Scott Co, Iowa - IAGenWeb Project


P. J. Thede Biography

From "History of Davenport and Scott County" Vol. II by Harry E. Downer-S. J. Clarke Publishing Co. 1910 Chicago.

Surnames: Thede, Peterson, Lensch.

P. J. Thede, who is cashier of the Dixon Savings Bank and is otherwise substantially connected with the commercial life of the town, was born in Liberty township, Scott county, June 18, 1887, a son of John H. and Catherine (Peterson) Thede. They were also natives of Scott county and are of German parentage. At present they are residing in Liberty township, where Mr. Thede has pursued farming for many years. Six children were born to them: Lydia, who is the wife of Otto Lensch, of Liberty township; P. J., the subject of this sketch; Henry R.; Millie; Ella; and Verna.
P. J. Thede was reared upon his father's farm, in the work of which he assisted greatly until he was sixteen years of age. Having completed the course of study provided by the district schools of his locality, in 1903 he was enrolled as a pupil in the Capital City Commercial College of Des Moines, Iowa, and from that institution received his certificate for work completed November 25, 1905. He then came to Davenport, where he accepted a position as time keeper with the American Can Company. Later he was in the employ of the Davenport Fur &  Carpet Company until October, 1907, when he was called to Dixon to become cashier of the Dixon Savings Bank. While he has proved himself a most careful, accurate and conscientious employe, he has also found time to take up other business, from which he has derived no small addition to his income. He is the agent for several of the reliable fire insurance companies, conducts a vigorous business in real estate and has also been appointed notary public. When the German Mutual Telephone Company was established here Mr. Thede became its secretary, which is another evidence that he is ever on the alert to make the most of the opportunities for advancing his own interests and at the same time contributing to the welfare of his associates. He belongs to the Dixon Lodge, Knights of Pythias, and also to that of the Modern Woodmen of America. In both of these organizations he has made stanch and loyal friends. A young man, who if one were to judge only by his years, was just entering upon his business career, has attained distinction which would seem to augur a most successful and brilliant future.

Transcribed by Elaine Rathmann


Louis Bennewitz Biography

From "History of Davenport and Scott County" Vol. II by Harry E. Downer-S. J. Clarke Publishing Co. 1910 Chicago.

Surnames: Bennewitz, Swarting, Schlapkohl, Schroeder, Brandt, Pieper, Fick, Sindt.

No history of Walcott would be complete without extended mention of Louis Bennewitz, who, during his residence in this city has figured prominently in business, financial and political circles. He is numbered among that class of representative American citizens who claim Germany as the place of their nativity and who, in the new world, have found opportunity for advancement and progress in business lines. He was born in Sachen Gotha, Germany, on the 3d of December, 1845, and is a son of Octav and Paulina Bennewitz, also natives of that country.
Reared to manhood across the waters, Louis Bennewitz acquired his education in the schools of Germany and remained at home until April, 1866, when he came to America, making his way direct to Davenport, Iowa. He was first engaged in farm work for about six months and then entered the employ of B. Swarting, with whom he came to Walcott in 1867. In the following year he located in Davenport, where he worked until 1870, and then returned to Germany, where he remained about a year. Again coming to America, he was in the employ of F. Schlapkohl in Davenport until 1872, after which he once more entered the services of Schroeder & Brandt, former employers. He was thus connected until 1874, when he made another visit to the fatherland which lasted nearly a year. The year 1875 witnessed his removal to Stockton, Iowa, where he entered business in partnership with A. Pieper, and this connection continued until 1876, when he came to Walcott and became the senior partner in the firm of Bennewitz & Company, which was formerly known as the B. Swarting company. He has since made his home in this city and has become well known as one of the leading business men of the community. Although busily engaged in the conduct of his business, he has nevertheless found time to devote to other lines of activity and in 1893, when the Walcott Savings Bank was organized, he became one of the stockholders and a few years later was appointed a director. In 1906 he was elected to the presidency of that institution and since that time has manifested excellent administrative ability and executive control. His opinions are often sought by patrons of the bank and he has ever manifested toward each a sincere interest, a kindly spirit and a thoughtful consideration that has made him popular with all who have any dealings with the institution.
Mr. Bennewitz laid the foundation for a happy home life in his marriage in 1876 to Miss Mary Fick, a native of Holstein, Germany, and of this union have been born two children, namely: Tillie, who wedded Louis Mack; and Robert, the assistant cahier in the Walcott Savings Bank, who married Clara Sindt, a daughter of Henry Sindt, of Walcott.
Mr. Bennewitz is well known and prominent in fraternal circles, holding membership in Walcott Lodge, No. 312, K. P., and in Hiawatha Camp, M. W. A., of Walcott, and likewise belongs to the Modern Brotherhood. In politics he is a stanch republican, at all times taking a deep interest in community affairs and something of the feeling entertained for him by his fellow citizens is manifest in the fact that in 1894 he was elected mayor of the city, in which office he served very capably and efficiently until 1897. He finds recreation in outdoor sports and is an enthusiastic hunter, taking extensive trips through the country in search of large game. A man of resourceful ability, constantly watchful of opportunities, he has seized legitimate advantages as they have arisen and has never hesitated to take a forward step when the way was open. Fortunate in possessing ability and character that inspired confidence, the simple weight of his character and ability has brought him into positions of trust and responsibility and he ranks high among the well known and valued citizens of Scott county.

