisted of three resolution; the first demanding that candidates be nominated at Chicago by the National Republican Convention, of National reputation for ability; second, that James G. Blaine be the choice of the Republicans of the State, and third, in instructing delegates to the National Convention to vote for Blaine. The Greenbackers met at Des Moines, May 11, and adopted a platform reasserting their demands for the abolition of the National banks, the reduction of the army, the limitation of Chinese immigration, the reduction of salaries, and the payment of the National debt in greenbacks. The Democrats met at Des Moines, September 2, nominated a ticket, and adopted a platform endorsing Hancock and English, and the National platform adopted at Cincinnati.

The Greenbackers in this country made no nominations this year, and for President only polled about 193 votes, Garfield received 2712 votes in this county, and Hancock 1096. The majority of the Republicans for county officers was from 1329 to 1372. The entire vote polled was 4004.

The election in 1881 was for State and county officers, and was devoid of much interest. The three leading parties had State tickets in the field. President Garfield had been assassinated by Charles J. Guiteau and Vice-President Arthur had been installed as the chief executive; and this to some extent affected political matters. The Republicans carried Tama county by majorities of from 823 to 1,400, the latter being R. G. McIntire’s majority for Auditor. On the State ticket, Tama county had a representative in the person of Hon. L. G. Kinne, who was Democratic candidate for Governor. He ran far ahead of his ticket in Tama county, reducing the majority of the Republican candidate to 823—much lower than that received by any other Republican candidate on the ticket. The campaign of 1882 opened early, as it was for the election of State officers, Congressmen and General Assembly, members who were to elect U. S. Senators. Interest concentrated on the general issues. Republican, Democratic and Greenback State tickets were in the field. The Greenbackers polled a very light vote. The Democratic campaign was probably better managed than has been a campaign in the past twenty years of Iowa’s history. The official vote speaks for itself.

OFFICIAL VOTE
Here is presented the official vote of every general election since the county was organized. One election was held prior to this, but it was for township officers while Tama county formed a part of Benton county. It is treated in another place. The politics of the different candidates is taken from the fact that they were at the time running upon the ticket indicated. The book from which the returns were obtained was resurrected from a dust heap, and is very dim and poorly written, so that where a name is mis-spelled it is due to the uncertainty of the record. Particulars regarding the officers elected and the peculiar features of the various campaigns will be found in other chapters.

ELECTION—MARCH 1853
The record states that “the returns were made to Benton County, the following officers were elected: “Tallman Chase, County Judge; John Huston, Prosecuting Attorney; David D. Appelgate, Clerk of Courts; Norman L. Osborn, Sheriff; David F. Bruner and Anthony Wilkinson, were tied for School Fund Commissioner; Wesley A. Daniel County Surveyor. This election was for the temporary organization of the county. It was made permanent by the next election.

ELECTION, AUGUST 1853

County Judge
John C. Vermilya, Whig...................36--4
James H. Hollen, Democrat..............32
J. P. Wood, Whig.............................. 4

Treasurer and Recorder
John Ross, Whit................................46—20
David F. Bruner, Whig..................... 26

Sheriff
Miron Blodgett, Democrat............... 40-11
W. F. Hollen, Democrat................... 29
N. L. Osborn..................................... 1

Coroner
Franklin Davis, Democrat................ 40—22
Zebedee Rush, Democrat................. 15
J. H. Voorhies.................................. 10
Franklin Vorus................................. 4
W. A. Daniels, Whig....................... 18

Surveyor
Wesley A. Daniels, Whig................ 50

ELECTION, OCTOBER 3, 1854

School Fund Commissioner
Noah Myers, Whig....................... 51

Drainage Commissioner
Anthony Wilkinson...................... 28

ELECTION, AUGUST 7, 1854

Clerk of District Court
D. D. Appelgate, Whig................. 100—45
Thomas A. Graham, Whig............ 55

Prosecuting Attorney
Alford Phillips, Democrat............ 84—36
James C. Marshall, Whig............. 48

ELECTION, OCTOBER 2, 1854

Distraining Sheep and Hogs from Running at Large
For the proposition ...............90—41
Against the proposition .......... 49

ELECTION, APRIL, 1855

Commissioner Des Moines River Improvement
William McKay, Whig ................ 110—73
O. D. Tisdal, Democrat ...............37

Register Des Moines River Improvement
J. C. Lockwood, Whig................ 109—72
William Dewey, Democrat .............37

Register of Stand Land Office
Anson Holt, Whit ....................109—72
Samuel H. Stark, Republican .........37

For the Prohibitionary Liquor Law
For it ............................. 163—37
Against it ...........................126

ELECTION, AUGUST 6, 1855

County Judge
John C. Vermilya, Whig ...............342—240
T. A. Graham, Whig ................... 2
E. Church ............................2

Treasurer and Recorder
T. J. Staley, Whig ....................180—27
K. D. Shugart, Whig .................. 163

Sheriff
William Garner, Democrat ............ 204—66
James C. Marshall, Whig ............. 138

Coroner
F. Davis, Democrat ..................234—184
John Connell, Whig ...................50
En. N. Whipple ......................1
H. C. Foster .........................3

