Page County, Iowa obituaries
transcribed by Pat O'Dell genpat@netins.net
 
 
Holbrook, George W. -


George W. Holbrook was born in Nodaway County, Missouri, just south of Braddyville, Iowa, May 9, 1857, and lived in and around this community all his life.
He was united in marriage October, 12, 1876, to Emma M. Pownell and to this union were born four children, Geo. H., Carlton L. Nora Belle, and Clarence C. all of whom are living to mourn the loss of a dear father.
The deceased began failing in health five years ago and continued to grow worse until he was confined to his bed four weeks prior to his death, which occured Tuesday, August 23, 1921, at 5:30 a. m. age 64 years, 3 months and 14 days.
Emma M. Powell, wife of George W. Holbrook, was born at Mt. Pleasant Iowa, August 8, 1860 and departed this life, February 4, 1920 aged 59 years, five months and 26 days.
She was a member of the Baptist church and lived a true Christian life up to the time of her death.
She was in poor health several years but was confined to her bed about one week preceeding her death Because of the presence of influenza in the family and community, it was impossible to hold funeral services. Hence it was desired and fitting on the part of relatives to include tribute of love in memory of her with that of the husband and father. Funeral services were held at the home of their son, Clarence, where Mr. Holbrook had been making his home since the death of his wife. Rev. Ray Snodgrass conducted the services on Wednesday, August 24 at 2 p. m.. After an eloquent and touching address and beautiful singing by the Maryville Male Quartette, his remains were taken to the Burch Cemetery for burial by the side of his wife. CLARINDA HERALD, Clarinda, Iowa, Sep 1, 1921

 

Holby, George H. -

Geo. H Holby died about 6:30 yesterday morning at his home in north Clarinda, age 51 years. He had been in poor health a long time from consumption and his death was no surprise. He leaves a wife but no children to mourn his death. He was a man of moderate means and carried a policy in the Modern Woodman. Being born near Richmond, Ind., where his parents now live, he will be taken back there for burial. PAGE COUNTY DEMOCRAT, Clarinda, Iowa, Apr 26, 1908

 

Holcombe, R.I. - A telegram was received yesterday by Mrs. L. H. Holcombe of this city announcing the death of Mr. S. I. Holcombe of St. Paul. Mr. Holcombe was State historian at the Capital. No particulars are known at this time concerning his death. Frank Sawtelle of Clarinda and O. E. McAnulty of Independence, Kasn. have gone to St Paul to make the arrangement necessary for the funeral which will be held Saturday at St. Paul. Burial will be there also. PAGE COUNTY DEMOCRAT, Clarinda, Iowa, Nov 23, 1916

R. I. Holcombe, one of Clarinda's early residents, who was also a Civil War veteran, and in his later years a historian, of note, died suddenly Nov. 21st, 1916, in his rooms at 370 E. Tenth Street, in St. Paul, Minn.
It was only a few weeks ago that Mr. Holcombe was in Clarinda, coming here to attend the funeral of his beloved daughter, Mrs. O. E. McAnulty. At the time of his visit here he seemed the picture of health. He was one of Clarinda's earliest residents, many years ago being a printer here, working in the same office with Postmaster A. B. Robinson at a time when type was all set by hand and the printing trade was more laborious than it is now-a-days.
The funeral, held in St. Paul Central Park Methodist church, on Nov. 25th, was a military funeral. Frank O. Sawtelle of Clarinda was in attendance, representing his mother, Mrs. E. O, Sawtelle, who was a friend of the family, and the son-in-law, E. O. McAnulty, of Independence, Kans., was also present. The funeral was largely attended, the Methodist pastor, Rev. W. E. S. Gratz being in charge of the religious services, and Col. J. H. Davison also made an address. Many people attended the funeral, and the floral offerings were most profuse. Among those attending were employes of the state house at St. Paul, where for many years Mr. Holcombe had been one of the workers, besides the Boy Scouts, the Spanish War veterans, the staff of the Minnesota Historical society. The honorary pallbearers were Charles Hare Commander of Garfield Post G. A. R., Allen Swain, E. S. Kenrick, E. E. Corliss, Charles Humason and William Treziyulny. The active pallbearers were chosen of the two camps of the United Spanish War veterans, Judge J. W. Fiswshout, Maj. N. C. Robinson, Otto N. Hatha, Representative Carl C. Van Dyke, Dr. D. C. Jones and Hugo V. Koch. Burial was in Soldiers Rest, in Oakland cemetery, St. Paul, taps being sounded by James Darey, bugler of the North Bagley camp.
While Mr. Holcombe in Clarinda has been known chiefly as a citizen and a man, his reputation nationally rests on his historical researches and contributions to historical literature. He has recently been engaged in writing a history of McLeod county, Minnesota, and many other counties owe the publication of their histories to this patient and indefatigable writer of history. His going to St. Paul was at the request of his publishers to write a history of St Paul, in July 1888, and led to that being his permanent home. From his pen came a four volume history "Minnesota In Three Centuries," assisting the State Historical society in the work. It was Mr. Holcombe who contributed the first article dealing with the Indian side of the Sioux uprising, having personally interviewed "Big Eagle," the Sioux Chief, in order to get the viewpoint of the aboriginees. He also published the histories of twelve counties in Kansas.
R. I. Holcombe was born Feb. 24, 1845, in Gallia county, Ohio. His parents were descendents of Revolutionary stock.  He moved to Missouri in 1851, serving 3 years and 8 months in the Union Army during the Civil War, enlisting in 10th Mo. Infantry. He was a member of the G. A. R., the Sons of the American Revolution, and of the Minnesota State Historical society. CLARINDA HERALD, Clarinda, Iowa, Dec 14, 1916

FUNERAL OF R.L HOLCOMB.
The funeral of R. I. Holcombe, one of Page county's pioneer citizen, lately residing in St Paul, Minn., were held Nov. 25th, in the Central Park M. E. church at St Paul. Frank O. Sawtelle was present from Clarinda, and also O. E. McAnulty from Independence, Kans., formerly resident here. It was a military funeral, largely attended, about which we shall have more to say in the obituary next week, being unable to include same in this issue. Mr. Holcombe's death was quite unexpected. He has been living at 370 E. Tenth Street in St. Paul engaged in the writing of histories, which was his life's work. He was nearly 72 years of age, and his death comes as a shock to many friends and admirers. CLARINDA HERALD, Clarinda, Iowa, Dec 7, 1916


R.I. HOLCOMB PASSED AWAY.
A telegram to friends in Clarinda received Wednesday told of the death of R. I. Holcomb, at his home in Minneapolis, where Mr. Holcomb has been engaged in historical work. No particulars were given, but we shall have these fully for next week. Frank Sawtelle left Wednesday evening for Minneapolis, to attend the funeral there, which is to be held this Saturday. [paper unknown]

Holcombe, R.I.
R. I. Holcombe, a former resident of Clarinda, died in St. Paul. Minn, Wednesday, Nov. 22. 1916. His death occurred suddenly and the attending circumstances are not known here. Mr. Holcombe was in Clarinda recently at the time of the death of his daughter. Mrs: O. E. McAnulty. Funeral services are to be held in St. Paul, Saturday. O. E. McAnulty from Independence,, Kan., went to attend the funeral. Clarinda Journal, Clarinda, Iowa, Nov 23, 1916

 

Holland, Miles Hanson -

Another Veteran Gone.
Miles Hanson Holland was born in Franklin county. Ohio, near Columbus, April 19, 1837. Died, Jan. 26, 1903, at his residence in Taylor county, Iowa, aged 63 years, 9 months, 10 days.
He came to eastern Iowa with his parents in 1843. In 1858 he removed to Taylor county and since that time he has resided in the immediate communiiy. He was united in marriage with Hannah D. Bentley, Aug. 22, 1865. To this union four children were born three of whom survive him. Two sisters also mourn his death.
The deceased responded to the call of his country in the hour of her greatest need. He enlisted in the 1st regiment engineers. Missouri volunteers in 1862. This regiment was later consolidated with the 25th Missouri engineers.
The deceased was with Sherman on his march to the sea. After three years of faithful service he was discharged, at the expiration of his term of enlistment, at Goldsboro, N. C., with no taint upon his record as a brave and faithful defender of the flag. At 2 p. m, Jan. 30th, after a short ritualistic service at the home by the I. O. O. F. of which order he was a loved and honored member, the remains were conveyed to the
Hawleyville M. E. church where services were conducted by the writer. The gospel was preached from Heb. 9 27-28. The body was then tenderly and lovingly laid to rest by his brother Odd Fellows, in the little cemetery on the hill.                                                 Willis A. Wells.
Hawleyville, Iowa. Jan, 30, 1903.

