Scott Co, Iowa - IAGenWeb Project


Isaiah Calvin Yocum Biography

From "History of Davenport and Scott County" Vol. II by Harry E. Downer-S. J. Clarke Publishing Co. 1910 Chicago.

Surnames: Yocum, Dopp, Logue, Pollock, Briceland.

Isaiah Calvin Yocum, deceased, was at one time numbered among Scott county worthy and representative farmers. He was born August 21, 1845, of the marriage of William and Sarah (Dopp) Yocum. His birth occurred in Huntingdon county, Pennsylvania, and he began his education in the public schools there, but when nine years of age accompanied his parents on their removal to the middle west. They settled upon the farm which is now the home of his widow. It was then all prairie land, wild and unimproved, which the father purchased from Mr. Stacey.
After arriving in this county Isaiah C. Yocum continued his education in schools here and also attended a business college in Davenport. He then returned to the old homestead, where he carried on farming up to the time of his marriage, when he removed across the road, settling on another part of the farm. There he continued to reside until his death, which occurred December 4, 1902. He was always an energetic, enterprising farmer, carrying on his work diligently and persistently and meeting with that success which ever follows earnest effort. He was also one of the directors of the Farmers Mutual Insurance Company, and in addition to tilling his fields he dealt in stock and found that a profitable source of income.
Mr. Yocum was first married in Davenport, January 20, 1869, to Miss Hannah C. Pollock, who died on the 30th of May 1871, and their only child, William James H., who was born in May, 1871, died on the 6th of the following August. On the 10th of February, 1875, Mr Yocum was married to Miss Martha Ellen Pollock, a sister of his first wife and a daughter of James and Mary (Logue) Pollock, the wedding being celebrated at Titusville, Pennsylvania. Unto Mr. and Mrs. Yocum were born four children, but the eldest, Eva, died in infancy. Sarah Alice, who is a graduate of the Davenport high school, was married August 25, 1909, to Hugo A. Briceland and they reside upon the farm with her mother. Mary E., a graduate of the Highland Park College of Des Moines, has taught in a number of schools in Scott county. Samuel Carey was a student in the high school at the time of his death. Both the son and father were suffocated in the Lincoln Hotel in Chicago, to which city they had gone to attend a stock show. This double calamity was almost unbearable to the family, who were left to mourn the loss of husband and son, father and brother.
Mr. Yocum had taken an active part in community affairs, had served as school director for fourteen years and was also treasurer of the school board and filled the office of justice of the peace. He held membership with the Ancient Order of Untied Workmen, with the Woodmen of the World and with the Legion of honor, and belonged to the Summit Presbyterian church, and its first meetings were held in the old Yocum home. His life was an upright and honorable one, in harmony with his professions and he left to his family an untarnished name. Mrs. Yocum still resides upon the old home farm of one hundred and sixteen acres of fine land in Lincoln township. She and her children are members of the Summit church and her daughters are very active and efficient workers in both the Sunday school and the church.

Transcribed by Elaine Rathmann


Hugo G. Schaeffer

From "History of Davenport and Scott County" Vol. II by Harry E. Downer-S. J. Clarke Publishing Co. 1910 Chicago.

Surnames: Schaeffer, Carsen Schlotfeldt, Hagedorn.

For a number of years Hugo G. Schaefer was a resident of Sheridan township, were he farmed for ten years, but for the last decade and more he has been a resident of the city of Davenport. A native of this county, he was born in Pleasant Valley township, his parents being William and Lena (Houseman) Schaefer, who were born in Germany and shortly after their marriage emigrated to America. They came to Scott county almost immediately and here the father rented land for a time. Later he purchased one hundred and thirty acres in Pleasant Valley township, and after a residence of about seven years thereon bought another farm of one hundred and twenty acres in Davenport township. On it he lived during the remainder of his active life, improving it and operating it with a marked success. He had, however, in the course of years invested heavily in real estate, so that at the time of his death he was in the possession of four hundred and sixty acres. He was an eager participant in th!
e public life of his township, having served as road commissioner for a long period and was a member of the Old German Settlers Society. The last years of his life were spent in Davenport and there he passed away December 5, 1908, in the seventy-fifth year of his age. His widow still survives. They were the parents of the following children: William, who is engaged in farming in Pleasant Valley township; Richard, an agriculturist of Davenport township; Alexander, who also resides in Pleasant Valley township; Hugo, in city of Davenport; Otto, of Pleasant Valley township; Albert, a resident of Davenport township; Meta, who is the wife of William Carsen, of Davenport; Emil, who died at the age of fourteen years; and two who died in infancy.
Hugo G. Schaefer has spent a large part of his life in Scott county. As soon as he was of suitable age he became a pupil in the district school near his home, later attending a German school and a business college. At the age of fifteen he put aside his text-books, left the farm and came to Davenport, that he might begin his business career. For the first four years he was clerk in a store and then secured a position as traveling salesman, in this capacity becoming familiar with the greater part of the south and west. In 1894 he opened a general store in Dixon, this county, which he conducted profitably during the next two years, but as his health had failed he was compelled to sell his interests and so turned to agriculture. He wan not a man, however, to confine his work to one field if he saw other opportunities for advancement. As a result several industries and enterprises in Scott county receive his support.
On the 30th of April, 1895, Mr. Schaefer wedded Miss Adele Hagedorn, a daughter of Christian and Mary (Schlotfeldt) Hagedorn, who are old German settlers of Scott county. One son, Clarence A., has been born to the couple. Mr. Schaefer is a member of the Knights of Pythias lodge, of the fraternal Order of Eagles and of the Turner Society. His energies have never been exerted selfishly but always in such manner that his fellow citizens profited from them.

Transcribed by Elaine Rathmann


Herman H. Frye Biography

From "History of Davenport and Scott County" Vol. II by Harry E. Downer-S. J. Clarke Publishing Co. 1910 Chicago.

Surnames: Frye, Brockman, Rier, Granaman, Stutt, Rochau, Olliver, Meyer, Hahn, Lamp, Lage.

