Scott Co, Iowa - IAGenWeb Project

BIOGRAPHIES

Jesse Dodds Biography

From "History of Davenport and Scott County" Vol. II by Harry E. Downer-S. J. Clarke Publishing Co. 1910 Chicago.

Surnames: Dodds, Blackman, Kramer, Rackster, Shutter, Voteman.

For the past ten years Jesse Dodds has lived in honorable retirement in a nice home in Davenport, being numbered among the highly respected pioneer settlers of Scott county. He is a native of Butler county, Pennsylvania, born August 4, 1834, of the marriage of James and Ellen (Sproll) Dodds. The father was a tanner by trade and also engaged in farming in the Keystone state.
Jesse Dodds acquired his education in the schools of his native state and was reared there to the age of nineteen, when he sought a home farther west. Coming to Scott county in 1855, he engaged in the livery business in LeClaire, while later he went to Pleasant Valley, where he was employed in a flour mill about seven years. He then spent some time at Pikes Peak, Colorado, but on his return to Davenport took up farming, which he followed throughout the remainder of his business career. He eventually became the owner of one hundred acres of land in Pleasant Valley township, situated on the river road about eight miles east of the city. Mr. Dodds devoted much of his land to the raising of onions and this proved a very successful venture. He also raised considerable stock and devoted some of his time to general farming. About ten years ago he put aside all business cares and purchased residence property in Davenport, to which he removed, and he has since made this his home. He still retains possession of his farming property, which he rents.
Mr. Dodds was married on the 31st of December, 1859, to Miss Ruby Blackman, a daughter of Louis and Jane Blackman. She was born November 27, 1839, and died November 10, 1901. She was a most estimable lady and an active and faithful worker in the work of the Baptist church and Sunday school. Unto Mr. and Mrs. Dodds were born seven children, three daughters and four sons, as follows: Jennie, the wife of Al Kramer and the mother of three children; Harry, who wedded Miss Sarah Rackster, by whom he has eight children; Jessie, the wife of F. S. Shutter and the mother of three children; Fred, who resides at home; Charles; Hattie, the wife of William Voteman; and Louis who has passed away.
A republican in his political belief, Mr. Dodds, formerly took an active part in public affairs. While living on the farm he filled various township offices and the cause of education has ever been one of deep interest to him. He was also connected with the postoffice department at Davenport for seven years but is now living free from all business cares with the exception of looking after the rental of his farm. He thoroughly enjoys home life and takes great pleasure in the society of his family and a friends. He is always courteous and affable and those who know him personally have for him warm regard. His life is exemplary in all respects and he has ever supported those interests which are calculated to uplift and benefit humanity, while his own high moral worth is deserving of highest commendation.

Transcribed by Elaine Rathmann


Captain E. J. Lancaster Biography

From "History of Davenport and Scott County" Vol. II by Harry E. Downer-S. J. Clarke Publishing Co. 1910 Chicago.

Surnames: Lancaster, Smith, Johnson, Abbott, Fedderson, Bissick, Hitchcock.

Captain E. J. Lancaster is one of the best known river men of the upper Mississippi, having sailed as captain on various steamers since 1866. His personal worth and ability in his chosen field of labor has won him high regard and because of his wide acquaintance his history cannot fail to prove of interest to many of the readers of this volume.
He was born in DeKalb county, Illinois, June 23, 1846, a son of Thomas and Cynthia (Smith) Lancaster, the former a native of Ohio and the latter of Pennsylvania. He comes of Scotch, English and of Pennsylvania Dutch ancestry. In his boyhood days he was brought to Scott county and in the district schools here acquired his education. Living near the river, he has always been interested in marine matters and, after starting in business life, became closely connected with the navigation interests of the upper Mississippi. In the meantime he had done valuable service for his country as a soldier of the Union army in the Civil war. He was but seventeen years of age when, on the 15th of August, 1863, he enlisted as a private of Company C, Eight Regiment of Iowa Cavalry, with which he served until honorably discharged at Clinton on the 10th of June, 1865. Being captured while on duty he was incarcerated in the Nashville prison for eight months and was later sent to Andersonville, s!
o that he underwent all of the hardships of southern prison life.
After the close of the war Captain Lancaster was mustered out and with a creditable military record returned to his home in Scott county. Here he has since lived. He at once became connected with navigation interests and has sailed continuously since 1866 as captain. He stands today as one of the foremost representatives of eh calling in this county and has a very wide acquaintance not only among river men but also among the business men who have reason to employ shipping facilities in the transportation of the goods which they may handle.
Captain Lancaster was united in marriage to Miss Helen Johnson, a daughter of John and Olive (Abbott) Johnson Her father died in LeClaire, but her mother is still living and makes her home in that place. Captain Lancaster's family numbers eight children: Nora, the wife of John Fedderson, a resident of LeClaire, by whom she has two children, Eli and Fritz Fedderson; Olive Helen, who was born July 21, 1879, and married W. H. Bissick, of St. Louis, Missouri; Alice M., born November 17, 1882; Edna, who was born February 15, 1886, and married C. B. Hitchcock, of Boone, Iowa; Harry E., born October 16, 1887; Lee L., December 23, 1891; Leona M., August 17, 1894; and Harold, January 4, 1896.
In his political views Captain Lancaster has always been a stalwart republican, believing firmly in the principles of the party which he regards as best calculated to conserve the public welfare. He holds member ship in Snow Lodge, No. 44, A. F. & A. M., at LeClaire, with which he has been identified since 1882, and his life exemplifies many of the beneficent principles of the craft. He deserves much credit for what he has accomplished in a business way for he started on the river as a hand on the rafts. He is now, however, in his twenty-eighth year as captain of the boat Eclipse, and he enjoys the high esteem of all with whom social or business relations have brought him in contact. In matters of citizenship, while not an office seeker, he is as true and loyal to his country in days of peace as he was when he followed the old flag upon southern battlefields.

Transcribed by Elaine Rathmann


William Hamilton Wilson

From "History of Davenport and Scott County" Vol. II by Harry E. Downer-S. J. Clarke Publishing Co. 1910 Chicago.