 

Hollis, Lulu L. Knowles -

Lulu L. Knowles Hollis was born in Holton county, Ill., July 9, 1878, and died in her home three miles north of Hawleyville, June 19, 1917, at the age of 38 years 11 months and 10 days. On Nov.. 25, 1901, she married Albert Hollis. To this union were born five children, Glen (deceased), Ora, aged 11; Gertie, aged 7,Virgil, aged 4, and Bert, aged 18 months. Besides the children her husband, father, mother, four sisters and two brother, and many friends, mourn their loss. In 1886 she united with the Baptist church and lived a consistent Christian life. She is spoken of as a kind, loving mother and as a lady who had the faculty of making and keeping friends. In her last moments she spoke of the Christian's hope and her heavenly home. Her funeral was held in the North Grove Methodist Episcopal church, Thursay, June 21, at
2 p. m., and was in charge of the Rev. Alfred Knoll of Villisca. CLARINDA JOURNAL, Clarinda, Iowa, Jun 28, 1917


Mrs. Lulu L. Knowles Hollis was born In Holton Co., Ill., July 9th, 1878, died three miles north of Hawleyville, June 19th, 1917. She united with the Baptist church in 1886. Her parents, Mr. and Mrs. P. S. Knowles, lived on the place near Ora Burwell's and she grew to womanhood here, and was united in marriage to Albert Hollis. To this union four children were born and are living to mourn the loss of a kind mother besides she leaves a husband, father and mother and four sisters and two brothers. Funeral services were conducted by Rev. Knoll of Villisca at the North Grove church. Interment in the North Grove cemetery.
Her parents, Mr. and Mrs. P. S. Knowles, of Kansas, and sister, Mrs. Jas. Young, of Hale, Mo., were with her during her last illness. CLARINDA HERALD, Clarinda, Iowa, Jun 28, 1917

 

Holm, J. Alfred -

J. Alfred Holm.
Essex Independent, Dec. 14:   "J. A. Holm died at his home in  this city last Thursday forenon.   His health
had been poor for some time and dur ing the past few weeks he was bedfast.
The deceased, was born in Sweden Feb. 1, 1849, was married Oct. 2, 1872 and came to America in   1883. He lived in Fremont township a number of years and came to this immediate vicinity in 1892, during the past few years he resided in Essex. He is mourned by his wife and six children, all of whom were present at the funeral.   The children are Charles J., Gust, Fred and Henry   Holm, Mrs. Clarence Moore and Mrs. Joe Johnson. The funeral was held in the Swedish Lutheran chrurch last Sunday afternoon and although the weather was extremely   bad   quite a number of friends were present.   Rev. J. A. Holmen conducted the services. Mrs. Seth Bergren and Miss Esther Swanson sang a couple of beautiful songs, Miss Florence Kample presided at the pipe organ.   The pall bearers were C. J. Sar, A. Broodeen, J. A. Ekeroth, A G. Falk, C. A. Kample and   E. G. Oline. The floral offerings were numerous and beautiful.   Burial was in the Essex cemetery." CLARINDA JOURNAL, Clarinda, Iowa, Dec 10, 1917      

     

Holmes, C.J. -

John Haidsiak, wife and three children, of Nelson, Nebr., and Oscar Holms and family were called to this city Saturday by the sudden death of Mr. C. J. Holms, out near Page Center. Mr. Holms was the father of Mrs. Haidsiak and also Oscar Holmes. Mr. and Mrs. Haidsiak had been here some time, returning home only a week ago last Saturday. PAGE COUNTY DEMOCRAT, Clarinda, Iowa, Sep 23, 1909

John Haidsiak and wife, of Nelson, Nebr., who were called here Saturday by the death of her father, C. J. Holms, will go over to Taylor county next week to visit his parents, Mr. and Mrs. Frank Haidsiak, before returning to their Nebraska home. PAGE COUNTY DEMOCRAT, Clarinda, Iowa, Sep 23, 1909


Holmes, Susan - Mrs. Susan Holmes died at the state hospital Friday. She was 74 years age and had been brought here from Randolph, Fremont county, Oct.29, for treatment. Her remains were shipped home Saturday evening for interment. PAGE COUNTY DEMOCRAT, Clarinda, Iowa, Nov 17, 1910

 

Holms, J.C. - J. C. Holms died Friday, Sept. 17, 1909, at his farm home near Page Center, from an attack of rheumatism and dropsy, aged 58 years, 6 months and 14 days. He had been in poor health for about a year, but not dangerously ill until three days previous to his death. Mr. Holms was a native of Sweden and came to this country when a young man, locating at Hanover, Ill. In 1871 he came to Page county, and a few years after was married to Miss Sophia Grant. Five children were born to them, four of whom are still living. He was an honorable man and highly respected by all who knew him. The funeral was held Sunday at 2 p. m. from the home, conducted by Rev. Williamson, of the U. P. church. A good man has gone to his long home. PAGE COUNTY DEMOCRAT, Clarinda, Iowa, Sep 23, 1909

 

Holslaw, Martha A. -

Mrs. Martha A. Holslaw died Saturday, April 26th, at her home near Norwich. She was the mother of thirteen children, nine of whom survive her and were present at the funeral. Her remains were laid to rest in the Polsley cemetery. PAGE COUNTY DEMOCRAT, Clarinda, Iowa, May 1, 1902

 


Holste, Bill -

Bill Holste, 71, of rural Hopkins, died Sunday, April 6, 1997, at his home.
Born Aug. 15, 1925, in Massena, Iowa, to Walter and Zua Richardson Holste, he was a farmer.
He married Doris Cullison, March 24,1945.
Mr. Holste served in the U.S. Navy during World War U and returned to a lifelong career of farming in the Villisca, Iowa, Clearmont and Hopkins communities.
He was preceded in death by his parents; and one brother, Bernard Holste.
Survivors include his wife, Doris, of Hopkins; one son, Mike Holste of Hopkins; two daughters, Nancy David of Lincoln, Neb., and Carol Carmicharl of Pacifica, Calif.; one brother, Richard Holste of Clarinda, Iowa; six grandchildren; three great­grandchildren; and nieces and nephews.
Visitation will be held from 7 to 8 p.m., Tuesday, April 8, at the First Christian Church in Hopkins.
Services will be held at 1:30 p.m., Wednesday, April 9, at Walker-Merrick Funeral Home, Clarinda,
Iowa.
Burial will be in the Clarinda Cemetery, Clarinda, Iowa. MARYVILLE FORUM, Maryville, Missouri, Apr 8, 1997 and CLARINDA HERALD-JOURNAL, Clarinda, Iowa, Apr 16, 1997

 

Holton, Elmer -

Elmer Holton Dies in Colorado - Word was received by wire here Monday morning that Elmer E. Holton, son of Mr. and Mrs. D. B. Holton, of this place, had died the previous evening at his home in Loveland, Colo. Mr. and Mrs. D. B. Holton, and O. B. Holton drove from here Monday afternoon and they, together with Frank McKee, of Clarinda, and his mother, left on the afternoon train from that place, for Loveland.  No further word than the message was received.
Elmer was known by nearly everyone in this section, having lived here with his parents until a few years ago, when he went west for his health which had been quite poor. He had been in fairly good health since he arrived in Colorado, until he received an injury while handling a horse a short time ago, and it was from the effect of this injury that he died.—Braddyville Enterprise. CLARINDA HERALD, Clarinda, Iowa, Jun 9, 1908

 

Holton, Margaret -

Mrs. Margaret Holton, wife of D. B. Holton of Braddyville,  died at their home Monday after a continued illness from old age and a complication of diseases, aged 67 years, 6 months and 9 days. She had been a resident of that town for many years and was a woman highly respected by all. The funeral took place this afternoon at 2 o'clock from the home, conducted by Rev. J. D. Hower, and interment in the Braddyville cemetery. PAGE COUNTY DEMOCRAT, Clarinda, Iowa, Dec 2, 1909

 

Homan, Fletcher's FATHER -

Word comes that Fletcher Homan's father died at his home in Corning, Wednesday. He had been failing rapidly since the middle of the summer and death came after weeks of sickness and suffering. Mr. Homan was at his father's bedside when the end came. The sincere sympathy of his Clarinda friends is extended to Mr. Homaa in his bereavement.

CLARINDA HERALD, Clarinda, Iowa, Oct 6, 1905

 

Homan, Ruth -

Little Ruth Homan.
Little Ruth Homan, the 16-months-old daughter of President Fletcher Homan, of the Willamette university, is the fifth and last victim of the cold, swift and absolutely unprotected waters of south mill race and another otherwise happy household is plunged into the depths of grief thereby.
The saddest part of it all is that the father, Rev. Homan, is away from home attending the Methodist conference at Payette, Idaho, and the mother was confined to her bed with a ten days old baby in arms when the heart rending news of the tragic death of her child was broken to her. Rev. Homan was reached by telegraph yesterday afternoon and he wired back that he would come home on the first train, and he will probably arrive this afternoon when funeral arrangements will be completed and announced.
Little or nothing is known of how the little tot happened to fall into the race. She was playing with her little brother and other children upon the baseball grounds of the university yesterday morning and was not missed for some time and it is supposed that she climbed into the grandstand and fell through the large apertures between the seats. The body was discovered floating, feet upwards, down the mill race, near High Street, by George Dewis, operator for the Oregon electric railway. He was just in time to grasp the clothing of the child when the switching crew of the Southern Pacific arrived upon the scene and assisted in getting the body out. Among those who helped to get the body out were Joe McCann, Guy Simmons and D.G. Sherman.
Drs. Robertson and Morse were immediately notified of the occurence and Dr. Robertson hastened to the scene but all efforts to resuscitate the drowned child were unavailing and Dr. Robertson stated that she had been dead at least 40 minutes. . The child had not been missed by her playmates for several minutes when they reported the fact to the invalid mother and an organized search was at once instituted but no trace of the child could be found until the news of the finding of the body was communicated to the distracted mother.
Dr. G. V. Ellis, who has been in attendance upon Mrs. Homan during her recent illness, was telephoned to as soon as the loss of the child was discovered. The shock of course completely unnerved her and she was considered in a serious condition for a short time. As soon as he could get away Dr. Ellis hurried to the telegraph office to get in communication with Dr. Homan.
President Homan succeded President J.E. Coleman to the head of Willamette university about three months ago, and, having been unable to find a suitable house to rent, occupied apartments in the Ladies' hall of the university, temporarily.   Beside the drowned child, which was exceptionally bright and strong for her age, Rev. and Mrs. Homan have four other children, three sons, aged 17, 15, and 10 respectively, and an infant daughter of about ten days.
This makes about the fifth victim of the cruel waters of the south mill race within the past few years and the residents of the contiguous territory through which it passes threaten to rise up in righteous indignation against the nuisance and will organize a campaign to have the ditch covered from the eastern boundaries to the city limits to High street, the end of the danger zone. Among the little tots who have been sacrificed at this altar of carelessness and negligence are the little son of the late R. S. Wallace, the son of W. T. Rigdon and the son of the late Dr. A. A. Jessup.—Daily Oregon Statesman. CLARINDA HERALD, Clarinda, Iowa, Aug 28, 1908