Bridge Tax
Against the tax ...................... 162—35
For the tax .......................... 127

ELECTION, APRIL 7, 1856

School Fund Commissioner
Lewis S. Frederick, Whig ............. 225—40
Jeremiah Hardin, Democrat ............ 185
Jonas P. Wood, Whig .................. 170
Woodhull Helm ..........................1

Bridge Tax
For the tax .......................... 247—76
Against the tax ....................... 171

ELECTION, AUGUST, 1856

Clerk of Court
David D. Appelgate, Republician .......404—117
James H. Hollen, Democrat ............ 187
James P. Wood .........................1

Prosecuting Attorney
Nathan C. Wieting, Republican..........240—31
Timothy Brown, Republican ............. 200
E. B. Bolens, Democrat ............... 141
Alford Phillips .......................1

ELECTION, APRIL, 1857

County Assessor
J. P. Wood, Republican .............. 333—12g
S. R. Somers, Democrat .............. 210
T. Shafer, Independent ...............139

Sheriff
H. C. Foster, Republican .............362—109
J. F. Ward, Independent .............. 253
H. Long, Democrat ...................59

Drainage Commissioner
Nathan Fisher, Republican ............333—48
A. Hale, Democrat ...................... 185

ELECTION, AUGUST, 1857

County Judge
Leander Clark, Republican .............476-161
John C. Vermilya, Independent ............ 315
William C. Salsbury, Democrat ............. 9

Treasurer and Recorder
Andrew J. Wheaton, Republican .......... 452—102
Jeremiah Hardin, Democrat ............. 350
Leander Clark, Republican ..............1

Sheriff
Thomas Murray, Independent ............ 447—93
George Raines, Republican ............. 351
J. Hardin, Democrat ....................1
William Turbett, Democrat .............. 1

County Surveyor
Charles Irish, Democrat ................ 497—195
Horace Jacobs, Republican .............. 302

Coroner
Clinton Olney, Republican ...............392—141
John Connell, Republican ..............251
S. B. Shiner ............................. 1

ELECTION, OCTOBER 13, 1857

Governor
Ralph P. Lowe, Republican ............... 303—129
Benjamin Samuels, Democrat ............. 174

ELECTION, APRIL, 1858

County Superintendent of Schools
Woodhull Helm, Republican ...............653—620
Peter McRoberts, Democrat ................. 33
John Connell ........................... 1

ELECTION, OCTOBER 12, 1858

Clerk of Courts
David D. Appelgate, Republican ......... 524-266
Leonard Stoddard, Democrat ............. 258
John Flathers ........................ 1

ELECTION, APRIL 4, 1859

To authorize the County Judge to issue bonds to secure the location of the State Model Farm and Agricultural College in Tama county, to the amount of 40,000.

For issuing the bonds ................ 444-249
Against issuing the bonds ................. 195

ELECTION, OCTOBER 11, 1859

Governor
Samuel J. Kirkwood .................... 600—305
A. C. Dodge ............................. 295

County Judge
Leander Clark, Republican ................ 867—860
W. S. Turbeit, Independent ................ 7

Treasurer and Recorder
A. J. Wheaton, Republican ................ 880

County Superintendent of Schools
John Ramsdell, Republican ............... 454—37
John McLain, Democrat ..................... 417
C. J. Rhodes, Independent .................. 5

Sheriff
Thomas Murray, Independent ............ 542—197
Eli Harmon, Republican ..................... 345

Coroner
T. Walter Jackson, Republican ........... 645-637
Scattering ............................................ 8

Drainage Commissioner
Z. T. Shugart, Republican .................. 681—680
Andrew Hale, Democrat .................... 1
H. Travis, Democrat .......................... 2

County Surveyor
Horace Jacobs, Republican ................. 594—296
C. W. Irish, Democrat ......................... 296

Representative 41st District
Abram Thompkins, Republican .......... 643—536
William Garner, Democrat ................. 117
G. Jaqua, Republican ......................... 9
John Doe ............................................1

ELECTION NOVEMBER 6, 1860

President
Abraham Lincoln .............................. 775—362
Stephen A. Douglas .......................... 413

Clerk of Courts
David D. Appelgate, Republican ....... 772—349
C. R. Ward, Democrat ....................... 423

Coroner
I. J. Wilkins, Republican .................... 744—297
Isaac Butler, Democrat ...................... 447

ELECTION MAY 20, 1861

Senator from the 35th District
Joseph Dysart, Republican ..................371—257
James C. Traer, Democrat .................. 114
Scattering ............................................ 3

ELECTION OCTOBER 8, 1861

Representative
Leander Clark, Republican ................. 510—107
Phineas Helm, Independent ................ 403
Scattering ............................................ 3

County Judge
John Allen, Republican ....................... 897—892
W. S. Turbett, Democrat ..................... 5
Thomas Asher ..................................... 1

Treasurer and Recorder
A. J. Wheaton, Republican ................. 904—903
J. R Hawkinson .................................. 1
William Garner .................................. 1
T. Wilcox ............................................ 1

