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Kellerton Community School
1948 - 1949

Kellerton, Iowa

Transcriber's Note: This yearbook has several personal photographs,
newspaper clippings and other such mementos
pasted on the pages, greatly enhancing the memory of Kellerton Public School, 1948-49.

     We, the students of K. H. S.,
will long remember his loyal friendship,
and do hereby dedicate this
initial "Tomahawk" to Roland Meadows.



The following two newspaper articles were
pasted on the yearbook's dedication page.

Meadows Dies of Wounds Suffered in Gun Accident

Funeral services for Roland Meadows were held Wednesday afternoon from the Methodist church in Kellerton. Roland, 17-year-old son of Mr. and Mrs. Weldon Meadows of Kellerton, did Monday in the Iowa Methodist hospital in Des Moines of wounds suffered in a gun accident February 28th. Burial was at Kellerton.

Roland, a senior in the Kellerton high school, was struck in the back of the head by a shotgun blast while crow hunting with two companions, Chester and Donald Munyon. The accident happened about half a mile east of Kellerton.

The wounded youth was taken to the Decatur county hospital at Leon for treatment, after which he was removed to the Iowa Methodist hospital.

Surviving, besides his parents, are a brother and two sisters.



Obituary --- Roland H. Meadows.

Roland Howard Meadows, younger son of Weldon and Louise Meadows, was born September 11, 1931, in Kellerton, and departed this life March 7, 1949, at the Iowa Methodist hospital in Des Moines, at the age of 17 years, five months and 24 days.

At an early age he united with the Methodist church at Kellerton.

Roland was a member of the senior class of the Kellerton high school. He was active in athletics, playing the lst two seasons on the basketball and baseball teams. His hobby was woodcraft and he spent many hours making articles for the home.

He was a lover of outdoor life and had a collection of rocks, many of which he collected in the Black Hills. Roland possessed a sunny disposition and his friends were numbered by his acquaintances. He will be greatly missed in the home, in the school and in the church.

He leaves to mourn his passing his parents, a brother, Donald, two sisters, Janice and Ann, all of the home, a grandfather, Alvin Davis, and a grandmother, Mrs. John Meadows, of Kellerton, several uncles and cousins and many friends.

Funeral services were held March 9, at two o'clock, from the Methodist church in Kellerton, conducted by the Rev. Harvey E. Butler. The Rev. Verne Weigel, a former pastor, gave the ritual at the cemetery [Maple Row Cemetery, Kellerton].

 

 

Editor-in-Chief 
Rex James
Business Manager 
Bob Smith
Activity Editor 
Ruth Farmer
Sports Editor 
Esther Doser
Art Editor 
Sara Clough
Sponsor 
Morris L. Allen

 

Editor-in-Chief 
Theola Greene
Senior Reporter 
Ruth Farmer
Junior Reporter 
Sara Clough
Soph. Reporter 
Barbara Teale
Fr. Reporter 
Janice Heggs


Mrs. Ruth Treichler
 

Mrs. Naomi Schneider
 

Elmer R. Burch
 

A. J. Rizzo
 

Morris Allen
 

 


HAROLD REED
 

ROLAND MEADOWS
 

DALE BASSETT
 

RUTH FARMER
 

SARA PITKIN
 

REX JACKSON
 

REX JAMES
 

LEON JAMES

 
 
 
 
 

BILL McDERMOTT

 
 
 
 

     We, the Senior Class of '49, seeing before us the expiration of our school days at K.H.S., do hereby make this final will and testament.

     I, Roland Meadows, will to Marlene Williams my talent for wood carving. May it prove to be a source of much amusement.

     I, Rex Jackson, bequeath to Keith Sissel my entire packet of sweetly scented, perfume-laden letters of love and passion which I received from a various assortment of blondes, brunettes, and redheads.

     I, Harold Reed, leave to Theola Greene the inspirational pictures, buttons, and ribbons which I have installed in my car.

