Scott Co, Iowa - IAGenWeb Project


Mrs. Marie L. Follette

From "History of Davenport and Scott County" Vol. II by Harry E. Downer-S. J. Clarke Publishing Co. 1910 Chicago.

Surnames: Follette, Wick, Franks, Davidson, Doty, Hatton, Hull, Rutan, Flora, Goodlow.

Mrs. Marie L. Follette, living in LeClaire, was born in Marion, Ohio, about forty miles from Columbus, on the 10th of March, 1833. She has, therefore, reached the age of seventy-seven years and is one of the most highly esteemed among the older ladies of this city. Her father, John Newton Wick, was born in 1801, and having arrived at years of maturity, he wedded Maria Louisa Franks, who was born July 4, 1804. His death occurred in October, 1834, when his daughter Mrs. Follette was only a years old, and in the year 1844 Mrs. Wick came to Iowa. She died in Platteville, Colorado, in May, 1890, at the advanced age of nearly eighty-six years. Her father was a soldier of the Revolutionary war and also the war of 1812, and participated in the battle of New Orleans under General Jackson. He was a slaveholder in Virginia, where for many years he made his home.
Mrs. Follette came to Iowa with her mother September 15, 1844, when but eleven years of age. She acquired her education in the schools of Portsmouth, Ohio, and there attended one of the  first public schools that was opened in the United States. She has been married twice. On the 22d of May, 1849, when but sixteen years of age, she gave her hand in marriage to Captain J. E. Davidson, a son of William and Elizabeth Jemini Davidson of Philadelphia. His grandfather was a well known sea captain. Unto Captain and Mrs. J. E. Davidson were born four children. William Henry, whose birth occurred June 18, 1850, died in California in 1874. Mary Louise, born January 18, 1852, died in infancy. Edgar Alfred, born May 11, 1853, is a master musician of Bay City, Texas, and married Elizabeth Doty, by whom he has four children, Gladys Doty, Edgar Alfred, Charles Eugene and William Walter. Louisa Davidson, born June 24, 1855, was married in August, 1871, to Charles Hatton, now a resident of Goldfield, Nevada, and they have seven children: Grace, who became the wife of Bion Hull; Lulu Hatton, who became the wife of Morton Rutan; Charles Hatton, a resident of Wichita, Kansas; Katharine; Alice; William D.; and one who died in infancy.
After the death of her first husband Mrs. Davidson was married on the 11th of February, 1862, to William D. Follette, and they became the parents of a son and daughter. The elder, Charles Stewart Follette, born August 4, 1863, married Leona Flora and is a marine engineer residing at Seattle, Washington. Genevieve Follette, born April 24, 1865, became the wife of Christopher T. Goodlow, who was a river engineer. Both are now deceased, the death of Mrs. Goodlow having occurred in 1903.
Mr. Follette was a farmer by occupation and a large landowner, having extensive holding, from which he derived a substantial annual income. His property interests also enabled him to leave his family in very comfortable financial circumstances, when, in March, 1880, he was called to his final rest. In his political views he was a democrat but never aspired to office, preferring to concentrate his energies upon his business affairs, in which he met with excellent success.
Mrs. Follette has now lived in Iowa for sixty-six years and during her residence in Scott county has always enjoyed in large measure the friendly regard of those with whom she has been associated. After her husband's death she removed to LeClaire, where she is now pleasantly situated in a comfortable home.

Transcribed by Elaine Rathmann


Hans Heinrich Kistenmacher

From "History of Davenport and Scott County" Vol. II by Harry E. Downer-S. J. Clarke Publishing Co. 1910 Chicago.

Surnames: Kistenmacher, Kruse, Muldoon, Nelson, Zoller, Rochau.

Among the many pioneers of Scott county who brought the strong traits of character of the German race to bear up its development was Hans Heinrich Kistenmacher, now deceased, who for more than a quarter of a century was a prosperous farmer of Blue Grass township, on the place which his son Louis still operates. He was born in Schleswig-Holstein, Germany, January 3, 1826, and came to America before he reached his majority. On the 13th of July, 1847, he reached Scott county, and the next year was granted by the government eighty acres of land, the document asserting his right to its possession bearing the date of June 1, 1848, and being signed by President Polk. A couple of years later he received forty acres more from the government, this grant being dated April 1, 1850, and bearing the signature of President Taylor. These scrips of national paper are still in possession of Louis Kistenmacher, who places high value upon them, for their historical value and for the associatio!
ns with which they will always be joined while in the family. For many years Mr. Kistenmacher tilled the soil with profit, although the early years of his residence here were attended with the hardships which come to the pioneer, and as time brought rich returns from his endeavors he acquired more land until at his death he owned four hundred and forty-five acres in Blue Grass township. In 1885 he retired from the active pursuit of farming, taking up his residence in the city of Davenport, which was his home when, on the 19th of August, 1909, he passed away.
After coming to Scott county Mr. Kistenmacher was united in marriage to Miss Maria Kruse, who was born in Schleswig-Holstein, Germany, March 3, 1833. Their marriage was blessed with the following children: Louis, of whom mention is made below; Amelia, who, unmarried, is living in Davenport; Augusta, who became the wife of James Muldoon, of Corley, Iowa; Dorothea, the wife of Theodore Nelson, of Harlan, Iowa; Christina, who has not married and makes her home in Davenport; Della, who is also unmarried and lives in Davenport; and Bertha, the wife of Charles Zoller, of Davenport.
Louis Kistenmacher, the only son born to his parents, has always lived upon the farm where he resides today. It embraces two hundred acres of the old homestead and is well cultivated. In addition his wife owns three hundred and twenty acres in Rock county, Minnesota, a valuable asset. She was Miss Louisa Rochau in her maidenhood and is a daughter of F. A. Rochau, of Sheridan township. Eleven children have been born to the couple, all of whom are at home. They are Arnold, Henry, Walter, Alice, Lydia, David, flora, Minnie, Martha, Louis and John. Mr. Kistenmacher has not allied himself with any political party, preferring to vote for measures and candidates as appear to him best, and for two terms has rendered efficient service to the community through being a member of the school board. He belongs to the Modern Brotherhood of America and is active in its lodge, No. 26, of Blue Grass, where he has made many friends, who, recognizing the high character of the man and aware of his success and the honorable manner in which it has been gained, are loyal in their admiration of him.

Transcribed by Elaine Rathmann


Mrs. H. A. Horton

From "History of Davenport and Scott County" Vol. II by Harry E. Downer-S. J. Clarke Publishing Co. 1910 Chicago.