A telegram was received last Monday evening by Dr. and Mrs. Collier from Mrs. Fletcher Homan of Salem, Ore., saying that their little daughter, Ruth, was drowned that morning. As yet no particulars have been received telling of the accident. Little Ruth was but sixteen months old and the sympathy of all goes out to Rev. and Mrs. Homan in their bereavement. Rev. Homan was in Idaho at the time of the accident. CLARINDA HERALD, Clarinda, Iowa, Aug 21, 1908

Mrs. Dr. Collier received a telegram from Rev. Fletcher Homan of Oregon yesterday morning stating their 16 months old babe had been drowned. No particulars given. Rev. Homan was formerly pastor of the M. E church here. PAGE COUNTY DEMOCRAT, Clarinda, Iowa, Aug 20, 1908

 

Honan, Mary [says Hannah] -

LIVED IN THREE CENTURIES
A tombstone in the Blanchard cemetery records the fact that a woman buried there had lived to see three centuries. Mrs. Hannah Honan, born in 1798 and died in 1901, saw the eighteenth century end, saw the nineteenth century from beginning to end, and saw the twentieth century begin—a most remarkable record.— State Line Herald. PAGE COUNTY DEMOCRAT, Clarinda, Iowa, Dec 6, 1917

 

Hood, Lois - Lois, the two year old babe of Mr. and Mrs. Geo. Hood of New Market died suddenly at the Killingsworth hospital Wednesday of last week. The little girl fell from a chair at home and broke the bones in her left arm just below the elbow. She was brought to this city for treatment and nursing. Just as the physicians were about to administer anesthetics for the treatment they discovered her heart action was very weak. Restoratives were quickly applied but she failed to recover and passed away on the operating table. PAGE COUNTY DEMOCRAT, Clarinda, Iowa, Nov 13, 1913

CHILD DIES FROM AENESTHETIC Little Lois Hood of New Market was brought to Clarinda on the morning train last week Wednesday by her father, George Hood, and her grandfather, Dr. McCullum of New Market coming with them. The object of their trip was to have a broken bone set in the little girl's arm, which had been broken some days before at the elbow, but was not doing well, hence they came to Dr. Killingsworth's office to secure assistance in getting the arm reset and placed in a plaster cast. Arriving there about noon the girl was placed under the influence of ether, administered by Dr.McCollum, less than a drachm being used, which is less than the usual amount even for children. Dr. Killingsworth then set the bone, and shortly afterward noticed that the child was not breathing properly. Investigation was made and it was found that the heart action was not right, in fact, the patient soon became synotic from lack of circulation and for an hour the doctors administered artificial respiration  and    did everything possible to regain the lost heart action, but without avail,  and about one o'clock the little girl was given up as beyond human aid. The cause for the heart failure will never be known, as it arose from some condition of the child's system, probably connected with the brain rather than the heart. The cause was not the administering of the aenesthetic, although that may have been a contributing cause. The child's arm was first broken by falling from a chair. The pathetic part was the absence of the child's mother in New Market at the time when the little girl was in Clarinda. CLARINDA HERALD, Clarinda, Iowa, Nov 13, 1913

 

Hood, Robert -

Blanchard
June 27.—Robert Hood, a young man about eighteen years old, was drowned in the Nodaway river at Burlington Junction, Mo., Sunday morning about 11 o'clock, but the body was not found for about three hours afterward. He is a brother of Mrs. Earl Hernick of near this place and lived with his parents near here a few years ago, so is quite well known here. The funeral services were held at Burlington Junction Monday afternoon at 1 o'clock. The many friends extend their sympathy to the bereaved ones. CLARINDA JOURNAL, Clarinda, Iowa, Jun 28, 1917

Young Man Meet Death in Nodaway
A young man by the name of Robert Hood, of Burlington Junction was drowned in the Nodaway river west of that city Sunday forenoon. He had gone in bathing with a number of others, and as he could not swim and got into water about 8 feet deep he went down and was drowned before help could reach him. The body was not recovered until between two and three o'clock in the afternoon. The young man was about 18 years old.—Clearfield News.

PAGE COUNTY DEMOCRAT, Clarinda, Iowa, Jul 5, 1917

 

Hooker, Candace [maiden name?] Worth -

The many warm Page county friends of Rev. W. S. Hooker will be grieved to learn that he has just sustained the loss of his wife. This bereavement will be a heavy blow to Mr. Hooker in his declining years. The following is from the Indianola Herald:
"Mrs. Candace Worth Hooker, after a lingering illness, died at the home of her son, Frank Worth, in San Diego, Calif., Thursday, Nov. 26. The remains will be in this city for burial Tuesday evening, December 8. Funeral services at the Methodist church Wednesday, December 9, at 10 a. m, conducted by Rev. E. M. Holmes. Mrs. Hooker was an excellent woman and her passing will be mourned by many sincere friends in Warren county." CLARINDA HERALD, Clarinda, Iowa, Dec 11, 1908

 

Hooker, W.S., Rev -

Rev. W. S. Hooker, D. D. was born in England in 1835, died at the home of his daughter, three miles southwest of Blanchard, Saturday morning, January 6. Entered the Des Moines conference in 1872, of which he has remained a loved and honored member through all these years. His service to the church has been varied, as pastor, presiding elder and! financial secretary of Simpson College. His noble manhood has been an inspiration to the younger men of the conference. He will be greatly missed from this brotherhood. His death will bring sorrow to many hearts and homes where he has been so favorably known through these many years.

CLARINDA HERALD, Clarinda, Iowa, Jan 11, 1912

 

Hooker, Warner's BABE -

The infant child of Mr. and Mrs. Warner Hooker was found dead by Mrs. Hooker at about midnight last Saturday night. The babe had not been well since its birth, being a constant care. The mother went to the bed about nine o'clock in the evening and the child seemed to be sleeping so she did not bother it. About twelve o'clock she awoke and, feeling of the child, found it cold in death. The funeral was held Sunday and the little one put to its final rest in the Franklin Grove cemetery. The parents have the sympathy of their many friends.— Essex Independent. CLARINDA HERALD, Clarinda, Iowa, Nov 12, 1901

 

Hookham, Julia -

Mrs. Julia Hookham died at the family home west of town Sunday, January 26th, 1908, from the effects of a severe cold, combined with the ills incident to her advanced age. She was born in England May 30th, 1824, and was 84 years, 8 months and 26 days old at the time of her death. Her funeral will be held this afternoon at 2 o'clock at the Methodist church in this city, Rev. J. W. Abel conducting the services.   Interment at Clarinda cemetery. CLARINDA HERALD, Clarinda, Iowa, Jan 28, 1908

Mrs. Julia Hookham, wife of the late Wm. Hookham, died Sunday morning at her home southwest of the city, at the advanced age of 84 years. 8 months and 26 days. She was a native of England but had resided many years in this county. She was a kind and motherly lady. The funeral took place from the home at two o'clock, conducted by Rev. Abel. PAGE COUNTY DEMOCRAT, Clarinda, Iowa, Jan 30, 1908

 

 

Hookham, Kathryn Ruth -

Ruth Hookham died at the home of her parents, Mr. and Mrs. Albert Hookham, three miles southwest of Clarinda, Thursday, April 5, 1917. Her death is attributed to pneumonia. Before her last illness she was in poor health for several weeks.. The deceased was born March 12, 1916. The funeral was held from the family home at 2 p.m. last Saturday, conducted by Rev. A. S. Woodard, pastor of the Methodist Episcopal church of this city, and interment was in Birchwood cemetery. CLARINDA JOURNAL, Clarinda, Iowa, Apr 12, 1917

Baby Dies of Pneumonia.
Kathryn Ruth Hookham, the baby daughter of Albert and Lulu Hookham of Clarinda, died Thursday, April 5, of pneumonia. She was only one year and twenty-three days old. She was born March 12, 1916.
Her last illness extended over a period of five weeks and during that time she bore her sufferings with remarkable patience for one so young. All that loving hands could do or medical skill could offer was done for her but the death angel conqured and she has gone to be at home with Jesus. "A precious one from us is gone. A voice we loved is stilled. A place is vacant in our home, Which never can be filled." CLARINDA HERALD, Clarinda, Iowa, Apr 12, 1917