During his active life Herman H. Frye was one of the more prosperous farmers of this county, and when advancing years and a large income suggested the wisdom of retiring he took up his residence in Davenport, where his death occurred November 2, 1903. One of the early German settlers of this section of Iowa, he had been born in what was known as Klein Dreele, Hanover, Germany, February 4, 1830, a son of Bernard and Adeline (Brockman) Frye.
At the age of sixteen, in 1846, he came to the United States alone, and having chosen the southern route for crossing the ocean, landed at New Orleans. He spent the winter in that city and in the spring ascended the Mississippi to St. Louis, Missouri, which remained his home for the next decade. There, in 1856, he was married and shortly afterward, in the same year, came to Davenport, opening a brickyard, which he operated for about a year. Then he traded it for one hundred and sixty acres of prairie land in Sheridan township, Scott county, on which he built a house, broke his land and prepared it for cultivation, driving from his labors a rich return that placed him among the most successful agriculturists of this section. As the years brought their full measure of success, he invested extensively in land, until at his death he was in possession of about one thousand acres besides some town property. He had been among the first to settle in the county, which has proved to !
be so rich agriculturally, and witnessing its development he also participated in its improvement and his name appears upon the roll of those who rendered their fellowmen substantial and invaluable service.
While living in St. Louis, on the 14th of March, 1856, Mr. Frye was united in marriage to Miss Louisa Rier, a daughter of William and Maria (Granaman) Rier. She had been born in Nordhammen, Westphalia, Germany, April 28, 1834, and came to this country in her young womanhood, although her parents remained in the fatherland. Ten children were born to Mr. and Mrs. Frye. George D., living upon the old homestead, wedded Miss Thrissa Stutt, now deceased, and they had four children: Hermanza, who became the wife of Julius F. Rochau, of Oklahoma, and has one child, Blanch Louise; George D., Jr.; Blanch, the wife of Henry Olliver, of California; and Harry. William F. resides in Hickory Grove township. In his young manhood he married Miss Carolina Meyer and they have eight children; Wilbert, Alfred, Arnold, Carl, Elsie, Frances, Norman Scott and Adelia. The eldest, Wilbert, married Miss Hilda Hahn and lives at Independence, Iowa. Charles, the third of the Frye family, married Miss Emma Lamp and lives at Seattle, Washington. Emma is deceased. Frank F. married Miss Augusta Lamp and lives in Seattle, Washington. They one child, Marion. Louisa and Alfred are deceased; Julia is at home. Elizabeth M. became the wife of H. C. Lage, of Davenport. The youngest died in infancy.
Not only was Mr. Frye one of the prosperous farmers of Scott county, but he was also intimately connected with its public life and prominent in such enterprises as were calculated to develop the interests and promote the welfare of the community in which he lived. He served as county supervisor for a considerable period and was a school director. He assisted in the organization of the German Fire Insurance Company of Scott county, of which he was treasurer for a number of years, and was a member of the German Pioneer Association. In 1889 he retired from active life and removed to Davenport, where the last years of his life were past (sic) in comfort and with the knowledge that the past had been well spent.

Transcribed by Elaine Rathmann


Henry Sindt Biography

From "History of Davenport and Scott County" Vol. II by Harry E. Downer-S. J. Clarke Publishing Co. 1910 Chicago.

Surnames: Sindt, Weisi, Baldt, Klindt, Lage, Meyer, Croft, Kroft.

Few men have won a more marked success from years of persistent cultivation of the soil than has Henry Sindt, who owns two hundred and forty acres of fine farm land in Hickory Grove township but has now retired from active life and lives in Davenport. He was born in Holstein Germany, March 29, 1821, a son of Hans and Anna Sindt. He received his education in the public schools of his native land and when he reached manhood rendered the military service exacted of all German born males. He served in the Holstein war with Denmark and at the expiration of his period of enlistment he came to the United States.
It was in 1851 that Mr. Sindt landed at New Orleans, where he took a boat upon the Mississippi river to St. Louis. There he remained tow days and then reembarked upon the river and came to Davenport. Twelve weeks had elapsed from the time he left the old country until he reached his destination. Upon his arrival here he secured work as a farm laborer, but after a little experience he decided to rent land and himself obtain the compensation for his own toil. He was industrious and thrifty besides being ambitious, and in 1856 he was able to buy one hundred and sixty acres of prairie land in Hickory Grove township. He built a house thereon, to which he brought his wife, and it remained his home until 1894, when he retired from the active pursuits of farming. In the course of years, however, he had invested heavily in land until he owned three hundred and twenty acres at one time. Fifteen years ago he bought the excellent town property where he now makes his home and has since !
lived in the enjoyment of a well earned rest.
Shortly after his arrival in this country Mr. Sindt was united in marriage to Miss Bertha Weisi, June 26, 1852. She, like her husband, is a native of Holstein, Germany, where she was born in January, 1823. Seven children were born to them. Johannes, who is living in Lyon county, Iowa, married Katie Klindt, and they have three children: Hugo, Theodore, and Carolina. Heinrich, also a resident of Lyon county, married Miss Augusta Baldt, and they have four children: Hugo, Herbert, Amanda and Malona. Celia became the wife of Henry Klindt, of Scott county, and they have three children: Albert, Meta and Henry. Emma is the wife of Henry Lage, and they have seven children: Theodore, Laura, Mary, Hattie, Anna, Emma, and Lura. Alvina is the wife of Theodore Meyer, of Hickory Grove township, and has become the mother of six children: Emil, Alma, Grover, Martha, Frank and Stella. Edward, a farmer of Hickory Grove township, wedded Miss Bertha Croft, and they have three children. Gustave, residing in California, married Miss Helena Kroft, and they have two daughters.
In the half century or more of his residence in Scott county, Mr. Sindt took an active part in local affairs, serving as school director and road supervisor for long periods. He was faithful in the performance of his duties and gained the good will of his fellow citizens.

Transcribed by Elaine Rathmann


John H. Mohr Biography

From "History of Davenport and Scott County" Vol. II by Harry E. Downer-S. J. Clarke Publishing Co. 1910 Chicago.

Surnames: Mohr, Dau, Petersen, Boge, Fellner, Arp, Hagedorn, Schroder, Emeis, Rauch.

John H. Mohr, who since 1894 has lived retired in Davenport, is one of the oldest German-American settlers of this county and a valued member of the German Pioneers Association. For many years he was actively and successfully identified with general agricultural pursuits and is still the owner of four hundred acres of fine farming land in Sheridan and Lincoln townships as well as some town property. He was born in Holstein Germany, on the 26th of December, 1828, his parents being Paul and Katherine Mohr, who spent their entire lives in the fatherland.
John H. Mohr obtained his education in the schools of his native land and there also learned the carpenter's trade. He served as a soldier from 1848 until 1850, loyally defending the interests of his country in the war with Denmark. In the year 1852, influenced by the many favorable reports which he had heard concerning the advantages of the new world, he crossed the Atlantic to the United States, landing at New Orleans. Thence he made his way up the Mississippi river to Davenport, Iowa, and here worked at his trade for about six years, assisting in the erection of many residences, a large number of which are still standing. About 1858 he turned his attention to general agricultural pursuits, purchasing a partly improved farm of eighty acres in Lincoln township, on which he made his home for five years. On the expiration of that period he disposed of the property and bought another tract of one hundred an sixty-five acres in Lincoln township, erecting thereon a new residence as well as well as all necessary barns and outbuildings for the shelter of grain and stock. As time passed he brought the place under a high state of cultivation and improvement and there continued to carry on his agricultural interests until he put aside the active work of the fields and took up his abode in Davenport in 1894. As his financial resources increased, owing to his well directed labor and capable management, he added to his landed holdings, purchasing a tract of one hundred and ten acres atone time and later a farm of three hundred and eighty acres. He has sold a portion of his land to his sons but still retains possession of four hundred acres in Sheridan and Lincoln townships. Having eventually won a handsome competence through his labors as an agriculturist, he retired from active life and for the past fifteen years has lived in Davenport, enjoying in well earned ease the fruits of his former toil. He is a stockholder in the Iowa National Bank and the Davenport Grain & Malting Company and is widely recognized as a most respected and substantial citizen.
On the 10th of September, 1853, Mr. Mohr was united in marriage to Miss Catherine Dau, whose parents died in Germany and who came to the United States when nineteen years of age. Mr. and Mrs. Mohr reared a family of ten children, the record of whom is as follows: Amelia, the eldest, gave her hand in marriage to Fritz Petersen, of Avoca, Iowa, by whom she has five children: Katie, Elsie, Carl, Paula and Leona. Henry, living in Sheridan township, married Miss Laura Boge, by whom he has five children: Wilma, Alice, Jessie, Robert and Anna. Gustavus, likewise a resident of Sheridan township, married Miss Emma Fellner and has three children: Martha, Alfreda and Herbert. Anna Mohr, the next in order of birth, is deceased. William, who makes his home in Sheridan township, wedded Miss Minnie Arp and has four children: Anna, Alphonse, Elmer and Wilbert. Adolph, living in Lincoln township married Miss Laura Hagedorn and now has four children: John, Selma, Ralph and Edna. Catherine became the wife of Henry Schroder, of Lincoln township, and is now the mother of four children: Hattie, Harry, Edwin, and Mabel. Emma, who gave her hand in marriage to C. M. Emeis, resides with her father. Emil wedded Miss Elizabeth Rauch, of Lincoln township, and has three children: Leona, Norma and Frances. Herman Mohr has passed away.
In his political views Mr. Mohr is a stalwart democrat, and for two years he capably served in the office of township trustee. Fraternally he is identified with the Independent Order of Odd Fellows. He has never had occasion to regret his determination to seek a home in the new world and has gradually worked his way upward, enjoying the advantages offered in this country, which is unhampered by caste or class. He has now reached the venerable age of eighty-one years and, having made his home in Scott county for fifty-seven years, has an extensive circle of friends here who give him their unqualified regard and esteem.