Surnames: Horton, Van Ostern, Hart, Foster, Mitchell, Brotherlin, Kindley, Headley.

Among LeClaire's highly esteemed ladies is Mrs. H. A. Horton, who has now passed the seventy-first milestone on life's journey, her birth having occurred in Louisville, Kentucky, October 18, 1838. Her father, Nathan Hart, was born in Warsaw, Poland, in 1793, and it was after his arrival in America that he met and married Miss Amelia Van Ostern, who was born in New Orleans, Louisiana, in 1813. For many years Mr. hart engaged in the dry-goods business, but was living retired at the time of his death. He came to Iowa in 1857, settling in LeClaire, and for a long period was connected with the commercial activity and prosperity. He always adhered to the Jewish faith and in his political views was a democrat but never an office seeker. In his family were eight children: Mary; Elenora, the deceased wife of Major Foster, of the Eleventh Iowa Infantry; Rebecca, who became the wife of Colonel Mitchell, of the Eleventh Iowa infantry; Moses, who died in Walla Walla, Washington; Mrs. Horton; Ada, who resides in Wakefield, Massachusetts; Belle, who makes her home in Butte, Montana; and Edward, who was a newspaper editor of Chicago, where he died in 1889.
Mrs. Horton spent her girlhood in her native city and was nineteen years of age when she came with her parents to Iowa, where she has since made her home. On the 20th of September, 1865, she gave her hand in marriage to H. A. Horton, a son of George W. and Eliza (Brotherlin) Horton, who were residents of Clinton, Iowa, at the time of their demise. Their son, H. A. Horton, acquired his education in the graded schools of LeClaire and, entering business life, became a steamboat engineer on the Mississippi river. He always led a busy and useful life, was faithful, reliable and industrious and his services were therefore, always in demand.
Mr. and Mrs. Horton became the parents of two children. Belle S., who was born February 23, 1868, is the wife of Edgar Kindley, a resident of Silvis, Illinois, where he is filling the position of superintendent of schools. They have one child, Murena Kindley. George W. Horton, who was born in 1871, is a resident of Rock Island, Illinois, where he carries on business as an electrician. He wedded Mary Headley and they have one child, Isabel Horton, who was born march 25, 1906.
The death of Mr. Horton occurred January 8, 1910, and was deeply regretted by many friends as well as his immediate family. He was a faithful member of the Masonic fraternity, affiliating with Snow Lodge, No. 44, F. & A. M., at LeClaire, and was held in high esteem. He gave his political support to the republican party and was a stanch advocate of its principles. He held the office of school director and was also a member of the city council, in which connection he exercised his official prerogatives in support of various progressive public measures. His long residence in this county made him widely known and his many substantial qualities gained for him the high regard of those with whom he was brought in contact.

Transcribed by Elaine Rathmann


Cornelius J. Brown

From "History of Davenport and Scott County" Vol. II by Harry E. Downer-S. J. Clarke Publishing Co. 1910 Chicago.

Surnames: Brown, Mangus, Pheris.

Although Cornelius J. Brown took little active part in the public life of Davenport, his name was ever connected with those interests which make for progress, philanthropy and the general amelioration of the conditions that surrounded his fellow citizens. On the 20th of March, 1908, he passed from their midst, and has since been mourned as a man of ability and high character. He was born in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, March 15, 1843, and by the early death of his father was thrown upon his own resources while still a boy. Upon the inauguration of the Civil war, although only eighteen years of age, he enlisted in Knapp's Independent Battery, Twentieth Pennsylvania Volunteers, and in four years of his service took part in many of the important battles of the great struggle, among which were the memorable fight at Chancellorsville, the second engagement at Bull Run, and that of Gettysburg. He had entered the army as a private, but in recognition of the valor which ever distinguished his presence upon the scene of conflict, he was promoted until at the close of the hostilities he held the rank of corporal.
After he returned to the life of a civilian Mr. Brown remained for a time in the east and then in 1872 came west, spending ten months at St. Louis, Missouri. In 1872 he came to Davenport, and almost immediately upon his arrival was made a clerk in the commandant's office at the Rock Island arsenal while in 1876 he was made chief clerk. There he remained during the remaining thirty-six years of his life, the length of his term of service telling its own story of the ability and conscientiousness of the man. He was highly regarded by his superior officers at the arsenal, while in Davenport, where he was known for his public spirit and the interest he always evinced in the progress and development of the city, he had many warm friends, who were attached to him because of his many excellent and engaging qualities.
While still living in Philadelphia, Mr. Brown was united in marriage to Miss Eliza Morre Hague, and unto them were born one daughter and four sons, namely: August Mangus, deceased; Mrs. W. E. Pheris, of St. Paul; Charles C., also of St. Paul, Minnesota; Benjamin F., who is a salesman; and Cornelius J., who is a clerk in the Arsenal. Mr. Brown was ever in sympathy with the religious tenets of the Unitarians and was active in the work of that church, but although local matters, charities and other interests commanded much of his attention, he was most concerned for the welfare and advancement of the Masonic orders becoming, indeed, a man upon whom his fraternal brothers throughout the country conferred honors. He was made a Master Mason in Integrity Lodge, No. 187, A. F. & A. M., October 18, 1868; in May 1874 was exalted to the rank of Royal Arch Mason, and in 1875 was made a Knight Templar. In 1874 he had entered the Scottish Rite, and upon him was conferred the honorary thirty-third degree. His life ever exemplified the beneficent spirit of the craft which is based upon mutual helpfulness and brotherly kindness.

Transcribed by Elaine Rathmann


Louis A. Keppy

From "History of Davenport and Scott County" Vol. II by Harry E. Downer-S. J. Clarke Publishing Co. 1910 Chicago.

Surnames: Keppy, Rohwer, Ewaldt.

Louis A. Keppy was born in Donahue, Scott county, August 28, 1879, and has spent the greater part of his life in that village, in affairs of which he plays a prominent part. His parents are Frank and Mary (Rohwer) Keppy, who reside in Donahue and he is the second of their three children. He received his education in district school No. 1 in Allens Grove township, after which he laid the foundation of a successful business career by a course in Duncan's Business College in Davenport. After working for his father in his creamery until he made himself acquainted with the details of the business he became manager and continued in that capacity for four years. When his father entered a new field of activity, dealing in general merchandise, live stock and farm implements, he accepted his present position as general manager.
On July 29, 1908, Mr. Keppy married Miss Lena Ewaldt, who was born in Eldridge, Scott county, March 26, 1887, and is a daughter of Herman E. and Katherine Ewaldt, residents of Eldridge. Their home is brightened by the presence of a small daughter, Katherine Marie.
Mr. Keppy has given his allegiance to the republican party, to whose measures he pins his faith. He takes a keen interest in public affairs and enjoys the confidence of the community in which he makes his home and where his career has been watched from birth. He is a councilman and serves as assistant to his father, who in addition to his business, holds the office of postmaster.