RUTH CATHERINE HOOKHAM
Ruth Katherine Hookham, infant daughter of Mr. and Mrs. Albert Hookham, living west of this city, died at the family home last Thursday, April 5, 1917, from brain fever, aged 1 year and 23 months.
Funeral services were conducted by Rev. A. S. Woodard at the home of the parents, Saturday afternoon, April 7, and the little one laid to rest in the city cemetery. A large concourse of neighbors and friends, who
deeply sympathize with the parents and sister who so dearly loved the little girl were in attendance at the
funeral. PAGE COUNTY DEMOCRAT, Clarinda, Iowa, Apr 12, 1917

 

 

 

Hookham, William -

Wm. Hookham died Monday evening at his home southwest of Clarinda, f ollowing a long and painful illness from cancer on his face. He was about 78 years of age and an old resident of this county. PAGE COUNTY DEMOCRAT, Clarinda, Iowa, May 22, 1913

W. H.. Hookham was born August 6th in London, England, where he grew to manhood and in 1851 was united in marriage with Julia Butterworth. Sixty years ago he emigrated to America, settling for a time in the state of New York, in 1856 he removed to Illinois, where he resided for fifteen years and in 1870 came to Page county, settling on the farm where he has continuously resided and where he passed away May 20th, aged 85 years.
Ten children were born, two died in infancy and the eight surviving children, six sons and two daughters, were present at the funeral.
Five years ago, after a married life of fifty-six years, the wife preceded him to the better land and many, many times since he has expressed the desire to those who so carefully watched over him in his last illness that be might be permitted to sleep away from his present trouble and affliction which desire was kindly granted him.
Beside the six sons and two daughters, there are 21 grandchildren and eight great-grandchildren, the names of the surviving sons and daughters being as follows: William, living near Clarinda; Fred, George, Ed and John at Coin, la.; William at Greenwood, Neb., and two daughters, Mrs. Susan Dunmire, Coin, la., and Mrs. Julia Morgan, Kansas City, Mo.
Reared in the church of England, he and his wife united with the Methodist Episcopal church in Clarinda in 1878. The funeral service was held from his late residence in Harlan township Thursday at 2 p m. CLARINDA HERALD, Clarinda, Iowa, May 22, 1913

 

 

Hoover, Angaline -

Death of Mrs. Angaline Hoover. Mrs. G. M. Troy returned to her home Monday morning from Oskaloosa, where she has spent most of her time since December beside the sick bed of her mother, Mrs. Angaline Hoover, who passed away, March 2, 1914, at the age of 76. Mrs. Hoover was laid to rest beside her husband in Bloomfield cemetery near the old home. She was a member of the Friends church. Her life was beautiful in its simplicity. She made it the supreme motive of her life to exemplify the teachings of the Master she loved and followed. She came sweetly and peacefully down to the close of life's journey, not losing her interest in things of this present life but giving prominence to those of higher and future life.
Mrs. Hoover has spent part of her last , few winters with her daughter, Mrs. Troy, and granddaughters, Mrs. Herbert Davis and Mrs. Arthur Pfander, and had made many friends in Page county, as was shown by the beautiful tribute of flowers sent her during her sickness. CLARINDA HERALD, Clarinda, Iowa, Mar 19, 1914


Hoover, Mrs - G. M. Troy received word last Tuesday that his mother-in-law, Mrs. Hoover, had been killed at Oskaloosa, where she lives. He left immediately for that city, but sent us word yesterday that the report was a false one, sent by someone who was mistaken. He found Mrs. Hoover alive and well, but heard of an uncle who was killed accidentally in machinery a few days before. CLARINDA HERALD, Clarinda, Iowa, Oct 19, 1900

 

Hopkins, Frank L. -

REMAINS OF SOLDIER BEING RETURNED HOME

Mr. and Mrs. A. F. Hopkins received word the early part of the week from the war department stating that the ship carrying the body of their son Frank L. Hopkins was expected to land at Hoboken on or about April 5. Frank was inducted from Sheldon, O'Brien County, Iowa, and was sent with the Sheldon boys to Camp Gordon, leaving to go over seas, the 13th of Sept., 1918 in Co. 18, Camp Gordon Casuals. Disease caused the death Sept. 30. The remains are to be brought to Gravity for burial, it being planned to allow the American Legion there to have charge of the services. CLARINDA HERALD, Clarinda, Iowa, Apr 8, 1920

The funeral of Frank L. Hopkins, held in Gravity on Monday of last week; was attended by fully 500 people, so we learn from the Gravity Independent. The sermon was preached by Rev. Weber, at the Methodist Church, Gravity Post of the American Legion having charge of the service, this being the first body of an overseas soldier to be returned to this neighborhood. The following obituary was read at the funeral service:
Frank Lee Hopkins was born in Washington township, Taylor county, Iowa, October 12, 1888, died in Paignton, Devon, England, September 30, 1918. He entered the service of his country July 23, 1918, at Pringhar, Obrien county, Iowa. He was sent to Camp Gordon, Georgia, and remained in training there until September 6, when he was sent to Camp Merritt, New Jersey.
He was sent overseas September 13. He arrived safely in England, his death was due to pneumonia, following flu.
When Frank was 12 years old, he made a start for better living, during a meeting by Evangelist Billy Sunday, and was baptized into the Advent Christian faith, and altho he grew careless in later years, still he always had respect for the word of God and the church. Of a family of seven children, five girls and two boys, he was the first to go. CLARINDA HERALD, Clarinda, Iowa, Apr 22, 1920



 


 

Hopkins, John C. -

Word was received in this city last week of the death of Dr. John C. Hopkins of Denver, Colo., Feb. 2, 1917 at a hospital in Denver, following a surgical operation.
Mrs. Hopkins will be remembered in this city as Miss Lulu Burrows, daughter of Mr. and Mrs. John Burrows who lived in Clarinda many years before going to California to make their home. Dr. Hopkins had been teaching dentistry in the State Dental College at Denver. His remains were taken to Los Angeles, Cal. for burial.
Besides his wife, he is survived by one child, a little boy.

PAGE COUNTY DEMOCRAT, Clarinda, Iowa, Feb 15, 1917

 

Hopper, N.F., Mrs -

Mrs. N. F. Hopper Dead

An operation was performed upon Mrs. N. F. Hopper Sunday afternoon, by Dr. Killingsworth, assisted by Doctors English and Enfield, for rupture. Mrs. Hopper had been suffering for years from rupture, and on Sunday became very much worse. The operation performed at the hospital was successful, as far as surgical aid could go, but the trouble had gone so far that the patient could not recover, and she died at four o'clock this morning. The body was taken to Elmo, Mo., this morning on the eleven o'clock train for burial. CLARINDA HERALD, Clarinda, Iowa, Apr 2, 1901

 

Hoppock, Louis -

Many of our readers will remember Mr. and Mrs. Louis Hoppock, who lived in west Clarinda for some time and a little over a year ago, sold their property and went west. They were most excellent people and every one who became acquainted with them appreciated their worth in the community and regreted to see them leave. Their only son, H. E. Hoppock, of Falls City, Nebr., spent Thursday in town visiting with his boyhood friend, Chas, Tunnecliffe. We learn from him that he was on his way back from Kewanee, Ill., where he had been called to attend the funeral of his father who died at Denver, March 29, from an attack of acute peritonitis. This will be a surprise and a source of pain to many of our readers who had learned to esteem the excellent qualities of Mr. Hoppock. CLARINDA HERALD, Clarinda, Iowa, Apr 8, 1904

 

Horning, Ralph Edwin -

Ralph Edwin Horning.
Ralph Edwin Horning, youngest son of Mr. and Mrs. A. A. Horning, formerly of Page county, died at the home of his parents, southeast of Bedford, Tuesday, Oct. 30, 1917, at 5 a.m.. He was born March 1, 1899, so was 18 years of age at the time of his death. He was ill with typhus fever from Friday, the 26th, to Tuesday, the 30th. He was seriously ill from the start. The funeral services were from the Baptist church in Bedford, Thursday, Nov. 1, conducted by Reverends Hatcher and Burroughs of Bedford. Interment was in Fairview cemetery. He was I known as a splendid young man. CLARINDA JOURNAL, Clarinda, Iowa, Nov 15, 1917

 

Horton, William -

Another sad case of death from accidental shooting. This time it came from near Hawleyville, Friday afternoon, when Marshall Owens shot and instantly killed Wm. Horton. The young men were out hunting and Mr. Owens seeing a rabbitt under a pile of brush undertook to scare it out to shoot it, but in doing so the gun was discharged before he was aware of it through chilled hands, and Mr. Horton who was about twenty feet away received the full charge of number four shot in his breast, some of which penetrated the heart and he expired without a murmur. Mr. Horton was about 26 years of age, and leaves a wife and two children. The two men had long been intimate frieads. The inquest held by Coroner Milen showed it to be accidental with no blame attaching to Mr. Owens. PAGE COUNTY DEMOCRAT, Clarinda, Iowa, Dec 26, 1901

 

Hosack, E.M. -

Death of E. M. Hosack.
A. E. Hosack, formerly of this city, now of Grove City, Pa., writes under date of March 9th, that his father, E. M. Hosack, died very suddenly February 24 at five o'clock after an illness of two hours with neuralgia of the heart. E. M. Hosack frequetly visited his son during the latter's residence here and will be remembered by many. The following is a clipping from the Mercer (Pa.) Dispatch:
"Judge A. W. Williams on Monday filled the vacancy on the board of county commissioners, caused by the death of E. M. Hosack, by appointing A. E. Hosack, a son of the dead official, to serve until the first Monday in January, 1909.  The new  commissioner is an energetic young man, and in Grove City, where he has been engaged in mercantile business for several years, he bears an enviable reputation. The appointment gives general satisfaction, and it is believed Mr. Hosack will prove a thoroughly competent official." CLARINDA HERALD, Clarinda, Iowa, Mar 13, 1908

 

Hosier, Chauncey C. -

Chauncey C. Hosier died at his home in Yorktown Jan. 11, aged 69 years. Services were held at the Yorktown Presbyterian church Saturday at 10 o'clock and the remains brought to this city for interment. He was among the early settlers of this county.