Sheriff
H. A. Williams m. Republican ............ 508—127
Geo. W. Free, Democrat ...................... 381
Scattering ............................................. 10

Superintendent of Schools
John Ramsdell, Republican .................. 532—171
S. S. Dillman, Republican .................... 361
Scattering ............................................. 3

Surveyor
Horace Jacobs, Republican .................... 879—878
Allen Way .............................................. 1
Horace Greeley ...................................... 1

Coroner
G. W. Cowles, Republican .................... 893—890
I. J. Wilkins ........................................... 3
E. B. Coffin ............................................. 1

Drainage Commissioner
Z. T. Shugart, Republican ....................... 880—876
Scattering ................................................ 4

ELECTION, OCTOBER 11, 1862

Representative
W. F. Johnston, Republican .............605—594
R. Wyle ............................................ 2
John M. Siegle, Democrat ............... 9
W. C. Salsbury, Democrat .............. 8
W. S. Turbett .................................... 3

Clerk of Court
David D. Appelgate, Republican ..... 678—676
William Garner, Democrat .............. 2
Benjamin Hammitt .......................... 1

County Judge
T. A. Graham, Republican .............. 464—44
T. K. Armstrong, Democrat ............ 420

Coroner
I. J. Wilkins, Republican ................. 602—601
A. E. Rourke ................................... 1

ELECTION, OCTOBER 19, 1863

Treasurer and Recorder
A. J. Wheaton, Republican .............. 879—584
H. T. Baddy, Republican ................. 295
G. Shanklin ...................................... 1

County Judge
T. F. Bradford, Republican ............... 812—451
James Shanklin, Republican ............ 361
Mies Barker ..................................... 1
Scattering ......................................... 2

Sheriff
H. A. Williamson, Republican ......... 757—315
T. Forker, Democrat ......................... 442

County Superintendent of Schools
T. L. Downs, Republican ................. 788—451
W. P. Forsyth, Republican ............... 337

County Surveyor
Horace Jacobs, Republican .............. 811—399
S. R. Somers, Democrat .................... 412

Coroner
F. Davis, Republican .......................... 815—497
I. J. Wilkins, Republican ................... 318
B. Eldridge .......................................... 8

Drainage Commissioner
T. B. Martin, Republican .................... 776—762
J. C. Jacobs, Republican ..................... 14
L. B. Nelson, Republican ................... 7
A. Tompkins, Republican ................... 1

ELECTION OCTOBER, 1863—SOLDIERS’ VOTE

Treasurer and Recorder
A. J. Wheaton, Republican .................... 128—118
H. T. Baldy, Independent ...................... 10

County Judge
T. F. Bradford, Republican .................... 128—118
James Shanklin, Independent .................. 10

Sheriff
H. A. Williamson, Republican ................ 101—73
T. Forker, Independent ............................ 28
John M. Siegle ......................................... 1

Surveyor
Horace Jacobs ........................................... 19—9
S. R. Somers ............................................. 10

County Superintendent of Schools
T. L. Downs, Republican .......................... 125—114
W. P. Forsyth, Independent ....................... 11
Somers ....................................................... 1

Coroner
Franklin Davis, Republican ....................... 68—58
Ira J. Wilkins, Independent ....................... 10

Drainage Commissioner
T. B. Martin ............................................... 85

ELECTION, October, 1863

Representative from District 39
Phineas Helm, Republican .......................... 794—384
Capt. A. Stoddard, Democrat ...................... 410
Soldiers Vote for Representative
Francis Helm, Republican ........................... 110—94
Capt. A. Stoddard, Democrat ...................... 16

ELECTION, NOVEMBER, 1864

President
Abraham Lincoln ........................................ 873—485
George B. McClellan .................................. 388

Clerk of Court
David D. Appelgate, Republican................. 1050—1948
Benjamin Wickham, Democrat .................. 2
Scattering .................................................... 3

County Judge
T. A. Graham, Republican .......................... 1021—1020
I Holt ................................................................ 1
R. R. Crawford .................................................. 1
B. Wickham ...................................................... 2
M. Kellogg ...................................................... 1
Pat. Dowd ....................................................... 3
William Turbett ................................................. 1
Henry Free ...................................................... 9
G. Jaqua ........................................................ 3

Sheriff
Knight Dexter, Republican ........................... 887—382
Anthony Bricker, Democrat .......................... 505
Scattering .............................................. 4

County Recorder
Jacob Yeiser, Jr., Republican ................................ 1046-720
E. R. Fish, Democrat ................................. 326
Scattering ................................. 4.

Question of Restraining Sheep and Swine from Running at Large
In favor of ................................. 1050-955
Against ................................. 95

Question of Levying Court House Tax
Against the tax.................................703-241
For the tax ................................. 462.