Transcribed by Elaine Rathmann


Charles Edward Glynn, M. D. Biography

From "History of Davenport and Scott County" Vol. II by Harry E. Downer-S. J. Clarke Publishing Co. 1910 Chicago.

Surnames: Glynn, Langan.

The demands made upon the members of the medical fraternity are in some respects greater than perhaps upon any other class of citizens. If the minister is reserved and austere we imagine that it is because he is engaged with thoughts far beyond our mental ken; if the lawyer is brusque and crabbed it is considered a mark of genius. There is demanded unfailing geniality and courtesy from the physician, however, and to his broad professional knowledge he must add sympathy and a quick, almost intuitive understanding of the mental phases which he sees represented before him. Meeting the various requirements of the practitioner of medicine, Dr. C. E. Glynn gives his entire time to his professional service and is now president of the Davenport Hospital, one of the best appointed establishments of this character in the state. He was born in Scott county, January 9, 1873. His father, Thomas J. Glynn, was a native of Ireland and came to the United states with his parents when a child of six years, spending his boyhood days in Indiana. He afterward removed to Scott county, Iowa, and became a prosperous farmer and stock-raiser, closely associated with the agricultural interests of the county until 1892, when he sold out and has since lived retired, making his home in Davenport, Iowa. He has always been active in affairs of the county, contributing to public progress through his cooperation in many movements for the general good. He is, moreover, recognized as a leader in local democratic circles and was elected and served as chairman of the board of supervisors. He married Anna M. Ennis, a native of Canada and of Irish parentage.
The public schools of this county afforded Dr. Glynn his early educational advantages and later he attended St. Ambrose college in Davenport, from which he was graduated in the class of 1888. He afterward taught school for two years but throughout that period had in view the object of eventually becoming a member of the medical fraternity. He entered the college of Physicians and Surgeons at Chicago from which he was graduated in 1902. He then began practice in Davenport and, in association with Dr. J. Siewert Weber, he has organized and built the Davenport Hospital for the treatment of medical and surgical cases. This is one of the best appointed and most up-to-date accessories known to medical and surgical practice at the present time. He is president of the hospital and is also a member of the various medical societies, whose object is to advance the efficiency of the medical fraternity by the dissemination of knowledge acquired through original research and experience. He is likewise assistant medical director in the director in the Germany Mutual Insurance company and aside from his hospital work has a good private practice.
Dr. Glynn was married November 22, 1905, to Miss Blanch J. Langan, a native of DeWitt, Iowa, and in this city they have many friends. Dr. Glynn is a member of the Knights of Columbus and other fraternal orders. He is a member of the American, the Iowa State, the Iowa and Illinois and the Scott County Medical Societies.

Transcribed by Elaine Rathmann


John Egel Biography

From "History of Davenport and Scott County" Vol. II by Harry E. Downer-S. J. Clarke Publishing Co. 1910 Chicago.

Surnames: Egel, Isenacher, Schroeder, Kippe, Zeyer, Bakman, Brown, Carpenter, Platt, Hovenagle.

John Egel, who for about thirty years was one of the leading agriculturists of Buffalo township, and, now, having given up the arduous work of the farm I residing in Blue Grass, was born in Germany, 1831. In 1854 he crossed the Atlantic with the intention of making a place for himself in this land of opportunities. For several years he made his home in the east, for the most part in New Jersey, and then the fame of the richness of the Iowa lands having reached him, in 1869 he came to Scott county. For many years  he operated tented land and it was not until 1882 that he purchased his first tract, which embraced on hundred and twenty acres in Buffalo township, and then as success attended his efforts he bought forty acres more, so that he owned a quarter of a section. On it he engaged in farming until 1899, when he leased the farm to a tenant and removed to Blue Grass, for he felt that the success he had gained entitled his to a rest.
While living in Brunswick, New Jersey, Mr. Egel wedded Miss Barbara Isenacher, who was also a native of Germany and was born in the same year as her husband, that of 1831. Their union was celebrated in 1857 and in the course of years was blessed with ten children, five sons, and five daughters, all of whom married and were well established in life. Louise, died in 1890; John Chris wedded Miss Rosa Schroeder and lives in Muscatine county, Iowa; Henry married Miss Catherine Kippe and also resides in Muscatine county, Iowa; Henry married Miss Annie Zeyer, of Buffalo. Charles married Miss Pauline Bakman. Louisa became the wife of Henry Brown. Mary is the wife of James Carpenter, of Buffalo township. Catherine is the wife of William Platt. Mrs. Nellie Hovenagle is the widow and lives in Bluegrass.
When Mr. Egel was admitted to citizenship in this republic he looked to the democratic party for political guidance and has since given to it his unswerving support. While he ever exercises his right of franchise at election times, he has never aspired to public office, nevertheless exhibiting an interest in the welfare of his fellowmen and being ever ready to exert himself in their behalf.

Transcribed by Elaine Rathmann


Harvey E. Weeks Biography

From "History of Davenport and Scott County" Vol. II by Harry E. Downer-S. J. Clarke Publishing Co. 1910 Chicago.