PAGE COUNTY DEMOCRAT, Clarinda, Iowa, Jan 18, 1912

 

Hosier, Pete, Mrs [maiden name Owen] -

Word reaches James Owen of the death of his sister, Mrs. Pete Hosier, who passed away Saturday afternoon, at her home in Fredonia, Kans. The funeral was held there Tuesday afternoon. Besides her brother, Jas. Owen, Mrs. Hosier left two children, both grown, one of them living in Wisconsin, the other son being single and has been making his home with his mother in Fredonia. The Hosier family formerly lived here, making their home on the McCowan farm north of Clarinda. CLARINDA HERALD, Clarinda, Iowa, Mar 25, 1920


Hoskins, Charles - Sam and Ben Hoskins received the sad news Sunday that their brother, Chas. Hoskins, had been run over by the cars at Pacific Junction, Saturday evening and seriously injured. They took the evening train for that place. Charley was removed by the railroad authorities to the hospital at Plattsmouth, Neb, where he died about 11 o'clock Sunday. He had been railroading the past fifteen years up there and at the time of his death was a hostler at the yards in that place, having charge of the engines. No particulars are given but it is supposed he was run over by the switch engine in the yards. It is said that his injuries were so severe that the physicians did not deem an operation possible for his recovery and could only strive to alleviate his suffering. The body was taken to Glenwood for interment. He leaves a wife and three children to mourn his tragic death. PAGE COUNTY DEMOCRAT, Clarinda, Iowa, Jun 29, 1905

A very sad accident occurred at Pacific Junction Saturday night when Charley Hoskins, who is well known here and who has been working there in tbe round-house, was fatally injured. The word first received by his relatives here was that he had been run over in the yards and was very seriously hurt and the next news came that he died from his injuries about eleven o'clock Sunday forenoon. Sam and Ben Hoskins of this city were both called to Pacific Junction Sunday as was also his sister, Mrs. C. A. Heaton, of Hawleyville. CLARINDA HERALD, Clarinda, Iowa, Jun 27, 1905

 

Hoskins, Hoyte M. -

Hoyte M. Hoskins.
Hoyte M. Hoskins youngest son of J. W. and Carrie Hoskins, was born in Harlan township, Page county, Iowa, Jan. 8, 1901, and died of pus-appendicitis, Jan. 6, 1916, aged 14 years 11 months and 28 days. Hoyte was a boy of fine physique, cheerful disposition, lovely character and industrious habits. He was ever thoughtful of the wants of his parents, especially his mother— in his last sufferings he would ask the attending physician: "Will you hurt me much?" and when the answer was "No," he would reply, "Well, then, mamma can stay in the room." He was a general favorite with his schoolmates. Even little girls often made the remark, "I like Hoyte; he is a nice boy; he never teases like other boys."
The last few days of his life he realized that he could not get well; was conscious to the last, meeting everyone with a smile and often remarked: "I can be spared better than any of the rest of the family." The old adage, "Death loves a shining mark," seems true in this case.
He leaves to mourn his early demise, a father, mother and one brother, Harold, together with a host of other relatives, neighbors, schoolmates and teachers.
The funeral was held at the J. W. Hoskins home, southwest of town, Sabbath, Jan. 9, 1916, at 2 o'clock.
Rev. A. S. Woodard of the Methodist church conducted the services and the body was laid to rest in the Clarinda city cemetery.
Not now, but in the coming years, It may be in the better land, We'll read the meaning of our tears, And there, sometime, we'll understand.
We'll know why clouds, instead of sun,

Were over many a cherished plan; "Why song has ceased when scarce begun;
'Tis there, sometime, we'll understand.
what we long for most of all
Eludes so oft our eager hand;
Why hopes are crushed and castles fall,
Up there, sometimes, we'll understand."

PAGE COUNTY DEMOCRAT, Clarinda, Iowa, Jan 11, 1916

Hoyte M. Hoskins.
There was the quality of a genuine hero in the life of Hoyte M. Hoskins, youngest son of Mr. and Mrs. J. W. Hoskins, of Harlan township, Page county, who died in Clarinda, Jan. 6, 1916. He was to undergo a surgical operation for appendicitis, and the story of his conduct at the time affords an illustration of his "manliness. The story was this: In his last suffering he would ask the attending physician: "Will you hurt me much?" and when the answer was "No!" he would say: "Well, then, mamma can stay in the room." This was the thoughtfulness of a boy not quite 15 years of age. He was born in Page county, Jan. 8, 1901; had he lived two more days he would have been 15 years old. His death is attributed to pus-appendicitis. One who knew his characteristics and worth says of him: "Hoyte was a boy of fine physique, cheerful disposition, lovely character and industrious habits. He was ever thoughtful of the wants of his parents, especially his mother. He was a general favorite with his schoolmates. Even little girls often made the remark: 'I like Hoyte; he is a nice boy; he never teases like other boys.' The last few days of his life he realized that he could not get well; was conscious to the last meeting everyone with a smile, and often remarked: 'I can be spared better than any of the rest of the family.' The old adage, 'Death loves a shining mark,' seems true in this case." Surviving Hoyte are his parents, one brother, Harold, with a host of other neighbors, schoolmates and teachers. The funeral was held at the home of the parents of the deceased, in Harlan township, Sunday afternoon, Jan. 9, conducted by Rev. Abram S. Woodard, pastor of the Methodist Episcopal church of Clarinda, and burial was in the Clarinda city cemetery. The following verses have been suggested in connection with the death of Hoyte M. Hoskins:
"Not now, but in the coming years, It may be in the better land,
We'll read the meaning of our tears, And there, sometime, we'll understand.
We'll know why clouds, instead of sun,
Were over many a cherished plan; Why song has ceased when scarce begun;
'Tis there, sometime, we'll understand.
Why what we long for most of all Eludes so oft our eager hand;
Why hopes are crushed and castles fall, Up there,  sometime, we'll understand," CLARINDA JOURNAL, Clarinda, Iowa, Jan 13, 1916

Hoyte M. Hoskins youngest son of J. W. and Carrie Hoskins, was born in Harlan township, Page county, Iowa, Jan. 8, 1901, and died of pus-appendicitis, Jan. 6, 1916, aged 14 years, 11 months and 28 days. Hoyte was a boy of fine physique, cheerful disposition, lovely character and industrious habits. He was ever thoughtful of the wants of his parents, especially his mother—in his last sufferings he would ask the attending physician: "Will you hurt me much?" and when the answer,was "No," he would reply, "Well, then, mamma can stay in the room." He was a general favorite with his schoolmates. Even little girls often made the remark, "I like Hoyte; he is a nice boy; he never teases like other boys."
The last few days of his life he realized that he could not get well; was conscious to the last, meeting everyone with a smile and often remarked: "I can be spared better than any of the rest of the family." The old adage, "Death loves a shining mark," seems true in this case.
He leaves to mourn his early demise, a father, mother and one brother, Harold, together with a host of other relatives, neighbors, schoolmates and teachers.
The funeral was held at the J. W. Hoskins home, southwest of town, Sabbath, Jan. 9, 1916, at 2 o'clock.
Rev. A. S. Woodard of the Methodist church conducted the services and the body was laid to rest in the Clarinda city cemetery. "Not now, but in the coming years,
It may be in the better land, We'll read the meaning of our tears,
And there, sometime, we'll understand.
We'll know why clouds, instead of sun, Were over many a cherished plan; Why song has ceased when scarce begun;
'Tis there, sometime, we'll understand.
Why what we long for most of all
Eludes so oft our eager hand; Why hopes are crushed   and castles fall,
Up there, sometimes, we'll understand." CLARINDA HERALD, Clarinda, Iowa, Jan 13, 1916

 

 

 

 

Hoskins, Jesse - Jesse Hoskins died Saturday morning at his home in east Clarinda, after long suffering from a compilication of diseases aged 76 years. He had lived in this county nearly thirty years and won many friends. The funeral occured Monday afternoon, conducted by Rev Abel, with Masonic services at the grave. PAGE COUNTY DEMOCRAT, Clarinda, Iowa, Mar 26, 1908

Jesse H. Hoskins.
Jesse H. Hoskins was born February 23, 1832, in Bureau county, Ill., and died at his home in this city Saturday morning at 8 o'clock, March 21, 1908, after a long and lingering illness, aged 76 years.
Mr. Hoskins was married to Melissa Searle, in Shelby, Bureau county, Ill., and to this union were born eleven children, several of whom with the mother having already passed into the great beyond. The following are the remaining ones of the family, all of whom were present at the funeral yesterday afternoon: Elizabeth F. Savage of Gravity, Theresa C. Hoskins, Edmond, Jesse W., John H. and James C, of this city.
Mr. Hoskins moved to Page county 27 years ago, where he has continued to live, being one of Clarinda's highly respected citizens. He has long been a member of the Methodist church, and Rev. Abel, pastor of the Methodist church here, had charge of the services yesterday afternoon from the home. CLARINDA HERALD, Clarinda, Iowa, Mar 24, 1908

 

Hoskins, Mary Leona Meeds -

Mary L. Hoskins, wife of S.B. Hoskins of this city, died Wednesday morning, Sept 18, 1918, at Excelsior Springs, Mo. The funeral was held Saturday morning in the Methodist Episcopal church in this city, conducted by Rev R. C. Snodgrass. The obituary will be given in The Journal next week. CLARINDA JOURNAL, Clarinda, Iowa, Sep 26, 1918

Mary L. Hoskins.