Transcribed by Elaine Rathmann


Jacob Hugh Harrison Biography

From "History of Davenport and Scott County" Vol. II by Harry E. Downer-S. J. Clarke Publishing Co. 1910 Chicago.

The business progress of Davenport has not been conserved by one or two individuals but has resulted from the combined efforts of a large number of business men whose activity has been the source of the city's commercial advancement and improvement. In this connection Jacob Hugh Harrison deserves more than passing notice, for to the time of his death he was recognized as one of the foremost representatives of mercantile interests in Davenport. He was born in Carrollton, Kentucky, December 25, 1840, and was a son of William Henry Harrison, a cousin of President Harrison of the same name. The father was a native of Prince William county, Virginia, born in 1810. He had two brothers, Benjamin Franklin and George Washington Harrison, and they were sons of John and Elizabeth (Harris) Harrison, the latter a daughter of John Harris and the former a son of Obadiah Harrison, a native of Virginia. William Henry Harrison, reared and educated in the south, was married to Miss Eleanor Moore Mimich, a daughter of Richard and Sarah (Lester) Mimich and a granddaughter of John and Elizabeth Mimich, who were natives of Maryland. It will thus be seen that Jacob H. Harrison was a representative of some of the oldest southern families. He was one of ten children, five of whom reached years of maturity, namely: Mary; Richard; Mrs. Sarah Hayden; Jacob; and Charles Emery, who is living in Davenport.
When he was thirteen years of age and still attending school Jacob Hugh Harrison entered the drug store of his uncle at Carrollton, Kentucky, and under his direction thoroughly learned the business. His educational opportunities were those afforded by the schools and academy of his native city. All through life, however, he remained a student and broad reader and accumulated a large and valuable library, with the contents of which he was thoroughly familiar. The business pursuit to which he was reared he made his life work. In 1861 he and his brother Richard purchased the business of their deceased uncle and conducted the store until the following year, when Richard Harrison died. The subject of this review then carried on the business alone until 1867, when he disposed of his interests in Kentucky and came to Davenport. Here he at once became engaged in the retail drug business, becoming at first connected with the firm of Harrison & Stark, while later he was senior partner of the firm of Harrison & Holman. The latter firm was located in the Hill block at the corner of Third and Brady streets, but hits was destroyed by fire on the night of February 22, 1876. In the fall of 1878 Mr. Harrison again established a business, which under the name of Harrison's Pharmacy was for fourteen years located at No. 305 Brady street. He then removed to No. 312 Brady street, where he remained for eight years, or until the time of his retirement from active mercantile life, disposing of his store to L. P. Carstens in January, 1901. Soon after Mr. Harrison and Mr. Holman established their store on Brady street, following the fire, Mr. Harrison admitted his brother Charles to a partnership I the business. They afterward had a store erected purposely for them near the site on which the business is still carried on, and later Mr. Harrison built a store which is still utilized for the business. Altogether he established six different stores, which he continued to own and manage until his death. For forty years he had been closely associated with the drug trade as proprietor, and even prior to that time had been an employe in that field of labor. He enjoyed the reputation of being the most competent druggist in the state of Iowa, having intimate knowledge of all the drugs and medicinal remedies which he handled, knowing fully their properties ad the results which might be attained by their use.
On the 16th of May, 1865, Mr. Harrison was united in marriage to Miss Frances Elizabeth McCallister, who was born in Cincinnati, Ohio, and was a daughter of Dr. William R. McCallister, formerly a physician of Troy, Tennessee, now deceased. The McCallisters were of Scotch lineage. The marriage of Mr. and Mrs. Harrison took place at Carrollton, Kentucky, and was the first Protestant church wedding celebrated in that town. Her paternal grandfather, Dr. Charles McCallister, married Frances Elizabeth Sims Reader, whose uncle was the author of the Sims Theory, while her great-uncle was the father-in-law of President Harrison. Mrs. Harrison was born in Cincinnati but was reared in Tennessee. By her marriage she became the mother of nine children: Minnie Ingaloe, who was born February 26, 1866, is now the wife of Oscar P. Judd, of Reno, Nevada, Mary Eleanor, who was born May11, 1868, is the wife of W. H. Snyder, of Davenport; Cora Sims, who was born July 21, 1870, is the wife of George H. Schaffer, of Fort Madison, Iowa; William Henry, who was born March 1, 1872, died when only two weeks old; Juliana was born April 26, 1873; Sarah Hayden was born September 3, 1875; Edward Reader was born July 14, 1879; Wilfred Hugh and Frances Elizabeth, twins, were born July 1, 1882. The former wedded Miss Mary Gibbons, of St. Paul, and the latter is the wife of Bert G. Powell. There are now five grandchildren in the family. Mr. Harrison was a man of considerable literary ability and was the author of a number of poems of more than ordinary merit. His reading covered a wide range and made him well informed concerning a variety of subjects. At the time of his marriage he joined the Methodist church and remained a consistent representative thereof until his death, his earnest Christian faith being the permeating influence in an honorable, upright life. His public spirit was manifest in his active support of many measures for the public good and Davenport gained a valuable citizen when he established his home within her borders.

Transcribed by Elaine Rathmann


Captain H. B. Doolittle Biography

From "History of Davenport and Scott County" Vol. II by Harry E. Downer-S. J. Clarke Publishing Co. 1910 Chicago.

Surnames: Doolittle, Twombly, Goodwin, Faulkner, Hibbetts, Highley, Murray, McMurray.