ELECTION, OCTOBER 10, 1865

Whether the county should donate $40,000 to the Iowa Central R. R. to be used in building through Tama county
For the proposition.................................1013-812
Against the proposition.................................201

Whether Tama county should devote the Swamp Lands and proceeds toward aiding the construction of the same road
For the proposition.................................1053-908
Against the proposition.................................145

ELECTION, OCTOBER, 1865

Representative
Leander Clark, Republican.................................855-415
N. Norris, Democrat................................. 440

County Judge
T. A. Graham, Republican.................................892-428
T. K. Armstrong, Democrat................................. 464

Sheriff
K. Dexter, Republican.................................837-358
W. T. Hollen, Democrat.................................479
Benj. Wickham, Democrat.................................1

Coroner
Nathan Fisher, Republican................................. 891-438
V. P. Gray, Democrat................................. 453

County Surveyor
Horace Jacobs, Republican ................................. 891-843
C. W. Irish, Democrat.................................49
J. B. Talmadge, Republican.................................3
M. Hate.................................1

County Superintendent
T. L. Downs, Republican.................................848-790
John Hillman, Democrat.................................58
T. Whitaker.................................1
James Hallett................................. 1
S. Vandyke................................. 1
John McLane................................. 1

ELECTION, OCTOBER, 1866

Clerk of the District Court
David D. Appelgate, Republican .................................917-446
Wm. H. Stoddard, Democrat................................. 471

County Recorder
Jacob Yeiser, Jr., Republican ................................. 1048-633
John M. Hillman, Democrat................................. 415

ELECTION, OCTOBER, 1867

Representative
James Wilson, Republican.................................922-473
James R. Graham, Democrat.................................449
Patrick Dowd.................................6

County Judge
Thomas Free, Republican.................................893-495
Eleazer Mann, Democrat.................................438
Jack Wheaton.................................1
T. A. Graham ................................. 1
E. Gallion................................. 1

Sheriff
Knight Dexter, Republican .................................. 903-438
H. B. Belden, Democrat................................. 465
Tom Carter.................................5
Charles Bailey................................. 1
H. Carpenter................................. 1

Surveyor
C. W. Hiatt, Republican................................. 936-934
H. Jacobs ................................. 2

Superintendent of Schools
J. R. Stewart, Republican................................. 924-473
J. B. Tims, Democrat................................. 451
T. L. Downs ................................. 2

Coroner
M. Fisher, Republican................................. 930-481
Peter McRoberts, Democcrat (sic) ................................. 449
Mr. Davis................................. 1

Drainage Commissioner
W. S. Turbett, Democrat ................................. 16
Mr. Hillman................................. 2

ELECTION, NOVEMBER 1868

Clerk of District Court
L. B. Blinn, Republican................................. 1873-1079
J. F. Ward, Democrat ................................. 794

Recorder
Jacob Yeiser, Jr., Republican ................................. 1864-1062
T. Frank Hill, Democrat.................................. 802

For Gopher Tax ................................. 442-171
Against Gopher Tax .................................271

For the Stock Act................................. 885-561
Against Stock Act................................. 324

ELECTION, OCTOBER 1869

Representative
James Wilson, Republican ................................. 1190-778
P. B. McCullough, Democrat ................................. 412
W. W. Leckins ................................. 1

County Auditor
T. S. Free, Republican ................................. 1196-782
C. H. Kentner, Democrat ................................. 414
T. Forker................................. 1

County Treasurer
Thos. Shaeffer, Republican ................................. 1048-498
Turner Forker, Democrat................................. 550

Sheriff
Knight Dexter, Republican ................................. 1015-445
W. T. Hollen, Democrat ................................. 570
A. J. Stewart ................................. 1
N. Dexter ................................. 1
T. W. Hunton ................................. 1

Surveyor
C. W. Hiatt, Republican ................................. 1176-1175
H. Jacobs ................................. 1

Superintendent of Schools
J. R. Stewart, Republican ................................. 1164-789
D. S. Glidden, Democrat .................................. 375
J. S. Stewart................................. 1

Coroner
N. Fisher, Republican ................................. 1182-765
M. Bostwick, Democrat ................................. 417

Drainage Commissioner
E. T. Gallion, Republican................................. 1125-728
W. S. Turbett, Democrat ................................. 397
L. Merchant ................................. 2
A. N. Lawrence ................................. 1

ELECTION, OCTOBER, 1870

Member Board of Supervisors
Leander Clark, Republican................................. 1609
G. Jaqua, Republican ................................. 1662
A. N. Poyneer, Republican ................................. 1448
Turner Forker, Democrat ................................. 865
S. Thompson, Democrat................................. 602
John W. Fleming, Democrat ................................. 610
H. T. Williard................................. 1
A. C. Tenney ................................. 16
A. J. Wheaton................................. 2
Ed. Morse ................................. 1
M. Lewis................................. 1

Clerk of the District Court
L. B. Blinn, Republican .................................. 1706-1117
J. G. Strong, Democrat .................................. 589

Recorder
John R. McClaskey, Republican ................................. 1686-1084
Robert Irwin, Democrat ................................. 602
N. H. Wittington ................................. 1
Turner Forker ................................. 1

ELECTION, OCTOBER, 1871

Representative
James Wilson, Republican ................................. 1216-580
C. B. Bradshaw, Democrat ................................. 636

