Scott Co, Iowa - IAGenWeb Project


Charles W. Barr Biography

From "History of Davenport and Scott County" Vol. II by Harry E. Downer-S. J. Clarke Publishing Co. 1910 Chicago.

Surnames: Barr, West, Gettens, Robinson, Myrick

Charles W. Barr, who devotes his time and energies to general farming and stock-raising in Lincoln township, cultivates two hundred acres of arable and productive land about three miles east of Eldridge and also a tract of three hundred and twenty acres adjoining. He, therefore, carries on farming operations on an extensive scale and is meeting with substantial success in his undertakings. He was born on the farm which he now occupies, November 22, 1857, and is a son of Israel and Sarah E. (West) Barr, who were early settlers of this county. The father was born in Huntingdon county, Pennsylvania, July 3, 1831, and in 1846 accompanied his parents on their westward removal, the family home being established in Sheridan township in the year in which Iowa was admitted to the Union. The grandfather of our subject took up a claim of prairie land and since that time Israel Barr has continuously lived in this county. Throughout the greater part of his life he carried on farming but!
 has now retired and is enjoying a well earned rest in Davenport township. His wife passed away at the age of fifty-five years. The four children of that marriage were: Charles W.; William A., who is living in Davenport township; J. E., at home; and Sarah E., the deceased wife of Harry H. Gettens.
Charles W. Barr lived upon the home farm until ten years of age, when his parents removed to the city of Davenport, where they resided for a year and a  half. They then returned to the old homestead, upon which the father is still living, and Charles W. Barr continued with him until twenty-six years of age, when he took charge of the farm upon which he is now located. He had previously pursued his education in the district schools of Davenport and in Griswold College. For more than a quarter of a century he has remained continuously upon the farm which he is now cultivating, and in addition to raising the cereals best adapted to soil and climate he has for a long period engaged in raising stock, making a specialty of shorthorn cattle, horses and mules. He is an excellent judge of stock, so that he never makes a mistake in buying poor animals or in selling at a loss.
On the 20th of May, 1891, Mr. Barr was married to Miss Fredonia a. Myrick, a daughter of F. D. and Sarah E. (Robinson) Myrick, both of whom were natives of Nashville, Tennessee, and at present reside at Mapleton, Kansas, where her father follows the occupation of farming. Mr. and Mrs. Barr have three children: Richard, who is now a student in Brown's Business College in Davenport; Stella M., attending the same institution; and Edna E., at home. Mrs. Barr was born in Mapleton, Kansas. She has made her home a hospitable one, ever open for the reception of the many friends of the family. Mr. Barr holds membership with the Woodmen of the World at Long Grove and is highly esteemed in that order and throughout the county wherever he is known. He has lived here for more than a century, so that he has witnessed much of its growth and development and has borne active and helpful part in the work of general progress and improvement.

Transcribed by Elaine Rathmann


Thomas F. Halligan Biography

From History of Davenport and Scott County, Vol. II by Harry E. Downer-S. J. Clarke Publishing Co. 1910 Chicago.

Surnames: Halligan, McNally, Lillis, Young

Davenport, the commercial center of Iowa and the home of many extensive wholesale houses, finds one of its prominent representatives in Thomas F. Halligan, president of the Halligan Coffee Company, an enterprise of large and extensive proportions, in the development of which he has been a most important factor. In commercial affairs he displays marked ability in discriminating between the essential and non-essential and bringing into close harmony the varied forces that constitute the interests of the enterprise with which he has been associated. He is one of the city's native sons, born October 25, 1855. His father, Patrick Joseph Halligan, was a native of Ireland, born in Summerhill, County Meath, August 31, 1825. He came to the United States as a young man of twenty-four years, settling in Paterson, New Jersey, in 1849. He there resided for two years, during which time he was married, on the 27th of October, 1850 to Miss Ellen McNally, a native of Clonard, County Kildare, Ireland, who came to the United States in 1850 and died in 1897. In 1851 Patrick J. Halligan and his young wife removed from Paterson, New Jersey, to Peru, Illinois, where for two years he was connected with the gas business. On the 17th of August, 1853, he arrived in Davenport and was superintendent of the gas company here from 1858 until 1888, or for a period of thirty years, at the end of which time he retired. He enjoyed in unqualified measure the confidence and trust of those whom he represented and gave to them an efficient and valuable service, which was indicated in his long connection with the company. He enjoyed, moreover, the unwqualified good will and esteem of all with whom he came in contact outside of business relation. He had a strong love for the land of his birth and was a member of the Sarsfield Guards when in Ireland, but was ever a most loyal American, in full sympathy with the republican form of government and the liberal principles for which this country stands. He died in 1893.

Thomas F. Halligan was the third in a family of six children, all of whom were born in Davenport with the exception of the eldest son, John. In St. Marguerite's parochial school Thomas F. Halligan pursued his studies until fifteen years of age, when he accepted a position in a flour and feed store, where he continued for a year. He then became delivery clerk in the grocery store of Morrison & Glaspell and thus obtained his initial knowledge of the business, with which he has been more or less intimately associated since that time. He remained with the firm and their successors for five years and in June, 1875, accepted a position with Milton J. Gaspell. On the 1st of January, 1884, he entered into partnership with Mr. Glaspell in the grocery business at No. 16 East Third street under the firm name of Glaspell & Halligan. They were very successful, the firm enjoying a growing trade until 1887, when Mr. Halligan sold his interest and with G. J. Washburn organized the Washburn-Halligan Coffee Company, carrying a large line of teas, coffees and spices. This undertaking also proved profitable from its inception and after five years at their original location the firm in 1892 removed from Third street to larger quarters at No. 215 East Second street. On two occasions they suffered losses through fire but with resolute purpose they conducted their interests, the business continuing to prosper and grow until there was a pressing demand for still more commodious quarters. In 1907 the present magnificent building was erected and the business is now carried on extensively on East Fourth street. This is one of the most complete and attractive wholesale buildings in Davenport, where the wholesale trade of this section of the country largely centers. Mr. Washburn retired in 1896 and the business was then reorganized under the name of the Halligan Coffee Company, with Thomas F. Halligan as president, R. F. Miller, vice president, William Lillis, secretary, and Joseph E. Halligan, treasurer. The trade today extends largely over Iowa, Missouri, the Dakotas, Minnesota and Illinois. The house sustains an unassailable reputaion for the reliability of its business methods, and the spirit of enterprise and industry which dominates every department constitutes the basic element in the development of what is today one of the largest and most important wholesale concerns of the city.

On the 17th of August, 1886, Mr. Halligan was married to Miss Mary, a daughter of John and Bridget Lillis. Mrs. Halligan was born in Davenport and by her marriage has become the mother of six children: Gilbert L., Eugene J., Grace, Camilla, Thomas, Francis and Angela.

Mr. Halligan's social nature finds expression in his membership with the Commercial Club, the Woodmen of the World and the Knights of Columbus, and his standing in business circles is indicated in the fact that he has been elected to the presidency of the Jobbers & Manufacturers Association. He is active in every project concerning the welfare of the city and is a loyal son of Davenport, doing everything in his power to promote her welfare along the lines of substantial and permanent growth and improvement. He is recognized by friends and business associates as a man of high character and sterling qualities and his life record exemplifies many traits of character which are well worthy of emulation.

Biographical History and Portrait Gallery of Scott County...1895; American Biographical Publishing

Patrick Joseph Halligan.
     Mr. Halligan is a native of Ireland, being the son of John Halligan and Mary (Young) Halligan, now deceased, both born in England, but at the time of Patrick's birth on August 31, 1825, residents of Summerhill, County Meath. Mr. Halligan made up his mind early in life to come to America, thinking that in this country he would find better opportunities for his advancement, and accordingly he took passage in the year 1849, reaching the United States on the fifteenth of July. He settled at Paterson, New Jersey, where he remained for a couple of years.
     He was married in Paterson on October 27, 1850, to Miss Ellen McNally, a native of Clonard, County Kildare, and who was born on June 20, 1823. Mrs. Halligan came to America in 1850, touching the soil for the first time on August 18. Mr. and Mrs. Halligan have six children, all of whom reside in the City of Davenport. They are: John, James, Thomas, William and Joseph, sketches of whom appear elsewhere, and Mary, born October 18, 1859, now residing with her parents.
     Mr. Halligan left Paterson in May, 1851, and came west to Peru, Illinois, where for about two years he was connected with the gas business. On August 17, 1853, he reached Davenport where he has resided ever since. He was superintendent of the gas company here for thirty years (from 1858 to 1888), after which he retired from active life to the enjoyment of a well earned rest.
     He has never held a public office in the community, but he has been one of the most successful men who ever resided here, simply because he made his business the foremost purpose of his life. This, however, should not be understood to mean that he was so much occupied with his business that he took no interest in public affairs, but simply that he perfected himself, as nearly as it was in his power to do, in the business he chose when a young man and made himself so proficient in it that his services to the company were very valuable. Politics had no charms for him. He preferred rather a peaceful, domestic life than an exciting political career. In religious belief Mr. Halligan is a Catholic and in politics he is a Democrat.