     I, Sara Pitkin, seeing that I shan't need them hereafter, leave all my old beaux in K.H.S. to Cheryl Baker.

     I, Bill McDermott, will to Bonnie George my Western air and style. (I'll give you lessons in horseback riding too, if you like.)

     I, Dale Bassett, leave to Denny Duffield, the pair of sweat socks, just as they stand (all by themselves, too) that I've been wearing this season.

     I, Sara Pitkin, bequeath to Mary Jane Fullerton the semester of school I escaped. You may need an extra one.

     I, Ruth Farmer, leave to Sara Clough my seat by the radiator, and a blanket for the lap if the radiator is frosted over.

     I, Rex James, leave to Rex Payton my bagful of assorted tricks of the trade, guaranteed to outmaneuver and trap any scheming woman of the female species. (Results are unknown concerning anything but redheads).

     I, Harold Reed, leave my studious behavior and reputation of teacher's pet to James Gannon.

     I, Rex Jackson, will my liking for argument with Mrs. Treichler to anyone who thinks he might profit by it.

     I, Leon James, better known as the Lion, do bequeath my garrulous, aggressive nature to Big Bad Bob Walker.

     I, Rex James, leave Paul Stevens my unquenchable thirst during Boys Glee Club period. May you float in melody.

     I, Wild Bill McDermott, because my Sal Hapaticia disapproves of it, give my beard to Chester Munyon.

     I, Roland Meadows, bequeath my impulsive, flighty nature to John White.

     I, Dale Bassett, bequeath my timid giggle and fear of the dark that shy, withdrawn Chester Munyon.

     I, Leon James, will my effervescent laugh (which Ruth just loves to hear) to that Kibitizin' Keith.

     I, Ruth Farmer, leave vacant my position as the target of Mr. Burch's jokes. Woe to he who is elevated to this position of notorious publicity.

     We, the Senior Class, leave with a measure of regret yet with a sense of pride for our record, the last row of seats in K. H. S. to all who brave the first eleven years of educational endeavor to become holders of that cherished title of "Seniors".

To:

The Students and Faculty of K. H. S.
     Kellerton, Iowa

Dear People:

     My mission is completed. I have carried out your wishes and am sending my report to you as requested. Here in a nutshell is what each member of the 1949 graduating class is now doing, only 5 years later. So you can follow more easily, I will tell you some of the circumstances surrounding my mission.

The first person I visited was Leon James. Leon is still in Kellerton and has a modern and very successful school of instruction for future hep cats (dancing school, gramps) in an upstairs apartment. The easy carefree life Leon leads, the flashy clothes he wears, the assortment of cars he drives all support claims that teaching of this type is a profitable business. Leon's reckless nature has won for him the title of town playboy, and typical of his type, he has already received 18 traffic tickets this year mostly for illegal parking. The police say his choice of companions is about evenly divided between blonds, burnettes, and red heads.

     Finding this type of life a bit too strenuous, I went on my way. A few miles along the country road I spied another of that great class, Harold Reed. Harold, now tiller of the soil, was in the front yard hanging out the family washing, and was singing at the top of his voice. He told me it was his wife's bridge afternoon, then invited me out back to see his flower bed and vegetable garden. They were indeed beautiful and Harold seemed particularly fond of the delicate posies and red roses. He asked me to stay awhile and share some cookies he had just taken out of the oven, but I felt the traveling urge and moved along.

     "The Hocus Hot Spot is the Place to Go", a brilliantly lighted sign told me, so there I went, and discovered that Rex James has accomplished marvels in the night club business. He is packing them into the "Spot" with a brand new version of burlesque, being amply supplied with talent from brother Leon's school in Kellerton. Most of Rex's personal life is spent by first dating one then another of his chorus line. His friends say don't get alarmed, but there is a definite trend toward red heads. Do you recall, students of '54, when Rex and another red head were such close friends? Could it be that he still thinks of her??