Transcribed by Elaine Rathmann


Hermann Wulf

From "History of Davenport and Scott County" Vol. II by Harry E. Downer-S. J. Clarke Publishing Co. 1910 Chicago.

Surnames: Wulf, Speckelman, Mueller, Klindt, Moeller.

Hermann Wulf, who is at the head of one of the largest and most prosperous concerns of Davenport, the Davenport Brewing Company, was born in Germany, May 6, 1852, his parents being Michael and Margaret (Speckelman) Wulf, both natives of the fatherland. He received his education in his place of birth, where he also learned the trade of a locksmith, and in early manhood came to the United States, whither his brother Fred had preceded him. For eight years he worked at his trade here in conjunction with H. Mueller. Later he engaged in the grocery and saloon business for a number of years very successfully. In 1891 he and George Klindt bought out the interest of Henry Klindt and operated the Eagle Brewery on Third street, of which the latter had been the head for a number of years. For the next three years Mr. Wulf and his partners made it one of the substantial enterprises of Davenport until 1894, when a consolidation was effected among the five breweries in the city under the name of the Davenport Malting Company. In that year Mr. Wulf became the city representative of the firm and in 1900 became its president. About 1908 the name was changed to the Davenport Brewing Company. Mr. Wulf is also a director in the Davenport Malt & Grain Company, his experience in this line of work making him a valuable member of the concern. He was also president of the Hawkeye Realty Company until 1910.
In 1874 Mr. Wulf wedded Miss Emma Seaman, a native of Davenport. Five children have been born to them: Amiel, Rudolph, Emily, Bertha and Hugo. Emily is now the wife of Hugo Moeller. Mr. Wulf belong to all the German societies flourishing in this city and is a member of the Independent Order of Odd Fellows. A man of fine business ability, he is also endowed with those traits of character which make him popular among his fellowmen. While he is ever willing to join others in pleasure, he is, nevertheless, a good citizen. The Davenport Brewing Company is one of the largest concerns here and is developing an ever increasing field of operations, largely due to the fact of Mr. Wulf's able guidance.

Transcribed by Elaine Rathmann


Louis A. LeClaire, Sr.

From "History of Davenport and Scott County" Vol. II by Harry E. Downer-S. J. Clarke Publishing Co. 1910 Chicago.

Surnames: LeClaire, Pujal, Beddison, Corporal, Middleton.

Few among the families of Davenport occupy a more prominent position than that of which Louis A. LeClaire, Sr., is at present the head. He has been for many years identified with the business life here and is now the vice president o the LeClaire & King Publishing Company. A native of Davenport, he was born January 4, 1842, a son of Alexius and Marie (Pujal) LeClaire. The father was a so of Francis LeClaire, a brother of Antoine LeClaire, who holds a most conspicuous place in the annals of Davenport from the time of its foundation. A more extended mention of him, however, is made in the history prefatory to these biographies. Alexius LeClaire was a merchant and, like his uncle, was one of the important men of the city during his lifetime.
Louis A. LeClaire attended the public schools of Davenport and after completing the course of study here entered Iowa College. When he embarked upon his business career in 1862 he engaged first in real-estate dealing, to which he devoted his energies for about thirteen years. At that time he became administrator of his uncle's estate and united his interests with those of a son of colonel Davenport, filling the position of accountant in the latter's office. In 1882 he went to the western part of Iowa and then, in 1886, entered the gas office. About that time, however, on account of poor health, he was compelled to give up all business and take a much needed rest. Later, when he had recuperated, he joined his sons in the formation of the LeClaire & King Publishing Company, of which he was made vice president. This is one of the enterprising concerns of the city, owing no small share of its prosperity to the wisdom and good judgment of the senior member of the firm.
It was in December, 1870, that Mr. LeClaire was united I marriage to Miss Mattie S. Beddison, a daughter of Thomas and Martha (Corporal) Beddison. They are descendants of a family which has been prominent from the Revolutionary days and one ancestor fought in Washington's army. At that time the homestead was in one of the southern states, but later a removal was made to Rock Island, Illinois, where Thomas Beddison became very prominent. Five children have been born to Mr. and Mrs. LeClaire. Margaret has remained unmarried and makes her home with her parents. Marie has passed away. Louis, Jr., is the president of the LeClaire & King Publishing Company. He married Miss Jessie Middleton and they have one daughter, Marie. Beatrice and Bernice are both at home. The family belong to the Catholic church of Davenport and are prominent in its work and liberal in its support. As is befitting a descendant of the famous Antoine LeClaire, our subject is one of the more prominent of the citizens of Davenport. He is interested in all the more vital of the city's affairs, although he has never been persuaded to take nay active part in the local government. Nevertheless, he enjoys the sincere esteem of those who have come to know him and feel that he has made a name for himself and is not dependent on the reputation won by his ancestors, while his success is the outcome of clear judgment, experience and unabating energy.

Transcribed by Elaine Rathmann


Samuel B. Yohn

From "History of Davenport and Scott County" Vol. II by Harry E. Downer-S. J. Clarke Publishing Co. 1910 Chicago.

Surnames: Yohn, Church, Bonnell, Condron, Lancaster, Womert.

Samuel B. Yohn, living in Princeton, his attention in his business life being devoted to carpentering and farming, was born in Lancaster county, Pennsylvania, March 13, 1833, and has therefore reached the age of seventy-seven years. His has been a well spent life and his many substantial qualities have gained him the trust and good will of his fellow townsmen.
His father, Frederick Yohn, was also a native of Lancaster county, born March 13, 1812, and, having arrived at years of maturity, he wedded Rebecca Church, who was born in the same county on the 4th of February, 1811. For many years they resided in the Keystone state, where they were married and reared their family, but in 1868 removed westward, settling in Scott county. The father purchased one hundred and sixty acres of land from Malen Bonnell in Princeton township, and lived upon that farm for six years, carefully cultivating the fields in the production of substantial harvests. He then removed to the village of Princeton, where he retired from active life, his death there occurring five years later. His children were Samuel B., Anna Elizabeth and Julia. The elder daughter was born October 22, 1847, and is the wife of David Condron, a carpenter residing in Princeton. The younger daughter is also living in Princeton and is now the wife of George Lancaster, an engineer.
When honorably discharged Mr. Yohn returned to Pennsylvania, where he continued to reside until 1879, when he came to Princeton, where he has since made his home. Here he ha followed carpentering and has been closely and actively associated with building interests, his efficient workmanship bringing him a liberal patronage.
Mr. Yohn has been married three times. He first wedded Miss Mary Womert, a daughter of Mr. and Mrs. John Womert. Unto them was born a son, Frank, who died when twenty years of age. For his second wife Mr. Yohn chose Miss Etta Howard and to them was born a daughter, Etta, who died in infancy. For his third wife Mr. Yohn chose Sarah Ferguson, a native of Galena, Illinois.
In his political views Mr. Yohn has always been a stalwart republican since casting his first presidential vote. He has held most of the township trustee, and has always been loyal and faithful to the trusts reposed in him. He is recognized as a reliable and enterprising citizen, who is always found on the side of improvement and progress. He can remember seeing Antoine Le Claire in 1857. During the years of his residence in Scott county he has witnessed many changes and has taken helpful part in bringing about the transformation which has made Scott county one of the populous and prosperous sections of the great Mississippi valley.