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Hans Nissen Biography

From "History of Davenport and Scott County" Vol. II by Harry E. Downer-S. J. Clarke Publishing Co. 1910 Chicago.

Surnames: Nissen, Hartwig.

In the years of his residence in Davenport, covering the period from 1874 until his death in 1906, Hans Nissen enjoyed the respect and good will of his fellow townsmen and was recognized as a leader among the German-American citizens. He was born in Wohlde, Friedenstadt, Schleswig-Holstein, Germany, September 24, 1847, and was a son of Hans Nissen, Sr.
Mr. Nissen of this review was reared in the land of nativity, acquired his education there and rendered military aid to the country in the German-Franco war of 1870-71. Immediately afterward he crossed the Atlantic to the new world and took up his abode in Chicago soon after the disastrous fire which destroyed much of that city. He continued his residence there until 1874, when he removed to Davenport and entered the employ of Peter Goldschmidt, an undertaker and furniture dealer, with whom he remained until 1880, when he utilized the capital that he had saved from his earnings in the establishment of an undertaking business on his own account. He soon built up a large and growing business and in 1901 he admitted his brother-in-law, A. Hartwig, to a partnership. The enterprise is still conducted under the same name and from the beginning the firm as enjoyed a liberal patronage, having a well appointed establishment and winning trade through straightforward and reliable methods.
Mr. Nissen was married in Davenport to Miss Dora Hartwig, who still survives him and makes her home in this city, where she is well known socially. Her father, James Hartwig, was well known in Davenport for many years as the proprietor of the old Western House, one of the leading hotels of the early days. Mr. Nissen was a public-spirited man, interested in all that pertained to the progress and welfare of Davenport, and as the years went by he cooperated in many movements for the general good. He was a member of eleven local societies, including the Independent Order of Odd Fellows, the Knights of Pythias and the Turners. His social qualities and sterling characteristics made him popular in these organizations, in which he had many friends. The wisdom of his choice in the selection of Davenport as a place of residence was demonstrated in the success which he won, and the city gained a citizen whose worth was widely acknowledged. He was devoted in friendship, reliable in business and loyal to every trust given to his care, and as the years passed by he firmly established himself in the affection of his friends.

Transcribed by Elaine Rathmann


Presley B Nebergall

From "Vol 2 History of Davenport and Scott County" by Harry E. Downer - S. J. Clarke Publishing Co. 1910 Chicago

That the life history of Presley B. Nebergall is the record of success is due to the persistent effort and intelligently directed industry which he displayed through the many years of his connection with agricultural interests in Scott county. He was born in West Virginia, in 1834, and pursued his education in his native state. In 1854, when a young man of twenty years, he came to Scott county with his father, Jacob Nebergall, who settled in Blue Grass township, where he purchased a partially improved farm. Later he bought more land at different times and improved his acreage, devoting his remaining days to general agricultural pursuits.

After coming to Iowa, Presley B. Nebergall lived with his parents on the home farm and assisted his father in the cultivation and improvement of the fields until his marriage, which was celebrated on the 27th of January, 1859. On that date he wedded Miss Felicity B. Van Bibber, who was also a native of West Virginia. They began their domestic life on a farm of one hundred and twenty acres near the home of his father and there Mr. Nebergall continued to cultivate his fields until his life's labors were ended in death on the 22d of September, 1878. He was diligent and persevering and, working on persistently year by year, he won that measure of prosperity which always crowns earnest and indefatigable effort.

Unto Mr. and Mrs. Nebergall were born six children, but one son, George, died at the age of twenty-two years. The others are: J. F. and Jacob A., both of whom are now residents of Davenport; Mrs. Eugenia Whittaker, who is living in Grinnell, Iowa; Edward Lee; and Mrs. Grace Porter, whose home is in Canada. There are also twelve grandchildren in the family.

When Mr. Nebergall purchased the home farm he paid thirty-five dollars per acre for it, but with the settlement of the county and owing to the improvements placed upon the farm its value increased until Mrs. Nebergall sold it some years after her husband's death for one hundred and twenty-five dollars per acre. Following her husband's demise she resided thereon for fifteen years, or until 1893, when she removed to this city and purchased a tract of land within the city limits upon which she has since made her home. It was at that time that she disposed of her farm, obtaining therefore a substantial price which places her in comfortable financial circumstances.

In his political views Mr. Nebergall was a stalwart democrat, believing that the adoption of the principles of that party would best conserve the interests of good government. He served as president of the school board in his township and was a stanch champion of the cause of public education. He held membership in the Baptist church, in which he was a deacon, and at all times was a public-spirited man, active in support of measures that contributed to the social, educational and moral progress of the community. All who knew him respected him for his sterling worth and he left to his family the priceless heritage of an untarnished name.

Transcribed by Debbie Gerischer


Rev. Anthony Niermann

From "Vol. 2 History of Davenport and Scott County" by Harry E. Downer - S. J. Clarke Publishing Co. 1910 Chicago

Rev. Anthony Niermann, for over fifty years the revered pastor of St. Joseph's parish, was born in Germany, August 9, 1831, a son of John Henry and Fransica (Witting) Niermann, life-long residents of Germany. He is one of a family of six children, four daughters and two sons. His early studies were pursued in Germany. He was perfected in philosophy and theology, and, owing to the strictness of the examinations, his education was thorough in every respect.

While he long desired to come to America, Father Niermann remained in Germany until his father's death. In the meanwhile the demand for young German priests was growing, owing to the tide of German emigration which swept over the United States, and when he was ready to come here, he was received into the diocese of Dubuque. Upon his arrival he continued his studies at a Catholic academy in St. Louis, under Rev. Hennessey, afterward archbishop, and a stong friendship sprung up between the two, which only the death of the latter severed. Father Niermann was ordained at Dubuque by Bishop Clement Smith, and on April 2, 1859, was sent to Davenport. For many years before the building of the church, services were held in the small structure now used as a schoolhouse. The cornerstone of St. Joseph's church was laid in 1881. Many changes have taken place since Father Niermann came here to take charge of what is now St. Joseph's parish, but was then a part of the parish of St. Cunegonda. The populous district where the church stands, in the center of the city, was then on the outskirts. Father Niermann states that he often shot quails and rabbits in his own dooryard.

This venerable old priest is beloved, and deservedly so, by the people he has labored among so long. Genial and entertaining, he also shows the marks of the scholar and churchman. During his whole career in the priesthood, this good man has labored solely for his people in Davenport, never having been assigned to another charge, nor will he be. St. Joseph parish is the child of his heart and brain and nothing but death will separate them.

Transcribed by Debbie Gerischer


J.P. Oberleitner

From "Vol 2 History of Davenport and Scott County" by Harry E. Downer - S. J. Clarke Publishing Co. 1910 Chicago

In the years, amounting to almost a quarter of a century, that J. P. Oberleitner has been connected with the life of Liberty township, he has proved himself a public-spirited and valuable citizen. As manager of the H. O. Seiffert Lumber Company's branch here, he has been instrumental in advancing the business activity of the recently established village of New Liberty in whose welfare he has taken an active interest. This man of industry, energy and enterprise was born in Kaltenkirchen, Holstein, Germany, August 17, 1869, and is a son of Christian H. and Elizabeth (Schmidt) Oberleitner, both natives of the same province as their son. In 1876 they came to the United States, coming directly to Davenport which remained their home until they moved to New Liberty. Here the mother passed away, in January, 1902, when she was seventy-five years old, and here the father still lives, pursuing the carpenter's trade, to which his whole life has been devoted. A daughter, Catherine, was born to him and his wife, and she passed away.

J. P. Oberleitner, the only son, was about seven years of age when his parents settled in Davenport, where he attended the pblic schools, in which he received a good education, and in that city also learned the carpenter's trade. About twenty-three years ago he came to Liberty township, which has since been his home and the scene of his labors. He was accounted a good workman, and a good man of business, who had developed the power to guide others during the years in which he had worked here. These were the very qualities for which the H. O. Seiffert Company sought when they opened a branch of their Davenport house here. The company are extensive dealers in lumber, coal, builders' hardware, bricks, tile and sun-proof paints, so that a wide field of operations demanded a manager of pronounced ability. Such a one they believed they had discovered in Mr. Oberleitner, and in the last seven years, during which he has filled that position, there has never been any indication that their judgment was at fault. Mr. Oberleitner has proved that he was the man for the place, and has conducted the interests of his employers here with profit. At the same time he has advanced the welfare of the little community in which he lives, for when the establishment of a bank here was agitated he became one of the organizers and is still one of the directors of the German Savings Bank of New Liberty.