Surnames: Wilson, Morgan, Griffeth, Grilk, Oliver, Willard,

William Hamilton Wilson, engaged in law practice in Davenport since 1871 and now the senior partner of the firm of Wilson, Grilk & Wilson, is a native of western Pennsylvania. His father, James Wilson, also born in the Keystone state, was of Scotch-Irish descent. He spent his entire life in Pennsylvania, his record covering the years between the 19th of September, 1807 and 1886, in which year he was called to his final rest after long connection with agricultural interests. His wife, who bore the maiden name of Margaret Morgan, was born in Pennsylvania, January 2, 1815, and died July 25, 1873.
William H. Wilson pursued his early education in the schools of western Pennsylvania and afterward attended Washington and Jefferson College at Washington, Pennsylvania, from which institution he was graduated in 1869 with the highest scholarship in a class of forty-nine members. He qualified for the bar in Mercer, Pennsylvania, his reading being directed by the Hon. Samuel Griffeth, and in September, 1871, he was admitted to practice.
Believing that the west offered better opportunities, Mr. Wilson came immediately to Davenport, where he has continuously engaged in practice since November, 1871. He was alone until November 1, 1902, when the firm of Wilson and Grilk was formed and has since existed. In 1905, his son, Charles H., was admitted to a partnership under the firm style of Wilson, Grilk & Wilson. The two younger men are both graduates of Harvard College and of the Harvard Law School. William H. Wilson has from the beginning of his connection with the Davenport bar occupied a conspicuous position as one of the legal practitioners here and it is said of him that "he has probably saved more money to his clients through wise settlement of cases out of court than he has made for them in litigation." As the years have passed he has studiously and carefully and conscientiously increased the talents that were given him. In his practice he has ever been absolutely fair, has never indulged in artifice or concealment and has never dealt in indirect methods.
Mr. Wilson has found time and his success has given him the means to become interested in other matters aside from the law, and he is now financially connected with several of Davenport's important business enterprises. He has been called to the he presidency of the Davenport Loan, Building & Savings Association and is a director and attorney for the Davenport Savings Bank. He is also interested in the E. W. Gates Lumber Company, of Yellow Pine, Alabama.
In 1874 Mr. Wilson was united in marriage to Miss Abbie F. Oliver, of Massachusetts, who in her childhood days came to Davenport with her parents, Albourne and Eliza (Willard) Oliver. The two children of this marriage were Amy and Charles H., but the former, born in 1876 died in 1884.
Mr. Wilson is a member of the Presbyterian church and is much interested in all kinds of charitable work and in everything tending to elevate or ameliorate the condition of the masses. He has never found his happiness in self-centered interests but in those broader lines of life which lead to service for others and at the present time he is actively interested and associated with the Peoples Union Mission. The important economic and sociological questions of the present day find in him a close student and that he is a man of high character and genuine worth is indicated in the fact that he is held in the highest esteem wherever known. In connection with his business history the local press has said: "Application and hard work are the secret of the success which William H. Wilson has attained and surely if constant attention to business and an earnest endeavor for the best interests of his clients is surety of barristerial triumph he has deserved it, as his fellow members of  the bar acknowledge him to have been an indefatigable worker all his life." While he has gained distinction in his in his chosen profession, however, this is but one phase of his life, for his broad humanitarianism is constantly being evidenced in one line or another with the result that many lives are brightened by the sunshine which he sheds around him.

Transcribed by Elaine Rathmann


William R. Weir Biography

From "History of Davenport and Scott County" Vol. II by Harry E. Downer-S. J. Clarke Publishing Co. 1910 Chicago.

Surnames: Weir, Davison.

Prominent among Davenport's business men is William R. Weir, an insurance agent, who was born in Monticello, Iowa, February 14, 1870. In the preceding generation his family is of Canadian stock, both his father and mother having been born in Peterboro, Canada, where they were reared and married. The former was a stone mason and an expert in drilling artesian wells. He came to Iowa in pioneer days and located in Monticello. He died in 1886, but the mother is still living.
William R. Weir was educated in the public schools of Monticello and upon looking over the various callings took up the insurance business, for which his soundness of judgment and ability to inspire confidence particularly fits him. In 1892 widening opportunity brought him to Davenport, and here he engaged in the fire insurance business, in which he has acquired a clientele of flattering proportions. He is the Iowa general agent for both the Maryland Casualty Company and the American Bonding Company. He is also a director of the Union Savings Bank and a leading spirit in the Commercial Club, having served as its president for one year and as director for three. This organization is of a semi-social nature. He has served six years as a member of the board of education and is now its president.
In 1894 Mr. Weir was united in marriage to Miss Jessie Davison, a native of Davenport, her father being Abner Davison, well known in this city. Their home is brightened by the presence of two daughters, Mary D. and Annabel.
That Mr. Weir enjoys unusual popularity among his fellows is no anomaly, since in every relation he is vigorous, whole-souled and magnetic. The confidence in which he is held by the large concerns which he represents is manifest in the fact that he has been entrusted with the jurisdiction of the entire state of Iowa.

Transcribed by Elaine Rathmann


Henry H. Horst Biography

From "History of Davenport and Scott County" Vol. II by Harry E. Downer-S. J. Clarke Publishing Co. 1910 Chicago.

Surnames: Horst, Hahn, Goetch, Maas, Voss, Sueverkrüebbe, Ames.

Henry H. Horst, a prominent and representative agriculturist of Scott county, owns a fine farm of one hundred an seventy-seven and a half acres in Davenport and Sheridan township and devotes his energies to the work of farming and threshing with gratifying results. He was born on the 31st of October, 1867, and the place on which he now resides has been his home from his birth to the present time.
His parents, Claus and Ida (Hahn) Horst, were both natives of Germany, the former being born on the 30th of December, 1819, and the latter on the 20th of February, 1828. Hans and Margaret (Goetch) Horst, the paternal grandparents, both passed away in Germany. Claus Horst, the father of our subject, obtained his education in the schools of his native land and was a young man of twenty-eight when in 1847 he crossed the Atlantic to the United States. After landing at New Orleans he made his way up the Mississippi river as far as St. Louis and there spent the winter. The following spring witnessed his arrival in Scott county, Iowa, and  here he was employed at breaking prairie, etc., receiving a wage of ten dollars per month. In 1850 he was married and purchased a tract of eighty acres of prairie land in Davenport township, which is now in possession of his son Henry and on which he built a small house. As the years passed by he brought the farm under a high state of cultivation and improvement and gradually added to his landed holdings by additional purchase from time to time until at his death he owned five hundred and sixty acres of rich and productive land. In 1880 he went to New York city for medical treatment, as his health had been broken down by his many years of unremitting toil, but died in the eastern metropolis on the 24th of May, 1881. His remains were interred at Davenport, where his widow has made her home since 1889. The latter, a daughter of John and Margaret Hahn, lost her father in 1845. Her mother afterward married again, becoming the wife of Oswald Maas, with whom she came to Scott county in the year 1847. A sketch of Mrs. Ida Horst appears on another page of this volume. She was the mother of six children, as follows: Louisa M., who is the widow of Herman Voss; Adolph J., living in Sheridan township; Theresa A. C., the widow of Henry Horst; Edward N., who is a resident of Sheridan township; Henry H., of this review; and one who died in infancy.
Henry H. Horst acquired his early education in the district schools and later pursued a course of study in the business college at Davenport. Since putting aside his text-books he has devoted his attention to the he work of farming and for the past fifteen years has also been engaged in threshing, meeting with a well merited and creditable measure of success in his undertakings. His home farm comprises one Hundred and seventy-seven and a half acres in Davenport and Sheridan townships and he is likewise the owner of a quarter section of land in Dakota.
On the 25th of February, 1891, Mr. Horst was united in marriage to miss Emily Sueverkrüebbe, a native of Germany and a daughter of Claus and Katherine (Ames) Sueverkrüebbe, who crossed the Atlantic to the United States and took up their abode in Scott county in 1881. The father still survives and is a worthy and respected resident here, but the mother was called to her final rest on the 29th of April, 1904. Unto Mr. and Mrs. Horst have been born five children, namely: Martha, Herbert, Alfred, Elmer and Malinda, all of whom are at home with exception of Malinda who is deceased.
Since age conferred upon him the right of franchise Mr. Horst has given his political allegiance to the men and measures of the republican party. The cause of education has ever found in him a stalwart champion and he has served as president of the school board since 1893. His entire life has been passed in this county, where he is now widely known, and the fact that many of his warmest friends are those with whom he has been acquainted since his boyhood days indicates that his career has always been upright and honorable.