Transcribed by Elaine Rathmann


The Very Rev. Marmaduke Hare, M. D.

From "History of Davenport and Scott County" Vol. II by Harry E. Downer-S. J. Clarke Publishing Co. 1910 Chicago.

Surnames: Hare, Leighton, Hurstmontcieun, Watson, Saltoune.

The Very Rev. Marmaduke Hare, M. D., rector and dean of Trinity Cathedral, was born in Knottingly, Yorkshire, England, April 6, 1856, a son of the Rev. Robert Henry Hare, also a clergyman of the church of England, and Margaret (Leighton) Hare, a cousin of Lord Leighton. On the paternal side of the house, the family belongs to that bearing the name of Hurstmontcieun.
Dr. Hare was educated at Bath College, after which he went to Kings college, from which he was graduated in medicine in 1876. For the following two years he practiced medicine in London, but carrying out the wishes of his mother he entered the church and studied theology at Dorchester College, Oxford, for two years, and was ordained by the bishop of Oxford in 1879. His first charge was the church of Dorchester Abbey. He then entered the army service during the first Boer war, and spent five years in South Africa. Returning to England he was appointed rector of Bow, London, E. C., where his pastorate extended over a decade. During that period he was chairman of the Poplar Board of Guardians and one of the managers of the London schoolboard.
During his military service in South Africa, in 1882, Dr. Hare was married to Mary Catherine, daughter of Sir Thomas Watson, then premier of South Africa, and a great granddaughter of Lord Saltoune. She died in London, in 1897, and soon thereafter the bereaved husband paid a visit to America. While in Albany, he accepted a call to St. Paul's church of that city. While in Albany, he accepted a cal to St. Paul's church of that city. He remained a year at St. Paul's, and then spent four years as rector of St. George's church of Toronto. Following this he was rector of All Saints Church, of New Milford, Connecticut. In 1907, he came to Davenport, becoming rector and dean of Trinity Cathedral in October of that same year.
Dr. Hare is a Mason, a member of the commercial and contemporary Clubs. He is a man of wide experience and profound learning and his personality and convincing manner make him very popular. His zeal in his work has resulted in very beneficial effects in the city and vicinity, where he is widely known and beloved.

Transcribed by Elaine Rathmann


Ernest T. Kegel, M. D.

From "History of Davenport and Scott County" Vol. II by Harry E. Downer-S. J. Clarke Publishing Co. 1910 Chicago.

Surnames: Kegel, Petersohn, Byrnes.

Although one of the younger physicians, Dr. Ernest T. Kegel is said to enjoy the largest practice in Scott county, outside of the city of Davenport, of any of those following the medical profession. He resides in Blue Grass township, which has been the scene of his labors for more than a decade. A native of Germany, he was born in Potsdam, June 13, 1875. His father, whose birth occurred in Saxony, wedded Miss Augusta Petersohn, a native of east Prussia, and in 1891 came to the United States. Upon reaching Iowa, he settled in Shelby county, where he engaged in the practice of medicine. He is still living there and is highly regarded.
Dr. Ernest T Kegel received his early education in the public schools of Berlin, and after coming to this country pursued an academic course in the School of Correspondence. It was in September, 1892, that he came to America. He completed his studies in the Iowa State University, from which he was graduated with the class of 1896. Immediately thereafter he joined his father in Shelby county, Iowa, but remained only six months, after which he came to Blue Grass township, Scott county, taking up his residence in Walcott. In a few years he built up a large practice in that and adjoining townships, for as opportunity was afforded for the exercise of his talents he proved himself to be a man of skill and ability and one upon whose judgment in medical matters his clients might rely with confidence. He returned to Germany in 1907 to take a post-graduate course in the University of Berlin. He also studied in London, under the direction of Professors Douglas and Wright. Since he has identified himself with the interests of Blue Grass township. Dr. Kegel has done much to promote the public welfare and was one of the original stockholders of the Farmers Saving Bank of Walcott, of which he was elected president in 1905. Since that date he has guided its financial policy with a wise, conservative, yet progressive hand, and no small part of the prosperity of the locality is due to his efforts.
In December, 1897, was celebrated the wedding of Dr. Kegel and Miss Birdie J. Byrnes, a daughter of Dr. Thomas Byrnes, who practiced medicine in Walcott for a number of years. One son, Allen Byrnes, has been born to the couple.
Dr. Kegel is a member of all the Masonic bodies of Davenport, being a Knight Templar and ahs been advanced to the thirty-second degree in the Scottish Rite. He belongs also to the Modern Brotherhood of America, being president of the Walcott Lodge. In recognition of his proficiency as a practitioner and of his character as a man, Dr. Kegel was appointed a health officer of the village of Walcott, in which position he is serving his second term, and was also made health officer of Hickory Grove township. As a member of the American Medical Association, and of the Iowa State, the Scott County, the Iowa and Illinois Central Medical Associations, he keeps well abreast of the advance which has been made in his profession. In connection with his practice Dr. Kegel conducts a drug store, wherein are dispensed drugs of a high quality, and which while it evinces the Doctor's business acumen is but another demonstration of his desire to render his clients the greatest service within his power.

Transcribed by Elaine Rathmann


Walter McMann

From "History of Davenport and Scott County" Vol. II by Harry E. Downer-S. J. Clarke Publishing Co. 1910 Chicago.