     After spending a delightful night at the HHH my quest continued and led straight to the university. Therein I spied a muscular black-haired chap, pouring industriously over a book. Is it ?? --- I wasn't quite sure. "Fire!" I cried. The figure neither moved nor so much as twitched an eyeball. Yes, that was Bo Meadows, now here at college and majoring in ornithology. After graduation from K. H. S. Bo was undecided what to go but then read a book (Jackson's Bigger and Better Bird Book) which deemed his career. Any one who wants to know anything about birds just go to Bo Meadows. He is an authority.

     And to get on to the rest of them, class of '54, who I failed to contact personally, but found out what each is doing. Here it is.

     Ruth Farmer has changed her name to Retha Freemont and today is the most talked about girl in Hollywood. Immediately after leaving high school she went to college with just one purpose in mind. After trying for two years and still unmarried and unengaged, she grew disgusted and went to Hollywood. Her luck, her income, and the color of her hair all changed with her name and now 7 movies later and 3 engagements later she is nearing the top of her professional career. Currently unattached Ruth -- pardon me, Retha is often seen at the ------ you guessed it, the Hocus Hot Spot. It takes no Sherlock Holmes to figure that one out.

     Bill McDermott is the sole owner and manager of a 30,000 acre dude ranch in Arizona. His main hobbies are raising champion cattle and inducing Hollywood stars --- beg pardon --- starlets to be his guests at the dude ranch. From all reports he is doing all right on both counts.

     "Pic" Jackson is one of the class who gained national fame for himself. Soon after his graduation he surprised himself and everyone else by writing the now famous Jackson's Bigger and Better Bird Book. He took the proceeds from this enterprise, studied up on nature and now Doctor Jackson tours the country giving lectures and talks on that topic.

     Perhaps you have heard of that famous entertainment show, the Saradale. This name is a combination of two of that "49 class, Sara Pitkins and Dale Bassett. These two have been a comedy team ever since Dale was fired by NBC for always singing overtime on his radio broadcasts, and since Sara's third husband died. Members of the cast tell me that the show is likely to break up because Dale has accepted a bid from NBC and Sara has accepted a bid for a fourth husband.

     Well, class of '54, these are the facts and figures of those who preceded you. Accept as truth what you like; accept as fantasy what you like. I merely wish to say that if any of the above mentioned are in the circumstances here pictured, none will be more surprised than I.

     It was the first day of school in the year of 1936. Primary class was being introduced in the Kellerton school system. Thirteen dubious, solemn little faces watched for the appearance of the teacher this morning. What was this "primary", anyway? Some of us were frankly tearful - one little boy, Dale, couldn't understand why he couldn't go back home with his mama dear. These little innocents were: Dale Bassett, Ed Coy, Darrel Coy, Ruth Farmer, James Foster, Bobby French, Marilyn Heinisch, Donella Kneedler, Raymond Lutz, Roland Meadows, Jack Swan, Arnold Wion, and Edward Lutz. We emerged from the primary class as experienced pupils. After all, didn't we finally realize "that it wasn't nice to chew our tablet paper and spit it out all over the floor"? Not everyone knew that.

     First grade appeared, and with it came trials to the teacher. Arithmetic was introduced: Let's see, if you had three locks of hair and cut two off with you little pair of scissors, what happens? You have one long little shock of hair left on top of your head and no little pair of scissors. The teacher couldn't understand what fun it is to cut hair in school-time and refused to give the scissors back to their owners. What you don't have to put up with around here!

     The second grade revealed an unhappy fact that these unsuspecting children. If the teacher suggested that we fact the front of the room, and we chose to over-rule the suggestion, a ruler was promptly lowered on chubby hands.

     In the third and fourth grades the escapades of Superman were followed closely from a comic book concealed inside the geography textbook covers. The teachers must have liked Superman, too, from the number of books they took from us. These intelligent third and fourth graders not only counted more than fingers or even their toes, but memorized the multiplication table as well.

     School took on a livelier aspect in the fifth and sixth grades. Life was just one big song! If we became too tired of singing, at our teacher's suggestion we went to the hall to relax our lungs, or else to the superintendent's office to let him join in on the chorus.