Transcribed by Elaine Rathmann


Frank T. Logan Biography

From "History of Davenport and Scott County" Vol. II by Harry E. Downer-S. J. Clarke Publishing Co. 1910 Chicago.

Surnames: Logan, Pott, Langwith, Thoene, Rowan.

Frank T. Logan, one of the farmers of Buffalo township, whose success in his filed of labor is advancing the sum total prosperity of his locality, was born in Fulton county, Pennsylvania, in 1860. He is a son of Charles T. and Melinda (Pott) Logan, both natives of the Keystone state, the father having been born in Fulton county in 1830, the mother in 1833. In 1866 Charles T. Logan decided to come to Iowa, having been influenced by the report of the fortunes made from cultivating its fertile soil, and after his arrival here purchased the farm in Buffalo township on which his son Frank T. is living today and which remained his home until his death in 1873. He and hid wife were the parents of six children, three sons and three daughters, namely: John P., who is in Oregon; William E., who is in Alaska; Frank K., the subject of hits sketch; Anna M., the wife of E. T. Langwith, of Davenport; Ollie, who married Julius Thoene, of Bonesteel, South Dakota; and Emma C., who is living in Cedar Falls, Iowa, with her mother.
Frank t. Logan was about thirteen years of age when his father died, and, having received a rough education in public schools of the district, decided that he would seek his fortune in the west. In 1879 he enlisted in the Fifth United States Cavalry, at Fort D. A. Russell, Wyoming, and, having served through five years with credit and honor, was discharged in 1884 with the rank of sergeant. He then returned to his home in Buffalo township, this county, and after his marriage rented of his mother the farm on which he had been reared in part and which is now his home. It was not until 1902, however, that it became his possession through purchase. He has increased the cultivation of the soil by using most advanced methods in accordance with the progress of the times, and has since won a gratifying return for his investment of time, thought and labor. Although his life has been passed quietly and unostentatiously, his success has not passed without recognition by his fellow cit!
izens, who, having witnessed the strong qualities of his character, elected him to positions of trust and responsibility. He enjoys their confidence and appreciation, which he regards as of even more value than the substantial success he has won from the prosecution of his labors as a farmer.
When he returned to Buffalo township after his experience in the regular army, Mr. Logan was married in 1885 to Miss Cora E. Rowan, a daughter of C. G. Rowan. They have three children: Charles F., Warden E. and Ruel G., all of whom are at home. The family are members of the Methodist church. Mr. Logan has always given unqualified support to the republican party and on that ticket was elected to the position of assessor of his township, in which capacity he served for eight years. From 1901 to 1907 he was a member of the county board of supervisors. He has also been deeply interested in the schools and for the past twenty-five years has been treasurer of the independent school district, No. 6. He belongs to lodge No. 298, B. P. O. E., of Davenport, and is now past chancellor of Banner Lodge, No. 16, K. P. Among his fraternal brethren, as among the citizens of his township, Mr. Logan is held in the highest esteem.

Transcribed by Elaine Rathmann


L. J. Porstmann, M. D. Biography

From "History of Davenport and Scott County" Vol. II by Harry E. Downer-S. J. Clarke Publishing Co. 1910 Chicago.

Surnames: Porstmann, Stroner, Heckle, Springmeier.

A man of high standing in his profession is Dr. L. J. Porstmann, who for the past few years has made his home in Davenport. He was born April 13, 1865, in Atkinson, Henry county, Illinois, his parents being John and Augusta (Stroner) Porstmann. The father was a mechanic by trade and a well known citizen and land owner, who possessed a farm of one hundred acres, which was regarded as one of the finest agricultural properties in the locality. Upon his retirement he removed to Buffalo, Iowa and lived there until his death, which occurred about seventeen years ago. He was a man of excellent education and most successful in all his relations. His parents were German and never left their native land. The maternal grandfather, John Stroner, made his home in Kansas and after a life of usefulness passed on to his reward at the age of ninety-three.
Dr. Porstmann when a lad attended school in Moline, Illinois, and upon removing to Scott county, at the age of fourteen, resumed his education in the schools of Buffalo, in due time graduating from the high school. Following this he remained upon the farm until his twentieth year and then for the next five years held positions of various kinds in and about Scott county. At the age of twenty-five the idea of joining the regular army took root in his mind and he enlisted in the Seventeenth Regular Infantry, where he served for eighteen months and then purchased his discharge.
AT this juncture Dr. Porstmann made a fortunate step in his decision to prepare for the profession for which he is so well suited and in the practice of which he has found undeniable success. He attended first the Illinois Medical College at Chicago, then removed to St. Louis for the purpose of attending the Barnes University, form which he graduated in 1898 with a record for scholarship of a high order. His first experience as a practitioner was obtained in his old home-Buffalo, Iowa,-where he remained until 1905. His ability eminently fitting him for a larger field of endeavor and he came to Davenport where he gained speedy recognition both among laymen and his professional brethren.
Dr. Porstmann was married June 17, 1903, to Miss Mary A. Springmeier, a daughter of Henry and Catherine (Heckle) Springmeier, and they have two children: Louise Mary and Albert L. The family residence is situated at 2110 Bowditch street. Only through integrity and the display of actual ability could a footing such as Dr. Porstmann's have been established in so short a time.

Transcribed by Elaine Rathmann


F. C. Skinner, M. D.

From "History of Davenport and Scott County" Vol. II by Harry E. Downer-S. J. Clarke Publishing Co. 1910 Chicago.

Surnames: Skinner, Wiggin, Kahlke, Hiddle, Heuring, Jensen, Williams.

Dr. F. C. Skinner, although one of the younger representatives of the medical profession, is demonstrating his ability to handle complex problems in his line and has built up a good general practice in and around Le Claire. He was born in Rock Island, Illinois, may 30, 1873, a son of Almond and Augusta (Wiggin) Skinner. He is a representative of a good old New England family and has in his possession tow old land grants given to the Lees on his mother's side, during the reign of King George III, one dated July 1, 1761, and the other November 8, 1764. The Doctor is a lineal descendant of Captain Mason of Revolutionary fame and has the dagger and powder horn carried by that gentleman during the war for independence.
The Doctor's father was born near Buffalo, New York, and was a painter by trade. At one time he had charge of the paint department for the Rock Island plow factory and painted the first engine that was run west by the Union Pacific Railroad Company. This engine was named Big Chief and the picture which Mr. Skinner painted on the tender of the locomotive was of an Indian chief standing on Council Bluffs. Mr. Skinner made his home in Rock Island for many years and owned the land that is now occupied by Kahlke Brothers as a boatyard. The father died when our subject was but two and a half years old and there were three other children in the family but all are now deceased except our subject. After the after the father's death, the mother, who was a native of Niles, New Hampshire, removed with her family to Rochester, Minnesota, and eventually was married to Louis Hiddle, a druggist of Mackinaw, Illinois, where they still make their home. There is one daughter of this marriage, Maud, now the wife of John Heuring, a resident of Peoria, Illinois.
Dr. Skinner was very young when he was taken by his mother to Rochester, Minnesota, and at the usual age he entered the public schools of that city and before completing his education it was necessary for him to go to school, being employed during the day. In this way, he saved enough money to pursue a college course in Davenport, while later he pursued a classical course at Eureka College, in Eureka, Illinois. In the meantime the medical profession appealed very strongly to him and eh entered the Iowa State Medical College, graduating from that institution on the 28th of March, 1898.
Dr. Skinner spent some time as an employe in a hospital at Iowa City, Iowa, and then opened an office at Port Byron, Illinois. He then came to Le Claire, where he has since been engaged in general practice. Of studious nature, he is ever seeking to advance his knowledge of medicine through reading and investigation and all acknowledge his worth as a practitioner and as a man. For the past nine years he has served as health officer and in this connection is working toward more sanitary conditions.
Dr. Skinner has been married twice. He was first married in 1900 to Miss Grace Jensen, a daughter of Charles Jensen, of Rock Island, Illinois. Her death occurred October 5, 1902, her remains being interred in the Rock Island cemetery. For his second wife the Doctor chose Vergie L. Williams, their marriage being celebrated on the 11th of May 1904. She is a daughter of George and Eva Williams, the former born near Norwich, New York, October 12, 1848, and the latter at McGraw, that state, November 30, 1851. The family settle in Le Claire about 1871, and the father was a fireman on steamboats which plied the Mississippi river, following that business for many years. He is also a charter member of the knights of Pythias lodge of Le Claire and is an influential and highly respected citizen of this community.
Dr. Skinner belongs to the Knights of Pythias, the Independent Order of Odd Fellows and the American Patriots. He early displayed the elemental strength of his character, when, realizing the necessity for a good education suited to the demands of the times that he might start out in life well equipped for strenuous service, he devoted his evening hours to study, and this has proved one of his strongest characteristics through life, for he still devotes his leisure hours to study. While all recognize his ability and worth of character and are ever ready to pay deference to his excellent qualities, in nature he is modest and retiring and in his expressions concerning brother practitioners is friendly and indulgent.