Surnames: Weeks, McGill, Pope.

About four years ago, Harvey E. Weeks came to the city of Davenport as secretary and treasurer of the Peoples Light Company and of the Tri-City Railway Company and has since been identified with the business and commercial interests of the city. He is a young man of enterprise and experience, and in the few years that he has been proving his ability to the people of Davenport has won a right to be considered one of the most progressive and valuable citizens here.
He was born in Upper Alton, Illinois, March 19, 1874, his parents being Captain Joseph H. and Martha M. (McGill) Weeks. The former was a native of Oyster Bay, New York, and was a contractor and builder. He removed to Upper Alton, Illinois, in 1860, where at opening of the Civil war he enlisted as private in Company F Seventeenth Illinois Volunteer Infantry. He served throughout the years of the great struggle and attained the rank of captain. Returning to his home after its close, where he passed the remaining years of his life thirteen years of which time he was postmaster. His death occurred July 13, 1907. His wife is still living in Upper Alton.
Harvey E. Weeks, who was the first son of the four children born to his parents, was reared in the city of his birth, and, after having completed the course prescribed in the public schools, he became assistant postmaster at Upper Alton, Illinois, serving in that capacity for four years. this was necessitated by the fact that his father's health was so impaired by seven months confinement in Andersonville prison during the civil war that he was incapacitated for active business. During those four years, Mr. Weeks took special studies in Shurtleff college. In 1895 he received the appointment of committee clerk in the state senate of Illinois, serving during the session of 1894-95. On June 1, 1895, he entered the employ of the public service corporations which afterward were merged by J. F. Porter under the name of Alton, Granite & St. Louis Traction Company. He remained with that concern until June, 1906, having steadily risen in those years until he was secretary of the com!
pany. When he severed his connection with them he came to Davenport as secretary and treasurer of some of the more important companies which are developing the resources of the city and serving the needs of its citizens. He has filled his position with credit to himself and to the satisfaction of those who placed confidence in his ability, trustworthiness and business acumen. He has already made a place for himself among his associates. His career has been a steady advance from one responsible position to another, and as it has been the result of his own efforts he has every reason to feel a gratification in the guerdon the years have brought him. In addition to the concerns mentioned at the opening of this sketch, Mr. Weeks is secretary and treasurer of the Davenport Gas & Electric Company of Davenport, the Peoples Power Company of Rock Island and Moline, East Moline and Watertown Railway Company of Moline; and he is also a director in the Cottage Camps Company of Davenport. 
On the 27th of June, 1895, was celebrated the marriage of Mr. Weeks and Miss Lutie Vashti Pope, a native of Kane, Illinois, and daughter of Jacob G. and Susan C. Pope. Two sons have been born to Mr. and Mrs. Weeks: Harold Parker and George Edward.
The family belongs to the Calvary Baptist church. Mr. Weeks has always been an adherent of the political principles of the republican party. He is a member of the Davenport commercial Club and Davenport Outing Club. Fraternally he is affiliated with the Modern Woodmen of America. He is secretary and treasurer of the American Street & Interurban Railway Accountants' Association, an association composed of the accounting officers of all the street and interurban railways of the United States, Canada and Mexico, which position he has held for three years. hard working and popular, he has attained to a respected position among the people of Davenport.

Transcribed by Elaine Rathmann


Wilhelm Wulf Biography

From "History of Davenport and Scott County" Vol. II by Harry E. Downer-S. J. Clarke Publishing Co. 1910 Chicago.

Surnames: Wulf, Hass, Thomson, Groht, Stropfen, Siebke.

Wilhelm Wulf, one of Hickory Grove township's leading men, is German by nativity , his birth having occurred in Holstein, February 11, 1858. When only about sixteen years of age he and his brother Charley became imbued with the desire to try their fortune in "the land of promise," and upon landing on our shores came at once to Davenport, where they have since resided. His parents were John and Doris (Hass) Wulf. His father died when he was a lad of about six years of age, responsibility in consequence falling upon his shoulders at an unusually early age. The mother, born July 26, 1816, followed her sons to America in 1875 and made her home with Charley, her death occurring April 19, 1909. Although advanced in years she enjoyed good health nearly to the time of her demise and took much pleasure in her American home and friends. In the family were six children as follows: Mrs. Louisa Thomson, of Davenport, widow of Christ Thomson; Lena, who married William Groht and is deceased; Christina, the wife of Peter Stropfen, a retired farmer living in Davenport; Doris, the wife of John Hass, of Durant; Charley, a citizen of Cleona township; and Wilhelm, the subject of the sketch.
Wilhelm Wulf was reared on a farm and its wholesome, independent life has appealed to him sufficiently to induce him to cling to agriculture all his life. He spent his first five years in this country as a farm hand, but in 1880 rented property which he managed successfully for a number of years. In 1895 he bought one hundred and sixty acres in Cleona township and foru years later sold this to become the owner of his present homestead in sections 30 and 31, Hickory Grove township. This first consisted of two hundred and fifty-seven and a half acres, but Mr. Wulf has added to it until it now amounts to three hundred and thirty acres. On this very desirable tract he engages in general farming and stock raising and his advanced agricultural methods have been productive of the best results.
In 1887 Mr. Wulf was united in marriage to Miss Theresa Siebke, daughter of Marx and Louise Siebke, natives of Holstein, Germany. She was born November 11, 1867, in Muscatine county, Iowa. Unto Mr. and Mrs. Wulf have been born the following children: Henry, Herman, Amelia, Mata, Ella, Rudolph and Helda. Louis, the third child is deceased.
Mr. Wulf has many friends and is happy in all the relations of life. He is recognized in the community as a man whose support is always ready for any measure likely to prove conducive to the public good. Among other interests he is a stockholder in the Farmers' Elevator Company of Walcott.