     The seventh and eighth grade room was the scene for many eye-filling battles. Eye-filling was right! We held an ink blotter up for facial protection, prepared our ink-filled pen for action, and let ink fly in self protection. "Survival of the fittest" could probably be applied to those who were enrolled in the eighth grade.

     Ascending the steps to take our places in the freshman row were these: Dale Bassett, Merrill Comer, Harold Cooper, Patricia Ethington, Ruth Farmer, Raymond Hampton, Melba Higday, Rex Jackson, Donella Kneedler, and Roland Meadows. All bravado left each countenance upon being informed of our lowly position -- mere errand-boys of upper classmen. Oh well, our time was to come! Raymond Hampton left our class this year.

     As sophomores, upper classmen informed us to live up to their ideals -- that is, as young men and women. After watching the various subtle movements of slipping a thumb-tack into some unsuspecting person's seat, we were aware of our own mistakes in such an act and vowed to follow in the footsteps of those who were more experienced in the act. It always pays to be observant. Marilyn Heinisch, Betty Pierce, Harold Cooper, and Donella Kneedler started in our sophomore class, but left before the year was completed. We were glad to welcome two more to our dwindling number: Rex and Leon James came to Kellerton in the last semester.

     After a little practice, some of our members became so proficient in sophisticated ways of the world that they were given special rooms in which to study during our junior year. No one wanted to force them to have to associate with such lowly, dull individuals in the assembly. Harold Reed joined our class this year. The class numbered eight at the closing of the year -- six boys and two girls.

     The senior year was approached with some mis-givings. This was the last year we would be members of K. H. S. With this thought in mind, after putting our tear-stained handkerchiefs back into an inner pocket, we rose determined to make this year unforgettable. It has remained a thing to remember in our minds and to help others remember our illustrious class of 1949, we cite the names of our graduating seniors: Harold Reed, Bill McDermott, Dale Bassett, Rex James, Ruth Farmer, Rex Jackson, Leon James, and Sara Pitkin.

This program was inserted into the 1949 Tomahawk yearbook.

BACK ROW -- L. to R. -- Kenneth Davenport, Duane Davenport, Robert Smith, Chester Munyon, James Gannon, Donald Gibson, and Rex Payton.

FRONT ROW -- L. to R. -- Mary Jane Fullerton, Shirley Billett, Theola Green, Sara Clough, Esther Doser, Cheryl Baker, Doris Wicker, and Lucille Reed.

BACK ROW -- L. to R. -- Keith Sissel, and Max Higday.

FRONT ROW -- L. to R. -- Barbara Teale, Marlene Williams, Janice Meadows, Nellie Gibson, and Bonnie George.

BACK ROW -- L. to R. -- Tom Duffield, Robert Walker, John White, Denny Duffield, and Paul Stevens.

FRONT ROW -- L. to R. -- Janice Heggs, Phyllis Meadows, Joan Hanks, and Norma Reed.

7th & 8th GRADE


BACK ROW: Jack Ethington, Walter Lipe, and Ernie Greene.

MIDDLE ROW: Marion Ethington, Marvin Lesan, Verlyn Hoff, Edgar Newton, Max Scott, Lyle Corll, John Hixson, Bob Houghton, Jimmie Meadows, and Darrell Baker.

FRONT ROW: Janice Cox, Darlene Sissel, Sharon Brown, Mary Ann Gannon, Beverly Laird, Dorothy Harvey, Rena Laird, Lona Lu Moore, Caryll Lou Higday, Evelyn O'Connell, and Charlotte Kneedler.

Teacher -- Mrs. Moore.

Not pictured -- Dick Mosbarger.

BACK ROW: Jackie Higday, Larry Brown, Larry Dean Kneedler, Larry Joe Campbell, Marvin Corll, Jerry Andrews, and Mrs. Pitkin.

FRONT ROW: Mary Kneedler, Clara Mae Hogue, Sandra Virden, Karen Laird, Carolyn Davenport, Shirley Laird, Ann Meadows, Lois James, Carolyn Galbraith.