Transcribed by Elaine Rathmann


Julius C. Hasler Biography

From "History of Davenport and Scott County" Vol. II by Harry E. Downer-S. J. Clarke Publishing Co. 1910 Chicago.

Surnames: Hasler, Nahlen.

Julius C. Hasler, cashier of the Farmers & Mechanics Savings Bank, is a man who has long been known to the citizens of Davenport, and as the year have passed they have accorded to him increased respect and esteem. He was born in Hannibal, Missouri, July 29, 1860. His father, Henry Hasler, was a native of Zurich, Switzerland, and in 1858, at the age of thirty-eight years came to Davenport, later going to Hannibal, where he remained only a few months. Upon his return to this city he engaged in the grocery business in the west end, being very successful in that occupation and winning respect in the community. He retired in 1883 and twenty years later passed away at the advanced age of seventy-nine years.
Julius Hasler attended the public schools, in which he obtained a good education, and he received his practical training in his father's store. In 1885 he became general delivery clerk in the postoffice under Postmaster De Armond but remained there only fifteen months. Then he became teller in the Scott County Savings Bank, holding that position for a number of years, fulfilling his duties and discharging his responsibilities with honor and credit. He next occupied the same the same position in the Davenport National Bank, which he left to become cashier of the Farmers & Mechanics Savings Bank, an office he holds at present. He is a man who is careful, accurate and conscientious, and one in whom his associates place the utmost confidence.
In March, 1886, Mr. Hasler was united in marriage to Miss Josephine G. Nahlen, of Chicago. Fraternally he is connected with the Benevolent and Protective Order of Elks, the Turners, the Schuetzen and other organizations of a social or benevolent character. He also is a member of the Outing Club and of the Commercial Club, in this way giving expression to the public spirit which is one of his dominant characteristics. As a man of sterling integrity he holds the position of treasurer of the Guarantee Mutual Insurance Company of this city and fulfills duties of a similar nature in the Davenport Baseball Club. Having spent all of his life in this city, he is well known in banking and commercial circles, where his name is always spoken with respect and honor. He is popular for he is endowed with those qualities that attract men to him and in every way is a worthy son of a noble father.

Transcribed by Elaine Rathmann


J. E. Burmeister Biography

From "History of Davenport and Scott County" Vol. II by Harry E. Downer-S. J. Clarke Publishing Co. 1910 Chicago.

Surnames: Burmeister, Behrens, Faster.

J. E. Burmeister, whose position as a financier and reputation for sound and reliable methods, have made him well known throughout this part of the state, was born in Davenport, January 17, 1877, a son of Ernst and Mary (Faster) Burmeister, natives of Germany. The father was born in 1846 and came to Davenport in 1870, here meeting and marrying his wife. They had two sons: John F. and J. E. For many years Ernst Burmeister operated a large meat market. He died March 29, 1882.
The Davenport public schools furnished J. E. Burmeister with a good education, and he added to it by a course at the Davenport Business College. When but a lad he commenced earning his own living as a messenger boy, and then worked up to bookkeeper. By this time he had proven his worth and was employed by the Iowa National Bank as messenger boy. From that time on his rise was rapid through the successive grades of promotion. In 1902 he was made assistant cashier; in January, 1903, he was made cashier; and in December, 1907, became vice president. In addition to his connection with the bank, Mr. Burmeister has many other interests in the city, being secretary of Voss Brothers Manufacturing Company and secretary and treasurer of the Davenport Locomotive Works, as well as many others.
In 1902 he married Emma Behrens, who was born in Davenport, a daughter of P. M. Behrens, an old resident of the city and a native of Germany. Mr. and Mrs. Burmeister have two children; Richard and Bernice.
During the Spanish-American war Mr. Burmeister served in the Fiftieth Iowa Infantry as quartermaster sergeant of Company B. Prior to this he was a member of the Iowa National Guards and was prominent in such work. He is a Mason and an Elk and also belongs to the Travelers Association and the Commercial Club. Although a young man in years, he has accomplished much, demonstrating what can be done through sheer effort and untiring industry. He is a strong man, holding firmly to his own views, and influencing others to his way of thinking. Enthusiastically carrying out his plans when once he has entered into anything, he is an important factor in the life of Davenport and has become very popular with all with whom he is associated in either a business or social way.

Transcribed by Elaine Rathmann


David Y. Pollock Biography

From "History of Davenport and Scott County" Vol. II by Harry E. Downer-S. J. Clarke Publishing Co. 1910 Chicago.

Surnames: Pollock, Young, McGinnis, Annable, Brown.