Transcribed by Elaine Rathmann


Peter A. Boyle Biography

From "History of Davenport and Scott County" Vol. II by Harry E. Downer-S. J. Clarke Publishing Co. 1910 Chicago.

Surnames: Boyle, Copely.

Peter A. Boyle, a Harvard man whose liberal educational advantages well qualified him for a successful professional career, continued in the practice of law in Davenport for a number of years and is now giving his attention to the supervision of important property interests. He was born in New Haven, Connecticut, on the 11th of October, 1847, and is a son of John R. and Mary J. (Copely) Boyle. His parents were natives of county Kilkenny, Ireland, but were of English descent.  The father's birth occurred May 15, 1815, and the mother was born on the 12th of March, 1812.
John R. Boyle came to the United States in 1839 and settled in New England, where he conducted an extensive business as a contractor and builder of canals and railroads. He was married in New York City in 1842 and in 1850 came to the middle west, where he was engaged in the building of the Michigan southern Railroad. Two years later the family came to the west to Ottawa, Illinois. In 1854 they removed to Muscatine, Iowa, coming thence to Scott county in 1865. The father assisted in building many of the western railroads, including the Union Pacific and others. After taking up his abode in Scott county he purchased land in Davenport township and settled upon a farm, hi remaining days being given to general agricultural pursuits. His life was one of untiring business activity and his strong purpose enabled him to carry forward to successful completion whatever he undertook. He died September 16, 1895, while his wife survived until the 16th of May, 1902. they were the parents of two children: C. R. Boyle, who is now living in New York city; and Peter A., of this review.
Peter A. Boyle spent the first five years of his life in New Haven, Connecticut, and afterward attended school in different places as his parents removed from one point to another, the father's business calling him to different localities. At length he was graduated from Griswold College in the class of 1870 and with broad general information to serve as the foundation upon which to rear the superstructure of professional learning, he took up the study of law in Harvard University, from which he was graduated with the class of 1872. He then returned to Davenport and entered upon active connection with the profession as a law clerk in the office of Davison & Lane, formerly well known attorneys of this city. After ten years devoted to the practice of law, he turned his attention to his property interest, which now claim his attention.
On the 5th of June, 1884, Mr. Boyle was united in marriage to Miss Jessie A. Boyle, of Birmingham, Alabama, and unto them were born two children: Mary Lee, who died in 1898; and John R., who is now a high school pupil. The parents are members of the Episcopal church and are prominent socially in the city, theirs being one of the attractive and hospitable homes of wealth and culture. Mr. Boyle belongs to the Commercial Club and has other social relations, being usually seen where the most intelligent men of the city gather.

Transcribed by Elaine Rathmann


Johannes Thede Biography

From "History of Davenport and Scott County" Vol. II by Harry E. Downer-S. J. Clarke Publishing Co. 1910 Chicago.

Surnames: Thede, Sierk, Pahl, Klink, Frey, Lensch, Ohde.

A prosperous farmer of Liberty township, who is contemplating retiring from the active pursuit of his calling, and intends to take up his residence in the village of Dixon, is Johannes Thede, who was born in Liberty township, June 28, 1860, about one and a half miles north of the farm on which he is now living. His parents were Peter and Marie (Sierk) Thede, both natives of Schleswig, Germany, where the former was born April 27, 1832, and the latter February 15, 1828. In 1857, singly and alone, they came to America, locating in Kempton, Illinois, where they were married. Three years later, in the spring of 1860, they came to Liberty township, this county, where Mr. Thede engaged in farming. He was successful beyond the ordinary and as he saw opportunity invested in land so that at his death he held five hundred and sixty acres in that township. Toward the close of his life he relinquished the heavier cares and his death occurred January 4, 1909. His wife had died some years!
 previously, for she passed away in Dixon, May 8, 1903. They were the parents of six children: Peter, of St. Louis, Missouri; Johannes, the subject of this sketch; Henry, who died in 1893 at the age of twenty-one; Mary Lenora, who became the wife of George Pahl, both now deceased; William, a resident of Liberty township; and Erna, the wife of Charles Frey, of Davenport.
Johannes Thede was less than one year old when his parents removed from his birthplace to the farm on which he now lives and which has since been his home. He attended the public schools of the district, in which he obtained a fair education, but his practical preparation for life was received during the time he assisted his father in the cultivation of his land. A tiller of the soil from choice as well as from inheritance, he has been one of those who have won a conspicuous success form his vocation. Besides the homestead in Liberty township, consisting of two hundred and sixty acres on sections 35, 36, and 25, he owns an equal amount of arable land in Springfield township, Cedar county, and five hundred and sixty acres in Oldham county, Texas. The place which he makes his home is well improved and its fields excellently adapted to general farming which he has pursued. For the past fifteen years, however, he has made a specialty of stock feeding, feeding about one hundred head annually. He was one of the prime promoters of the Dixon Savings Bank, in which he is a large stockholder.
On the 8th of April, 1884, Mr. Thede was married to Miss Katharine Petersen, who was born in the same house that was the birthplace of her husband, January 23, 1864. Her parents, Henry and Wiepke (Klink) Petersen, were both natives of Schleswig, Germany. They were married in the old country and came to America about 1856, locating first in Illinois. About five years later they came to America about 1856, locating first in Illinois. About five years later they came to Scott county, which remained their home for the rest of their lives. Mr. Petersen was actively engaged in farming but, having obtained a gratifying income, retired to Dixon, where his death and that of his wife occurred. He owned at one time seven hundred acres of land in Liberty township. Five children were born to Mr. and Mrs. Petersen: Mrs. May Ohde, a widow living in Seattle, Washington; George, of Liberty township; Charles, a resident of Dixon; Mary, who is unmarried and makes her home in Dixon; and Katharine, the wife of our subject.