Captain H. B. Doolittle, who was for a long period one of the postmen of Davenport, died in Marshalltown, Iowa, August 12, 1896, when he was fifty-six years of age. He had been a resident of Scott county since 1857, and took part in the great development of this section of Iowa. From the time of his advent until the outbreak of the Civil war he was a clerk in a crockery store in Davenport, but at the first call for troops which was sent through the country he enlisted in Company C, Second Iowa Volunteer Infantry. From the very first he was always in the thickest of the fight and with his regiment participated in many of the more important engagements. It was the battle of Fort Donelson, however, that left the strongest impress upon his memory. In that memorable struggle he held a position in the front rank of his regiment and when one of his comrades was struck with a Confederate bullet he seized the flag from him and was in the act of carrying it over the breastworks of the enemy when he, too, was wounded twice and had to be carried from the field of battle. Captain Thomas Twombly, who was beside him, thereupon seized the flag and carried it on. As soon as his wounds were healed he rejoined his company, of which he was now captain, and on more than one occasion distinguished himself for his bravery. He knew no fear in the face of duty. When the war was brought to a close Captain Doolittle returned to Davenport, where he secured a position as postman on the mail delivery force. For thirty years he was known to the citizens of this city until 1895, when he was compelled to give up his work.
In his early manhood Captain Doolittle married Miss Rebecca Goodwin. Her father Hiram Goodwin, was born in Hamilton county, Ohio, September 22, 1819, and was a son of James and Nancy (Faulkner) Goodwin. Early in the 40's he came to Scott county, locating upon a farm in Lincoln township, on which he lived until 1897. During that period, he also gained some experience as a pilot on the Mississippi river. When he came here the land he secured had not been cultivated so that he had to break it as well as prepare it for cultivation, and the buildings which adorned it in later years were the results of his own labors. The tract comprised one hundred and twenty-seven acres and from it Mr. Goodwin derived a handsome income that enabled him to give his family every comfort and start his children well in life. He was married June 14, 1842, to Miss Delilah Hibbetts, a native of Knox county, Pennsylvania, and they had nine children: Mrs. Emily Highley, Alonzo L., Mrs. Theodica Murray, Mrs. Melissa McMurray, Thomas, Theodore W., Rebecca, Hiram P. and Orville F. Unto Captain and Mrs. Doolittle was born one daughter, Gertrude A., who is living with her mother in Davenport. They are members of the Baptist church, to which the Captain also belonged, and fraternally he was identified with the Grand Army of the Republic and the Masonic order. In politics he was a republican. He was one of those men who lived quietly but in strict accordance with the highest principles of manhood and whose every act was marked by that nobility which springs from a large and broad mind.

Transcribed by Elaine Rathmann


Captain De Forrest Dorrance Biography

From "History of Davenport and Scott County" Vol. II by Harry E. Downer-S. J. Clarke Publishing Co. 1910 Chicago.

Surnames: Dorrance, Clarke, Lancaster, Spinsby.

Princeton numbers Captain De Forrest Dorrance as one of her representative and valued citizens. Throughout almost his entire business life he has given his attention to river navigation. He was born in Rock Island county, Illinois, October 5, 1843, and comes of an old New England family in both the paternal and maternal lines. His father, Pascal Dorrance, was a native of Rhode Island and died when his son De Forrest was a lad of only eleven years. The mother, who bore the maiden name of Betsey Clarke, was born in Massachusetts and passed to her final rest when the Captain was a youth of seventeen years. Two sons of the family were soldiers in the Civil war.
As his name indicates Captain Dorrance is of Irish lineage. He acquired his education in the district schools and throughout his life has remained in the Mississippi valley. His proximity to the water made it a logical sequence that he should be interested in navigation and from his youth his life has been that of a mariner, covering a long service as pilot and as captain on the Mississippi. He has commanded a vessel since 1864 and now stands at the head of his calling. He has owned several steamboats on the river. There is in this locality no man more thoroughly versed upon marine affairs nor more widely or favorably known as a representative of shipping interests on the Mississippi.
Captain Dorrance was married on Thanksgiving day, when twenty-four years of age to Miss Eliza Lancaster, a daughter of Henthorn Lancaster. Two children were born of his marriage: Hushel, who wedded Miss Lila Smith and has one child, named for his father; and Irene, who became the wife of Isaac Spinsby. They have eight children: D. F., Thelma, John, Court, George, Blanche, Ruth and Pauline.
Captain Dorrance was for twenty years a member of the Independent Order of Odd Fellows but does not keep up active connection with the lodge at the present time. In his political views he is an earnest republican but has never aspired to office. His time and attention have been fully given to his business affairs, and as the years have worn on he has gained a wide acquaintance and won the esteem of all with whom he has come in contact through his courtesy and business reliability.

Transcribed by Elaine Rathmann


Edward J. Dougherty Biography

From "History of Davenport and Scott County" Vol. II by Harry E. Downer-S. J. Clarke Publishing Co. 1910 Chicago.

Surnames: Dougherty, Glynn.

In the development of the natural resources of Iowa and in the promotion of business interests which have had much to do with the upbuilding and advancement of Davenport and the state at large, Edward J. Dougherty took active and prominent part and came to be recognized as most influential in the promotion of business interests, as a leader in financial circles and as a promoter of various mining projects. The extent and importance of his work well entitled him to rank with the representative residents of this city. Mr. Dougherty was born in County Tipperary, Ireland, March 17, 1846, a son of William Dougherty, who in 1851 bade adieu to the Emerald isle and with his family sailed for the new world. Becoming a resident of Davenport, he started the first brickyard in this city. Two years later later he established his family upon a farm on the Utica road and there Edward J. Dougherty remained until twenty-six years of age, his youthful experiences being those that usually fall to the lot of the farm lad. He acquired his education in the public schools and through the summer months worked in the fields.

Two years before leaving the old homestead Edward J. Dougherty was married to Miss Alice E. Glynn, whose father was a prominent farmer of Lone Grove. After leaving the old home place Mr. Dougherty and his family resided on a farm in Sheridan township until 1888, when he purchased the old Brownlie farm on Brady street. There he made his home until he removed to this city and took up his residence in the old Dr. J. L. Reed homestead at No. 1504 Main street. He was one of the organizers of the Farmers & Mechanics Savings Bank and at the time of his death was a director and the chairman of the executive committee of the bank. The extent and variety of his business interests and connections made him one of the most prominent residents of Scott county. His labors contributed in large and substantial measure to public progress and improvement and he well deserves mention with those who have been the real upbuilders of this section of the state. He promoted the Davenport and Southern Railroad and was its first president, continuing in that office until his demise. He promoted and financed the Guaranty Mutual Life Insurance Company, becoming one of its directors, and was chairman of its executive committee. He was also the president of the Scott County Coal Mining Company, the president of Schick's Express & Storage Company, president of the Silvis Coal Mining Company of Carbon Cliff, Illinois, and a director of the Norris Coal Mining Company. As his financial resources increased he made extensive investment in realty and became one of the largest landowners of the county, holding title to twelve hundred and thirty acres in Princeton township, one hundred and sixty-two acres in Butler township, two hundred acres in Sheridan township and one hundred and sixty acres in Lincoln township. He also had extensive holdings in the Dakotas and Nebraska, together with much real estate in Davenport. Whatever he undertook he carried forward to successful completion and his business affairs were ever of a constructive nature, contributing to the general growth and prosperity of the community. He was a man of strong character, of domestic virtues and of moral and religious spirit. He was widely known as an efficient public official, serving for several terms as supervisor during his residence in Sheridan township. In religious faith he was a Catholic and gave generously to the support of the church and its charities. He stood as a splendid example of the type of self-made man. Reared in the growing west, he saw and improved the advantages which Iowa afforded her citizens and in the establishment and conduct of important business interests he became recognized as one of the foremost men of Scott county, his labors being of far-reaching and beneficial effect in relation to public welfare and at the same time constituting a source of substantial individual profit.

Transcribed by Cathy Joynt Labath


Caspar Fries Biography

From "History of Davenport and Scott County" Vol. II by Harry E. Downer-S. J. Clarke Publishing Co. 1910 Chicago.