The following is the obituary of the late Mary L. Hoskins, wife of S. B. Hoskins of this city, whose funeral was held in Clarinda Sept. 21: "Mary Leona Meeds was born Feb. 10, 1876, in Christian county, Ill., and died Sept. 18, 1918, at Excelsior Springs, Mo. She was married to S. B. Hoskins, April 16, 1894. To this union there were born nine children, two dying in infancy. Those living are Mrs. Ruby Mann of Clearmont, Mo., Dudley, Homer, Ruth, Jessie, Lula and Ethel of this city. She leaves, one sister, Mrs. Charles Williams, of Deer River, Minn., and a host of friends to mourn her departure. She united with the Methodist Episcopal church in 1915 and lived a consistent Christian life until her death. CLARINDA JOURNAL, Clarinda, Iowa, Oct 3, 1918


Hoskins, Melissa - Mrs Jesse Hoskins died Tuesday evening at her [---] in Clarinda. PAGE COUNTY DEMOCRAT, Clarinda, Iowa, Aug 17, 1905

Mrs. Melissa Hoskins died at her home in Clarinda, at 12 o'clock noon, on August 15, at the age of 68 year, 2 months, 26 days. She was born in Bureau county, Ill., May 19, 1837. Her marriage to Jesse Hoskins, occurred on September 16, 1852. They made their home in Illinois until February 24, 1881, when they moved to Page county, Iowa, where they have since lived. For the last thirteen years they have made their home in Clarinda. Mrs. Hoskins joined the Methodist church when a child at Searl Ridge, in Bureau county, Illinois and has ever been faithful to the church of her choice. She was also a member of the Eastern Star Lodge of Clarinda.
The children of Mr. and Mrs. Hoskins are Delila Barr, who died at Arcadia, Neb., August 8, 1905, just one week before her mother's death, Mrs S. A. Stahl, Miss T. C. Hoskins, E. S. Hoskins. J. W. Hoskins, J. H. Hoskins, J. C. Hoskins, of Clarinda; Mrs. W. P. Savage, of Gravity, la. The deceased children are: Rosetta A., Grant W , Harry O. Seven grandchildren and one great grandchild were present at the funeral. The following relatives were present: Mr. and Mrs. W. F. Nevius, of Gravity, Mr. and Mrs. O. A. Heaton, of Hawleyville, Mrs. C. C. Hoskins, and son, J. N. of Pacific Junction, la., and Mrs. R. J. Clark, of Chicago, Ill, The many friends of Mr Hoskins sympathize with him in his bereavement. The funeral services were conducted at the home on Thursday, Aug, 17, at 10 a. m. by Rev Fletcher Homan. CLARINDA HERALD, Clarinda, Iowa, Aug 18, 1905

 

 

 

Hoskins, Sam's BABE [1913] -

A girl babe weighing seven and a half pounds was born to Mr. and Mrs. Sam Hoskins Sunday morning about four o'clock,  at their home in South Clarinda.   The little one appeared in perfect health until late Sunday night when it was taken sick and grew worse until two o'clock Tuesday   morning when it passed away.   Short services; were held at the home yesterday at 10 o'clock when the little one was laid to rest in the city cemetery. PAGE COUNTY DEMOCRAT, Clarinda, Iowa, Dec 4, 1913

Mr. and Mrs. Sam Hoskins have the sympathy of many friends in the death of their baby girl born Sunday morning, whose young life came to an end early Tuesday morning. The funeral occurred Wednesday morning at the home, Rev. M. Hulbert conducting the services. The little casket was covered with beautiful flowers, and music was furnished by a ladies trio composed of Mesdames Wm. Owen, M. Hulbert and E. Sparks. During the time that Sam Hoskins has been absent from the engine house, Mart Reed has taken his place, staying there nights as well as daytimes. CLARINDA HERALD, Clarinda, Iowa, Dec 4, 1913

 

Hoskins, Sam's BABE [1918] -

Mr and Mrs. Sam Hoskins were called on to lay away their newborn babe Monday morning, July 8th, a baby girl born the night before, who did not live long. The family have the sympathy of many friends. CLARINDA HERALD, Clarinda, Iowa, Jul 11, 1918


Hoskinson, Inez Bosworth -


The hearts of the entire community are heavy with sorrow because of the death of Mrs. Clarence Hoskinson, who departed this life at her home in Clarinda, Sunday evening, September 18.
Inez Bosworth Hoskinson, daughter of Alvah F. and Jennie Hiefner Bosworth was born at Rowley, Iowa, in Buchanan County, September 20, 1894 where she lived until two years of age when her parents moved to Oxford, Iowa. When six years of age, her parents moved to Brooklyn, Iowa, where she entered school. She completed her studies by graduation from the high school in 1913 and was the honor student with an average of 97%.
Inez was reared in a Christian home and considered that she was born into the church, taking communion with her parents and assuming an active part in church responsibilities even when a child. She was baptized into membership in the Methodist church when she was 13 years old.
Her father was engaged in the hardware business and was superintendent of the Sunday School. Inez was the president of her Epworth League and always taught a Sunday School class.
After high school she taught one year in the rural schools and one year in the Brooklyn public schools.
She was married to Clarence E. Hoskinson, on June 27, 1915 and lived one year of her married life in Brooklyn. In August 1916, Mr. and Mrs. Hoskinson moved to Clarinda and have since made their home here.
During their residence here, Mrs. Hoskinson has taken an active part in the uplifting forces of the community. As a teacher, she has been greatly admired and loved by her pupils. She has proven herself a sincere and true friend to the many who have known her.
Brief services were held  at the Methodist church in Clarinda, Tuesday afternoon at three o'clock. Interment will be in the Oxford Cemetery, Thursday afternoon at two o'clock.   She will be laid to rest beside her father who died in 1914, a brother, who died in infancy and a sister Clio who was buried in 1910 when 23 years of age.
Besides her husband and mother Mrs. Hoskinson leaves many relatives and a host of friends who mourn her departure. But she has left with us the ineffable memory of a loving woman who faced life's problems, including her illness, as bravely as a soldier faces battle. Her fine character and her sterling worth will live with us always as a noble example of true and worthy womanhood.
The   services   at   the Clarinda Methodist Church were made impressive by the presence of the boys and girls from   Junior   High School,, whom Mrs. Hoskins[on] had taught, and of which Mr. Hoskinson is the Principal.     Rev. Williams spoke personaly of the life   which has   left us. Mrs. Helen Gilmore came from Red Oak to sing, with Lester Milligan at the organ.     The pallbearers were Clark McCune, Ellis Bradley, Lisle Cassatt,    Stanley     Glasgow, Lafe Boman and Roscoe Applegate.
Relatives and friends present from a distance were an uncle, Morris Blake   from Grand Island,
Nebr., an uncle and aunt Mr. and Mrs. J. P. Cleery from Oxford, la., besides a number of relatives of Mr. Hoskinson, including his father Edwin D. Hoskinson of Corning and wife, his brother and sister, Ensign M. and Vivian A. Hoskinson of Corning, also from Corning Mrs. Sara Delia Hoskinson, Elmer Hoskinson, Allen Hoskinson, Grace Hoskinson, Gladys Hoskinson, Mr. and Mrs. Frank Hoskinson, Mrs. Mary Nash. Bryan Hoskinson, Mr. and Mrs. Harry Samboley, and Harry Middaux. From Creston came an aunt Mrs. Millard and cousin Leland Millard. Mrs. Chas. Amick was present from Henderson and Joseph D. Wayt from Derby. CLARINDA HERALD, Clarinda, Iowa, Sep 22, 1921