Transcribed by Elaine Rathmann


Julius Sander Biography

From "History of Davenport and Scott County" Vol. II by Harry E. Downer-S. J. Clarke Publishing Co. 1910 Chicago.

Surnames: Sander, Mack, Ranzow.

The great business prosperity which has come to Davenport in the course of years is reflected in the success of Julius Sander, a dealer in general hardware, farm implements, seeds, buggies, wagons and automobiles. Having come to this country when a mere boy, with nothing but his own abilities and his determination to get ahead, the position he holds today is the result of his unaided efforts, and ready discernment of potential needs and the quality of being a good manager.
He was born in Neumünster, Holstein, Germany, July 31, 1857, and was reared and educated in the place of his birth. In 1871, although but fourteen years of age, he emigrated to America, coming direct to Davenport immediately after landing upon our shores. Upon his arrival here he secured employment as a clerk in the hardware store of the old firm of E. H. Mack & Company, which was located on Second Street where the Davenport Savings Bank now stands. He remained with that concern, until 1876, when it went out of business, and for five years he worked for Sickles Preston. At the end of that period, in 1871, he had saved enough money and acquired a sufficient familiarity with business methods here to warrant his embarking in business for himself. Accordingly at 325 West Second street, he opened a hardware store, which was well supplied with all the articles generally to be found in such an establishment. With fourteen years of success behind him, in 1895 he opened another store at 420 West Fourth street, where a large and varied line of farm implements were put on sale. In 1902 he combined the two stores, securing his present location at 218, 220, and 222 Ripley street, and here, keeping abreast of the times, he has added automobiles of reputable make, besides carrying a good line of buggies and wagons. Indeed, he has left no opportunity pass by unheeded, without trying to wrest from it some measure of advancement for himself. In consequence his is one of the busiest stores in the city, and the record of its sales will stand comparison with even larger concerns. In addition to hardware interests, Mr. Sander has been active in the financial circles here, for in 1893 he was one of the organizers of the Farmers & Mechanics Savings Bank, of which he is still a director, and later he was one of the organizers and directors of the Guarantee Mutual Life Insurance Company of Davenport. He holds the position of vice president of the Fairmount Cemetery Association and has made his influence felt in all walks of life.
In 1881 was celebrated the marriage of Mr. Sander and Miss Lina Ranzow, a daughter of Charles F. Ranzow, now deceased. They have a son, Harry, who assists his father in business, and a daughter, Paula, who is attending high school.
Mr. Sander has always given his support unfailingly to the democratic party, by which organization he was elected in 1908 to the board of county commissioners of Scott county. He holds the position of president of this body and will continue to exercise the duties of that office through the three years of his term. He belongs to several organizations, some of a fraternal nature, others social and still others of a beneficent character, for his is a member of the local Masonic lodge, the Turners, the Sharp Shooters Society, the Columbia Relief Society and the Davenport Cremation Society.

Transcribed by Elaine Rathmann


Charles H. Alt Biography

From "History of Davenport and Scott County" Vol. II by Harry E. Downer-S. J. Clarke Publishing Co. 1910 Chicago.

Surnames: Alt, Hansen, Danz.

Charles H. Alt, a successful farmer of Buffalo township, was born in the province of Schleswig, Germany, September 25, 1870, his parents being Karl and Catherine (Hansen) Alt, both native of the same section of the fatherland, where the former was born in 1833 and the latter in 1842. In 1885 the father came to America, and although he settled first in Rock Island county, Illinois, after on year's experience he came to Scott county, Iowa.
Charles H. Alt, being about fifteen years of age when he left his native land, had already received a thorough training in the rudiments of education as taught in Germany. However, after he reached Illinois he again entered school that he might obtain a knowledge of the English language and customs more systematic than could be obtained through intercourse with the men and women he should meet. He assisted in the work that was carried on upon his father's farm, assuming many of the heavier responsibilities of its operation as the years proved he was a man of power and ability. Later when he married he made it his permanent home. Although yet a young man with the most productive years of his life still before him, he has already made a record of which he has no reason to be ashamed. The condition of his buildings, the cultivation of his fields, tell their own story, that their owner is a man of industry and good management. While he is never sparing of hard work, he is caref!
ul that neither time nor substance is wasted, and consequently should enjoy a pronounced success as the years pass on. In 1908, he purchased his present farm consisting of ninety-two acres in Buffalo township.
In early manhood Mr. Alt was united in marriage to Miss Louise Danz, a daughter of Chris Danz, of Muscatine, Iowa. A son and a daughter have been born to them-Herbert and Catherine. The family are members of the Lutheran church, while Mr. Alt has always given his allegiance in political matters to the democratic party. While he is not an aspirant for office, he has won the confidence of his fellow citizens who elected him to the position of director of the Blue Grass schools. He belongs to Blue Grass Lodge, No. 26, of the Modern Brotherhood of America, and to the Grange, and he has made friends who loyally accord him respect and good will.