David Y. Pollock, a resident of Sheridan township, dates his residence in Scott county from 1866, arriving here when quite small. He was born in Airdrie, Scotland, October 27, 1857, and is a son of James and Helen (Young) Pollock. The father had served as coachman for a banker in Scotland but, believing that he might have better opportunities in the new world, he made arrangements to cross the Atlantic and in 1866 sailed for the new world. He landed first at New York ad thence came direct to Scott county, where he purchased eighty acres of improved land in Winfield township. The family home was established thereon and James Pollock continued to reside there until 1883, when he sold that property and purchased the place that is now the home of his son David, it also remaining his home until he was called to his final rest on the 13th of August, 1900, when at seventy-tow years of age. He had long survived his wife, who passed away in 1872, at the age of forty-nine years. Their family numbered four children: Betsy, of Davenport; Maggie, the wife of Neal McGinnis, of Davenport; Thomas, who is living in Winfield township; and David Y.
The last named began his education in the schools of Scotland, but was quite young when he came with his parents to America, and in the schools of Winfield township continued his studies. The periods of vacation were devoted to the work of the fields and after he had completed his education he gave his undivided time and attention to farm work in connection with his father until the latter's death. Later he engaged in farming for himself, having purchased the old homestead a short time prior to his father's demise. Throughout his life he has engaged in tilling the soil and the neat and thrifty appearance of his place indicates his careful supervision and methods. Moreover, he is a stockholder in the Long Grove Bank, the Eldridge Savings Bank and in the Farmers' Elevator Company of Scott county, and in business matters displays sound judgment as manifest in the careful investments that he has made and which have brought to him a substantial return.
On the 29th of November, 1897, Mr. Pollock was married to Miss Mary Brown, a daughter of Charles G. and Harriett E. (Annable) Brown, both of whom are now deceased. Mrs. Pollock was born in Moline, Illinois, and by her marriage has become the mother of four children: James, born September 9, 1898; William, August 13, 1900; Arthur, who was born November 16, 1901, and died December 16, 1906; and one who died in infancy.
Mr. Pollock is a member of Long Grove Lodge, No. 719, I. O. O. F., and the Modern Brotherhood of America, No. 86, of Long Grove, of which he has been president. He likewise belongs to the he Christian church of Long Grove and his life has been actuated by high and honorable principles, manifest in all of his relations with his fellowmen as well as in his fussiness associations. He has been a lifelong farmer and is today the owner of hone hundred ad twenty acres of rich and productive land, situated about a mile north of Eldridge, in Sheridan township, and a tract of forty-six acres in Winfield township. His place is well supplied with modern improvements and in its further cultivation and development Mr. Pollock is proving himself an enterprising and diligent farmer.

Transcribed by Elaine Rathmann


F. J. Sessions Biography

From "History of Davenport and Scott County" Vol. II by Harry E. Downer-S. J. Clarke Publishing Co. 1910 Chicago.

Surnames: Sessions, Fisher, McDowell.

F. J. Sessions, who since 1904 has capably served as superintendent of the Iowa Soldiers' Orphans' Home at Davenport, was born in Fairview township, Jones county, Iowa, on the 18th of February, 1853. His parents, C. M. and Mary J. (Armstrong) Sessions, are both natives of Cortland county, New York. In the year 1851 the father took up his abode in Jones county, Iowa, and there preached the gospel as a minister of the Methodist church until 1889, his labors proving an important element in the moral development of the community in pioneer times. He now makes his home at Mount Vernon, Iowa, and, though past the eighty-second milestone on life's journey, he is still hale and hearty.
F. J. Sessions supplemented his preliminary education, obtained in the public schools, by a course of study in Cornell College at Mount Vernon, where he won the degree of Bachelor of Arts. He was then prominently identified with educational interests for a period of twenty years and has held many important offices in that connection. He began his school work as principal of the Mount Vernon schools, later was at Springville, and subsequently he served as county superintendent of Linn county for four years. He was in charge of the educational exhibit at the St. Louis Exposition and in the same year was elected superintendent of the Iowa Orphan's Home and has since discharged the duties devolving upon him in this connection in a highly creditable and satisfactory manner, being well qualified for the office.
On the 26th of June 1879, Mr. Sessions was united in marriage to Miss Clara Fisher, a native of Illinois. They became the parents of four children, as follows: Alma, who is the wife of Dr. W. O. McDowell, of Grundy Center; T. W., who is engaged in the lumber business at Canton, Illinois; Charles, who is in the employ of the Bettendorf Car Company; and Harriet, who is pursuing a library course at the Pratt Institute of Brooklyn.
Mr. Sessions is a worthy member of the Masonic fraternity, exemplifying the teachings of the craft in his daily life. He is a gentleman of wide experience and information and one whose geniality and deference for the opinions of others have gained him an extensive circle of warm friends.

Transcribed by Elaine Rathmann


Bert Quinn Biography

From "History of Davenport and Scott County" Vol. II by Harry E. Downer-S. J. Clarke Publishing Co. 1910 Chicago.

Surnames: Quinn, Steffe, Harrison, Neckley, Clapp.

Bert Quinn, who cultivates a farm of eighty acres in Sheridan township. His place adjoining the corporation limits of Eldridge, in which village he was born May 10, 1873, is a representative of one of the oldest families of this county. His grandfather, W. I. Quinn, was one of the first settlers of Scott county, arriving in the fall of 1838, when he settled on the Wapsie in Winfield township. Iowa was then still under territorial rule and the work of progress ad development seemed scarcely begun He was born in Preble county, Ohio, November 12, 1831, a son of Joseph C. and Julia Quinn, who came originally from New Jersey but removed from that state to Georgia and thence to Ohio, coming from the Buckeye state to Iowa. They were of Irish descent and were farming people. When they first came to Scott county Joseph C. Quinn entered land of the Wapsie, securing one hundred and sixty acres. There were four brothers and all entered land in this vicinity, making choice of their claims because of the timber and water. Joseph C. Quinn and his wife afterward removed to Sheridan township, where he purchased a tract of land on which the town of Eldridge now stands, while another portion constitutes the farm upon which Bert Quinn is now living. Later he removed with his family to Hickory Grove township, where he bought a farm, and while living thereon his wife died. Subsequently Joseph C. Quinn removed to Jasper county, Iowa, where his last days were spent.
W. I. Quinn, the grandfather of our subject, has spent the greater part of his life in this county, his education being acquired at Long Grove. The Indians were still here at the time of his arrival and for years afterward there were many traces of Indian occupancy to be seen in the arrowheads and in the remnants of tepees which showed that the Indians had been former occupants of the soil. W. I. Quinn pursued his education in a log school building, which was also used as a church. His entire life was devoted to farming in Sheridan township until 1902, when he retired from business cares and removed to Long Grove. His wife died in 1908, at the age of seventy-three years. W. I. Quinn is a member of the Christian church and served as deacon for a number of years but put aside the duties of the office because of his advanced age.
Bert Quinn was reared by his grandparents and has spent his entire life in this county with the exception of a few years in college. He attended the schools of the district until he had mastered the elementary branches of learning and later he became a pupil in Eureka College at Eureka, Illinois, being graduated from the business department in the class of 1891. He then returned home and has since engaged in farming with the exception of a year spent in California.
On the 25th of January, 1900, Mr. Quinn was united in marriage to Miss Carried Steffe, a daughter of George and Mary Steffe, of Lincoln township, who were early settlers here. The father was of German nativity, his birth having occurred in Freiburg, Baden, Germany, October 28, 1823, while his wife was born in Switzerland, November 6, 1834. They were married in Hickory Grove township, this county, the father having come to Scott county when a young man. He had served in the German army and was also a soldier of the civil war enlisting at Davenport and participating in many important military movements, including the celebrated march of Sherman to the sea. After the war he resumed the pursuits of civil life and always devoted his time and energies to farming in Lincoln township, where he made his home up to the he time of his death on the 6th of November, 1900. For more than a year he had survived his wife, who died January 2, 1899. She had come to the United States when nine years of age with her parents, who made their way direct to Davenport, and here she lived all her life. She was married in 1859 to Mr. Steffe and became the mother of nine children: Mary, the wife of George Harrison; Rosie, the deceased wife of Brice Neckley; Joe, of Luverne, Minnesota; Jacob, deceased; Louisa, the wife of B. F. Quinn, of Cedar Rapids; Carrie, the wife of Bert Quinn; Hiram, of Sheridan township; Julia, deceased; and Adie, the deceased wife of William Clapp.
Unto Mr. and Mrs. Quinn has been born one son, Forest L., whose birth occurred November 6, 1904. Mr. Quinn is a member of the Modern Woodmen of America, affiliated with the camp at Long Grove, and the Odd Fellows lodge and has held most of the offices in the former. He likewise belongs to the he Christian church of Long Grove. In community affairs he takes a deep and helpful interest and yet he does not neglect his business, for he is known as a representative farmer of the community, carrying on general agricultural pursuits and also making a specialty of the cultivation of potatoes. In this he is meeting with good success and his farm product find a ready sale on the market.