Surnames: McMann, Hillhouse, Neuenhaus

Walter McMann, foreman of the machine and blacksmith shops of the Bettendorf Axle Company of Davenport, is one of the men who have risen to a responsible position through careful attention to his work and inherent ability for directing others. He was born in Moline, Illinois, June 1, 1871, being a son of Robert and Agnes (Hillhouse) McMann. The father was born in Ireland and came to the United States in time to serve four years as a soldier. Following his army experience, the young man went to Moline where he located and for a number of years was superintendent of the mills of Barnard Leas & Company, and a stockholder in the enterprise. At present he is in the real-estate business in British Columbia. His wife was born in Canada.
Walter McMann is a product of the public-school system of Moline. After finishing school he learned the trade of a machinist in his native city, and then wishing to see something of the west he worked at his trade in Tacoma and Seattle, Washington, remaining away for two years. Returning home, he was in the employ of the Moline Elevator Company until 1892, when the Bettendorf Axle Company was established. At that time he came to Davenport to enter its works, continuing a machinist until 1906, when the management placed him in charge of the machine and blacksmiths shops, realizing that they could secure no better man. In addition, Mr. McMann was one of the organizers of the Bettendorf Savings Bank and is now of its board of directors.
In 1893 Mr. McMann married Bertha Neuenhaus, a native of the city. They have four children: Arthur, Ruth, Walter and William. Mr. McMann is a member of the Modern Woodmen Camp and is very popular in that organization. He is a sound, reliable you man, absorbed in his work, and enjoying the full confidence of the company, which he represents.

Transcribed by Laura Rathmann


Felix Hirschl Biography

From "History of Davenport and Scott County" Vol. II by Harry E. Downer-S. J. Clarke Publishing Co. 1910 Chicago.

Surnames: Hirschl, Kohn, Gold, Willi

Felix Hirschl, a retired farmer and banker, who has taken up his residence in the city of Davenport, was born in Arad, Hungary, October 20, 1846, a son of Samuel and Theresa (Kohn) Hirschl. The father came to the United States in 1848 and after having been eighty-five days upon the ocean disembarked at New Orleans. He ascended the Mississippi river to St. Louis, settling in Belleville, near that city, where he opened dairy. After a short time, in 1850, he came to Davenport, where he found employment in the service of the government. Later he engaged in the wholesale grocery business and also dealt considerably in real estate. Before his death, however, he returned to the land of his birth, where he passed the remainder of his life and Vienna is still the home of several of his children.
Felix Hirschl was the fifth in order of birth in a family of twelve. He attended the schools of Davenport, in which he obtained all his education, learning after leaving school the trade of a tinner. He did not work at it, however, for he was put in charge of his father's property in this country when the latter returned to Hungary. For about three years he was an assistant to Mayor Murphy and then engaged in the street car business, being one of the promoters of the first lines established here. The year of 1880 to 1881 he spent in travel and then engaged in the farming in Boone county Iowa, on land which belonged to his father. About twelve years were spent in tilling the soil there, after which he removed to what was known as the old Dutton farm. Upon forsaking agriculture he took up his residence on Fourth street and engaged in banking in this city, an occupation he followed with success until he retired from active life, being one of the promoters of the Farmers & Mechanics Bank.
On the 10th of February, 1880, Mr. Hirschl was married to Miss Mary Willi, a daughter of Peter and Anna (Gold) Willi. They were residents of this county, where Mr. Willi followed farming for many years. Mr. and Mrs. Hirschl have become the parents of six children: Ella M., living at home, who was graduated from the St. Catherine's School of Davenport and is now an art student; Samuel W., who completed the high-school course and is now in the employ of the Bell Jones Company; Jesse and Flora, both deceased. Julius E., who was graduated from the high school and is now a freshman in the University of Illinois; and Theresa, who is still a school girl and lives at home.
The family now occupies a pleasant home at 725 Farmers street, where a generous hospitality is extended to friend and worthy stranger. Mr. Hirschl who was for many years an important factor in the business life of the city, still enjoys the esteem of the men who were his associates.

Transcribed by Elaine Rathmann


John Snyder Biography

From "History of Davenport and Scott County" Vol. II by Harry E. Downer-S. J. Clarke Publishing Co. 1910 Chicago.

Surnames: Snyder, Jacobs, Bousselot, Jesseron, LeRoy, Hickson

John Snyder, one of the progressive farmers of Allens Grove township, came to Scott county before Iowa was admitted to statehood, and, growing up with the country, he participated in its development, contributing no small share to its prosperity as an agricultural locality. He was born in Huron county, Ohio, August 5, 1843, his parents being Simon and Susanna (Jacobs) Snyder. They were both natives of Pennsylvania, he of Mt. Bethel and she of Philadelphia, but they were married in Tompkins county, New York, where Mr. Snyder, who was following the tanner's trade at that time, had built a tannery. Later they removed to Huron county, Ohio, whence he came to Scott county, Iowa, crossing the Mississippi river after dark on the last day of November, 1846. The old horse ferry was then in use in transferring the passengers from one bank to the other but this, like other incidents of those early days, is only a memory now. The family located one mile east of where the village of Dixon now stands, although there was little at that time to indicated the future growth of this section of the state. Nevertheless, Mr. Snyder believed he was not making a mistake and the years have proved the wisdom of his choice both in the case of his own achievements as a farmer and those of his sons. Here he spent the remainder of his life, acquiring several hundred acres of property before he divided it among his children. Seven were born to him and his wife. Ephraim is deceased. Roswell b. and Richard J. were drowned in the Wapsipinicon river in 1848. Rudolph S. enlisted in August, 1861, in Company C, Second Iowa Cavalry, and served until the close of the Civil war. He is now residing in Dixon. C. B. has also made his home in Dixon after having pursued farming successfully for a number of years. Daniel enlisted in the Second Iowa Cavalry and served during the three years of the Civil war. He is now living in Grand Mound, Clinton county, Iowa. John is the subject of this sketch. The father was always strong in his support of the principles of the republican party, while he gave his adherence in religious matters to the Methodist church.
John Snyder resided upon the farm which was his home until he retired from three years of age-in fact, since that December morning when his parents chose it as their home. He attended the district schools of Allens Grove township during his youth, obtaining the most meager education which was given to the farmer's boys at that time. He also assisted in breaking the soil for cultivation and in tilling it when he was old enough to handle the plow. When the landholdings of his father were divided he obtained one hundred and four acres of the old homestead lying upon sections 17 and 8, on the bank of the Wapsipinicon river, and twenty-four and one-half acres across the river I Olive township, Clinton county. Upon this land he has made a number of valuable improvements, erecting buildings which adequately fill his needs as a farmer and a stockman, for he has made a specialty of raising shorthorn Durham cows and Poland China hogs. From this branch of his business he derives an in!
come commensurate with that he obtains from his cultivation of the soil.
In 1873 Mr. Snyder was married to Miss Mary Bousselot who was born in France, May 9, 1852. In 1853 her parents, Frederick and Frances (Jesseron) Bousselot, came to this country, locating first in Illinois and later coming to Iowa. In this state they passed the remainder of their lives, Mrs. Bousselot dying in Clinton county, December 1, 1874, and Mr. Bousselot in this county, October 12, 1886. They had eleven children, seven of whom were born in France, where two died, the four others being natives of the United States. Only six are now living. Mr. and Mrs. Snyder have had seven children: Emma Josephine, the wife of Thomas Kincaid, of Allens Grove township; Ephraim Hayes, who is at home; Simon, who is living upon his grandfather's place adjoining the farm which belonged to his father; Daniel Le Roy, who resides in Buenavista (sic), Iowa; Sadie Lillian, who is at home; Nellie Laura, the wife of John Hickson, of Dixon; and Jennie Iva, who is a school teacher and lives at home.
Mr. Snyder has always given his support to the republican party but has taken little active interest in local affairs, although the success of his life and the integrity upon which it has been based would naturally suggest him as a man worthy to receive honors form the people.