Transcribed by Elaine Rathmann


William Schmidt Biography

From "History of Davenport and Scott County" Vol. II by Harry E. Downer-S. J. Clarke Publishing Co. 1910 Chicago.

Surnames: Schmidt, Paustian, Holdorf, Meier, Lehmkuhl, Brockmann, Seemann, Hinz, Boecken, Wessel.

William Schmidt is a native son of Iowa and possesses the enterprising spirit which has been the potent force in the rapid upbuilding and development of the middle west. He is now engaged in farming in Sheridan township, Scott county, where he owns one hundred and sixty acres of productive land, pleasantly situated about a half mile east of Eldridge.
His birth occurred in Butler township, this county, on the 9th of March, 1860, his parents being Detlef and Catherine Schmidt, both of whom were natives of Holstein, Germany. The father was a blacksmith there and came to America when a young man, making his way westward to Davenport. Soon afterward he secured employment as a farm hand in this county and, carefully saving his earnings, was at length enabled to purchase land in Butler township, whereon he resided until his death, which occurred when he was forty-two years of age. His widow long survived him and died at the age of seventy-four. In their family were eight children: Anna, the wife of Adolph Paustian, of Pottawatamie county, Iowa; William, of this review; Sophia, the wife of Charles Holdorf, of Pottawattamie county, Iowa; Charles, who is living on the old homestead farm in Butler township; Adolph, of Pottawattamie county; John, of the same county; Nancy, a resident of Davenport; and David, whose home is in Butler township.
William Schmidt was a pupil in the district schools of Butler township in his boyhood days and afterward worked on the home farm up to the time of his marriage, when he removed to another farm in Butler township, which was owned by his mother. After occupying and cultivating it for ten years he removed to his present place of residence, first renting the land, while in 1900 he purchased the property from Claus Meier, his father-in-law. He has since erected a fine residence and made other improvements which add much to the value and attractive appearance of his place, his farm being one of the well developed properties of the township. The place is neat and thrifty in appearance and indicates the careful supervision and practical methods of a progressive owner.
It was on the 15th of March, 1884, that Mr. Schmidt was united in marriage to Miss Anna Meier, a daughter of Claus and Catherine (Lehmkuhl) Meier, who were natives of Germany and early settlers of this county. Her father came to the United states when a young man and established his home in Scott county, Iowa, purchasing land in Lincoln township. He now lives retired in Davenport. His first wife died at the age of twenty-three years, leaving two children: Henry, now a resident of Allens Grove township; and Anna, now Mrs. William Schmidt. For his second wife, Mr. Meier married Miss Gretge Paustian a native of Holstein, Germany, and to them were born four children, namely: Albert, who is married and lives on the homestead; Louisa, the wife of Carl Brockmann, residing near Donahue, Scott county; Adele, the wife of Julius Seemann, of davenport; and Walter, who married Minnie Hinz and lives on a farm near Davenport. The mother of these children died February 9, 1909. Mr. and Mrs. Schmidt have two children: Olga, the wife of Ernest Boecken, of Walcott, Iowa; and Arthur, who lives on the home farm. He married Millie Wessel and thy have one child, Leota.
Mr. Schmidt has spent his entire life in Scott county and has, therefore, been a witness of its growth and progress for fifty years. This half century has witnessed many notable changes for all of the evidences of pioneer life have been replaced by those of modern civilization. He has always advocated progress and improvement and in as far as possible has aided in the work of general advancement. He is regarded as an enterprising farmer and his success is well merited as it has been attained entirely through his own labors.

Transcribed by Elaine Rathmann


Frederick Rock Biography

From "History of Davenport and Scott County" Vol. II by Harry E. Downer-S. J. Clarke Publishing Co. 1910 Chicago.

Surnames: Rock, Kleinschmidt, Wilson, Carstens, Baustian.