Not pictured -- Bob Mosbarger.

BACK ROW: David Holmes, Stephen Merritt, Larry Walter, Delbert Sissel, Sam Davis, Jim Hunt, Gerald Payton, Richard Rainey, Larry Manning, Bobby Baker, and Miss Smith.

FRONT ROW: Carolyn Scott, Kay Ryan, Kay Akers, Joan Meadows, Helen Cox, Judy Fugate, Elizabeth Corll, Janice Kneedler, Marcia Hanks, Sharon Bierlein, and Joan Kneedler.

Not Pictured -- Jimmy White.

BACK ROW: Kenneth Herren, Billy Hogue, Glenn Payton, Dickie Baker, Garry Manning, A. C. Newton, Larry Peppmeier, R. D. Baker, Gary McFarland, and Johnny Meadows. Teacher -- Mrs. Murray.

FRONT ROW: Susan Hoffman, Evelyn Cox, Marie Jensen, Eileen Maloney, Kathryn Holmes, Dorothy Sissel, Kay Turner, Linda Virden, Linda Higday, Carol Ann Ethington, Connie Schneider, Sharon Kneedler, Linda Andrew, and Linda Newton.

Not Pictured -- Don Allen.

BACK ROW -- L. to R. -- Roland Meadows, Robert Smith, Dale Bassett, Chester Munyon, and Rex James.

FRONT ROW -- L. to R. -- Rex Jackson, Tom Duffield, Paul Stevens, John White, Rex Payton, and Denny Duffield.
,
Coach: Mr. Rizzo

BACK ROW -- L. to R. -- Coach: Mr. Rizo. Kenneth Davenport, Robert Smith, Chester Munyon, James Gannon, Duane Davenport.

FRONT ROW -- L. to R. -- Rex Payton, Rex Jackson, Roland Meadows, Dale Bassett, Rex James, and Paul Stevens.

1948-49 Basketball Schedule added to yearbook


Rex James
(G)

Rex Jackson
(F)

John White
(C)

Dennis Duffield
(F)

Dale Bassett
(F)

Chester Munyon
(C)

Bob Smith
(G)

Kellerton
20
 Shannon City
17
Kellerton
33
 Beaconsfield
17
Kellerton
32
 Maloy
30
Kellerton
30
 Leon
26
Kellerton
32
 Garden Grove
31
Kellerton
31
 Grand River
38
Kellerton
38
 Ellston
40
Kellerton
22
 Afton
40
Kellerton
53
 Beaconsfield
29
Kellerton
53
 Lamoni
45
Kellerton
26
 Tingley
35
Kellerton
19
 Ellston
23
Kellerton
27
 Redding
43
Kellerton
21
 Grand River
52
Kellerton
45
 Tingley
22
Kellerton
33
 Maloy
59
Kellerton
59
 Redding
31
 
 
TOTAL POINTS 
 
Kellerton
649
 Opponents
709

BACK ROW -- L. to R. -- Coach: Mr. Rizzo. Bonnie George, Beverly Laird, Phyllis Meadows, Joan Hanks, Nellie Gibson, and Lona Lu Moore.

FRONT ROW -- L. to R. -- Barbara Teale, Ruth Farmer, Esther Doser, Cheryl Baker, Marlene Williams, and Janice Meadows.

Kellerton
19
 Shannon City
48
Kellerton
21
 Beaconsfield
62
Kellerton
18
 Leon
22
Kellerton
38
 Garden Grove
58
Kellerton
32
 Grand River
44
Kellerton
40
 Ellston
31
Kellerton
20
 Afton
21
Kellerton
32
 Beaconsfield
51
Kellerton
33
 Tingley
44
Kellerton
15
 Ellston
17
Kellerton
29
 Redding
55
Kellerton
31
 Grand River
44
Kellerton
24
 Tingley
34
Kellerton
22
 Redding
61
 