Mrs. C. E. Hoskinson.
In the death of Mrs. C. E. Hoskinson the community in which she lived sustains a distinct loss. The example of her exemplary life will long be helpful to those who knew her. The following beautiful tribute to her memory has been written by a friend:
A touching tribute was   paid the memory of a departed neighbor, friend and teacher, Tuesday afternoon, when a large audience gathered at the Methodist Episcopal church of Clarinda at 3 o'clock at the funeral services of Inez   Bosworth  Hoskinson,   wife of Clarence E. Hoskinson, who died at her home in this city, Sunday afternoon, after an illness of several months. Mrs. Hoskinson had been a teacher in the Grammar school or Junior high, of which her husband is principal, and the city schools were dismissed for the funeral, the pupils of the Junior high attending practically in a body. Floral offerings in great profusion and exquisite beauty testified to the love of many for this young woman, whose funeral   occurred   upon   her twenty-seventh birthday anniversary.
The services were particularly appropriate in every way to the age and character of the deceased young woman. The Rev. J. M. Williams, pastor of the Methodist Episcopal church of which she was a member, described her life as a beautiful one in its every aspect—as neighbor, friend, teacher and in the closer personal relationship to mother, husband and relatives. The music was music that she loved—numbers on the pipe organ by Lester Milligan and two solos by Mrs. Helen Gillmor of Red Oak, formerly of this city. The pall bearers were young men— Roscoe Applegate, L. N. Boman, C. E. Bradley, L. M. Cassat, Stanley Glasgow and Clark McKeown. Mr. Hoskinson was one of the leaders of the Boy Scouts of Clarinda and they were present in a body in charge of Dr. E. W. Freeland, the other scout master.
Mrs. Hoskinson had been a worker in the various departments of the church since childhood. Since coming to Clarinda she had charge of a class in the primary department and for four years had been with one group of little tots— boys and girls—who were almost ready for promotion—an event for which she had planned and for which she had provided beautiful Bible bookmarks for each member. This class is perpetuating her life and spirit by the creation of the Inez Hoskinson Memorial Fund which will go to support a child in the Children's Home at York, Nebr.
Interment was to be this afternoon at Oxford, Iowa, the childhood home of the deceased, where her body will rest beside that of her father who died in 1914, a brother who died in infancy, and a sister, Clio, who was buried in 1910 when 23 years of age. The Rev. J. M. Williams accompanied the party from Clarinda to Oxford.
The deceased, who was the daughter of Alvah F. and Jennie Heifner Bosworth, was born at Rowley, Buchanan county. Iowa, Sept. 20, 1894.   The family lived there until she was 2 years of age, when they moved to Oxford, Iowa. When she was six years of age her parents   moved   to   Brooklyn, Iowa, where she entered school, completing her common school education there in 1913, when she was graduated from the high school, being valedictorian of her class with an average grade of 97 per cent.   She was reared in a Christian home and took an early and natural part in the work of the church, being baptized and received into membership at the age of 13.   Her father, who was engaged in the   hardware   business, was   superintendent   of the Sunday school, and she was president of the Epworth League and always taught a Sunday school class. After high school she taught one year   in   the rural school's and one year in the Brooklyn public school.   She was married to Clarence E. Hoskinson on June 27, 1915, and spent one year of her married life in Brooklyn.   In August, 1916 Mr. and Mrs. Hoskinson moved to Clarinda where they have since made their home.
Mr. Hoskinson's parents,   Mr.   and. Mrs. E. D. Hoskinson of Corning, his two brothers and his sister and a number of other relatives were present for the funeral including Morris Blake, an uncle, from Grand Island, Nebr.; Mr and Mrs. J. P. McCleery, uncle and aunt, from Oxford, Iowa; Mrs. Millard Hoskinson and son, Leland, from Creston; Elmer Hoskinson and children, Allen, Grace and Gladys, from Corning; Mr. and Mrs. Frank Hoskinson, Mrs Mary Nash, Bryan Hoskinson and Mr.  and  Mrs.   Harry Lamboley, all from Corning.   Out of town friends included   Harry   Maddux   of Corning, Mrs. Helen Gillmor of Red Oak,, Mrs. C. H. Amick of Henderson and Joseph D. Wayt of Derby, former secretary of the Clarinda Community Y. M. C. A.
Her friends and relatives will remember her as a fine Christian character of sterling worth, whose life always influenced for the better those whom she touched, and who faced its problems, including her illness and approaching death, as bravely as a soldier faces battle. CLARINDA JOURNAL, Clarinda, Iowa, Sep 22, 1921

 

Hostetter, Amelia Sparger Burch -

Mrs. J. B. Hostetter
Mrs. J. B. Hostetter died at the family residence in Braddyville at 10:50 a. m., Sept. 26th, 1917, at the age of 86 years, 7 months and 14 days.
Amelia Sparger Burch was born in Green county, Ind., Feb. 12, 1831. She lived there until she was married to J. B. Hostetter on Sept. 18, 1856. Thus it will be seen that they enjoyed a little more than 61 years of devoted married life.
To them were born six children, two boys and four girls. The boys long ago preceded their mother in death; but the daughters, Mrs. Mary M. Linebaugh, Clearmont, Mo.; Mrs. Matilda R. Davidson, Coin; Mrs. Florence C. Williamson, Guthrie, Okla., and Mrs. Mahalia S. Henderson, Braddyville, together with twenty grand-children and twenty-three great-grandchildren live to mourn, with the aged and devoted husband, the loss of tender, loving mother and the tried and true and devoted life companion, and wife.
In 1866 she came with her husband to Iowa and located near Memory, where she lived until 1869 when they removed to Missouri. In 1901 she came to Braddyville where she has lived until her death, respected and loved by all who knew her.
The latter part of her life has been a time of suffering and dependency. On Aug. 21, 1912, she was afflicted with a stroke of paralysis which left her an invalid. On Sept. 9, 1917, she received a second stroke. All that loving hands and medical skill could do was done; but she gradually grew worse until on Sept. 26th the end came.
She was converted in Missouri about forty-two years ago. She united with the Baptist church at Clearmont, Mo., Aug. 13, 1904. On April 15, 1916, she united with the Seventh Day Adventist church at Braddyville, being one of the charter members of that church.
The community is deprived of a noble Christian character, and the members thereof unite in extending sympathy to the bereaved family.
Joyous in the hope of eternal life, she laid down the burdens and cares of life in exchange for the immortal joys and blessedness with which the people of God will be crowned when the great God and our Saviour shall come to gather his people home.
Funeral services were held at the Christian church on Friday, Sept. 28, at 10 a. m., conducted by Evangelist G. W. White of Council Bluffs. A large number of friends gathered as a mark of respect and love. Interment was made in Burch cemetery, where she awaits the call of the great life Giver.
Those from a distance who came to attend the funeral of Mrs. Hostetter, were Mr. and Mrs. Sam Hostetter, Maryville; C. J. Carmichael and family and Isaac Carmichael and wife, Hopkins, Mo.; James King and wife, Hopkins, Mo.; Jake Burch and wife, Hopkins; Mrs. Harrison and daughter, Gravity; Mrs. Jim Carmichael, Wheatland, Wyo.; Mr. and Mrs. Carl Rud, Quitman, Mo.; Mr. and Mrs. Vern Reed, Burlington Junction; Mr. and Mrs. John Parks, Bedford; Mr. and Mrs. Dollyhile and daughter, New Market; Mrs. Joshua Lamb and children; Wash Sherbon, Williams, Nebr.
The family with to express their thanks for the beautiful flowers, especially those given by the grand and great grand children, also to neighbors and friends for their sympathy and help during   the   sickness and death of our loving wife and mother. J. B. Hostetter, Mrs. Mary Linebaugh. Mrs. Matilda Davison. Mrs. Florence Williamson, Mrs. Mahalia Henderson. CLARINDA HERALD, Clarinda, Iowa, Oct 4, 1917

Mrs. J. B. Hostetter died Sept. 26, 1917, at her home in Braddyville. She had been an invalid from Aug. 21, 1912, when she was stricken with paralysis. She sustained a second stroke of that disease seventeen days before her death. The maiden name of Mrs. Hostetter was Amelia Sparger Burch. Her birth took place in Greene Co. Ind., .Feb.. 12, 1831. She was married there Sept. 18, 1856, to J. B. Hostetter, who survives her. Her age was 86 years 7 months and 14 days, and of this over sixty-one years were of wedded life. Two sons and four daughters, surviving, are Mrs. Mary M. Linebaugh, Clearmont, Mo., Mrs. Matida R. Davidson, Coin, Iowa; Mrs. Florence C. Williamson, Guthrie, Okla., and Mrs. Manaila S. Henderson, Braddyville, la. Mrs. Hostetter also is survived by twenty grandchildren and twenty-three great-grandchildren. In 1886 Mrs. Hostetter came with her husband to Iowa. They located near Memory, where they lived until 1889. They then removed to Missouri. In 1901 they again moved—this time to Braddyville. Mrs. Hostetter joined the Baptist church at Clearmont. Mo., Aug. 13, 1904, and April 15, 1916, became one of the charter members of the Seventh Day Advent church of Braddyville. She was most highly respected and those who knew her appreciated her exemplary Christian character. Her funeral was held at the Christian church in Braddyville,, Friday, Sept. 28. conducted by Evangelist G. W. White. CLARINDA JOURNAL, Clarinda, Iowa, Oct 4, 1917

 

Hostetter, Vera Ellen -

Vera Ellen, the little daughter of Mr. and Mrs. J. E. Hostetter, of this city, was born August 28, 1908 and died November 12, 1908, aged two months and 15 days. Whooping cough was the cause of the little one's death, and the two little brothers, who survive, aged 5 and 7 years respectively, have also been suffering from a severe attack of the same illness, but are now improving. The funeral service of little Vera Ellen, was held at the home in northeast Glarinda, Friday at 3 o'clock conducted by Rev. W. M. Jackson, and the body was laid to rest in the Clarinda Cemetery. There were many floral offerings from friends and relatives and countless expressions of sympathy for the bereaved family. CLARINDA HERALD, Clarinda, Iowa, Nov 20, 1908

 

Houchins, Leroy -

Leroy Houchins was born June 30th, 1894, at Castana, in Monona County,Iowa. Being called to serve his country he died at Camp Dodge, Iowa, Saturday morning, Oct. 12, 1918.
He is survived by a bereaved mother and father, a sister, Blanche Emma, a brother Wayne, both at home and a married sister, Mrs. Alma Carroll, Kennebec, la. He also leaves a grandmother, and grandfather, Mr. and Mrs. A. Hutchinson, and several uncles and aunts, besides a wide circle of loving friends. The remains were shipped to Hopkins, Mo., Monday, and taken to the home of his parents, and from, there, Tues. morning, were brought to Braddyville cemetery for burial. Rev. B. E. Yontz of the Church of Christ officiated. CLARINDA HERALD, Clarinda, Iowa, Oct 17, 1918

 

Houston, Irene -

Mrs, McChesney received a telegram Wednesday announcing the death of her little granddaughter, Irene Houston, who died at the home in Lincoln, after an illness of but seven hours, pneumonia being the cause of her death, Mr. and Mrs. Houston it will be remembered left Clarinda about a year ago to live at Lincoln. Mr. and Mrs. McChesney attended the funeral.