Auditor
Thomas S. Free, Republican ................................. 1228-637
John W. Fleming, Democrat ................................. 581
A.H. Lawrence ................................. 2

Treasurer
Theodore Schaeffer, Republican ................................. 1266-698
S. M. Chapman, Democrat ................................. 568
Mr. Shafer ................................. 3
C. B. Barnard ................................. 1

Sheriff
Knight Dexter, Republican ................................. 1013-333
W. T. Hollen, Democrat ................................. 680
H. B. Belden, Independent ................................. 147
Horace Jacobs ................................. 1
E. S. Kentner ................................. 1

Superintendent of Schools
Fayette Hurd, Republican ................................. 974-257
D. S. Glidden, Democrat ................................. 717
W. E. Roberts, Independent ................................. 129
H. A. Brown ................................. 18
A. H. Sterrett ................................. 1
Mr. Brown ................................. 1
Mr. Roberts ................................. 4

Coroner
M. A. Newcomber, Republican ................................. 1247-677
S. Thompson, Democrat ................................. 570
N. Fisher ................................. 5
Lewis Lyon ................................. 13

Supervisor
John Ramsdell, Republican ................................. 986-142
Turner Forker, Democrat .................................. 844
L. Clark ................................. 1

ELECTION, NOVEMBER 1872

Clerk of District Court
L. B. Blinn, Republican ................................. 2019-1306
G. H. Goodrich, Democrat ................................. 710
John Blanchard ................................. 1

Recorder
John R. McClaskey, Republican ................................. 1944-1167
Turner Forker, Democrat ................................. 777
T. A. Graham ................................. 2

Supervisor.
G. Jaqua, Republican.................................1864—1067
John T. G. Cold, Democrat.................................797
George Werum.................................1

ELECTION, OCTOBER 1873

Representative.
W. G. Malin, Anti-Monopoly.................................1055—244
A. N. Poyneer, Republican.................................906
Welcome Mowery.................................1
L. Merchant.................................1
Wm. Malin.................................1
Woodron Lane.................................1

Auditor.
A. J. Bowdle, Anti-Monopoly.................................1150--55
A. J. Wheaton, Republican.................................1500
A. E. Wheaton.................................25
Thomas S. Free.................................8
A. M. Bowdle.................................1
A. J. Free.................................1
Mr. Bowdle.................................1

Treasurer.
Daniel Forker, Anti-Monopoly.................................1220--402
T. J. Sweatt, Republican................................. 818
Theodore Schaeffer.................................2
Mr. Forker.................................3
Mr. Sweatt.................................1

Sheriff.
R. E. Austin, Anti-Monopoly.................................1218--354
Knight Dexter, Republican.................................864
County Supervisor.
Daniel W. Hutton, Anti-Monopoly.................................1065--37
Welcome Mowery, Republican.................................1028
Mr. Mowery.................................1

Superintendent.
A. H. Sterrett, Republican.................................1073--47
J. F. Giger, Anti-Monopoly.................................1026
S. W. Hutton.................................1

Surveyor.
W. H. Holstead, Republican.................................1070
G. W. Cowles, Anti-Monopoly.................................1076--63
N. Fisher, Republican.................................1013
O. H. Mills.................................2

ELECTION, OCTOBER 1874

Secretary of State.
Josiah T. Young, Republican.................................1637--697
David Morgan, Democrat.................................940

Auditor of State
Buren R. Sherman, Republican.................................1640--704
J. M. King, Democrat.................................936

Treasurer of State.
William Christy, Republican.................................1636--695
Henry C. Harges, Democrat.................................941

Register State Land Office.
David Secor, Republican.................................1638--699
Robert H. Rodeorneil, Democrat................................. 939

Attorney General.
M. E. Cutts, Republican.................................1637--697
John H. Keathley, Democrat................................. 940
Lewis Lyon.................................1

Clerk of Supreme Court.
Edward J. Holmes, Republican.................................1636--695
Geo. W. Ball, Democrat................................. 941

Reporter Supreme Court.
John R. Rummells, Republican.................................1634--692
James M. Weast, Democrat................................943

Congress.
James Wilson, Republican.................................1717--927
James Wilkinson, Democrat.................................790
Mr. Burnett.................................2
John Robbins................................. 1
Jane Wilson................................. 1
John Waller................................. 1
Wilkinson................................. 1

Judge of District Court.
James H. Rothrock, Republican................................. 2564--563
John Blanchard................................. 1

District Attorney.
Milo P. Smith, Republican................................. 1569--559
L. G. Kinne, Democrat................................. 1010
W. Thompson................................. 1

Clerk.
C. J. Stevens, Republican................................. 1697--820
Hiram Bissell, Democrat................................. 877

Recorder.
J. B. M. Bishop, Republican................................. 1612--656
A. N. Bates, Anti-Monopoly................................. 956
J. M. Bishop................................. 2
J. Bishop................................. 1
E. L. Dillman................................. 1

Supervisor.
J. H. Lauderdale................................. 1590--605
E. M. Griffith................................. 985

Coroner.
E. M. Bielby................................. 1631--646
Dr. James Thompson................................. 985