Surnames: Fries, Bartmeier, Zweihoff, Conklin, Lock, Brumm, Sutton, Conklin, Harman, Fulcher, Ellinghouse.

Among the business men whose years of well directed activity and enterprise have brought them success, enabling them now to live retired, is numbered Caspar Fries, and his record is an interesting one inasmuch as it is that of a self-made man who owes his success entirely to his own labors. As the architect of his fortunes he has builded wisely and well and has always enjoyed the full confidence and esteem of those with whom business and social relations have brought him in contact.
Mr. Fries was born in Prussia, January 1, 1833, and is a son of Peter and Savilla Fries, who spent their entire lives in that land. The father was a blacksmith and wagon maker in Prussia and served for three years in the army.
Spending his youthful days in his parents home, Caspar Fries attended the public schools of Prussia and afterward learned the trade of wagon making and blacksmithing under the direction of his father in the village of Bevengen. Comparison of the business opportunities of the new and the old world led him to the belief that he would more readily win success on the western side of the Atlantic and so he made preparations to leave his native country and in 1862 landed at New York. From the metropolis he proceeded direct to Buffalo, New York, where he remained for seven months, working for one month at his trade and then for six months as a farm hand. On the expiration of that period he removed to Kenosha, Wisconsin, where he was employed for three months, after which he went to St. Louis, where he worked at his trade, continuing in the employ of others for a year, after which he started in business on his own account on Fifteenth street, at the corner of Harrison, and there remained for four years. He then came to his present place at the corner of Locust and Harrison, intervening years. As a wagon maker and blacksmith he has done a good business. His workmanship has been characterized by thoroughness, his business dealings by honesty, and as the years have passed he has enjoyed a liberal patronage that enables him now in his later years to largely live retired.
While in St. Louis Mr. Fries was married on the 28th of July, 1864, to Miss Elizabeth Bartmeier, the wedding ceremony being performed by Father Liborius Zweihoff. Mrs. Fries was born in Prussia, November 20, 1843, a daughter of Frederick and Elizabeth Bartmeier. She came to the United States with her mother in 1860, her father having previously crossed the Atlantic. They landed at New Orleans in October, 1861, and lived for a time in the south but afterward made their way northward to St. Louis. Subsequently they became residents of Davenport, where both Mr. and Mrs. Bartmeier continued to make their home until called to their final rest. Unto Mr. and Mrs. Fries have been born eleven children: Elizabeth, the eldest, is the wife of John Conklin, of Davenport, and they have eight children-George, Caspar, Joseph, Eva, Antoinette, Leo, Bernice, and Bernard; Mary is the wife of Rufus Lock, of Arkansas, and they have one child, Bessie, Sophia is at home; John, who with his brother Peter carries on their father's shop, married Anna Brumm and they have three children-Elsie, Raymond and Edward; Lucy is the wife of Charles Sutton of Davenport and they have one daughter, Lillian; Joseph, now of Chicago, married Loretta Conklin; Peter wedded Katherine Harman and they have five children-Dorothy, Harold, Lester, Helen and Lucile; Anthony, living in Davenport, married Mabel Fulcher and they have three children-Evelyn, Ruby and Althea; Theresa is the wife of George Ellinghouse, of Bellevue, Iowa, and they have one child, Margaret; Frederick and Theodore both died in childhood.
Mr. Fries and his family are members of the German Catholic church. He is thoroughly a self-made man, for whatever of success he has achieved is attributable to his own efforts and he has won his prosperity by diligence, unremitting industry and honorable dealings.

Transcribed by Elaine Rathmann


Robert Krause Biography

From "History of Davenport and Scott County" Vol. II by Harry E. Downer-S. J. Clarke Publishing Co. 1910 Chicago.

Surnames: Krause, Osthaus, Steinhelber, Karlowa, Best.

The activities of today become the history of tomorrow, and thus it is that the name of Robert Krause is enrolled among those who have left their impress upon the annals of Davenport through the part which they have taken in developing the industrial, commercial and financial projects of the city. Progressive in business, his initiative spirit and constructive measures enable d him to establish one of Davenport's leading industries in founding and promoting the Krause Shirt Company. He came to be known, moreover, in financial circles as vie president of the Citizens Savings Bank, and he belonged to that class of men who have proven the value of the German element in our American citizenship. He was born in Walkenreid, in the province of Brunswick, Germany November 13, 1834, a son of Conrad Behrend and Francisca (Osthaus) Krause. In the mind of the father the idea of establishing a home in America at length took firm hold. He was a man of culture and education and the belief that the United States would present greater opportunities for his children led him to sever his association with the land of his birth and come with his family to the new world.
Robert Krause was but fourteen years of age at the time of this change of residence. Landing in New York, they proceeded by way of Buffalo to Cleveland, Ohio, and afterward to Mansfield, Ohio, where they lived for about twelve years, and eventually came to Davenport. Robert Krause had begun his education in the schools of the fatherland and continued his studies in Ohio, at length becoming a pupil in Kenyon College, his course there completing his education. Early in life he manifested splendid commercial talent. He came to Davenport with his brother William and identified himself with the interest of the city, at length founding and promoting the Krause Shirt Company, which was and is one of Davenport's leading industries and was carried on by him with entire success. He was one of the promoters of the glucose industry here and later became a factor in financial circles as the vice president of the Citizens Bank, to which he gave the benefit of his services for thirty years. In fact, he was thoroughly identified with many business projects in this city and thus became one of its foremost builders.
On New Year's day of 1860 Mr. Krause was united in marriage to Miss Louis Steinhelber, a daughter of Ezekiel and Wilhelmina Steinhelber, who became pioneer residents of this city and were of great assistance in advising and befriending many of the early German residents of Scott county. Mr. Steinhelber engaged in the real-estate business here, also conducted a hotel, was the owner of the first ice house and also of the first liver stable. Later he invested in farm lands until he became the owner of eight hundred acres in Scott county, upon which he spent the last thirty years of his life, save for a brief period of five and a half months which were passed in California for the benefit of his health. He was practically empty handed when he came to the United States but his carefully directed business efforts and wise investments brought him substantial success, making him one of the men of affluence of the county.
Unto Mr. and Mrs. Krause were born two daughters. Emelia V. is the deceased wife of Paul Karlowa, by whom she had three children, namely: Robert Krause, Carolyn and Clara. The second daughter, Clara L., is the wife of L. P. Best, of Davenport, and has two children, Louis Phillip and Gretchen.
The death of Mr. Krause occurred July 5, 1900. Mrs. Krause still survives and resides at No. 527 West Eighth street. He was a man of genial nature, and though he preferred a home life to clubs and social organizations, he was nevertheless a valued and interested member of the Turner Society and also of the Schuetzen Verein. Long a resident of Davenport, all  who knew him recognized the soundness of his business principles and the value of his activities as factors in the upbuilding of the city. Well descended and well bred, he manifested throughout his life those sterling traits of character which in every land and clime awaken confidence and regard. While he attained a prominent position in commercial and industrial circles, the most envious could not grudge him his success, so worthily was it won and so honorably used.

Transcribed by Elaine Rathmann


Frank J. Schebler Biography

From "History of Davenport and Scott County" Vol. II by Harry E. Downer-S. J. Clarke Publishing Co. 1910 Chicago.