A public-spirited man with an eye single to the general good, even at the occasional expense of personal interest, is a credit and a boon to any community. Such a one is Frederick Rock, a citizen of Walcott. He was born December 11, 1834, in the principality of Waldeck, Germany, his parents being Christian and Wilhelmina (Kleinschmidt) Rock. Early in life he became imbued with the desire to come to America, whose wholesome ideas in the matter of equality had in some way reached him across the seas. He did not allow this ambition to remain a dream but came to America in 1857, landing in New York in the month of May. He made his way almost at once to Davenport and in a short time found employment with Robert S. Wilson, a Scott county farmer, with whom he remained for four years. At the end of this time he had become sufficiently well acquainted with the ways of the land of his adoption to make a more independent venture and he rented a farm in Hickory Grove township, where he lived for another four years. In 1863, as the result of excellent management, he was enabled to purchase a farm, a very desirable tract of eighty acres located on section 4, Hickory Grove township. Here he lived until 1906, when he retired and removed to Walcott to make his home.
In 1865 Mr. Rock was united in marriage to a lady of his own nationality, Miss Margaretha Carstens, daughter of Claus Carstens, a native of Holstein, Germany. Three children were born to them but only one is living, Ella, now the wife of Otto Baustian. Mr. and Mrs. Baustian reside on the old Rock homestead in Hickory Grove township.
An evidence of the esteem in which Mr. Rock is held is the fact that he has been called upon to fill several important offices. He has served as trustee of Hickory Grove township and for over twenty years was justice of the peace. In the latter capacity he made a most remarkable record, for in all the twenty years a case was never appealed to a higher court after he had made his decision, his keen insight and unimpeachable justice being readily recognized. Mr. Rock is at present an advocate of the principles of the republican party and its administration of affairs, but he was originally a member of the democratic party. In 1893 he received the nomination of the gold democrats for the legislature but retired from the race before the election. He holds the position of president and secretary of the Mutual Fire insurance Company of German Householders and is secretary of the Walcott Mutual Fire Insurance Company. He is a stock holder in the Farmers and Mechanics Savings Bank of Davenport and also in the Farmers Savings Bank of Walcott, having at one time been vice president of the latter institution but compelled to resign on account of ill health in his family. In a word Mr. Rock is in all his relations worthy of respect and confidence, a man of integrity and progressiveness.

Transcribed by Elaine Rathmann


Albert W. Hamann Biography

From "History of Davenport and Scott County" Vol. II by Harry E. Downer-S. J. Clarke Publishing Co. 1910 Chicago.

Surnames: Hamann, Koenig, Hass, Heuck.

Albert W. Hamann, prominent as a representative of the legal profession and also active in political circles in Davenport, has found I these two fields scope for his energy and laudable ambition-his dominant qualities. One of Iowa's native sons, his birth occurred in Audubon county, November 8, 1876. His father, C. H. Hamann, was a native of Germany and, coming to America in 1855, established his home in Davenport, where he resided until 1873. In that year he removed to Audubon county, where he turned his attention to farming. He later returned to Davenport, where he established a wagon manufactory, becoming one of the pioneers in this field of business in the city. He retired from active life in the year 1890, and died in 1899, respected and honored by all who knew him. In early manhood he had wedded Marie Koenig, who was also a native of Germany and came to Davenport in 1856 with her father, Carl A. Koenig, one of the early settlers of this city.
Brought to Davenport during his early boyhood, Albert W. Hamann acquired his education in the public schools here, passing through consecutive grades to his graduation from the high school as a member of the class of 1893. He then entered the University of Iowa, where he won the degree of Bachelor of Arts, and with broad literary knowledge to serve as the foundation upon which to rear the superstructure of professional learning he entered the law department of the Iowa State University and was graduated in 1898. The following year he pursued a post-graduate course in law at Columbia University of New York city and returned to Davenport.
When he entered upon practice here his equipment was unusually good. To an understanding of uncommon acuteness and vigor he added a thorough and conscientious preparatory training, while in his practice he has exemplified all the higher elements of the truly great lawyer. He became associated with Carl F. Hass, and under the firm style of Hass & Hamann the partnership has since been maintained. His diligence and energy in the preparation of his cases, as well as the earnestness, tenacity and courage with which he defends the right as he understands it, challenges the admiration of his associates. His fidelity to the interests of his clients is proverbial, yet he never forgets that he owes a higher allegiance to the majesty of the law.
From his youthful days Mr. Hamann has been actively interested in politics and served for one term in the twenty-ninth general assembly of Iowa, giving earnest and careful consideration to each question which came up for settlement. In 1902 he was a member of the code supplement committee. In 1904 he was elected county attorney and acceptably filled that position for four years. His standing among fellow members of the bar is indicated in the fact that in 1908 he was elected president of the County Attorneys Association of the state. In 1902 Mr. Hamann was united in marriage to Miss Clara Heuck, a native of Germany, who came to Davenport with her parents in her girlhood days. They are prominent socially, and Mr. Hamann is a popular member of the Benevolent and Protective Order of Elks. He is recognized as a young man of high character who has demonstrated his worth in his chosen profession and in citizenship, and undoubtedly has before him a bright future.

Transcribed by Elaine Rathmann


B. L. Schmidt Biography

From "History of Davenport and Scott County" Vol. II by Harry E. Downer-S. J. Clarke Publishing Co. 1910 Chicago.

Surnames: Schmidt, Moeller, Martzhan, Kohrs, Sternburg, Struck, Koch, Kroeger.