ELECTION, OCTOBER 1875

Governor.
Samuel J. Kirkwood, Republican................................. 1466--488
Shepherd Leffler, Democrat................................. 978
John H. Lozier, Temperance................................. 4
W. H. Tiffany................................. 1

Lieutenant Governor.
Joshua G. Newbold, Republican................................. 1465--485
Emmett B. Woodward, Democrat................................. 980
G. Jaqua................................. 1

Judge of Supreme Court.
Austin Adams, Republican................................. 1466--486
Wm. J. Knight, Democrat................................. 980

Superintendent of Public Instruction.
Aleazo Abernethy, Republican................................. 1464--473
Asaiah Doane, Democrat................................. 991

Representative.
G. Jaqua, Republican................................. 1310--201
W. G. Malin, Anti Monopoly................................. 1109
C. J. Stevens................................. 1
O. Fleack................................. 1
G. E. Sharp................................. 1
Malin................................. 2

Auditor.
J. A. Bowdle, Anti-Monopoly................................. 1267--111
J. W. Willett, Republican................................. 1156
A. J. Bowdle................................. 1
Jos. Bowdle................................. 1
J. Bowdle................................. 8
Mr. Bowdle................................. 6
J. A. Bowton................................. 1

Treasurer.
L. B. Blinn, Republican................................. 1366--283
Daniel Forker................................. 1083
R. E. Austin................................. 1
J. A. Bowdle................................. 1
Mr. Forker................................. 2
E. B. Blinn................................. 2
R. A. Austin................................. 1

Sheriff.
R. E. Austin, Anti-Monopoly................................. 1401--362
E. M. Bielby, Republican................................. 1039
E. Bielby................................. 1
R. A. Austin................................. 1
Mr. Austin................................. 9

Surveyor.
W. H. Holstead, Republican................................. 2444--2440
Mifllin Levis................................. 4
Lyman Cary................................. 1
James Gannon................................. 1

Superintendent.
H. A. Brown, Republican .................................1372--302
L. Leyenberger, Anti-Monopoly................................. 1070
Rev. Brown................................. 1
A. H. Brown................................. 1
Mr. Brown................................. 3
Leyenberger................................. 1

Coroner.
J. C. Kendrick................................. 1377--353
Eli Harmon................................. 1024
T. J. Smith................................. 19
E. M. Bielby................................. 1
J. J. McCollister................................. 1

Supervisor.
T. F. Clark, Republican .................................1357
J. V. B. Green, Anti-Monopoly................................. 1099

ELECTION, NOVEMBER, 1876

Judge of Supreme Court.
Wm. H. Seevers, Republican................................. 2325--1006
Walter I. Hayes, Democrat................................. 1319
Charles Necus................................. 74
O. R. Jones................................. 9

Secretary of State.
Josiah T. Young, Republican...................2342--1022
John H. Steubenrauch, Democrat................ 1320
A. Macredy................................. 81

Auditor of State.
Buren R. Sherman, Republican...................... 2342--1023
Wm. Groneweg, Democrat................................. 1319
Leonard Brown................................. 81

Treasurer of State.
George W. Bemis, Republican.................... 2340--1019
Wesley Jones, Democrat 1321
George C. Fry................................. 81

Register of State Land Office.
David Secor, Republican....................... 2342--1023
N. C. Rideman, Democrat........................ 1319
Geo. M. Walker................................. 81

Attorney General.
John F. McJunkin, Republican................... 2341--1021
J. C. Cook, Democrat................................. 1320

Superintendent of Public Instruction.
C. W. Von Coellen, Republican...................2340--2267
J. A. Nash, Democrat.............................. 73

Representative in Congress.
Rush Clark, Republican......................... 2320--1009
Nathan Worley, Democrat........................ 1311
W. H. Rutherford............................... 107

Judge of Circuit Court.
John McKean, Republican........................ 2375--2374
S. A. Belt, Democrat........................... 1
A. L. Leavens................................. 1
A. Waller................................. 1

next page 443

Page 446-448

Roger N. Tenney.............................43
R. Tenney....................................7
R. E. Tenney........................... 22
Leander Clark...........................1

ELECTION, OCTOBER, 1878.

Secretary of State.
John A. T. Hull, Republican........... 1760--540
E. M. Farnsworth, Democrat............ 1220

Auditor of State.
Buren R. Sherman, Republican................ 1776--1142
G. V. Swearingen, Democrat............. 634
J. Eiboeck, Greenback........... 572

Treasurer of State.
George W. Bemis, Republican............ 1754--536
M. L. Devin, Democrat................... 1218
J. Eiboeck........................... 1

Register of State Land Office
James K. Powers, Republican.............. 1761--547
M. Farrington, Democrat............. 1214

Attorney General.
John F. McJunkin, Republican................... 1758--1114
C. H. Jackson, Democrat................. 644
John Gibbon, Greenback................ 574
J. H. Rothrock................. 1

Judge of Supreme Court.
James H. Rothrock, Republican...................1815--649
J. C. Knapp, Democrat...........................1166