 
COUNTY
TOURNAMENT
 
 
Kellerton
15
 Benton
40
 
 
SECTIONAL
TOURNAMENT
 
 
Kellerton
18
 Osceola
32
 
 
TOTAL POINTS 
 
Kellerton
406
 Opponents
664

Ticket added to yearbook


Janice Meadows
(F)

Cheryl Baker
(F)

Bonnie George
(F)

Marlene Williams
(F)

Barbara Teale
(G)

Ruth Farmer
(G)

Nellie Gibson
(G)

Esther Doser
(G)

BACK ROW -- L. to R. -- Theola Greene, Esther Doser, Janice Meadows, Shirley Billett, Ruth Farmer, and Doris Wicker.

FRONT ROW -- L. to R. -- Bonnie George, Nellie Gibson, Joan Hanks, Janice Meadows, Phyllis Meadows, and Barbara Teale.

L. to R. -- Rex James, Kenneth Davenport, Robert Smith, Dale Bassett, Roland Meadows, and Paul Stevens.

SEXTET: L. to R. -- Theola Greene, Esther Doser, Janice Meadows, Janice Heggs, Doris Wicker, and Barbara Teale.

"CARNIVAL"
October 29, 1948


     The week starting October 25th began a week of last-minute preparations for the Kellerton School Carnival. Weeks before plans had been made and completed for the carnival activities. Sara Clough and Ruth Farmer, who helped Mr. Burch with the carnival, made a trip to Kansas City, Missouri, with Mr. and Mrs. Burch to shop for carnival material. Raffle tickets on a white pine book-case which some of the high school boys had made. Yes, this week was a busy one.

     Probably the most nerve-racking part of the carnival to farmer's corn cribs as well as to the students was the corn contest. This was a contest between the classes in which the class bringing in the most corn received a trip to Creston and a dinner. Luckily, no one was injured in this rivalry and the junior class eventually won.

     The night of the carnival brought a good night and a good attendance. Mom, Dad and all the kids came. Dad paid an admission fee at the door for all and received a chance at the door prize -- a silverware set, complete with a case. Then he handed some folding money to each offspring and said, "Now hold onto that for a while." As we wandered around we heard a loud voice on the microphone from the bingo stand using every persuasion to entice all to play bingo. Mother thought that the owner of the voice looked like one of the high school boys but Aunt Susie said he was Mr. Allen, the Social Science Teacher. Dad saw a beautiful package gowned in black on Mr. Allen's arm when he left the room and supposing, of course, that they were giving away on the bingo stand, went to play bingo.

     In the meantime, Mom went upstairs to see Junior and Sister perform in the grade program. The stands, etc, downstairs remained open during the grade program, some of which were: the hoop-a-la, dart throw, balloon throw, bowling, basketball throw, penny pitch, and the eats stand.

     Mr. Rizzo was at the novelty stand. He supplied venturesome experiments with such equipment as confetti, squirt guns, and sundry souvenirs, such as balloons, button, and pennants.

     After Mom returned from the grade program she met one lady who said, "Have you had your fortune told yet?" That was a deciding question, so Mom went to have her fortune told. The "Madame", whose home is Wichita, Kansas, lowered her tent in the fifth and sixth grade room that night. Mom returned with a very pleased expression so the Madame apparently knew the facts.

     Junior had purchased a squirt gun at the novelty stand by this time and was promptly watering any wilty looking creatures within shooting range.

     After all had gone to the eats stand at different intervals of the evening, it was about time for the drawing -- the last event of the evening.

     The drawing took place in the assembly upstairs. The silverware set, the bookcase, and numerous articles donated by business-men were given away at this time.

     Dad then loaded a tired group in the old Ford to make the trip home. All agreed that it had been a nice evening and decided that they couldn't miss the one next year.

ALL-HIGH SCHOOL PARTIES


     The first social event of the year was one which was not enjoyed too much by the new freshman. It was the initiation party -- the formal welcoming of all new members to high school. We're glad to see that you arrived, freshmen of 1948-49.