B. L. Schmidt, president of the Schmidt Brothers company of Davenport, is a man of considerable force of character who has risen to his present position through the exercise of his native ability, combined with hard work and strict economy. Mr. Schmidt was born in Davenport, October 22, 1869, a son of Carl F. and Sophia (Moeller) Schmidt, both natives of Germany. The father came to Davenport in 1847, and although a cabinet-maker by trade, he farmed in Blue Grass township for fourteen years after coming here. Later he removed to a suburb of Davenport, where until his death, in 1889, he raised grapes and made wine. He and his wife were married in Scott county, and they had eight children, five of whom grew to maturity: L. W.; Minnie, now Mrs. A. F. Martzhan; B. L.; Hulda, now Mrs. J. L. Kohrs, and F. L.
B. L. Schmidt was educated in the public schools of this county, and after leaving school learned the trade of a machinist with William Sternburg in Davenport. After working at his trade for five years, he took a course in the Davenport Business College, and following this was made deputy county treasurer under Henry C. Struck. He then became associated with Voss Brothers in the manufacture of furniture fixtures, sash, door and blinds, making a specialty of wooden soled shoes with leather tops. This connection lasted five years, when Mr. Schmidt purchased the interests of Voss Brothers, and, taking his brother F. L. into partnership, the firm became Schmidt Brothers. This was in 1897 and until 1902 they were jobbers in the above mentioned lines, but in the latter year they sold their business and bought the patent on the Little Giant ice crusher and organized the Davenport Ice Chipping Machine Company, as well as the White Lily Manufacturing Company, B. L. Schmidt being president of both until 1909, when he sold the plant of the White Lily Manufacturing Company. After this they purchased the engine department of that company, to which they added the Ice Chipping Machine Company, and changed the name of the firm to Schmidt Brothers Company. In addition to this flourishing business, Mr. Schmidt is vice president of the Davenport Slaughter & Refining Company; a director of A. F. Koch Company; a director and vice president of the De Lux Textile Company; and a director of the Union Life Insurance company, of Chicago. He was one of the first directors of the Commercial Club and was one of the committee who raised the funds to build the club house.
In 1896 Mr. Schmidt married Johanna Kroeger, who was an old resident here. They have two children: Amy Louise and George L.
While never an office seeker, Mr. Schmidt was one of those who worked to secure the present form of government in Davenport. Whenever any measure is on foot for the betterment of his beloved city he is to be found in the front ranks, giving freely of both time and money. He is a thirty-second degree Mason, a Knight Templar and Shriner. He has always worked with untiring force, and seems to enjoy it. Capable and full of plans for the future, he is very popular, and his genial manner and kind heart win him friends everywhere.

Transcribed by Elaine Rathmann


Alfred G. Goldschmidt Biography

From "History of Davenport and Scott County" Vol. II by Harry E. Downer-S. J. Clarke Publishing Co. 1910 Chicago.

Surnames: Goldschmidt, Henrechsen, Bremer.

Alfred G. Goldschmidt, city electrician, belongs doubly to Davenport, by birth as well as by choice, since it was this place which witnessed his nativity March 30, 1868. His parents, Peter and Eliza (Henrechsen) Goldschmidt, were natives of Germany. The father early in his career followed the trade of cabinetmaker, which upon the widening of his business horizon he changed to that of furniture dealer and undertaker. He and his wife landed in New York in 1852, on the Fourth of July, which proved to be happily significant for he was to become an enthusiastic American. Ten children were born to these good people, of whom Alfred G. is the ninth in order of birth. Five of these are deceased. Mr. Goldschmidt's paternal grandmother joined her relatives here after the death of her husband in the old country, and here lived until her demise. The father located in Davenport almost immediately and this city has ever since been the family home.
For four years Alfred G. Goldschmidt attended the old German school of davenport and after this primary preparation he entered the public schools, attending Nos. 8 and 3. He was graduated in 1882 and later attended the high school for one year. He then matriculated in the University of Illinois, where he qualified in that line to which his natural talents inclined him-mechanical engineering, receiving at the end of his course the degree of Bachelor of Science. His first practical experience was gained experience was gained in the employ of the Davenport Foundry Machine Company, where he served for a year as a draughtsman. Then going to Chicago, he entered the offices of the United States Electrical Company and work of this nature exerted upon him such a fascination that he has ever since associated himself with electrical concerns. He has divided his time and energies between Chicago and Davenport. For two and a half years he was in the service of the Bettendorf Company of Davenport. On August 1, 1895, he was appointed city electrician by the city council, who created the office at this time, Mr. Goldschmidt being the first incumbent. On January 1, 1901, he was succeeded by J. E. Moore. He was then frequently out of the city on general construction business for a Chicago form, at one time having charge of the Silvis plant in Rock Island. In 1903 he became the superintendent of the Davenport Gas & Electric and Street Railway Companies, which responsible positions he held for two years. He then resumed his former position as city electrician, which includes in its duties the inspection of all the wiring in the city. His offices are located on the third floor of the city building.
On June 28, 1894, Mr. Goldschmidt married Miss Anna Bremer, whose parents came from Germany and were among Scott county's early settlers. Their attractive home at 2222 West Fourth street receives additional interest from the presence of two children, Erma C., who is attending the public schools; and Alfred, Jr., who is four years of age.
Mr. Goldschmidt's fraternal relations extend to the Elks, the Owls and the Knights of Pythias, in all of which his membership is valued. He is a man who by sheer native brilliance ha made his mark and placed himself in one of the finest positions in the bestowal of the city.

Transcribed by Elaine Rathmann


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