Clerk of Supreme Court.
Edward J. Holmes, Republican.......................... 1758--539
Alexander Runyon, Democrat............. 1219

Reporter of Supreme Court.
John S. Runnells, Republican................... 1753--1104
G. W. Rutherford, Democrat.................... 649
John B. Elliott.................... 571

Representative in Congress.
Rush Clark, Republican...........................1754--595
George Carter, Democrat...................... 1159
Timothy Brown 66

District Judge.
John Shane, Republican 2260--1575
John Miller, Democrat 685
Scattering 5

District Attorney.
Milo P. Smith, Republican 2323--1670
A. R. Sterrett, Democrat 653
J. Dysart 1

Clerk of District and Circuit Courts.
C. J. Stevens, Republican 1824--1284
James McClung, Democrat 536
J. W. Shaler 540
J. C. Stevens 66
Mr. Evans 5

Recorder.
J. B. M. Bishop, Republican 1841--1267
A. Bywaters 562
W. B. Gillespie 574

Supervisors.
Joseph Dysart, Republican 1743--1115
A. E. Stewart 628
O. Gravatt 600
Jonah Howe 1
Shall the number of Supervisors be increased to five.
Against 1091--671
For 420

ELECTION, OCTOBER, 1879.

Governor.
John H. Gear, Republican 2278--1412
H. H. Trimble, Democrat 866
Daniel Campbell, Greenback 475
D. R. Dungan 51
Scattering 2

Lieutenant Governor.
Frank T. Campbell, Republican 2324--1460
J. A. O. Yeoman, Democrat 867
M. H. Moore, Greenback 472
H. H. Withington 1

Judge of the Supreme Court.
Joseph M. Beck, Republican 2335--1464
Reuben Noble, Democrat 871
M. H. Jones, Greenback 471
M. H. Moore 1

Superintendent of Public Instruction.
Carl W. Von Coellen, Republican 2298--1429
Erwin Baker, Democrat 869
J. A. Nash, Greenback 508
M. H. Jones 1
H. Black 1

Representative in Congress.
Wm. G. Thompson, Republican 2358--1051
Wm. Thompson 1
Mr. Thompson 1
W. H. Calhoun, Democrat 1277

Representative in General Assembly.

Geo. R. Struble, Republican 2304--1032

W. G. Malin, Greenback 1272

Scattering 9

 

Auditor.

R. G. McIntire, Republican 2369--1067

M. Bunker, Democrat 1302

R. E. Austin 1

 

Treasurer.

L. B. Blinn, Republican 3603--3597

Scattering 6

 

Sheriff.

J. C. Fitzgerald, Republican 2052--458

R. E. Austin, Democrat 1594

Mr. Austin 10

Robert Austin 1

Rob. Austin 1

R. Austin 1

John Fitzgerald 3

Mr. Fitzgerald 2

 

County Superintendent.

A. H. Sterrett, Republican 2059--479

W. H. Black, Democrat 1580

Mr. Sterrett 4

A. Sterrett 1

W. Black 5

Mr. Black 5

Wm. Black 4

Scattering 3

 

County Surveyor.

W. H. Holstead, Republican 2341--2331

Scattering 10

 

Coroner.

J. C. Kendrick, Republican 2294--924

B. Thompson, Democrat 1370

Scattering 4

 

Supervisors.

H. H. Withington, Republican 2123--805

H. Withington 168

W. O. Pond, Democrat 1318

Scattering 4

 

ELECTION, NOVEMBER, 1880.

 

President.

James A. Grafield, Republican 2712--612

Winfield S. Hancock, Democrat 1096

James B. Weaver, Greenback 193

 

Secretary of State.

John A. T. Hull 2713--1617

A. B. Keith 1096

George M. Walker 193

 

Auditor of State.

William V. Lucas 2713--1617

C. J. Barker 1096

G. V. Swearengen 193

 

Treasurer of State.

Edwin H. Conger 2714--1619

Martin Blinn 1095

Matthew Farrington 193

 

Register of State Land Office.

James K. Powers, Republican 2713--1617

D Dougherty, Democrat 1096

Thomas Hooker, Greenback 193

 

Attorney General.

Smith McPherson, Republican 2713-1617

C. A. Clark, Democrat 1096

W. A. Spurrier, Greenback 193

 

Representative in Congress.

Wm. G. Thompson, Republican 2711--1626

R. E. Austin, Democrat 1085

A. F. Palmer, Greenback 194

 

Circuit Judge.

Christian Hedges, Republican 2717--2707

W. C. Salsbury, Democrat 10

G. W. Ealy 1

 

Proposition to amend the Constitution.

For 1643--1242

Against 411

 

Shall there be a Convention to revise the Constitution

For 1722-1092

Against 630

 

Clerk of the District and Circuit Courts.

S. C. Leland, Republican 2528--1372

J. S. Hopkins, Democrat 1156

John Hopkins, Greenback 183

Scattering 5

 

County Recorder.

T. E. Warren, Republican 2632--1332

L. F. Hammitt, Democrat 1300

L. Hammitt 3

Mr. Hammitt 1

Scattering 2

 

Supervisors.