Surnames: Schebler, Cannon, Steffens, Burrows, Weigand, Moss, Hiegel, Rauch, Muellenbeck, Wachter, Siefred Niermann.

The belief that favorable environment and influence area usually factors in success finds no proof in the life history of Frank J. Schebler, whose progress in the business world is attributable entirely to his own efforts. That he has own prosperity is due to the fact that close application unfaltering energy and firm purpose have been the salient features in his life. He was formerly well known as a grain dealer of Scott county but is now living retired in Davenport, enjoying well earned rest. He has passed the seventieth milestone on life's journey, his birth having occurred in Bavaria, Germany, June 7, 1839. His parents were John and Margaret Schebler, the former a baker who learned his trade in Vienna, Austria, and in other European cities, being employed in that way in Paris, Munich, Frankfort, Berlin and other places. The greater part of his life, however, was spent in the fatherland.
Frank J. Schebler attended school in Germany to the age of thirteen years, when he came to the United States, landing at New York city in 1852. After two months passed in Williamsburg, New York. He came west to Davenport with an older brother, John, and sister, Mary. The brother had just completed a term of service in the Bavarian army and at the time of the Civil war in this country he joined the Forty-fourth Illinois Infantry as a musician, being thus connected with the regiment for a year. He afterward served for three years in the Twentieth Iowa Infantry and was thus with the army throughout the period of hostilities between the north and the south. After arriving in Davenport Frank J. Schebler attended school for one winter and then started out to earn his own living, securing employment in John Cannon's sawmill. He afterward worked in different places until 1859, and all the time was actuated by the laudable ambition of one day engaging in business on his own account.!
 At length this course was made possible by his economy and industry. He had first become identified with the grain business, however, as an employe of August Steffens, but later he was employed by James D. Burrows until 1868. From that time until 1901 he was connected with the Davenport Elevator Company but in May of the latter year he opened a feed store on Ripley street in Davenport, of which he is still the owner, although the business is now being carried on by his son Lewis on account of the illness of the father.
Having arrived at years of maturity, Frank J. Schebler was married to Miss Katherine E. Weigand, a daughter of Adam and Magdalena Weigand, who were among the early settlers of Davenport, coming in April, 1843, from Indiana, February 24, 1842, while her parents were natives of Hessen, Germany. Her father was one of the first aldermen of Davenport, serving in 1850. From the time of his arrival in the new world until his death he continued his residence in the city where he conducted his business as a butcher and teamster. He was born in 1811 and passed away at the age of seventy-one years, while his wife, who was born August 15, 1809, died on the 30th of January, 1892. The marriage of Mr. and Mrs. Schebler was celebrated April 17, 1860, the wedding ceremony being performed by Father Niermann, the old Catholic priest who is still here and in the old stone church. Unto Mr. and Mrs. Schebler have been born twelve children. The eldest, Agnes, is now deceased. Frank J. C., who is engaged in the confectionery business in Davenport, married Catherine Moss and they have seven children: Celia, Vincent, Carl, Paul, Antone, Angela and Frank. Bernhard, the third, has passed away. Agnes M. is the wife of Aloysius Hiegel and they have nine children: Josephine, Antone, Clara, Marie, Frank, Leo, Agnes, Christina and Gertrude. Joseph A., of Davenport, married Katie Wachter and they had five children: Clara; Eugene, deceased; Agnes; Aloysius; and Bernadine. Theodore, of this city, married Rosie Siefred and their children are Margaret, Lena, Arthur, Theodore, Lawrence and Rose M. Albert, the next of the family, is at home. Julius died at the age of twenty-eight years. Lewis is also still under the parental roof; George died when seven months old, while Charles, the youngest, was nine years old at the time of his demise.
Frank J. Schebler is a member of the Catholic church and of the St. Joseph's Benevolent Society. With one exception he is the oldest communicant of the Catholic faith in Davenport and Father Niermann not only officiated at his marriage but has also baptized and married all of his children and grandchildren and conducted the burial services of his parents, who arrived in this city in 1858. He was instrumental in securing the services of Father Niermann for the Catholics of Davenport in 1857 and has been numbered among his parishioners since that day. Both Mr. and Mrs. Schebler have spent nearly their entire lives in Davenport and have occupied their present home for half a century. He began building the house in 1858, erecting at first but two rooms, but now it is a comfortable residence of nine rooms. He has lived to witness many changes here, seeing the city grow from a small town into one of the important commercial centers of the Mississippi valley, and at all times he has rejoiced in what has been accomplished and has borne his full part in the work of general progress and improvement.

Transcribed by Elaine Rathmann


Charles L. Schiele Biography

From "History of Davenport and Scott County" Vol. II by Harry E. Downer-S. J. Clarke Publishing Co. 1910 Chicago.

Surnames: Schiele, Waltenburg, Barneck, Clawson, Carl.

The fourteen hundred acres of excellent farm land in Cedar county, Iowa, and the fine town residence on Main street, Davenport, are an indication of the success which attended the agricultural operations of Charles L. Schiele. He has been closely identified with the public affairs and although America is but the country of his adoption, he was one of those who offered his life in support of the Union during the years of the great struggle between the north and south.
Mr. Schiele was born in Prussia Germany, December 16, 1840, a son of Carl and Wilhelmina (Waltenburg) Shiele. The father, who was born in 1811, served in the German army and followed the baker's trade in his native land. In 1854 he started upon his journey to the United States with his family, disembarking at New Orleans. They traveled up the Mississippi river to Davenport, where they landed June 20, 1854, and then went to Muscatine county, Iowa, almost immediately for Mr. Schiele had friends there who persuaded him to buy eighty acres of timber land. With the help of his sons he built thereon a log cabin, which remained the family home for several years. Later he bought eighty acres more and again eighty acres in the same township, upon which he lived until his death in 1887. After his demise the mother lived with her son Otto until her death in 1907 when she was ninety-four years of age. They were the parents of five children: Charles L.; Frederick, deceased; Wilhelmina, deceased; Julius, who lives on the old homestead in Montpelier township, Muscatine county; and Otto, who lives near Durant in Cedar county.
Charles L. Schiele attended the public schools of Germany before the family came to this country. Being but fourteen years of age, however, at the time of their arrival, he was enrolled as a pupil in the public schools of Muscatine county, but during the progress of the Civil war he decided to join the forces of the north. Accordingly, in the fall of 1864, he enlisted in Company C, Second Tennessee Infantry, at St. Louis, Missouri, whence he went to Nashville, Tennessee, participating in the famous battle there. Then he went to Franklin Crossroads, where he became infected with typhoid fever and was sent back to the hospital at Nashville. He remained there several months and having recovered, was discharged May 10, 1865. Thereupon he retuned to his home, where he remained until 1869.
In the meantime, Mr. Schiele and his brother rented one hundred and sixty acres of land from their father, which they operated until about 1867, when Mr. Schiele bought a wild tract of equal area in Farmington township, cedar county. The year 1868 he spent in breaking it and preparing it for cultivation, and in 1869 he married, built a house upon his land and took up his residence there. It remained his home of  thirty-six years, but in the meantime, as the result of his unceasing labor and his economy, he had accumulated the fourteen hundred acres which he still owns. While this is the record of the success he gained in his private life it affords no indication of the respect and confidence he has won from his fellow citizens, who have witnessed his advancement. They elected him on the democratic ticket as county supervisor and assessor and he also served as justice of the peace for sixteen years. After his removal to Davenport in the spring of 1907, he was elected trustee!
 of the city, holding the position to the present.
On the 1st of June, 1869, Mr. Schiele wedded Miss Elizabeth Barneck, who was born in Germany and is a daughter of Moritz and Elizabeth Barneck, of Muscatine county. They have become the parents of six children. Charles, the eldest, married Emma Miller and lives in Cedar county. They have two children, Carl and Helen. Gustavus, who lives upon the old home place in Cedar county, married Bertha Clawson and they have three sons, Otto, Richard and John. Morris resides in Chicago, Illinois. Richard is deceased. Rudolph married Stella Carl and lives in Cedar county. Clara E. lives with her parents.
Faithful in the performance of his duties and endowed with the noble qualities of honesty integrity, Mr. Schiele deserves the high regard in which he is held by those with whom he has come in contact. His success in his vocation redounds to the agricultural prosperity of the state of Iowa, while his life record is a high tribute to the citizenship of Davenport.