On the 8th of July, 1893, was celebrated the marriage of Mr. Oberleitner and Miss Lizzie Arp, who was born in Davenport, July 23, 1870. Her parents, Heinrich and Trina (Bock) Arp, were natives of Probstei, but after coming to this country settled in Davenport, whence they moved to New Liberty, which is now their home. Mr. Oberleitner is a democrat in his political affiliations, and upon that party's ticket was elected to the position of township clerk, in which capacity he is now serving his second term. When the village of New Liberty was organized in August, 1909, he was also elected its clerk, as the record of his work in the township warranted the placing of additional responsibilities upon his shoulders.

Transcribed by Debbie Gerischer


Elise Overdieck

"Vol 2 History of Davenport and Scott County" by Harry E. Downer - S. J. Clarke Publishing Co. 1910 Chicago

Mrs. Elise Overdieck, occupying one of the fine residences of Davenport, has been a resident of this city for more than a half century, living on the site of her present home since 1854. She is the widow of Gustave Overdieck, who was born in the village of Preetz, Holstein, Germany, January 18, 1818. His parents, Ludarino and Dora Overdieck, spent their entire lives in Germany, the father following merchandising. Gustave Overdieck, reared in his native land, came to the United States in 1848, when about thirty years of age. He landed at New Orleans, whence he made his way northward to Davenport, but, purchasing a small tract of land in the vicinity of the city, took up his abode there and resided thereon until 1854. In that year he purchased an acre and a quarter of land in the city and built thereon a house, which was later destroyed by fire. He then erected the present fine residence occupied by his widow. His death occurred on the 29th of March, 1877.

Mr. Overdieck was married in this county to Miss Elise Anderson, a daughter of D. J. and Marie Anderson, who came to Iowa with their family in 1848, having previously been residents of Kiel, Germany. The father purchased one hundred and sixty acres of land in Pleasant Valley township. It was nicely improved with substantial buildings and an orchard and as the years passed Mr. Anderson continued to devote his time and energies to the further development of the place. He only lived for a short time after his arrival, however, nor did his wife survive for very long. Their daughter Elise was born on the 18th of November, 1829, and it was in the spring of 1851 that she gave her hand in marriage to Mr. Overdieck. They became the parents of five children: Harriet, at home; Frederick, who departed this life in 1876; Charlotte, the widow of O. S. McNeil, of Davenport; Ellen, the wife of L. F. Robinson, of Davenport, by whom she has a daughter, Amy; and Albert, at home. Mrs. Overdieck is now one of the esteemed old ladies of Davenport, having passed the eightieth milestone on life's journey and fifty-five years of that period has been spent as a resident of this city, while for sixty-one years she has lived in the county. She is therefore familiar with much of its history and relates many interesting incidents of the early days before the evidences of pioneer life had been entirely replaced by the improvements of a modern civilization.

Transcribed by Debbie Gerischer


August Paustian

From "Vol 2 History of Davenport and Scott County" by Harry E. Downer - S. J. Clarke Publishing Co. 1910 Chicago

One of the native sons of Hickory Grove township, whose bountiful harvests sustain the reputation of this section of Iowa as an agricultural center is August Paustian, who was born March 2, 1856, a son of Frederick and Christina (Roehs) Paustian. They were both natives of Holstein, Germany, the former having been born January, 14, 1820, the latter August 28, 1825. In the country of their birth they were reared and married, coming to the United States in 1851. On their arrival they made their way to Scott coutny, Iowa, locating upon a farm in Hickory Grove township, which had belonged to Mr. Paustian's father-in-law. He had learned the trade of a mason in the fatherland and this he pursued to some extent in this country in connection with the general farming, to which he devoted himself more and more as it proved a remunerative occupation. In the course of time he became very well-to-do and highly respected among the pioneers of this county, which remained his home until January 27, 1886, when at the age of sixty-five years he passed away. His wife, who survived him about fifteen years, died July 21, 1900, when she was seventy-five years of age. They had a family of twelve childfen, but two died in childhood. The others are: Caroline, the wife of Martin Greenwood, of Cleona township; Fred, who resided in Minnesota; August, the subject of this sketch; Emma, the wife of Christ Paustian, of Cleona township; Louis, who makes his home in Cedar county, Iowa; Sophia, the wife of William Buhmann, of O'Brien county, Iowa; James, who resides in Hickory Grove township; Charles, also a farmer in Hickory Grove township; Minnie, the wife of Herman Meinert, of Cleona township; and Bertha, the wife of Henry Paulsen of Muscatine county, Iowa.

August Paustian has spent all his life in Hickory Grove township and attended the district school near his home. He assisted his father in the cultivation of the fields constituting the homestead until he was married. Accordingly, he went to Cedar county, Iowa, where he remained for three years, at the expiration of that period returning to Hickory Grove township, Scott county, Here he operates a tract of one hundred and fifty-three acres of land on section 19, Liberty township, a landholding of no inconsiderable value. His wife recently bought one hundred and sixty acres on section 33, Hickory Grove township, a farm that was formerly known as the Goetsch homestead, so that in the aggregate Mr. Paustian has a large amount of land under his control. In addition to his agricultural interest he holds stock in the farmers elevator of Walcott, one of the progressive enterprises of that village.

In 1884 was celebrated the marriage of Mr. Paustian and Miss Matilda Lamp, who was born in Hickory Grove township, April 30, 1863. She is a daughter of Claus H. Lamp, who was one of the prominent farmers of his section of Scott county but has now retired from active life and lives at 1026 West Fourteenth street, Davenport. He was the parent of seven children: one who died in infancy, Matilda, Caroline, Julius, Gustav, Clara and Adolph. To Mr. and Mrs. Paustian were born eleven children, of whom seven are living, namely: Meta, Wilma, Julius, August, Martha, Hilda and Clarence. Hugo died at the age of six years. Harry was three and a half when he passed away. Alma died when three years old, and Edward was only two months when he died.

Although other tracts embrace a larger area none express more careful and thorough cultivation of the soil than does that which is Mr. Paustian's. He has not spared industry to make it productive and as he cultivates the fields with intelligence he knows how to bring from them the largest harvests.

Transcribed by Debbie Gerischer


Henry C. Plambeck

From "Vol 2 History of Davenport and Scott County" by Harry E. Downer - S. J. Clarke Publishing Co. 1910 Chicago

Henry C. Plambeck, a retired cigar manufacturer of Davenport, has lived in well earned ease for the past fifteen years. His birth occurred at Preetz, Holstein, Germany, on the 28th of April, 1841, his parents being Detlef and Margaret (Brooks) Plambeck. The father, who was born in 1811, was engaged in the shoe and tanning business in Germany, although his ancestors had followed general agricultural pursuits. He likewise served as a soldier in the Danish army, as his country was at that time under Danish rule. In 1852, in company with his wife and children, he set sail for the new world, landing at New Orleans after an ocean voyage of eight weeks. The trip up the Mississippi to Davenport consumed four weeks, for the ice in the river impeded the progress of their boat and several stops were necessary. On arriving in this city Detlef Plambeck opened a shoe shop but soon afterward his health became impaired and after lying ill for about two and half years he passed away in 1855. His widow still survives at the remarkable age of ninety-seven years, her birth having occurred on the 28th of February, 1813. She is the oldest person living in Scott county and has a very wide acquaintance within its borders. She became the mother of seven children, three of whom died in infancy. The others were as follows: Detlefine, who is deceased, as is also her husband, Louis Feid; Henry C., of this review; Dorothea, the widow of Henry Vollmer; and Minnie, who is the widow of Ludwig Bruning.

Henry C. Plambeck did not begin his education until he was a lad of about eight, as he suffered from ill health during the early years of his life. He was eleven years of age at the time he accompanied his parents on their emigration to the United States, and for about two months he attended a German school in Davenport but on account of the illness of his father was compelled to abandon his studies and assist in the support of the family. He was first employed as a farm hand, clearing hazel brush at a wage of twenty-five cents per day, and subsequently worked in the vicinity of Davenport at various occupations, scorning no employment that would yield him an honest living. In 1855 he began learning the cigar maker's trade and was continuously identified with that line of activity for four decades or until the time of his retirement in 1895. He was in the service of the Kuhnen Cigar Company for about thirty years, acting in the capacity of foreman for about twenty-three years of that time. At two different intervals he was engaged in business at Davenport as a cigar manufacturer on his own account and also conducted an enterprise of that character in Denver, Colorado, for about a year. When his untiring energy and capable management had brought him a handsome competence he put aside business cares and for the past fifteen years has lived in honorable retirement at Davenport, making his home with his mother.