Transcribed by Elaine Rathmann


Oscar C. Koehler Biography

From "History of Davenport and Scott County" Vol. II by Harry E. Downer-S. J. Clarke Publishing Co. 1910 Chicago.

Surnames: Koehler, Priester, Vollmer, Lange

The building of cities begins with the work of a few men who lay the foundations, but the superstructure comes as the result of the marked enterprise and business ability of those who recognize in the complexity of interests the opportunity for the establishment and successful control of large undertakings. It was because of his powers in this direction that Oscar C. Koehler became one of the conspicuous figures in the business life record covered the intervening years to the 16th of August, 1902-years fraught with large accomplishment and substantial successes. He came to Davenport with his parents in 1871.
His father, Henry Koehler, established the Arsenal brewery, which became well known in this and surrounding states and was interested in many other enterprises that brought him a gratifying measure of success and resulted in the enlargement of the commercial operations of the city. Five of the children born to him still survive, namely: Hugo, who is the secretary of the Independent Breweries Company; Henry, who resides in St. Louis and is president of the St. Louis, Rocky Mountain & Pacific Railroad; Max K., who has various business interests; and Mrs. Adolph Priester and Mrs. Karl Vollmer, who are living in Davenport.
Oscar C. Koehler received his early education in the public schools of Fort Madison, Iowa, and, after coming to Davenport, spent four years in the schools of this city, wherein his general training was completed. In 1875, with the intention of becoming thoroughly familiar with the science of brewing, he went to Germany and for three years studied chemistry at Worms and Leipsic. For the two years subsequent to his return to Davenport he was actively engaged in business with his father, and then, in 1880, went to St. Louis, Missouri, where they opened a brewery. They operated it successfully for a number of years and after selling it our subject and his brother Henry embarked in the wine business, Oscar becoming secretary of the company. Being joined by their brothers, Hugo and Max K., in 1890 they formed the American Brewing Company and it was due to their efforts that the A. B. C. beer became more widely known west of the Mississippi than any other brand. Henry and Hugo Koehler remained in St. Louis, but in 1894, Oscar Koehler returned to Davenport to manage the large interests of the family during the absence of his father, and from that time until his death he was actively connected with progressive business interests in this city. With the keen sagacity that ever characterized his undertakings he looked beyond the exigencies of the moment to the possibilities of the future and appreciating the tendencies toward combination, conceived the idea of consolidating the brewing interests in this city. Through his efforts this was accomplished and he was made president of the amalgamated concern, which was known as the Davenport Malting Company, and the success of which, conspicuous in the midst of many prosperous enterprises, was largely due to Mr. Koehler's able management.
On the 15th of August, 1886, Mr. Koehler wedded Miss Matilda Lange, a member of one of the of the oldest and most prominent families of St. Louis, Missouri. Her father was one of the organizers of a bank in that city and had other financial interests there. Mr. and Mrs. Koehler became the parents of six children; Hugo, Elise, Herbert, Ottilie, Ida and Hildegard.
Mr. Koehler was faithful in all his home relations, being a loving husband and a wise and affectionate father, and his loss was keenly felt. He was also missed among his business associates and his fellow members of the Turners and other German societies, for he possessed those qualities that endeared him to others. A most energetic and up-to-date business man, his views of affairs were not cramped or confined, but rather broad and looking to large horizons and including many interests, and his influence was ever effective in promoting progress.

Transcribed by Elaine Rathmann


J. H. Bendixen Biography

From "History of Davenport and Scott County" Vol. II by Harry E. Downer-S. J. Clarke Publishing Co. 1910 Chicago.

Surnames: Bendixen, Kramp

Davenport has some notable examples of self-made men who have advanced from humble stations to high official positions with firms that command immense capital and control the destinies of many employes (sic). Such a man is J. H. Bendixen, vice president and sales manager of the Bettendorf Company. He was born in Germany, June 12, 1870, a son of Henry and Martha (Johanssen) Bendixen, also natives of Germany. The same year of our subject's birth the family came to the United States, locating in Davenport, where the father was employed as an engineer for a number of years, but is now living retired in the city.
J. H. Bendixen, after receiving a common-school education, learned the machinist's trade, which he followed in Davenport and Chicago for fourteen years, four of which were spent in the employ of the Illinois Steel Company, in charge of the machine shop. For three years he was in charge of the machine shop of the Standard Elevator Company, now the Otis Elevator Company. In 1894 he returned to Davenport, to take a position with the Bettendorf Axle Company as assistant superintendent. As the business advanced, he progressed with it, becoming superintendent and then manager of the works, and in 1906 he was made vice president and sales manager. The remarkable success of this company has been furthered by Mr. Bendixen, whose intimate knowledge of the work and wide experience with mammoth institutions made him well qualified to advance any concern with which he might have connected himself.
In March, 1894, he was married to Johanna Kramp, a native of Germany. Mr. Bendixen belongs to the Commercial club and the Travelers Society, a well as to other clubs and societies in various cities in which he has lived. He is a man widely and favorably known as possessing unusual business ability. Although absorbed in the advancement of the company he is connected with, Mr. Bendixen has never neglected his duty as a citizen, and has cheerfully supported whatever he believed would be for the best interests of all parties concerned.

Transcribed by Elaine Rathmann


F. A. Quistorf Biography

From "History of Davenport and Scott County" Vol. II by Harry E. Downer-S. J. Clarke Publishing Co. 1910 Chicago.