Transcribed by Elaine Rathmann


Allen R. Boudinot Biography

From "History of Davenport and Scott County" Vol. II by Harry E. Downer-S. J. Clarke Publishing Co. 1910 Chicago.

Surnames: Boudinot, Waite, Walston.

Allen R. Boudinot, a civil engineer of Davenport, who is also acting as county drainage engineer, has been accorded  gratifying patronage in this connection in recognition of his superior ability and knowledge. He birth occurred in Marion county, Iowa, his parents being H. Raymond and Ella J. Boudinot. He attended the schools of his native county but most of his education was obtained in the city of his adoption, where he located at the age of ten years. After attending the Davenport high school he became enrolled as a student in the Iowa State College at Ames, being graduated therefrom as a civil engineer in the year 1905.
Subsequently Mr. Boudinot spent about two years in Chicago as an employe of the American Bridge Company but on the expiration of that period returned to Davenport and has since practiced his profession here. His rapid and substantial rise in his calling has is attributable to the thoroughness with which he has mastered everything bearing upon the subject of civil engineering, combined with his unwearied industry and his professional integrity.
On the 26th of September, 1906, Mr. Boudinot was united in marriage to Miss Luverna Walston, a daughter of William and Sarah (Waite) Walston, who were numbered among the pioneer settler of Jones county, Iowa. Mr. and Mrs. Boudinot are now the parents of two children, William W. and Donald J.

Transcribed by Elaine Rathmann


Emil N. J. Geisler Biography

From "History of Davenport and Scott County" Vol. II by Harry E. Downer-S. J. Clarke Publishing Co. 1910 Chicago.

Surnames: Geisler, Halkins, Clausen.

In the beautiful semi-tropical and sunny land of southern California Emil N. J. Geisler is now spending the evening of life, but for many years was so closely and prominently associated with the growth and progress of Davenport and of Scott county as to render his history and integral chapter in the annals of this part of the state.
He has passed the eighty-second milestone on life's journey, having been born on the 11th of April, 1828, in Lunden Dithmarschen, Schlesweig-Holstein, Germany in which country his father engaged in teaching. After his confirmation the son completed his studies at a university and then became a private teacher. In 1848 he enlisted for service in the war in which Germany was then involved and served as sergeant until the close of hostilities in 1851. Soon afterward he started for the United States to enjoy the liberties offered in the land of the free. He landed at New Orleans in June, 1852, and then came northward from the Crescent city to Davenport, which was then a small town of comparatively little commercial and industrial importance. He therefore accepted whatever work offered itself and was at different times employed at farming, in clerking and in private teaching.
The years thus passed until 1857, during which time Mr. Geisler saved enough money with which to enter the grocery business on his own account. For seven years he conducted his store with good success, and in 1864 he sold the business and invested in a vineyard in West Davenport. He also gave his attention to the contracting business, building and selling houses, and his efforts as a speculative builder materially increased his financial resources. In 1875 he invested in farm lands and in company with several others laid out the now flourishing town of Marne. In all of his business affairs his efforts were so uniformly and capably directed that prosperity attended him and at the same time his efforts were of a character that promoted the welfare of the community as well as his individual success. In 1904 he removed to Coronado, California, where he now lives.
Aside from business affairs Mr. Geisler was active in many ways whereby Davenport's interests were promoted. He assisted in bringing into existence the German free school and for many years was its president. He was also active in the erection of the Davenport Crematorium and served as its vice president. He became an enthusiastic member of the Academy of Science and his efforts in its behalf largely promoted its interests. He also joined the Turner Society and was ever an influential factor among the German people of this city. He has been made honorary member of various organizations, these societies being proud to have his name upon their membership roll.
Mr. Geisler was married in Davenport on the 24th of December, 1855, to Miss Sophia Halkins, and in 1905 they celebrated their golden wedding in Coronado, California, their family, at that time consisting of a daughter and grand daughter, being present. Of their four children, two died in infancy, while one daughter, Adele, who became the wife of Otto Clausen, died in 1886. Mr. Geisler makes his home with his other daughter, Mrs. J. Clausen, his wife having passed away on the 15th of March, 1908.
While now eighty-two years of age Mr. Geisler possesses uncommon vigor and activity for one of his years and in 1909 he made a trip to his old home in Germany, traveling all alone. Throughout his life he has been a man of friendly spirit, of hospitable disposition, and has ever looked upon the bright side, and because of his sterling qualities of manhood as well as his business activity and public spirit, he has won a host of friends who entertain for him the highest honor and respect.

Transcribed by Elaine Rathmann


David Clapp Biography

From "History of Davenport and Scott County" Vol. II by Harry E. Downer-S. J. Clarke Publishing Co. 1910 Chicago.

Surnames: Clapp, Bond, Hartzel, Knouse, Stump, Guy, Marti, Drenter, Neil.