Mr. Plambeck belongs to the German Pioneers Society and is also a worthy exemplar of the Masonic fraternity. He has a very wide acquaintance in the county which has been his home for more than a half century and enjoys the respect of all with whom business or social relations have brought him in contact.

Transcribed by Debbie Gerischer


Henry Vollmer

From "Vol 2 History of Davenport and Scott County" by Harry E. Downer - S. J. Clark Publishing Co. 1910 Chicago

Henry Vollmer, long a respected resident and active business man of Davenport, learned the printer's trade as the initial step in his business career and from a humble position worked his way steadily upward until he gained that success which comes from the capable management of large and important printing interests. He was a a native of Germany and one of a family of several children. When little more than three years of age he was brought by his parents to the new world, the family home being established in St. Louis, where the days of his boyhood and youth were passed and his education was acquired. In early manhood he learned the printer's trade, which he followed in St. Louis and neaby towns until 1861, when he came to Davenport. Here he took a position with the German Democrat, being made foreman of the composing room, and for almost a score of years he remained on that paper, his long connection therewith being incontrovertible proof of his capability and fidelity in discharging the duties that devolved upon him. In 1880 he resigned to engage in business on his own account and purchased an interest with J. M. Buck in a rubber stamp manufacturing enterprise. They extended the scope of their activities to include job printing and the partnership relation was maintained for some time, but eventually Mr. Buck sold his interest to A. L. Mossman and the firm of Mossman & Vollmer was formed. Under that style the business was continued until the death of Henry Vollmer, although for about a year prior to his demise his son Emil took his place in the active management of the business. Throughout his life Mr. Vollmer was actuated by laudable ambition and his earnest purpose and unfaltering industry constituted a force which won for him a gratifying measure of success.

In 1863 occurred the marriage of Henry Vollmer and Miss Dorothea Plambeck, of Davenport, and unto them were born seven children: Emil, Henry, Carl, Fred, Arthur, Agnes and Dora. The children have all been provided with good educational privileges, not only in the schools of Davenport but also at Iowa City. Mrs. Vollmer was brought to this city when seven years of age by her parents and her father died three years later. The death of Mr. Vollmer occurred December 12, 1890, and thus passed away a man whose sterling worth was recognized by all who knew him. He belonged to the Truners Society, the Ancient Order of United Workmen and to the Knights of Pythias, and he was also known and honored for his activity and faithfulness in political circles. In 1883 he was elected to the office of county recorder, in which position he served for two terms, retiring in 1887 with the confidence and good will of all concerned. He was a man of strict probity and upright character, who at all times and under all circumstances could be depended upon to conserve the best interests of any movement or measure with which he was connected. He won substantial success in business and more than that he gained the confidence and good will of his fellowmen, leaving to his family the priceless heritage of an untarnished name.

Transcribed by Debbie Gerischer


Fred Vollmer

From "Vol 2 History of Davenport and Scott County" by Harry E. Dwoner - S. J. Clarke Publishing Co. 1910 Chicago

During thirteen years' connection with the bar of Davenport, Fred Vollmer has made steady progress, recognizing the fact that in law advancement must depend upon individual effort and merit. He was born in this city, December 12, 1874. His father, Henry Vollmer, was a native of Bremen, Germany, and came to the United States in 1853, when three years of age, his parents crossing the Atlantic to America and settling in Davenport. After attaining to years of maturity, Henry Vollmer became a prominent citizen, both in his commercial connections and in his association with public affairs. For many years he conducted a printing business and the enterprise was one of large and profitable proportions. As a citizen he took active and helpful interest in various measures for the public good and for four years served as county recorder. He married Dora Plambeck and continued a resident of Davenport from 1853 until 1890, when he was called to his final rest.

Reared in the city of his nativity, Fred Vollmer at the usual age began his education in the public schools and passed through consecutive grades until he was qualified to enter the Iowa State University. It was in that institution that he prepared for a professional career, being graduated from the law department with the class of 1896. He was then admitted to practice and opened an office in Davenport, where he has since remained. He has always engaged in the general practice of law, keeping well informed on various branches of jurisprudence and his continued research and investigation along professional lines has given him rank among the more able and successful lawyers fo the city.

Mr. Vollmer is also active in politics as a supporter of the democratic party and his labors have been an effective force in promoting its success. In 1908 he was elected county attorney, which position he is still filling and neither fear nor favor can swerve him in the faithful performance of his duties. His social relations are with the Benevolent and Protective Order of Elks and outside of fraternal organizations he has many warm friends, having always resided in the city where he yet makes his home.

Transcribed by Debbie Gerischer


Karl Vollmer

From "Vol. 2 History of Davenport and Scott County" by Harry E. Downer - S. J. Clarke Publishing Co. 1910 Chicago

Davenport, his native city, numbers among her honored and successful physicians Dr. Karl Vollmer, who by reason of his ability and thorough training has attained foremost rank among the representatives of the medical profession in this city. Born on the 20th of November, 1869, he is a son of Henry and Dorothea (Plambeck) Vollmer, extended mention of whom is made on another page of this volume, and a brother of Henry Vollmer, attorney and counsellor of this city.

In the public schools of Davenport Dr. Vollmer acquired his preliminary education and later, deciding upon the practice of medicine as his life work, became a student under the direction of Surgeon-in-Chief Peck, of the Rock Island Railway, and was the last one to study under that well known physician, who was recognized as one of the best medical practitioners of his day. Under his guidance Dr. Vollmer became imbued with the importance of his profession and also its beauty, mystery and unselfishness, and it was his ambition to follow in the footsteps of him who was his principal inspiration. With this end in view he entered the medical department of the Iowa State University, from which he was graduated in 1892, and then went abroad, spending a season at the Allegemeine Krankenhause in Vienna in post-graduate work. This was followed by a season as assistant in the Royal Opthalmic Hospital in London, after which he returned to Davenport, and in the fall of 1893, thus well equipped, entered upon the practice of his profession in this city. His study abroad had been confined pricipally to the eye, ear, nose and throat, and along this line he has since continued to specialize, his office in the Schmidt building being thoroughly equipped with every modern and up-to-date accessory for carrying on this branch of the medical profession. In 1906 he again went abroad and supplemented his former study by work at Warzburg University. He keeps in close touch with his professional brethren through his membership in the National, State and County Medical Societies, and the high place which he occupies in medical circles is indicated by the fact that in 1907 he was elected to the presidency of the latter organization.

It was in 1897 that Dr. Vollmer was united in marriage in Davenport to Miss Paula Koehler, a daughter of Henry and Ottilie Koehler, mention of whom will be found elsewhere in this volume. This union has been blessed by the birth of one son, born on the 20th of October, 1902, who is the life and light of the household. The family reside in an attractive home at No. 817 West Seventh street, and are very prominent in the social circles of the community.

Dr. Vollmer is on the staff of Mercy and St. Luke's Hospitals, and with a large private practice demanding his time and talents, he has little time for the amenities of life, yet he takes time to keep up his interest in things municipal and social and gives hearty support to the democratic party, while he is a member of the Commercial Club, the Outing Club, the Davenport Turn Verein and many local social societies of lesser note. His principal interest, however, is in his profession, the duties of which he performs in a conscientious and thorough manner, fully realizing the heavy responsibilities that rest upon him in the conduct of his chosen calling. Davenport has watched with interest his rapid and substantial rise and this city, in which he was reared and which has been the center of his efforts and activities, recognizes him as one of her most valuable citizens and an honor to his profession.

Transcribed by Debbie Gerischer


C. Henry Witt Biography

From "History of Davenport and Scott County" Vol. II by Harry E. Downer-S. J. Clarke Publishing Co. 1910 Chicago.