Surnames: Quistorf, Langfeld, Bein, Ewaldt, Steffan, Hensen, Goetsch, Snyder.

F. A. Quistorf, who has now retired from active farming pursued with such profit in Liberty township, was born in Neudorf, Holstein, Germany, November 28, 1835, his parents being L. A. and Anna Elizabeth (Langfeld) Quistorf. The former was a native of the same town as his son, but the latter was born in Quistorf and there passed away in October, 1848, at the age of thirty-six years. In 1850 L. A. Quistorf embarked upon the journey to America, accompanied by his six children: F.A., the subject of this sketch; Henry F., who died in Davenport, May 6, 1909; Katharine Elizabeth, who is the widow of Ferdinand Bein and resides in Davenport; Bernhard, who died in Santa Cruz, California, in 1898; time after his advent here Mr. Quistorf worked as a farm hand and then purchased forty actress of land in Blue Grass township, continuing farming in this county until he retired from active life and took up his residence in Dixon, which remained his home until his death, January 6, 1873. He !
was at that time sixty years and one day old and a man who was well thought of in the community. He had been a weaver in the old country but after coming here devoted himself exclusively to farming.
F. A. Quistorf worked as a farm hand for three years after his arrival in this county and then united with his father when the latter purchased the first tract of forty acres in Blue Grass township. This he assisted the older man to cultivate until, having gained substantial returns, they were able to sell it and buy a place of one hundred and sixty acres in Liberty township. There he lived until he married when he and his brother Henry assumed full charge of the homestead, the other brothers having gone to Pike's Peak. In 1897 Mr. Quistorf decided to retire from active life and came to the village of Dixon, which is now his home. The extent of his landholdings, however, indicates with what profit he pursued agriculture for he owns two hundred and forty acres, one hundred and sixty in Liberty township, the remainder in Cleona, besides the handsome home in Dixon which he occupies.
When Mr. Quistorf married he chose as his wife Miss Helene Steffen, who was born in Holstein, Germany, March 24, 1841. In 1858 she with her parents, Jochem and Anna (Ewaldt) Steffen, came to Scott county, by way of New Orleans and the Mississippi river. Mr. And Mrs. Steffen passed the remainder of their lives here, he dying in Cleona township and she in the city of Davenport. They had two sons and three daughters, all born in the old country. The sons went to Australia before their parents came to America. Mr. And Mrs. Quistorf have had seven children, Anna E., the widow of William Schroeder, of Archer City, Texas; Ferdinand, who operates his father's farm in Liberty township; Caroline, the wife of Louis Hensen, of Cleona township; Meta H., the wife of Henry Goetsch, of Eldridge, this county; and Clara, the wife of Dan Snyder, of Buena vista, Iowa.
Mr. Quistorf is now a stanch adherent of republican principles, although in former years he gave his support to the democrats, but, irrespective of his party predilections, he has always been active and prominent in local affairs and asserts, with a bit of pardonable pride, that since he became a citizen of this country he has missed only two elections. All of the more important offices within the gift of the people of his locality have been bestowed upon him. For more than the past quarter of a century he has been a justice of the peace in Liberty and Allen Grove townships and in Dixon. He was clerk of Liberty township for twelve years and trustee and school director there for another long period. From 1880 to 1883 he served as county supervisor, in this capacity as in all the others rendering the most efficient service possible, such as to obtain for him the confidence as well as the esteem of his fellow citizens.

Transcribed by Laura Rathmann


Claus H. Lamp Biography

From "History of Davenport and Scott County" Vol. II by Harry E. Downer-S. J. Clarke Publishing Co. 1910 Chicago.

Surnames: Lamp, Gutch, Stotenburg, Prescott, Goetsch, Paustian, Schlapkohl, Magnus, Harbeck.

After about half a century of unremitting labor which was not without many compensations naturally, Claus H. Lamp has retired from agricultural pursuits in Hickory Grove township and has taken up his residence in Davenport. He is one of the most prosperous farmers of this county and, despite advancing years, still retains a keen interest in the old life for he holds a large amount of land which is a constant reminder of the success he gained in former years.
He was born in Holstein, Germany, may 6, 1838, a son of Claus and Celia (Gutch) Lamp. The father, also a native of Germany, was a carpenter by trade. In 1847 he decided to bring his family to the United States and make a new start in life. They were fourteen weeks and four days in crossing the Atlantic but finally reached New Orleans on Christmas day. The next day they started up the Mississippi river and, having reached St. Louis, spent the winter there. With the opening of spring they came to Davenport, where the father bought a lot on Fourth street and himself erected a house. It remained the family home for several years while he worked at the carpenter's trade. Later he bought one hundred and sixty acres of land in Davenport township, for which he paid only one hundred and forty dollars. As it was raw land the father turned it over to his two sons to prepare for cultivation. They accomplished the work so well that shortly the family was able to take up their residence !
thereon and there lived until the death of the mother, when they separated and the father lived with his children. He died at the age of ninety-four years, while his wife was only seventy when she passed away. They were the parents of four children: Trina, who married Henry Stotenburg, both now deceased; Asmus H., of Davenport; Claus H., the subject of this sketch; and Peter of Port Arthur.
Although Claus H. Lamp was but eight years old when the family left his native land he had already acquired some education in the schools of Germany. After coming to Scott county he spent a few winters in the pursuance of studies, his first teacher having been Mr. Prescott. He had little time, however, to give to lessons for he had early to begin to work. His first job was driving a team of oxen to a breaking plow. Later when his father bought his first farm he and his brother Asmus undertook to prepare it for cultivation. Taking their sister with them as housekeeper, they lived on that place during the summer, coming to town with the cattle during the winter. Later Mr. Lamp's father bought another tract of one hundred and sixty acres in Hickory Grove township. It also was raw prairie land and Mr. Lamp again undertook to break it. There he lived for two years, working for his father, the latter receiving the crops. Then he was given the place, and it remained his home until!
 about 1897, when he retired from active life and removed to Davenport. In the meantime, however, he kept increasing his landholdings until he has nine hundred and forty acres in that township; a third of one hundred and sixty acres also in Hickory Grove township; one hundred and sixty acres in Liberty township; and forty acres in Cleona township. Another indication of his prosperity is the fact that he holds considerable stock in the German Savings Bank and in the Walcott Savings Bank. Like his brother Asmus H. Lamp, whose sketch appears elsewhere in this work, Claus Lamp has made the best use of the opportunities afforded him. More than that he has not been lax in seeking for chances to better his fortunes and prove himself worthy of the highest type of citizenship in this republic.
On the 13th of August, 1861, Mr. Lamp wedded Miss Catherine Lamp, a daughter of Peter and Abel (Goetsch) Lamp. They have had five children. Mathilda became the wife of August Paustian, of Hickory Grove township, and they have seven children, meta, Wilma, Julius, August, Martha, Hilda and Clarence. Caroline married George Schlapkohl, of Liberty township, and they have four children, Katie, Edna, Albert and Mabel. Julius wedded Lena Schlapkohl and they have four children, Rudolph, Clarence, Martha, and Leonard. Gustavus P. married Regina Magnus and lives in Hickory Grove township. They have three children, Louis C. E., Dewey E. and Melinda. Clara C. became the wife of Otto F. Harbeck. They live with Mr. Lamp and have three children, Catherine C., Clara M. and Helen M.
Mr. Lamp has always voted the republican ticket and while he was living in Hickory Grove township was elected upon it to the offices of justice of the peace, trustee, school director and road supervisor. The duties of each position he fulfilled with a care and efficiency which has marked the operations of his private life so that he enjoys the respect of his fellow citizens. He is a member of lodge No. 221, A. F. & A. M., of Davenport, and of the German Pioneer Society.