The agricultural interests of Scott county find a worthy representative in David J. Clapp, who owns and operates a fine tract of two hundred acres of arable land in Sheridan township, near the village of Eldridge. He is well known in his locality, where he has spent his entire life and is a worthy son of one of the pioneers of this section of the state, for his father, Charles F. Clapp, came to Scott county in 1854. He was born in Fulton county, Illinois, February 28, 1838 , his parents being Spencer and Tilma (Bond) Clapp. The Clapp family came originally from Europe, being established on American soil many years ago by three brothers, from whom all of the name in this country are descended. In 1869 a reunion was held in Massachusetts and it was then discovered that there were more than twelve hundred members of the family here, many of whom left here eastern home and are now numbered among the early settlers of the middle west.
Spencer Clapp, the grandfather of David J. Clapp, and his father, Selah Clapp, came west as far as Ohio in 1820, settling in Portage county, where the latter bought a farm, which is still in the possession of his descendants. There Spencer Clapp grew to manhood, learning the shoemaker's trade, and there he was married and lived until 1837, when he and his wife and his brother-in-law, Seldon Bond, went by wagon to Fulton county, Illinois. There he secured one hundred and sixty acres of government land and Mr. Bond three hundred and twenty, for which they paid one dollar and a quarter an acre. Upon it they built a house, made other improvements and lived until 1839, when Mr. Clapp was called to Ohio by the illness of his father. Upon the latter's death he sold his property in Fulton county, Illinois, and operated the old homestead in Portage county, Ohio, until 1854, when he came to Scott county, Iowa, taking up his residence in Davenport. There, on Locust street near Brady, he built a house, which by the way is still standing, and rented ten acres near where Central Park is now situated, which he planted in corn. The next year he rented forty acres more, agreeing to give Dr. Hall , the landlord, two-fifths of the crops. For the next three years he lived in Davenport, in which time he sold the house he had built first, put up another on a lot he had purchased on Main street, and then traded that for forty acres in Sheridan township. After moving his family to the farm, putting up a house and establishing his home there, it was discovered that the title to the land was defective, and they lost their property.  They kept the house, however, for with thirty-tow yoke of cattle and the assistance of friends and neighbors Mr. Clapp moved it into the road. There he and his family lived for about a year.
Charles F. Clapp, who had accompanied his father upon his several removals married about that time and his first home was that house standing in the middle of the road. He had been able to get two crops from the land before the mortgage was foreclosed. Later, in 1863, he bought forty acres from Mr. Hartzel, built thereon a house, and then as he was drafted into the army he sold his place for twelve hundred dollars. He was not called into service, however, and with his money he bought eighty acres of land in Sheridan township, which is now included in the farm of his son, D. J. Clapp. He engaged in other real-estate transactions, buying finally one hundred and sixty acres of land in Sheridan township, on which he lived until 1896, when he retired from active life. He is now living in Davenport but still retains his interest in agricultural pursuits, as he owns two hundred and forty acres in that township.
On Christmas day, 1860, Mr. Clapp wedded Miss Elizabeth Knouse, who was born near Carlisle, Pennsylvania, January 28, 1842. Her parents were David and Mary (Stump) Knouse, who came to Scott county in 1850. Mr. and Mrs. Clapp have had nine children, namely: Samuel, who is living at Aredale, Iowa, and is the father of six children; Anna, who married L. B. Guy, of Davenport, and has three children; Emma, the deceased wife of George Marti; Bertha, the deceased wife of Milton Drenter; Seldon, who resides in St. Joseph, Missouri, and is the father of two sons; David J. and Charles S., who are twins, the former being mentioned below and the latter living upon the old home place in Sheridan township; Archie, who is a physician of Muscatine, Iowa; ad Nellie, who is living with her parents. Mr. Clapp served as road supervisor and as school director for about ten years, and fraternally is identified with the Ancient Order of United Workmen and with the Modern Woodmen of America. In 1854 he joined the Christian church of Davenport and is now the oldest member of the congregation. He was treasurer of the church for a number of years, and wherever he is known he is respected as a man of sterling integrity and noble life.
David J. Clapp, whose name stands at the head of this review, was born upon the farm whose fields he now cultivates, June 11, 1874, and has spent his entire life in the vicinity of his birthplace. When of suitable age he was enrolled as a pupil of the public schools in Davenport. The following three winters he went to business college, while in the summer he devoted himself to agriculture, which has always been his vocation. He is a young man imbued with progressive ideas, one who knows the value of industry and perseverance, and through the aid of these qualities and a good business judgment he has been able to make his farming profitable. He also owns in conjunction with his brother, Charles S., twenty acres of timberland on the Wapsipinicon river, this county. Mr. Clapp wedded, December 1, 1896, Miss Jennie Neil, a daughter of James Neil and a relative of Chris Marti. The latter is one of the well known citizens of Scott county, and was for a long period identified with !
the agricultural interests of Winfield township. He was a native of Switzerland and was about seven years of age when in 1852 he accompanied his father upon the journey to the new world. At the age of twenty-two he started to make his own way in the world as a farmer, and to this end procured some unimproved land in Sheridan township. He was successful in his undertakings and having rented his farm to his sons, enjoys a well earned rest. He was also a conspicuous figure in the public affairs of this county, for in addition to filling several of the minor offices he was elected to the general assembly at Des Moines, sitting in the twenty-third, twenty-fourth and twenty-sixth sessions, and in the call session summoned by Governor Drake. He received the nomination on the democratic ticket in 1898 for state senator but was not elected. However, the fact he has held the office of secretary of the school board continuously since 1872, is an indication of the confidence the people !
place in him. He is a man of sterling integrity, one who has ever proved true to the trust of his constituents and has ever acted as he believed right.
Mr. and Mrs. Clapp are the parents of one son, Neil, who was born September 12, 1900. Politically Mr. Clapp allies himself with the republican party and has severed the township for the past eight years as a member of the school board. Fraternally he is identified with several organizations. He belongs to the Long Grove lodge of the Independent Order of Odd Fellows and is serving as noble grand, while he is a member of and banker of the camp of the Woodmen of the World of Long Grove. He also belongs to the Modern Brotherhood of America, holding membership in the lodge at Eldridge. He gives his allegiance in religious matters to the Christian church of Long Grove, of which he is a deacon and in the work of which he is very active. Endowed by nature with a strong intellectual force, prompted by a laudable ambition to succeed in his occupation, and unafraid of hard, persevering work, he has already made substantial progress in his life work, and there is every reason for him to look forward to a bright and successful future.

Transcribed by Elaine Rathmann


Hans J. Brockmann

From "History of Davenport and Scott County" Vol. II by Harry E. Downer-S. J. Clarke Publishing Co. 1910 Chicago.

Surnames: Brockmann, Meyer, Hagedorn, Evaldt, Klindt, Lensch,

Hans J. Brockmann has since 1906 been living retired in Eldridge, Iowa, in the enjoyment of the fruits of thirty-five years of agricultural activity. He is a native of Holstein, Germany, his birth having occurred in the town of Louderbeck, December 19, 1843, and is a son of John and Anna Brockmann, the former being a blacksmith by trade. Mr. Brockmann attended the German schools and spent his early manhood in his native land.
In 1872 he with a company of friends, concluded to come to America, accounts of whose marvelous natural resources, equality of rank and general opportunity had been widely circulated in the old country. They landed in New York and eventually came on to Davenport, settling in this locality. Mr. Brockmann secured a position on a farm, which he held for one year. At the end of that time he rented two acres of land and he and his wife lived upon this place of r five years. By the exercise of thrift and economy they were then able to rent a farm of eighty acres and for three years devoted their energies to its cultivation. Then removing to the vicinity of Mount Joy, Scott county, they rented the Meyer farm for four years, after which they took the management of the Christ Hagedorn property in Lincoln township and remained here for eleven years. By this time their patient industry was to be rewarded. They had reached the coveted goal of independence and they bought the present homestead of one hundred and sixty acres, for which they paid twelve thousand two hundred dollars. Here they lived for the ensuing decade, making many improvements and yearly increasing the value of the property. Three years ago Mr. Brockmann relinquished farming and, having built a fine residence in Eldridge, removed there with the idea of making it his permanent home.
In January, 1873, Mr. Brockmann was united in marriage to Miss Lena Evaldt, a native of Germany, her parents having lived and died in the fatherland. Five children have grown up beneath the home roof: Amelia married Lewis Klindt, of Sheridan township, and is the mother of four children, Harry, Amanda, Leona and a baby; Clara married John Lensch, of Sheridan township and has five children, Amanda, Emiel, Leona, Raymond and Edna; Rudolph is a resident of Eldridge; and Meta and Harry are at home.
Mr. Brockmann enjoys the esteem of those who know him, and he served for a number of years as road superintendent while living upon his farm. Iowa undoubtedly owes much of her wealth and progress to her agricultural interests and it is to such men as our subject, self-made, prudent, thrifty and upright, that she is particularly indebted.

Transcribed by Elaine Rathmann


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