     Mr. Allen and Mrs. Schneider were the only new teachers resent and as a result they were continually appearing before the group. When the seniors looked upon their little black list and found something in which a teacher was to participate, it was just -- "Call Mr. Allen or Mrs. Schneider." Mr. Allen was quite good at pretending -- pretending not to feel the electric currant passing through the special "hot-seat" the boys had erected especially for him.

     As to the chocolate pudding the freshmen were given -- well, that's a long story! After finding the mixture lacked body, the senior girls added anything available found in the cupboard in the school Home Ed room. Luckily, the information showing what really was in that pudding has never reached the light of day.

     The Sophomore Class, sponsored by Mr. Allen, gave the next all high school party. The evening was spent in playing games. One little game that made its appearance was called "Satisfied or Dissatisfied". If one was dissatisfied anyone in the room could be compelled to do something to please the dissatisfied one. Mr. Burch seemed to think all were thirsty, the way he had some drinking quarts of water. The rest of the evening was spent in dancing to the jazz supplied by the only musical instrument with which Mr. Allen says he is really accomplished at playing -- the phonograph.

     An all-high school party was given by the Tomahawk Staff on the evening of February 4th for the express purpose of crowning Theola Greene as our Annual Queen. She was selected by a contest between the classes in which the class selling the most annuals had its candidate elected. Bob Smith very capably served as M. C. While those tardy people of earlier danced. Even though someone sprinkled the floor too freely with some substance to produce a sliding surface, the only casualties reported were several dents in dignities after a few upsets while square-dancing. Those present were then divided into teams. Each team was asked to select a representative for a different type of contest. The contest in which the contestant was supposed to milk an imaginary cow was characterized by Barbara Teale sitting down very sedately to milk one side, then rising and saying, "Now I'll go around to milk the other side." Some boys gave their interpretation of a back fence gossip -- very effectively, too. Mrs. Schneider gave a prize-winning sketch of a man shaving; his laborious efforts to refrain from cutting himself while Roland Meadows gave the other side -- a woman applying makeup.

     The evening came to a climax when Theola was given a corsage of pink carnations and Joan Hanks, Janice Meadows, and Ruth Farmer (unanimous choice of the Senior Class) were given pink carnations to pin in their curly locks as attendants from the other classes.

     The skating party took place on the gym February 18. After skating for awhile those present decided to have a basketball game on skates. Instead of saying, "He dribbled down the floor for a basket", it would be, "He coasted in slow on four wheels, trying to keep his balance and landed against the wall while trying to Make a basket."

Cast of Junior Class Play
December 9 & 10.

Billy Zanders-in love with Ann-Kenneth Davenport
Hank Evans
 
-
 
his pal
 
-
 
Duane Davenport*
-- Rex Payton
Tessie Heimberger-the Dutch cook-Theola Greene
Loretta Ware-who rules the roost-Cheryl Baker
Alix Ware- her husband-James Gannon
Cuddles LaRose- a chorus girl-Sara Clough
Miss Prudence Whitney
 
-
 
who wants to wed
 
-
 
Shirley Billett
--Lucille Reed*
Ann Whitney
 
-
 
her younger sister
 
-
 
Mary Jane Fullerton
Olaf Swanson- Tessie's boyfriend-Bob Smith
Mrs. Thurston Thwacker-
 
Alix's mother-in-law-
 
Esther Doser
 
Uncle Zebediah Zanders-
 
Billy's uncle
 
-
 
Donald Gibson
 

* Alternates who made their appearance in the second performance.


     The selection of a minstrel is now under way and will be presented by the Senior Class in the near future. Mr. Burch and Mrs. Schneider will direct the production.

____________________


     Even though it may appear we have no regard for proper placement, we would, considering this available space, like to take this mode of expressing our appreciation for the many things Mr. Davis does for our comfort throughout the school year.

1948-49 Kellerton Community School Tomahawk courtesy of GV Museum
Transcription by Sharon R. Becker, June of 2017


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