Surnames: Witt, Hoch, Oelrick, Busing, Melius, Puck, Petersen, Stuart, Kern

C. Henry Witt, a prominent agriculturist of Rockingham township, Scott county, forms part of that great German element of which, added to our native stock, helps to give it stamina. He was born in Holstein, Germany, June 1, 1851, his parents being Frank and Cecelia (Hoch) Witt. When Mr. Witt was only two years of age his father died and in course of time the mother again married, the second husband being a Mr. Oelrick. His mother by her first marriage had three children: Dorothy, deceased; Christina, who is the wife of Gerhart Busing of Nebraska; and the subject of the sketch. To the second marriage were born Herman, and Anna, who became the wife of Henry Melius, now deceased. In 1868 Mr. Oelrick resolved to bring his household to America and to prove or disprove for his own satisfaction the reports of wealth and opportunity lying in wait for the thrifty immigrant. They landed in New York but went on at once to Chicago. There their hopes in the promised land were to suffer a severe blow for they were overcharged to a great extent by a dishonest hotelkeeper with whom they were unable to cope on account of their unfamiliarity with the language and customs of the country. They were without sufficient money to pay the exorbitant bill and Mr. Witt's sisters were compelled to stay and work it out. The rest of the family came on to Davenport, the subject of the sketch having in his pocket at the time of his arrival only the sum of fifty cents. Fortunately he secured work in a very short time as driver on an ice wagon at which he continued for about nine years. At the end of that time he found himself, on account of his previous thrifty conduct, able to enter the ice business for himself, and he remained in this more independent capacity for about five years. In 1882 he made a radical change by becoming a landowner and agriculturist. He first purchased some eighty acres in Rockingham township from Henry Puck. Upon taking possession of this he built a house and made numerous other improvements and, thus satisfactorily environed, lived there until 1906. In this year he purchased from Mr. Petersen his present valuable homestead, also in Rockingham township, and built a substantial and attractive residence in which his household is at present established. His farms, the first of which is rented, are well improved and in a high state of cultivation. He does not specialize but engages in general farming with much success.
Mr. Witt has been twice married. He first wedded Miss Mary Stuart, and to this union one child, a daughter, named Helen, was born. Both mother and daughter are deceased. His second marriage occurred in November, 1889, his wife, hose maiden name was Carrie Kern, being the daughter of Frank and Christina Kern of Germany. They lived and died in their native land, although the mother at one time visited her daughter in America. Four children came to bless this union: Charles, born December 28, 1890; Mary, June 4, 1892; Henry, December 8, 1894; and William, October 24, 1901. All four of them reside under the parental roof.
The survey of the life of C. Henry Witt from the time he arrived in Davenport, a simple German boy with fifty cents in his pocket, to his present position of independence and respect is indeed inspiring and an eloquent testimony both as to Mr. Witt's native ability and the possibility of his adopted land.

Transcribed by Elaine Rathmann


Henrich Speth Biography

From "History of Davenport and Scott County" Vol. II by Harry E. Downer-S. J. Clarke Publishing Co. 1910 Chicago.

Surnames: Speth, Arp, Miller, Nissen, Gerken.

Henrich Speth, a retired agriculturist, has made his home in Davenport since 1893 and is the owner of the property on which he resides. His birth occurred in Holstein, Germany, on the 12th of August, 1832, his parents being Eben and Antya (Arp) Speth. The father spent his entire life in the fatherland, but the mother came to this country and died in Iowa. Their children were five in number, namely: Elsbie and Katherina, both of whom are now deceased; Claus, living in Germany; Henrich, of this review; and Lena, who has also passed away.
Henrich Speth, who obtained his education in Germany, spent the first twenty-two years of his life in that country and in 1854 crossed the ocean to the United States, landing at New Orleans. Thence he made his way up the Mississippi river to Davenport, Iowa, arriving here in the month of September. He first secured employment on a flat boat but soon afterward became identified with agricultural interests as a farm hand, being thus engaged for several years. Subsequently he devoted his attention to the cultivation of rented land and broke prairie. In 1863 he purchased one hundred and twenty acres of improved land in Cleona township and the following years bought an adjoining tract of forty acres, but never lived thereon. He leased his property for a number of years and did not take up his abode upon his first purchase until 1869. He had been married in 1859 and resided on the Miller farm in Blue Grass township until 1869, when he established his home on his farm in Cleona to!
wnship, erecting a commodious and substantial residence and otherwise improving the place. At the end of about six years he put aside the active work of the fields and removed to Durant, Iowa, where he lived retired for eighteen years. On the expiration of that period, in 1893, he came to Davenport and has here since continued to reside. He is a stockholder in the Durant Savings Bank and is well known and highly esteemed as one of the prosperous and representative citizens of his community.
On the 29th of December, 1859, Mr. Speth was united in marriage to Miss Bertha Nissen, a daughter of John and Maria Nissen. The mother passed away in Germany and the father afterward came to the United States, landing at New York in 1852. Mrs. Speth lived with an uncle at Jersey City for about four years and then came to Scott county, Iowa, with her father. The latter's demise occurred in 1875 while he was enroute to Germany on a visit. Mrs. Speth was one of a family of four children, two of whom died in Germany. The other, Christina, who gave her hand in marriage to Fritz F. Gerken, is also now deceased.
Politically, Mr. Speth is a stanch advocate of the democratic party. While living in Durant he served as a member of the council and proved a faithful and capable public official. He belongs to the Old German Settlers Association and is a valued member thereof. Germany has furnished to the United States many bright, enterprising young men who have left the fatherland to enter the business circles of this country with its more progressive methods, livelier competition and advancement more quickly secured. Mr. Speth found the opportunity he sought in the freedom and appreciation of the growing country. Though born across the water, he is thoroughly American in thought and feeling, and is patriotic and sincere in his love for the stars and stripes. His career is identified with the history of Scott county, where he has acquired a competence and where he is an honored and respected citizen. He has now passed the seventy-seventh milestone on this earthly pilgrimage and his life has ever been such that he can look back over the past without regret and forward to the future without fear.

Transcribed by Elaine Rathmann


P. A. Bendixen, M. D. Biography

From "History of Davenport and Scott County" Vol. II by Harry E. Downer-S. J. Clarke Publishing Co. 1910 Chicago.

Surnames: Bendixon, Beenk, Elspeth

Dr. P. A. Bendixen, a successful and progressive young medical practitioner of Davenport, has followed his profession here since January, 1907, having made a specialty of surgery. He was born in this city on the 8th of October, 1881, his parents being Peter and Catherine (Beenk) Bendixen, both of whom are natives of Germany. They were married, however in Davenport, the father making his way to this city in 1872. He was a cabinet maker by trade but secured a position as foreman in the Davenport Plough Works, acting in that capacity for a number of years. Subsequently he took up his abode in Gladbrook, Iowa, where he has been successfully engaged in the furniture business to the present time. Unto him and his wife were born three children but the two daughters died in infancy.
P. A. Bendixen, who was the youngest child in his father's family, obtained his education in the public schools of Gladbrook and after being graduated from the high school he entered the Chicago University, completing the scientific course at that institution in 1902. Having determined upon the practice of medicine as a life work, he became enrolled as a student at Rush Medical College and in 1905 the degree of M. D. was conferred upon him. He then had charge of the Chicago, Milwaukee & St. Paul Hospital in Chicago until 1906, when he went to Europe and for eight months pursued post graduate work at Berlin, Paris and Vienna, devoting special attention tot eh study of surgery, of which branch of practice he has since made a specialty. In January, 1907, he opened an office in Davenport, Iowa, and this city has since remained the scene of his professional labors. That he keeps I touch with the profession in its advancement, experimentation and experience is indicated through h!
is membership with the Scott County Medical Society, the Iowa State Medical Society, the American Medical Association, the Iowa and Illinois Central District Medical Society, the Chicago, Milwaukee & St. Paul Surgical Association and the American Association of Railway Surgeons. He acts as surgeon for the Chicago, Milwaukee & St. Paul Railroad and the Chicago, Burlington & Quincy Railroad and also for a number of manufacturing concerns and is examiner for the Northwestern Insurance Company.
In October, 1907, Dr. Bendixen was united in marriage to Miss Jane Elspeth Shuler, a native of Rapids City, Illinois. They now have a daughter, Jane Elspeth, whose birth occurred on the 23d of September, 1908.
Dr. Bendixen belongs to Davenport Lodge, No. 37, A. F. & A. M.; Davenport Chapter, No. 16, R. A. M.; Zarphath Consistory, No. 4; and Kaaba Temple, A. A. O. N. M. S.; and is like wise a valued and popular member of the Davenport commercial Club and the Davenport Outing Club. While yet a young man he has already attained a creditable position in professional circles, and the salient characteristics of his manhood are such as have brought him the warm regard of those with whom he has been otherwise associated.

Transcribed by Elaine Rathmann


Fritz Kuelper Biography

From "History of Davenport and Scott County" Vol. II by Harry E. Downer-S. J. Clarke Publishing Co. 1910 Chicago.