A. Z. Rawson, Republican 2625--1329

Wm. Cory, Democrat 1296

Silas Sears 25

V. Hurt 1

 

ELECTION, OCTOBER, 1881.

 

Governor.

Buren R. Sherman, Republican 1393--823

L. G. Kinne, Democrat 570

D. M. Clark, Greenback 176

Wm. Johnston 1

 

Lieutenant-Governor.

Orlando H. Manning, Republican 1439--951

James M. Walker, Democrat 488

G. M. Walker 32

James M. Holland 178

John M. Kent 1

 

Judge of Supreme Court.

Austin Adams, Republican 1442--982

H. P. Hendershott, Democrat 460

W. W. Williamson, Greenback 234

Jacob W. Rogers 1

 

Superintendent Public Instruction.

John W. Akers, Republican 1496--1036

Walter H. Butler, Democrat 460

Mrs. A. M. Swain, Greenback 174

S. N. Fellos 1

J. Hammond 1

Andrew Jackson 1

 

Senator.

A. N. Poyneer, Republican 1442--991

Joel Stewart, Democrat 454

W. B. King, Greenback 222

Scattering 7

 

Senator.

A. N. Poyneer, Republican 1442--991

Joel Stewart, Democrat 454

W. B. King, Greenback 222

Scattering 7

 

Representative.

G. R. Struble, Republican 1377--874

Andrew Jackson, Democrat 503

James McClung, Greenback 221

Scattering 4

 

County Auditor.

R. G. McIntire, Republican 1589--1400

Wm. Flint, Democrat 189

Arthur Sewall 9

Scattering 4

 

County Treasurer.

Lyman Cary, Republican 1502--1048

Turner Forker, Democrat 454

M. Mudgett, Greenback 167

L. B. Blinn 1

Scattering 4

 

Sheriff.

J. C. Fitzgerald, Republican 1475--1001

H. L. Wilson, Democrat 474

R. P. Fitzgerald, Greenback 181

 

County Superintendent.

J. P. Hendricks, Republican 1270--937

Mrs. E. M. Bull, Democrat 332

T. E. Mann, Greenback 204

Wm. Black 12

A. H. Sterrett 7

Scattering 10

 

County Surveyor.

W. H. Holstead, Republican 1565--1068

B. F. Moreland, Democrat 497

Scattering 13

 

Coroner.

C. H. Myers, Republican 1436--939

Dr. S. Thompson, Democrat 497

Dr. B. Bull, Greenback 182

Scattering 2

 

Supervisor.

B. Smith, Republican 1465--975

O. Gravatt, Democrat 490

Hiram Winders, Greenback 174

Scattering 2

 

SPECIAL ELECTION, JUNE, 1882.

 

For the adoption of the Prohibitory Amendment 2244-767

Against 1477

 

ELECTION, NOVEMBER, 1882.

 

Secretary of State.

John A. T. Hull, Republican 2033--663

T. O. Walker, Democrat 1370

W. J. Gaston, Greenback 216

 

Auditor of State.

John L. Brown, Republican 2033--662

Wm. Thompson, Democrat 1371

G. A. Wyant, Greenback 276

 

Treasurer of State.

Edwin H. Conger, Republican 2033--666

John Foley, Democrat 1367

George Derr, Greenback 216

N. Johnston 1

 

Attorney General.

Smith McPherson, Republican 2033--662

J. H. Bremerman, Democrat 1371

J. H. Rice, Greenback 216

 

Judge of Supreme Court.

William H. Seevers, Republican 2033--662

Charles E. Bronson, Democrat 1371

M. H. Jones, Greenback 215

 

Clerk of the Supreme Court.

Gilbert B. Pray, Republican 2032-661

H. F. Bonarden, Democrat 1371

E. N. Clark, Greenback 216

Scattering 1

 

Reporter of Supreme Court.

Ezra C. Ebersole, Republican 2049--695

L. A. Palmer, Democrat 1354

J. H. Williamson, Greenback 215

Scattering 3

 

Representative in Congress.

James Wilson, Republican 1978--561

Ben T. Grederick, Democrat 1417

David Platner, Greenback 194

 

Judge of District Court.

James D. Giffin, Republican 2032--662

Geo. W. Ball, Democrat 1370

H. B. Fraser, Greenback 216

 

District Attorney.

Milton Remley 2032--447

J. H. Preston 1585

 

Clerk of District and Circuit Courts.

S. C. Leland, Republican 2070--814

James Fowler, Democrat 1256

D. F. Mahone, Greenback 226

Scattering 3

 

County Recorder.

T. E. Warren, Republican 2061--756

Gust. Reichman, Democrat 1305

G. T. Ward, Greenback 238

 

Coroner.

J. C. Kendrick, Republican 2013--2010

Scattering 3

 

Supervisor.Joseph Dysart, Republican 2045--775

Silas Sears, Democrat 1270

W. G. Malin, Greenback 271

 

Shall the number of Supervisors be increased to Five.

For 913-211

Against 702

Tama Co. Home Page Table of ContentsBiography ListPortrait ListCertificates Chapter XIII