Transcribed by Elaine Rathmann


Merton E. Bowling Biography

From "History of Davenport and Scott County" Vol. II by Harry E. Downer-S. J. Clarke Publishing Co. 1910 Chicago.

Surnames: Bowling, Boies, Bennett,

Merton E. Bowling, the general manager of the M. V. Boies Company, is one of the business men of Davenport who has rapidly risen, through his own efforts to the responsible position he now holds. A native son of this city, he was born March 11, 1872, his parents being George D. and Almeda (Bennett) Bowling. The former was also born in Davenport, a descendant of one of the early pioneer families, and is still living, although he has given up active participation in the world of affairs and business.
Merton E. Bowling grew to manhood in Davenport, attending the public schools here, and after he had completed the prescribed course enrolled as a student at a college. For a number of years after the completion of his education he worked at various pursuits, finally turning his attention to the undertaking business, and about twenty years ago he entered the employ of the M. V. Bois Company. This concern was established in 1857 by M. V. Boies, under whose name it has continued to do business ever since. When Mr. Bowling first became connected with it he held the position of assistant, but as the years went on and he gave proof of his ability he was rapidly promoted until he now is general manager of the firm. In the meantime, however, he fitted himself for the work, for he took a course in the Western College of Embalming, form which he was graduated October 26, 1898, so that he is fully competent to assume charge of every phase of the business that is given to the company.
Mr. Bowling married Miss Mary Snyder, of Dixon, Iowa, and their union has been blessed with three sons-Ralph, Elmer and Raymond. The eldest is attending the high school, while the second is a pupil in the school of district No. 8, and the youngest has not yet entered upon his period of education.
Mr. Bowling enjoys wide fraternal relations, for he is a member of the local lodge of Masons, the Independent Order of Odd Fellows, the Fraternal Order of Eagles, the Elks, and the Modern Brotherhood of America. He also belongs to the he Turners Society of Davenport. In all of these organizations he is well known as a man of ability, of the highest principles and one endowed with many social graces as well as with those which make for success in the world of affairs. His rapid rise in the esteem of his business associates has not been without its substantial financial advancements.

Transcribed by Elaine Rathmann


Jacob M. Eldridge

From "History of Davenport and Scott County" Vol. II by Harry E. Downer-S. J. Clarke Publishing Co. 1910 Chicago.

Surnames: Eldridge, Brown, Woodward, Williams, Smith, Glaspell, Schlegel, Bawden.

Jacob M. Eldridge, arriving in Davenport in 1845, became an active and valuable factor in the business interests of the city and at the same time his opinions carried weight and his labors produced substantial results in financial circles. While he won success, his interests were never so self-centered that business excluded participation in projects and measures of progressive citizenship. On the contrary he was ever alert to the best interests of the community and his cooperation constituted a valuable force in inaugurating measures which were of public benefit. A native of New Jersey,, Jacob M. Eldridge was born at Haddonfield, November 20, 1824, a son of D. C. and Rachel (Brown) Eldridge. His father was the first postmaster of Davenport. The mother died when her son Jacob was but four years of age and the boy then went to live with his grandparents. His father, having remarried, came west and  had conducted a store in Davenport at the time of the death of the grandfathe!
r. Jacob M. Eldridge, then a boy of thirteen years, was thrown upon his own resources and soon afterward commenced teaming. Carefully saving his earnings, it was not long before he was able to purchase a team and in that field of activity he continued to labor for some time. Later he turned his attention to clerking and, actuated by the laudable ambition which was ever one of his strong characteristics, he soon made it possible to become the owner of a mercantile enterprise. This he conducted until 1845, when he came to Davenport, his attention  having already been directed to this city by the fact that it was the place of his father's residence. He arrived in Rock Island on the 23d of December after a two months' journey from Philadelphia and spent Christmas eve in Davenport. The next spring, however, he returned to the east to settle up his business affairs in that section of the country and in the succeeding fall again came back to this city. He had entered land from the !
government about three miles northeast of Davenport, for which he paid the usual price of a dollar and a quarter per acre. The improvements which he placed upon it and the natural rise in value consequent upon the rapid settlement of this section of the country enabled him in 1874 to dispose of that farm for one hundred and twenty-five dollars per acre. He was one of the first land agents of the city and followed that pursuit during much of his life. His keen judgment and sagacity enabled him to make judicious investments and profitable sales and at the same time he contributed to the he substantial improvement of this section of the state by his careful manipulation of realty interests.
At all times Mr. Eldridge was mindful of his opportunity to promote public progress and was actuated by a public-spirited devotion to the general good that was manifest in many tangible ways. He was prominent in the movement that extended the Chicago & Rock Island road to the river and continued its construction across the state as the Mississippi & Missouri road. The second line afterward consolidated, forming the Chicago, Rock Island & Pacific. Mr. Eldridge was also a member of the company that secured the franchise for the second railroad bridge and he put forth earnest effort wherever he believed it possible to secure the adoption of a project that promised material benefit to the city, county and state. The town of Eldridge was laid out by him and the city of Eldridge, North Dakota, was named in his honor. It was through the influence of Mr. Eldridge that Frank P. Blair became a resident of this city and a most important factor in its later upbuilding.
In the field of politics Mr. Eldridge was equally well known and prominent. He was a delegate to the convention held in Iowa City in 1855, which led to the organization of the republican party in this state. In 1872 he was sent as a delegate from Iowa to the convention of liberal republicans that nominated Horace Greeley for the presidency. He regarded it as the duty as well as the privilege of every American man to uphold by his ballot and his influence the principles in which he believed and while he never sought nor desired office for himself, he stood staunchly in support of those issues which he regarded as vital to good government. He conceived and instituted the idea of placing a memorial tablet in the rotunda of the courthouse in honor of the Scott county pioneers-a tablet which will preserve for future generations the names of several hundred residents who came here prior to 1848. He was one of the oldest and most faithful members of the Christian church, to the su!
pport of which he contributed generously, while in its various activities he took helpful part. One of the most honored members of the Old Settlers' Association, he filled all of its offices, including that of president. He was also president of the Board of Trade at one time and instituted various projects which were accomplished through the medium of that association.
In 1848 Mr. Eldridge was married to Miss Mary L. Woodward, who passed away eighteen months later. In June 1851, he married Miss Mary H. Williams, and on the 28th of September, 1866, he wedded Agnes Smith, who survives him. She was a daughter of Robert Smith, a farmer by occupation, who retired in 1861 and established his home in Davenport, where he spent his remaining days, dying at the age of eighty-eight years. The six children of Mr. Eldridge were all born of the second marriage, namely: George W., Mrs. R. F. Eldridge, Mrs. S. L. Glaspell, Mrs. Carl E. Schlegel, Mrs. George W. Bawden and Frank.
The death of Eldridge occurred June 8, 1892, and brought a sense of personal bereavement to a large majority of Davenport citizens, for during the many years of his residence here he was honored and respected by all who knew him. The value of his public work cannot be overestimated and his record furnishes a splendid example for emulation in its public-spirited devotion to the general good. As the architect of his own fortunes he builded wisely and well and did equally good work for the city, his name being on the roll of the representative men whose labors have constituted the chief elements in progress and improvement here.