Surnames: Kuelper, Orth, Harder, Oldenburg, Arp, Weise, Detrick, Schwab

Fritz Kuelper, one of the old German settlers of Sheridan township, lives upon an excellent farm of eighty acres which he owns, and despite his advancing years continues to retain the responsibility of its cultivation. He was born in Mecklinburg, Germany, November 24, 1928, his parents being Mr. and Mrs. Christ Kuelper, both natives of the fatherland. The father was a farmer in the old country and about 1853 decided to try his fortune in America. Accordingly in that year he and his family embarked upon the long ocean voyage, and, after having landed in New York, came directly to Iowa. In Davenport Mr. Kuelper found employment and later rented land in Blue Grass township, where he devoted himself to farming. In his family were five children: Henry, who is deceased; Fritz, the subject of this review; Marie, who became the wife of William Orth, of Rock Island, Illinois; Minnie, deceased; and Christ, who is residing in Belle Plain, Iowa.
Fritz Kuelper was about twenty-five years of age when he came to this country, so that he had previously obtained his education and had some experience in the struggles of life. After his arrival in Scott county he found work in Davenport and upon the farms surrounding the city. Later he rented land, and, as the result of his savings, in 1879 bought the eighty acres on which he now lives. Some improvements had already been made upon it at the time of purchase, but these Mr. Kuelper carried forward, erecting fine barns, granaries and other buildings, and remodeling those already standing. He found the soil best adapted to general farming and to such he has devoted his attention, gaining in the course of years a well merited success.
After he had firmly established himself in the new country, Mr. Kuelper married Miss Dorothy Harder, a native of Germany. Their union was celebrated in December, 1866, and was blessed with eight children. Meta became the wife of William Oldenburg, of Lester, Iowa, and they have five children, Stella, Linda, Esther, Wilbur and Amanda. Julius, a resident of Walcott Iowa wedded Miss Minnie Arp and they have three children, Vera, Alice and Lillian. Emma became the wife of Herman Weise, of Rock Rapids, Iowa, and they have two daughters, Hazel and Alma. Amanda is at home. Frank married Miss Amanda Detrick and lives in Davenport. Edward is at home. Emelia became the wife of Otto Schwab, and they have two sons, Harland and Russell. Theodore died in infancy. Mrs. Kuelper has also passed away, her death having occurred July 28, 1898, when she was fifty-six years of age.
Mr. Kuelper is a member of the German Old Settlers Society, and while he has always been interested in local affairs has not in any sense of the word been an aspirant for political office, although he filled satisfactorily the position of road supervisor for a period of years. He has spent his life quietly and unostentatiously, performing each day's tasks as they came, and winning in return for industry and diligence an income that makes the higher enjoyment of life possible.

Transcribed by Elaine Rathmann


Christian Rock, Sr. Biography

From "History of Davenport and Scott County" Vol. II by Harry E. Downer-S. J. Clarke Publishing Co. 1910 Chicago.

Surnames: Rock, Klauschmidt, Meints, Greve, Quistorf.

The life of Christian Rock, Sr. is a graphic illustration of the possibilities existing for the poor boy who is equipped with plenty of dauntless energy, integrity and intelligence in lieu of more material capital. He was born in Prussia, Germany, January 15, 1829, his parents being Christian and Wilhelmina (Klauschmidt) Rock. The parental roof sheltered the following large family of children: Wilhelmina Frazier, deceased; Christian, the subject of the sketch; Ludwig of Dixon, Iowa; Henry; Fredericka; Louise Brockman, who died in this country; Wilhelm, of Clinton county; and Frederick, of Walcott. The death of the father occurred in Germany, but the mother came to Dixon and made her home with her son Ludwig.
Early in life young Christian Rock fixed his hopes on America and in 1853 he crossed the seas with his cousin William Rock. Coming to Iowa, he for several years earned his livelihood as a farm hand and from that time he climbed steadily up the ladder of fortune. Concluding to put into practice the experience gained upon the farms of others, he rented a farm of one hundred and fifty-three acres on section 4, Hickory Grove township, and there resided from 1861 until he took possession of his present valuable property a farm of two hundred acres on sections 32 and 29, that township, where he has lived for about twenty years. Prior to dividing it among his children Mr. rock owned seven hundred acres of land, all of it fertile and in a high state of improvement, for he is thoroughly progressive and believes in the application of science to agriculture.
In 1857 Mr. Rock was united in marriage to a lady of the same name as his own, Miss Wilhelmina Rock, born in Prussia March 6, 1830, who came to America in the year of her marriage,, and died February 17, 1910. Their union was blessed by the birth of the following six children: Christian Jr., of Hickory Grove township; Louise, the wife of William H. Rock, whose career is treated elsewhere in this volume; Caroline, the wife of Christian Rock, of Avoca, Iowa; Wilhelmina, the wife of Henry Meints of Allens Grove township; Fritz, deceased; and Fredericka, the wife of Gus Greve of Allens Grove township.
Mr. Rock is highly regarded and a loyal citizen of the county in which he and his children have enjoyed prosperity and many of Heaven's best gifts. He rejoices in the possession of many friends whose companionship his present well earned leisure permits him to cultivate.
Christian Rock, Jr., son of the above, was born April 18, 1858 in Blue Grass township, Scott county. When about three years of age he removed with his parents to the farm which he at present occupies his father having taken possession of another homestead some years ago. The subject of the sketch has reside there from that day to this and has enjoyed great success as a farmer. This tract is especially well improved, much of the credit being due to the father, and the place is adorned by a fine eight room residence. Mr. Rock owns an additional two hundred and ten acres on sections 32 and 29, and one hundred and fifty-three in section 4, Hickory Grove township. He enjoys a wide reputation as a breeder of shorthorn cattle and owns thirty head of registered cattle. He is also a stockholder in the Dixon Savings Bank.
In 1890 Mr. Rock was united in marriage to miss Theresa Quistorf. She was born in Scott county, March 17, 1868, her parents being Henry and Louisa Quistorf, both of them natives of Germany, who settled in Scott county and resided here until their deaths. Mr. and Mrs. Rock have a fine family of six children; namely: Albert William, Sadie Leonora, Edwin Christian, Eleanor Theresa, Walter Sylvester and Elmer Henry. The Rock family is one of the largest and most prominent in this part of the country and Christian Rock, Jr., and his household are worthy representatives.

Transcribed by Elaine Rathmann


Samuel W. Kylor Biography

From "History of Davenport and Scott County" Vol. II by Harry E. Downer-S. J. Clarke Publishing Co. 1910 Chicago.

Surnames: Kylor, Sparr, Flogg, Ehrhart, Stone, Scott, Zuchler, Wicks, Jones Maddox VanDuzen, Duff, Davidson, Tory, Wood, Clarke, Barber.