Transcribed by Elaine Rathmann


Mrs. Dorothy Lieberenz Biography

From "History of Davenport and Scott County" Vol. II by Harry E. Downer-S. J. Clarke Publishing Co. 1910 Chicago.

Surnames: Lieberenz, Grum, Cassel, Walter, Scharff, Moore, Wiley, Bower, Wiley, Bower.

Mrs. Dorothy Lieberenz, well known in Princeton and the owner of one of the good farms of Scott county, was born in Prussia, Germany, July 20, 1854, and is a daughter of Menzendorf and Elizabeth Grum, both of whom were also natives of Germany. Her father was a soldier in the German army, serving for about three years. His family numbered five children: Mary, the deceased wife of Louis Cassel, who resides in LeClaire, Iowa; Carl, who died in Prussia; William, who also passed away in Prussia; Peter, living in LeClaire; and Mrs. Lieberenz.
Mrs. Lieberenz spent her girlhood days in her native country and was eighteen years of age when, in 1872, she bade adieu to home and friends and sailed for America, landing at New York. She did not tarry long in the east, however, but came at one to Princeton, where she has since resided. She had been educated in the schools of her native country and was a capable young woman, well qualified to manage a household of her own when, in March, 1873, she gave her hand in marriage to Fritz Lieberenz, who was born in Germany, October 16, 1840. He, too, came tot eh United States in 1872. The marriage was celebrated in Princeton and they began their domestic life as farming people of this locality. On coming to Scott county Mr. Lieberenz had purchased forty acres of land, which he cultivated and owned up to the time of his death, which occurred on the 30th of October, 1899, when he was fifty-nine years of age.
Unto Mr. and Mrs. Lieberenz were born seven children. Emma died at the age of six years. Henry, who was born February 20, 1876, was married to Miss Elizabeth Walter. He is a farmer by occupation and resides in Princeton. Sophia is the wife of Phillip Scharff, a farmer of Eldridge, and they have three children: Hazel, Andrew and Sadie. Samuel, born August 8, 1883, died December 25, 1885. Anna, born November 28, 1886, is now the wife of Hobart Moore, a stationary engineer of East Davenport, and they have one child, Ruth. Millie born march 1, 1887, on the 19th of October, 1907, became the wife of C. F. Wiley, a wholesale fruit dealer residing in Clinton. Louise, born may 20, 1889, was married in June, 1909, to Herbert Bower.
When Mr. Lieberenz passed away the community lost a worthy and respected citizen. He had been a member of the German Lutheran church while residing in his native country. His political support was given to the democracy but he never aspired to office. He labored diligently and earnestly in his business life and the success which he achieved was the result of his own efforts. By reason of his energy and capable management he was enabled to leave his family in comfortable financial circumstances.

Transcribed by Elaine Rathmann


Mrs. Minnie Oetzmann Biography

From "History of Davenport and Scott County" Vol. II by Harry E. Downer-S. J. Clarke Publishing Co. 1910 Chicago.

Surnames: Oetzmann, Hagge, Petersen, Arp, Willer, Weise

No one can more truly be said to belong to Scott county, if nativity and choice of residence county for aught, than Mrs. Minnie Oetzmann, the widow of George Oetzmann, for she was born in the very house in Sheridan township in which she now lives, her natal day being March 16, 1858. Her parents were Paul and Christina (Hagge) Petersen, who were among the stanch pioneers of Sheridan township. Both were native Germans, born in Schleswig-Holstein, the father's birth occurring in the city of Keil, February 5, 1809. Desiring to put to a personal test the much vaunted American opportunities and equality, he sailed of America in 1847, landing at New Orleans and coming almost directly to the vicinity of Davenport, where he secured employment as a farm laborer. As soon as he was financially able he secured employment as a farm laborer. As soon as he was financially able he purchased from the government eighty acres of prairie land at five dollars an acre, this property being part of the estate upon which Mrs. Oetzmann now lives. He proceeded to break the land and get it into tillable condition. He built a house and in 1856 married one of his own country women, bringing her to live there. As opportunity presented he bought more land and followed agriculture until his death in 1881. The mother, whose birth occurred in 1827, came to the United States when a young girl with her sister. She survived her husband fourteen years, passing away in 1895. These good people were the parents of three children: Minnie, the subject of this sketch; Charles, who died at the age of four years; and Elizabeth, who married Henry Arp, of Luverne, Minnesota.
Mrs. Oetzmann, was united in marriage march 14, 1875, to George Oetzmann, a native of Germany, who was born August 17, 1847. He came to the United States in 1869 and followed agricultural pursuits throughout his residence here, his death occurring August 23, 1893. To Mr. and Mrs. Oetzmann were born six children: Amelia, who married Claus Willer, of Lincoln township, married Reda M. Weise and is the father of two children, Clarence and Edna; Adolph and Emma are at home; and Christina is deceased.
Mrs. Oetzmann is a woman who takes great comfort in the sacred precincts of the home and in the society of those responsibility of the management of the estate by Adolph, who is a successful agriculturist, while the domestic cares are efficiently shared by Emma, daughter at home. She has that incomparable blessing-good health and possesses a multitude of friends in the community where she is so well known by reason of life-long residence. She owns no less than three fine farms, one of one hundred and sixty acres in Sheridan township, a second of two hundred acres in Lincoln township, and a third of one hundred and fifty-two acres in Lincoln township. It is upon the first of these that Mrs. Oetzmann makes her home.

Transcribed by Elaine Rathmann


Return to History Index Page