Transcribed by Elaine Rathmann


Louis Eckhardt Biography

From "History of Davenport and Scott County" Vol. II by Harry E. Downer-S. J. Clarke Publishing Co. 1910 Chicago.

Surnames: Eckhardt, Greve, Mundt.

Among the efficient and popular county officials of Scott county is numbered Louis Eckhardt, who since 1906 has ably served in the position of sheriff. He was born in Davenport, Iowa, on the 23d of October, 1867, his parents being Charles and Christine (Greve) Eckhardt, who, though natives of Germany, were married in Davenport. The father, whose birth occurred in 1821, crossed the Atlantic to the United States in 1848, landing at New Orleans, Louisiana. After residing for a short time at St. Louis, Missouri, he came up the river to Davenport, Iowa, in 1850. He was a skilled mechanic and carpenter, with which trade he had become familiar in his native land, but after working at that occupation for a number of years he became identified with the lumber industry, acting as salesman for the French & Davis Company during the period of the Civil war. He next turned his attention to the grocery business, while subsequently he entered the service of the Mueller Lumber Company in the capacity of salesman and was thus employed for a number of years or until he passed away on the 11th of October, 1885. His death was  the occasion of deep and widespread regret, for he was a well known and highly respected citizen whose upright and honorable life won him the confidence and regard of all with whom he was associated. Unto him and his wife were born nine children, five of whom reached years of maturity.
Louis Eckhardt, who was the eight in order of birth in his father's family, pursued his education in the public schools until he had attained the age of fourteen years. Having chosen the occupation of a barber as a congenial life work, he then devoted himself to the mastery of that trade and it was by reason of his untiring industry, indefatigable energy and excellent business ability that he eventually became the proprietor of the leading barbering establishment in Davenport. In addition to his interests in this connection he also gave considerable attention to public affairs and for two terms capably served as alderman of the fourth ward. He resigned that office, however, in order to enter upon the duties of sheriff, to which position he was elected in 1906. A democrat in politics, he is a prominent figure in the local ranks of his party-a fact which was proven by his election to the vice presidency of the Iowa State Sheriff's Association at the state convention of sheriffs.
On the 19th of August, 1896, Mr. Eckhardt was united in marriage to Miss Louise Mundt, a native of Davenport and a daughter of F. W. Mundt. They are now the parents of two children, Louise C. and Herbert W. Fraternally Mr. Eckhardt is identified with the Masons, the Knights of Pythias and the Benevolent and Protective Order of Elks, being the past exalted ruler of the last named order. He well deserves the proud American title of a self-made man, for by perseverance determination and honorable effort he has overthrown the obstacles which barred his path to success and has reached the goal of prosperity, while his genuine worth, broad mind and public spirit have made him a director of public thought and action. Both he and his wife have remained residents of Davenport throughout their entire lives and they well merit the high regard and esteem which is so uniformly accorded them.

Transcribed by Elaine Rathmann


Edward Roth Biography

From "History of Davenport and Scott County" Vol. II by Harry E. Downer-S. J. Clarke Publishing Co. 1910 Chicago.

Surnames: Roth, Bartberger, Kautz.

Edward Roth, who has known perhaps greater hardships than fall to the average farmer of today, is one of the native agriculturists of Buffalo township, who occupies a position of respect and prominence among his fellowmen. He was born December 1, 1871, and is a son of Peter Roth, whose birth occurred in Baden, Germany, in the year 1829. As his mother died when he was born, Mr. Roth was reared by Mr. and Mrs. Bartberger of Buffalo township. He attended the common schools of his section of the county, and when he had completed the course of study prescribed and was fairly will prepared to meet the practical responsibilities of life, he worked as a farm hand until he attained his majority.
Mr. Roth then married and rented a tract of land from his father-in-law. It remained his home for about seven years, then he purchased the place on which he now lives. It embraces one hundred and sixty acres of excellent arable land, well adapted to general farming which Mr. Roth carries on. He has also given considerable attention to raising stock for the market. In addition to his farm in Buffalo township he owns twenty acres in Blue Grass township, and, being a man who is well versed in the methods of tilling the soil to the best advantage and endowed with the ability for hard work, he is achieving an enviable reputation for himself as an agriculturist.
On the 29th of March, 1892, Mr. Roth married Miss Emma Kautz, a daughter of Chris Kautz, and they are now the parents of eight children: Edna, Edith, Florence, Clara, Della, Norma, John and Walter, all of whom are at home. The family are members of the Lutheran church, but at present Mr. Roth does not affiliate with any religious sect. He has joined the ranks of the republicans, feeling after due weight of the principles of various political organizations, that in their platform they embody the best ideas of government. He takes a deep interest in local affairs and has efficiently served as school director and road supervisor, but he has never desired public preferment for its own sake, rather only as it offered opportunity for him to advance the welfare of those who placed confidence in his judgment and integrity of act and purpose.

Transcribed by Elaine Rathmann


Oscar C. Woods

From "History of Davenport and Scott County" Vol. II by Harry E. Downer-S. J. Clarke Publishing Co. 1910 Chicago.

Surnames: Woods, White, Holbrook, Shontz.

Oscar C. Woods is the founder and the head of a wholesale fruit and produce establishment in Davenport conducted under the name of The Martin Woods Company. HE possesses a talent for leading and this coupled with his sound judgment and business ability is the secret of his success. He was born on a farm near the village of Passumpsic, Vermont, October 26, 1835, a son of Riley and Lydia (White) Woods, he being the youngest in a family of twelve children. The father was a son of John Woods, who served in the Revolutionary war.
Oscar C. Woods was reared in New England, beginning his education in the common schools of Vermont, while later he pursued a course in St. Johnsbury College. When he attained his majority he came to the west for he believed he would enjoy better business advantages here than he could in the east. He has one brother and one sister who also came west but the other members of the family all remained in New England. Upon arriving in the city of Chicago, Mr. Woods spent some time there, whence he made his way to Lamoille, Illinois, and alter his brother John Joined him and they there opened a dry-goods store which they conducted for several years. Eventually, owing to the he ill health of our subject, they sold their stock of goods and after recovering his health Mr. Woods again engaged in business, buying his stock of goods in New York, for, although they had previously purchased stock in Chicago, it was about this time that the great fire raged in that metropolis and he was co!
mpelled to send to the east for his merchandise. Again after a few years the brothers sold out review engaged in the stock business, buying horses for the eastern market. It was about 1873 that he removed farther west, locating in Davenport, where he continued to buy stock. Later he bought a half section of land near Waterloo, Iowa, and spent about a year and a half on the place. In 1883 he returned to Davenport and with others purchased the wholesale fruit business, to which he has since devoted his attention. Mr. Woods organized the firm which is now conducting business under the name of The Martin Woods Company and was incorporated in the spring of 1890. This is one of the important and well known management and executive ability of the president, Mr. Woods. He has made a number of changes in his business connection since coming to the west but each change has proved a profitable one and he has now reached the goal of success.
Mr. Woods was married in May, 1864, to Miss Cleora Holbrook, of Lamoille, Illinois. They had one child, who died young and now have an adopted daughter, Ruby, who is the wife of Harry L. Shontz, by whom she has two children, Harry W. and Mary Elizabeth. Mrs. Woods, an estimable lady, passed away in 1904 and her remains were interred in the cemetery at Lamoille, Illinois.
Mr. Woods is entitled to membership in the Sons of the Revolution from the fact that his grandfather served in the Revolutionary war. In business he has never been content to remain with the middle rank but has striven to reach the top round of the ladder and today he holds a high position in the business circles of Davenport, while his social qualities have won for him many friends.