The life record of few men is marked by a greater success, a larger number of vicissitudes and a more persistent devotion to duty than has been that of Samuel W. Kylor, one of the more prosperous farmers of LeClaire township. He owns two hundred and fifty acres of fine arable land in this county, also considerable property in Kansas. A native of Williamsburg, Blair county, Pennsylvania, he was born August 3, 1844, a son of Jacob and Mary (Sparr) Kylor. The family is of German descent as his paternal grandfather, Jacob Kylor, came over from the fatherland and after settling in this country found employment as a teacher of the German language at Huntingdon, Pennsylvania, I 1822, and lived only until 1847. His wife was born in Blair county, Pennsylvania, in 1822, and survived him about ten years, her death occurring 1857. They were the parents of three children: Rebecca, who married Matthew Flogg, of Williamsburg, Pennsylvania; Samuel W., of this sketch; and Jacob, who was killed at the battle of Spottsylvania, May 12, 1864. He had enlisted as a member of Company E, Eighty-fourth Pennsylvania Infantry from Williamsburg in 1863.
Being but three years of age when his father died, Samuel W. Kylor was reared on the farm belonging to his maternal grandfather, Samuel Sparr, which is still in possession of his descendents. Upon it he and his sister lived until 1861, attending the district school in the meantime. On July 25, 1861, Mr. Kylor joined Battery F, First Regiment Pennsylvania Light Artillery. He enlisted from Williamsburg and was mustered in at Harrisburg, whence the regiment went into camp at Camp Curten. After about ten days spent there, they went to Washington, D. C., where they received their supplies. Thence they went to Tinleytown, Maryland, where they were stationed until February, 1862, to guard the Potomac. At that date they went to Hancock, Maryland, where they helped keep Jackson's forces form crossing the Potomac and then removed to Harpers Ferry, later proceeding to the Shenandoah valley in time to take part in the battle of Winchester. They were in camp at several places and finally went to Culpeper, Virginia, participating in Pope's retreat from that point to Washington. They were also present in the battle of Bull Run. After that engagement Mr. Kylor's battery and the Pennsylvania Bucktails covered the retreat to Chantilly, Virginia where Phillip Carney was killed. Thence they crossed a chain bridge over the Potomac into Maryland, participating in the battle of south Mountain and later in the battle of Antietam. After that engagement they camped in the vicinity of the town for about thirty days, then returning to Virginia and entering winter quarters at Mountain Creek, Virginia. There after a thirty days' furlough Mr. Kylor reenlisted in the same regiment. They encountered Jackson in a number of skirmishes in the Shenandoah valley and then followed Lee back to Gettysburg. In the famous battle at that place his regiment formed part of Ricketts battery, which was stationed on East Cemetery Hill. At the close of the fighting they followed Lee through V!
irginia, crossed the James river at City Point, sat in siege in front of Petersburg during the winter of 1864 and the spring of 1865. the position of the battery during that time was on Fort Hill. Next they followed Lee to Appomattox and after the surrender there, which virtually closed the war, they returned to City Point, they returned to City Point, loaded horses and equipment on a transport, went down the James river and up Chesapeake bay to Washington D. C., where they marched in the grand review. Thereafter they turned over their small arms to the government and took a train to Harrisburg, Pennsylvania, where they were mustered out June 10, 1865.
At the conclusion of the war Mr. Kylor returned to Williamsburg, where he continued his agricultural labors until April, 1868, when he came to Davenport, Iowa. There he bought from Mr. Lorton one acre of onions, which had been partly cultivated, situated near Camp McClellan on the middle road. He continued its cultivation, sold the product for one dollar and ten cents per bushel, and after that experience hired out to John Ehrhart, of Pleasant Valley. For one year he worked for him on the farm, receiving 20 dollars a month wages, and then went to Mrs. Henry Stone's place in Pleasant Valley township, which he operated on shares for one year. Then he rented eighty acres in LeClaire township but after one year's experience there went to Kansas city, Missouri, where he bought cattle, formed a partnership with Thomas Scott, of Davenport, and shipped the stock to him. At the end of a year he returned to Pleasant Valley township and bought hogs and cattle for John Zuchler and other packers. Later he married and bought forty acres of land from Mrs. Wicks, of LeClaire township. It was partly improved and adjoined the eighty acres which his wife owned. On it they lived for about fourteen years, buying in the meantime twenty acres from W. H. Jones and later one hundred acres from William Maddox. Later he removed to what was then known as Hopkins farm of one hundred and five acres, bought it a lived thereon four years, but then sold it and finally purchased from James VanDuzen the one hundred and eighty-five acres on which he now lives. Later he added to it the old Turner place of sixty-nine and a half acres. Having made a number of improvements in the way of barns, house, etc., his farm and residence are among the finest of Scott county. Here he pursues general farming with a success that entitles him to be known as one of the prominent farmers of his township.
It was while he was working for Mrs. Henry Stone that she became his wife. By her former marriage she had two sons, namely: J. F. Stone, of Waterloo, Iowa, and C. H. Stone, who lives at home. She is a daughter of William and Anna (Duff) Davidson, of Scott county, but was born in Blair county, Pennsylvania, May 9, 1842. In 1861 she came to Scott county, while her parents followed in 1869. They were both natives of Huntingdon county, Pennsylvania, the father having been born there in 1808, the mother in 1810. She died in 1870, but her husband lived until 1883. They had six children: Elizabeth, who married Jacob Tory; James, deceased; Abigail A., the deceased wife of Samuel Wood; Winifred, the wife of Mr. Kylor; Margaret, who married Horace Clarke, now deceased; and John W., deceased. The two sons, James and John, both served in the Union Army during the Civil war, the former as a member of the Eighty-fourth Pennsylvania Infantry, the latter in the One Hundred and Tenth Pennsylvania Infantry. It as on the 19th of August, 1874, that Mr. Kylor and Mrs. Stone were united in marriage and in the succeeding years became the parents of two children. Nellie, who was born October 4, 1875, married John Barber, of Dewitt Iowa, and they have one daughter, Nellie. Samuel, who was born December 16, 1880, lives at home.
Mr. Kylor has served most efficiently as township trustee for a period of six years, as road supervisor and as school director. At the present time he is a member of the soldier's relief commission, a body appointed by the county supervisors. In his public life as in his private concerns he has won the admiration of those who have come in contact with him for he has proved himself a man of high character and sterling integrity.

Transcribed by Elaine Rathmann


Adam S. Black Biography

From "History of Davenport and Scott County" Vol. II by Harry E. Downer-S. J. Clarke Publishing Co. 1910 Chicago.

Surnames: Black, Stewart

Adam S. Black now living retired in Lincoln township, but for many years was actively engaged in general farming and is still the owner of one hundred and sixty acres of good land on sections 32 and 33, where he yet lives. The place is neat and thrifty in appearance and indicates the labor that for many years he bestowed upon it. Mr. Black has now reached the seventy-eighth milestone on life's journey, his birth having occurred in Blair county, Pennsylvania, near Altoona, on the 7th of May, 1832. He is a son of Jacob and Mary Black, both of whom were also natives of the Keystone state, were the father followed the occupation of farming.
Adam S. Black acquired his education in the district schools of his native county but his opportunities in that direction were somewhat limited, as it was necessary that he go to work when very young, owing to the limited financial resources of the family. He worked on the farm with his parents until about twenty years of age, after which he secured employment in a flour mill and spent six years in that way. Believing that he would have better opportunities in the six years in that way. Believing that he would have better opportunities in the middle west, he came to Iowa in 1857, establishing his home in Scott county, where he had some friends living. He settled in Lincoln township and for a time was employed as a farm hand, after which he engaged in threshing. Purchasing a threshing machine, he operated it in the service of others for thirty-three years and was one of the best known threshers of this part of the state, always being busy during the harvest season.
In 1862 Mr. Black came to his present farm to board with Daniel Stewart, who at that time owned the place, and here Mr. Black has lived continuously sine. In 1872 he bought eighty acres of the farm and I 1875 purchased the remaining eighty acres, so that he now has an excellent property of one hundred and sixty acres. He has tiled the land and made all of the improvements upon the farm which is now an excellent and valuable property. He has never engaged in tilling the soil to any great extent himself but has rented the land and to it has given his general supervision. He is now living retired, for his activity and energy in former years brought to him a fair measure of success. He holds membership in the Lutheran church and is widely and favorably known in the community where he has now lived for more than half a century.

Transcribed by Elaine Rathmann


Fritz C. A. Zabel Biography

From "History of Davenport and Scott County" Vol. II by Harry E. Downer-S. J. Clarke Publishing Co. 1910 Chicago.

Surnames: Zabel, Baushtam, Tiedge, Schwartz, Thoede, Miller, Kettleson, Henning

Fritz C. A. Zabel owns and occupies a fine farm of two hundred and thirty-three acres on section 16, Butler township, and also has a tract of forty-five acres of timber land in Clinton county. His property holdings are proof of his life of well directed thrift and enterprise. Whatever success he has enjoyed is attributable to his own efforts, for he started out in life without assistance and his earnest, persistent labor has been the means of bringing him substantial financial reward. He was born in Mecklenburg, Germany, June 15, 1856, and is a son of William and Sophia Zabel. His father was a blacksmith by trade and followed that pursuit in Germany except for the period of his service I the army, covering six years. Believing that better business opportunities might be enjoyed in the new world, he left his native country in 18967 and with his family, consisting of wife and five children, landed at New York. He did not tarry on the Atlantic coast, however, but made his way at once into the interior of the country, coming direct to Scott county, where lived his brother-in-law, John Baushtam. He secured work at his trade in Davenport in the employ of Mr. Miller and there remained until he was able to save from his earnings a sufficient sum to make payment upon a farm. It was in 1870 that he purchased on hundred and sixty acres of land in Butler township. The place was improved and the family at once took up their abode thereon. Mr. Zabel with characteristic energy began the cultivation of the fields and continued to reside upon that property until 1886, when he removed to Davenport, where he is still living at the advanced age of seventy-seven years. He is a member of the Lutheran church and an earnest Christian gentleman, whose well spent life has won for him the esteem, confidence and honor of all who knew him. In 1882 he was called upon to mourn the loss of his wife, Mrs. Sophia Zabel, who died at the age of forty-eight years and was laid to rest in P. J. Tiedge's cemetery in Butler township. In their family were eight children: William, now living in Winfield township; Fritz c. A.; Amelia, the wife of Andrew Schwartz, now living on the old homestead; Theodore and Charles, who are resident farmers of Lincoln township; Meta, the wife of Henry Thoede, of Butler township; Albert, also of Lincoln township; and Alvina, who died at the age of eleven years and was laid to rest in the cemetery where her mother lies buried.
Fritz C. A. Zabel was educated in the schools of Germany and of Davenport an after putting aside his text-books learned the carpenter's trade, which he followed until twenty-seven years of age, working in all parts of Scott county. He went to Ida county, Iowa, with three other men in 1878 and they built a settlement there called Holstein. In 1883 Mr. Zabel married and turned his attention to farming, renting the place upon which he now resides, while later it came into possession of his wife through inheritance. Their original home was a log cabin, in which they lived for a number of years, after which Mr. Zabel erected a large, commodious and substantial frame residence which they now occupy. He has made many other substantial improvements upon the farm and in its cultivation and development has met with excellent success. He raises hogs, selling a large number each year. He has like wise made investment in other lines of business and is now a vice president and one of the directors of the McCausland Savings Bank and a stockholder in the American Security Company of Davenport.
On the 3d of March, 1883, was celebrated the marriage of Mr. Zabel and Miss Lena Miller, a daughter of Ernest and Christina (Kettleson) Miller, who were among the first and most prominent settlers of Butler township, casting in their lot here during pioneer times. Unto Mr. and Mrs. Zabel have been born six children: Wilma, the wife of L. H. Henning, of Butler township, by whom she has three children-Milton, Grace, and Loyd; Ernest, who is now in South Dakota, and Hilda, Fred, Hertha and Paula, all at home. Mr. Zabel was originally a democrat and upon that ticket was elected to the office of trustee of Butler township. He had served in the position for three years when his study of the political issues and questions of the day led him to give his support to the republican party, and by that party he was elected to the office of trustee and served for six years more. He is now acting as a school director and was road supervisor for six years. He is ever interested in measures!
 and projects for the welfare and upbuilding of the community and has cooperated in many movements of for the general good. In all of his business affairs he has proven himself reliable, energetic and diligent, and as the years have passed by he has won that success which is ever the reward of earnest labor and capable management.

Transcribed by Elaine Rathmann


Peter H. Hagedorn Biography

From "History of Davenport and Scott County" Vol. II by Harry E. Downer-S. J. Clarke Publishing Co. 1910 Chicago.

Surnames: Hagedorn, Krausfeldt, Kardel, Schwarten, Mohr, Klint, Elmegreen, Kirtley, Frick

When Peter H. Hagedorn came to Iowa Scott county was in the first stages of its development and even after he had reached man's estate and had entered upon his business career as a farmer he had to clear and break the land on which he lived for fifty years. Therefore, not only has he witnessed the transformation of the county and of the various townships in which he owned real estate, but he has participated in the difficult work of development. The success he won contributed in no small measure to the sum total of the prosperity of this section of the state. Having retired from active life, he still owns two hundred acres of arable land in Sheridan township, one hundred and forty five acres in Davenport township, one hundred and twenty in Lincoln township and two pieces of town property in the city of Davenport, which is now his home.
He was born in Holstein, Germany, November 3, 1930, a son of Claus and Margaret (Krausfeldt) Hagedorn. The father was a weaver by trade in his native land and about 1847 decided to come to the United States. The family disembarked at New Orleans and ascended the Mississippi river to Davenport, where they landed June 21, 1847. Upon his arrival Mr. Hagedorn, Sr., entered forty acres of land in Davenport township, as it was then known but is now included within the boundaries of Sheridan township. The tract had not at that time known the plow or harrow so that the work of breaking it for cultivation added hardships to the life of a man who would make a home in this locality. Nevertheless, undiscouraged by the difficult prospect, he brought his family to the township and built a house upon his little plot of ground, which was destined to remain his home for eight years. He then removed to Winfield township, now Sheridan township. In the course of years, however, he was able to add considerably to his property and finally felt justified in retiring from the active pursuit of farming. The last twenty years of his life were spent in comparative rest in the city of Davenport. He and his wife were the parents of four children: Peter, the subject of this sketch; Christian, deceased; Kathryn, who married Henry Kardel, of Davenport; and James, who lives in Minnesota.
For several years after his advent here Peter H. Hagedorn worked for various farmers in his vicinity, at the same time rendering his father assistance in the cultivation of the home farm until October 14, 1850, when he and his brother Christian bought one hundred and sixty acres in Winfield township, now Sheridan township, which they started to break immediately and in 1853, taking their sister as housekeeper, took up their residence upon it for they had built a house upon the place. There Mr. Hagedorn lived for almost half a century, when he removed to Davenport, leaving some of his children to operate the home place. His son Otto died there and he was compelled to return to assume the management of the place, so that it was not until 1903 that he was finally able to make Davenport his residence. In the course of years, while he tilled the soil with the skill and industry of the born agriculturist, he accumulated large land holdings, having four hundred and seventy acres. !
He knew the value of frugality and economy of time and labor, and, being a man quick to see the increasing value of farm property, he invested heavily. He assisted in organizing and was vice president of the German Mutual Fire Insurance Company of Scott county.
On the 3d of April, 1860, Mr. Hagedorn wedded miss Eliza Schwarten, a native of Germany, where her parents had died. Twelve children were born to them. Henry is deceased. Emma is at home. Laura married Otto Mohr, of Lincoln township, and they have four children, John, Samuel, Ralph, and Edna. Otto died at the age of thirty years. Meta married Herman Klint and lives in Lincoln township. They have four children, Harry, Lillian, Sadie and Arthur. Agnes became the wife of Elmer Elmegreen and lives in Davenport. They have two children, Oscar and Hildegarde. The next two died in infancy. Minnie became the wife of William Kirtley but has now passed away, leaving one child, Florence. William and Julia are at home. Ella married William Frick, of Davenport, and they have two children, Elmer and Elvina.
While Mr. Hagedorn was a resident of Sheridan township he was closely identified with public interests. For a number of terms he rendered efficient service as township trustee and as road supervisor and for the greater part of a decade was president of the local school board. His official duties were fulfilled with a devotion and fidelity which ever characterized his performance of trusts imposed upon him, gaining for him the high esteem of the men who knew him as a farmer and a friend.

Transcribed by Elaine Rathmann


Edward Collins Biography

From "History of Davenport and Scott County" Vol. II by Harry E. Downer-S. J. Clarke Publishing Co. 1910 Chicago.

Surnames: Collins, Tobin, Purcell

In the life of Edward Collins, who was for many years one of the prominent newspaper men of Davenport and is now the auditor of Scott county, we have an exemplification of what is only too infrequently the case, the office seeking the man. A native of this city, he was born November 15, 1864, a son of Jeremiah and Mary (Tobin) Collins, both of Irish birth, who as young people came with their parents to this country at the time of the famine in Ireland. Jeremiah Collins located first in Detroit and Chicago, where he worked of years upon the lake steamers as steward. During that time, however, he also learned the trade of an iron molder, and when he came to Davenport, in the early '50s, he followed that calling until he retired from active life. His death occurred in 1907, when he was seventy-seven years of age, his life partner following him to the grave two years later. He and his wife were the parents of five children: one who died in infancy; D. J., passenger engineer upo!
n the Iowa Central Railroad; T. W., who served in the Philippines and is now engaged in river work in the south; Nellie, the widow of David Tobin and a resident of Savanna, Illinois; and Edward, the subject of the sketch.
Edward Collins received his fundamental training in the common English branches of education in the public schools of Davenport and then started to learn the printer's trade. He began upon the Northwestern News as printer's devil, ultimately becoming foreman. The Davenport Times was established by the same interests, and on that paper the subject of this sketch filled successively the positions of foreman, reporter, city editor and managing editor. In 1902 he went to the Davenport Republican as night editor, and then removed to New York city to assume charge of the composing room of the McClure's Magazine, which department was installed by him. He had been there only two years, however, when his health failed and he felt that he must reign his position. His employers were very reluctant to have him do that and rather than see him leave offered to send him upon a European trip to recuperate, provided he would remain with them. Nevertheless he could not be persuaded, but, feeling that he would be better in his native city, he returned to Davenport, where he assumed the duties of editor of the Daily Republican. In 1904, while occupying that position, he was elected city clerk, although he had not sought the office and had been too ill to do any campaigning, and two years later was elected county auditor. In 1908 he was the only republican who was elected in county or city, which is indicative of the high value the citizens place upon his services and the esteem in which he is held as a man and public servant.
In April, 1893, Mr. Collins was united in marriage to Miss Nellie Purcell also a native of Davenport and a daughter of Patrick Purcell, who was one of the old time locomotive engineers.
Mr. Collins belongs to a number of the social and fraternal societies of the city and is well esteemed among his fellow members. As a newspaper man he enjoyed the confidence of his associates and the public in general, and by the consideration shown during the years of service at the desk as also by the disposition to speak kindly rather than harshly of his fellowman he has made many warm friends who loyally come to his support when occasion demands and sincerely rejoice with him in the success that may follow. Despite the success that has rewarded his efforts and the honors that have been conferred upon him by his fellow citizens, Mr. Collins is the same plain, unassuming man he has always been and treasures deeply the friendship of the associates of his boyhood and his more strenuous days as a hustler in the newspaper whirl.

Transcribed by Elaine Rathmann



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