Transcribed by Elaine Rathmann


William L. E. Nickels Biography

From "History of Davenport and Scott County" Vol. II by Harry E. Downer-S. J. Clarke Publishing Co. 1910 Chicago.

Surnames: Nickels, Edward, Lahann, Morthoss, Einfeldt.

William E. L. Nickels, now living retired in Davenport, is a representative of that lcass of men who have found in agricultural life the opportunities for success. Long connected with farming interests, his diligence and enterprise in managing the work of the fields brought him the prosperity that now enables him to live retired. He was born in Holstein, Germany, October 18, 1835, a son of Henry Ludwig Edward and Louisa Nickels. The father was a farmer and hotel keeper who spent his entire life in Germany. Following his demise the mother married again and came to the he United States, spending her last days in this country.
William L. E. Nickels was a young man of twenty-one years when he crossed the Atlantic to America. Favorable reports which he heard concerning the new world led him to the determination to try his fortune on this side the Atlantic, and on the 22d of December, 1856, he landed at New York, whence he made his way westward to Rock Island, Illinois, where he arrived on the 1st of January. The following day he crossed the river to Davenport but after a few days went to Moline. While there he met Claus Lahann, a friend from Germany, who asked him to go to Clinton county with him and Mr. Nickels made his home with that friend in Clinton county through the winter. It was there he met the lady whom he afterward made his wife . In the spring of 1857 he left his German friend and worked for an American at Big Rock in order that he might learn the English language and there he remained for six months, after which he returned to his German friend, remaining his assistant until his friend's death in 1859.
It was then, on the 6th of January, 1859, that Mr. Nickels married his old friend's daughter, Miss Margaretta Lahann, who was born in Germany, January 12, 1824. He rented the farm from her widowed mother, who died in 1861, at which time by the terms of her will Mr. Nickels inherited the farm, comprising ninety acres. He made his home thereon until 1876 and during that time extended the boundaries of his place by additional purchase until it comprised on hundred and sixteen acres. He made a number of improvements and continued the cultivation of the fields there until 1876, when he removed to Wheatland, Iowa, renting his farm. While living in Wheatland he served as a member of the town council and was prominent and influential in public affairs. He continued his residence in Wheatland until 1901, when he came to Davenport, where he has since made his home.
In 1903 Mr. Nickels was called upon to mourn the loss of his first wife, who died on the 3d of March of that year. He has since wedded Caroline Morthoss, a daughter of Claus and Magdalena Morthoss, both of whom died in Germany. Mrs. Nickels had been previously married, her first husband being Hans Einfeldt, who died December 17, 1894. There have been no exciting chapters in the life history of William L. E. Nickels, who in his life has exemplified many of the sterling traits of his German ancestry. He has been diligent and persistent in business and as the years went by his labors brought him the success which always comes form honorable and well directed effort. Now at the age of seventy-four years he is living retired and his rest is well merited, following years of active life.

Transcribed by Elaine Rathmann


Charles H. Moeller Biography

From "History of Davenport and Scott County" Vol. II by Harry E. Downer-S. J. Clarke Publishing Co. 1910 Chicago.

Surnames: Moeller, Westphal, Werner, Smallfeldt, Theada, Frick, Ressen, Dietz, Hamann.

Prominent among the industrious, enterprising and successful farmers of Cleona township is Charles H. Moeller, a native of Louisiana, born at Covington, about sixteen miles from New Orleans, on the 15th of June, 1852. His parents, Godhardt and Mary (Westphal) Moeller, were both born in Mecklenberg, Germany, in the year 1826 and came to the United States in 1850, locating at New Orleans. In October, 1852, they came up the Mississippi river to Davenport and located upon a farm in Blue Grass township. Four years later they removed to Cleona township, here the father engaged in farming until about twenty-one years prior to his demise, when he retired from active life. He had been most successful in his agricultural pursuits, becoming the owner of eight hundred and sixty-six acres of land in Scott county. At the time of his retirement he removed to Walcott, where he and his wife spent their remaining days, the former passing away in 1902 and the latter surviving about two years, her death occurring in 1904. In their family were four children, namely: Charles H., of this review; Anna, the wife of Albert Werner, postmaster of Walcott; E. E., of Stockton, Iowa; and Herman D., residing in Worthington, Minnesota.
Charles H. Moeller was barely four months old when he came with his parents to Iowa, and therefore his entire life has practically been spent within the borders of Scott county. Reared under the parental roof, amid the busy activities of rural life, he acquired his education in the district schools near his home and at an early age became familiar with the tasks that fall to the lot of the farm lad. During the periods of vacation he assisted his father in the work of the fields and continued to make his home with his parents until attaining his majority. Upon reaching man's estate he entered business life on his own account as an agriculturist and has never sought to engage in any other line of activity, wisely choosing as his life work the occupation to which he had been reared. That his selection was a wise one is his undertaking and from time to time invested in land, until he eventually became the owner of eight hundred and six acres of this of valuable farming land. This property is all located in Cleona township with the exception of one hundred and sixty acres, which lie in Hickory Grove township, and is equipped with five sets of buildings, all in excellent condition and good repair. He makes his home on two hundred and six acres of this property, located on section 26, and to the cultivation and development of this farm is directing his entire energies. The rest of the land is leased, the rental therefrom forming a most gratifying source of income. With the tilling of the soil he also engages in stock-raising to some extent, making a specialty of short-horned cattle and Percheron horses, and this branch of his business has become an important factor in the large measure of success which is his.
In 1877 Mr. Moeller was united in marriage to Miss Fredericka Smallfeldt, a native of Mecklenberg, Germany, where her birth occurred on the 7th of August, 1855. She came to America when a little maiden of ten summers in company with her parents, Christ and Mary (Theada) Smallfeldt. The mother is now deceased, but the father survives and makes his home at present in New Liberty. Unto Mr. and Mrs. Moeller have been born nine children, as follows: Otto, who passed away at the age of nine months; Mattie, the wife of Herman Frick, of Cleona township, Herman, who died at the age of four years; Anna, the wife of Paul Ressen, also a resident of Cleona township, operating one of our subject's farms; Hulda, who married Ben Dietz, of the same township; Amanda, the wife of Emil Hamann who makes his home in Cleona township; Rudolph and Edward, both residing at home; and Charles H., Jr., who passed away when eleven years old.
Since age conferred upon him the right of franchise Mr. Moeller has ever given stalwart support to the democratic party, although he has never taken an active part in politics. He has not, however, been unmindful of his duties as a citizen but is regarded as one of the leading and representative men of Cleona township, whose position on all questions of moment is never an equivocal one. On the contrary he stands loyally in support of what he believes to be right and as the years have passed his labors and influence have contributed to the general welfare of the community. A man of domestic tastes, he has sought his happiness at his own fireside, in the companionship of his family, who know him as a loving and devoted husband and kind and indulgent father. He is also popular with a large number of friends, who hold him in high respect and regard because of his upright principles and honorable manhood.

Transcribed by Elaine Rathmann

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