CLARINDA HERALD, Clarinda, Iowa, Nov 30, 1906

 

Houston, Ross - Ross Houston, a former Page county young man, son of Mrs. Mary Shum of this city, died in Redding, Calif., Saturday, Oct. 26, 1918, of pneumonia. He was 34 years 3 months and 21 days of age. The remains were sent to Clarinda, the funeral being held last Sunday at 2:30 p. m. at the Rose Hill church. Rev. M. M. Cable conducted the services. He leaves, besides his mother, one brother. Squire Houston of Storm Lake; four half-sisters, Mrs. Neil Turner of Ottumwa, Mrs. Clyde Neeley of Carroll, Mrs. Charley Tinker of Crete, Nebr., Mrs. Ralph Waterman of St. Louis; two step sisters, Mrs. Harry Turner of this city, Mrs. F. L. Moore of Oskaloosa; and a step brother, Wesley Shum, of Clarinda. CLARINDA JOURNAL, Clarinda, Iowa, Nov 7, 1918

Ross A. Houston was born May 15, 1884 and died Oct. 26th, 1918 at Redding, Calif, aged 34 years, 5 months, and 11 days.
His boyhood days were spent near Clarinda, leaving for Salida, Colo., August 23rd, 1909, residing there about two years. He then traveled for some time through the northwestern states and British Columbia. Afterward he settled in Redding, Calif, where he has made his home for about seven years. His father died when he was a small child and at an early age he began to make his own way in life and established a reputation which was respected by all who knew him for he was industrious, thoughtful, and honest in his dealings, truthful in his words, always considerate af his mother and lending a helping hand in time of trouble. He was engaged in business for himself when death overtook him. He was a member in good standing in the I. O. O. F's also K. P's. and M. W. A's.
He leaves to mourn his death, his mother, Mrs. Pete Shum of Clarinda, one brother, S. C. Houston of Storm Lake, la., four half-sisters, Mrs. Neil Turner of Ottumwa, la., Mrs. C. C. Neely, Carroll, la., Mrs. C. C. Tinker, Crete, Nebr., Mrs. R. W. Waterman, St. Louis, Mo. two step-sisters, Mrs. H. W. Turner, Clarinda, la., Mrs. F. L. Moore, Oskaloosa, la., and one step-brother, S. W. Shum of Clarinda, Iowa.
Funeral services were held at the grave conducted by Rev. M. M. Cable Sunday afternoon at 2:30, burial taking place at Rose Hill Cemetery. CLARINDA HERALD, Clarinda, Iowa, Nov 7, 1918

Mrs. Pete Shum has received word of the death of her son, Ross Houston of Redding, Calif. His body was shipped to Clarinda, the 29th of Oct. Since the particulars are not yet known, no arrangements will be made until the arrival of the corpse. CLARINDA HERALD, Clarinda, Iowa, Oct 31, 1918

Roy Houston, son of   Mrs. Pete Shum was laid to rest at Rose Hill Sunday November 3.   The body was shipped   from California.   He was thirty-two years of age and was a barber by trade.  The funeral services were conducted by Rev. M. M. Cable, and the Odd Fellow Lodge of which there was a large body in attendance. CLARINDA HERALD, Clarinda, Iowa, Nov 7, 1918

 

Howard, Charles - G. W. Richardson was called to Snonomish, Wash., Monday, by the death of his brother-in-law, Mr. Chas. Howard. PAGE COUNTY DEMOCRAT, Clarinda, Iowa, Jan 23, 1913

 

Howard, Clarence Elmer - CLARINDA MAN DIED IN MONTANA
On Friday, February 21, Clarence Elmer Howard died at his home near Melstone, Montana, a victim of pneumonia following the influenza.

Clarence Elmer Howard was born at Shambaugh, Iowa, Sept. 13th, 1887, and died at his home 7 miles south of Melstone on Friday, February 21, 1919. He was married to Miss Elsie Delay at Clarinda, la., March 20, 1911. He went to Montana, six years ago and has since made his home there. Besides a host of friends, he leaves to mourn his departure a wife, three small children, a father and five brothers. Funeral services were conducted at the Delay home south of Melstone on Monday by Rev. Pollard and the body laid to rest in the Cabin Creek Cemetery. CLARINDA HERALD, Clarinda, Iowa, Mar 13, 1919

C.E. Howard - Word has been received in this city of the death of C.E. Howard at Melstone, Wyo. Mr Howard was a former resident of this city. CLARINDA JOURNAL, Clarinda, iowa, Feb 27, 1919

Clarence Elmer Howard
From copy of the Melstone, Montana Messenger of Feb. 27th we clip the following regarding the death summons of a former Page County man who used to live in Shambaugh:
"Last Friday Clarence Howard, one the best known young farmers on the south side, died at his home a victim of the pneumonia, following an attack of the influenza.
Clarence Elmer Howard was born at Shambaugh, Iowa, Sept. 13, 1887, and died at his home seven miles south of Melstone on Friday, February 21, 1919. He was married to Miss Elsie Delay at Clarinda, Iowa, March 20, 1911. He came to Montana six years ago and has since made his home south of town. Besides a host of friends, he leaves to mourn his loss his wife, three small children, a father and five brothers.
Funeral services were conducted at the Delay home south of town on Monday by Rev. Pollard, and the body laid to rest in the Cabin Creek cemetery." CLARINDA HERALD, Clarinda, Iowa, Jan 23, 1919

 

Howard, Francis Allen Dunn and Ernest William Howard -

Following is the obituary of Mrs. J. H. Howard who with her little child met with their death by drowning near Melstone, Mont., on July 10th. The bodies were taken to Shambaugh where the funeral was held Monday, June 20 th. The interment being in a local cemetery. Mr. and Mrs. Howard had made their home in this city for a number of years and had but recently moved to their new home in Mont.
Francis Marion Allen was born March 3rd, 1896, in the northern part of Iowa. About eight years ago she came to Page county with her mother, where they resided near Villisca. She then came to Clarinda, where she met J. H. Howard and, where they were married Apr., 21, 1912. They resided in Clarinda until about five months ago when they decided to go to Melstone, Mont., and there take a home­stead. Mr. Howard going before to make preparations for the wife and baby. Later she and the baby followed. They resided there until she and the baby met their death July 10,1914. They leave to mourn their loss a loving husband and father, a mother, Mrs. G. A. Dunn, also a brother, Leroy Dunn, besides a host of relatives and friends. The remains were brought to Shambaugh where the funeral, was held at the church of God, by Rev. Enoch Hill, of College Springs. Interment in the Butler cemetery.
Ernest William Howard was born March 10, 1913, in Clarinda and departed this life July 10 1914. CLARINDA HERALD, Clarinda, Iowa, Jul 30, 1914

Will Howard received word Saturday that his brother, Henry Howard, wife and baby, were drowned near their home in Montana. Mr. Will Howard left Saturday evening. Walter Huff is running the store while Mr. Howard is away. CLARINDA HERALD, Clarinda, Iowa, Jul 16, 1914

 

Howard, George - Mrs. M. J. Hitchings, of Maryville, Mo, and Mrs. Anna Cook, of Creston, who are visiting in Clarinda with Mrs. Burley, and other relatives, were called to Shambaugh yesterday morning to attend the funeral of their brother, Mr. George Howard. CLARINDA HERALD, Clarinda, Iowa, Feb 17, 1905

 

Howard, Martha - Last Sunday night about ten o'clock Mrs. T. E. Clark received a telephone message from Columbus, Neb., informing her that Martha, the eleven year old daughter of Mr. and Mrs. W. E. Howard was very sick and asking that she come as soon as possible. Mrs. Clark left on the train yesterday morning and was accompanied as far as Omaha by her son, Burch. Yesterday morning about nine o'clock another despatch was received stating the child had died and that the funeral would be held at 2:30 today. It was thought at first that the child was a sufferer from an attack of appendicitis but whatever it was, it was of that nature. The sorrowing family have a host of friends and relatives here who will mourn with them. CLARINDA HERALD, Clarinda, Iowa, Jul 29, 1902

 

Howard, Samuel E. -

A horrible death befel Mr. Samuel E. Howard, living down near Shambaugh, Tuesday night about twelve o'clock, being burned to a crisp in the flames that consumed his home. It is said that he awoke about midnight and discovered smoke in the bedroom where himself, wife and child were sleeping. Opening the door to another room in the building the flames rushed through and he hurriedly forced his wife and child out the front door and then returned to the bedroom but before he could get out, it is supposed he was suffocated by the dense smoke and dropped to the floor on a pile of bed clothes. Mrs. Howard heard him calling for help, and went around the house to the bedroom window, but everythsng was in flames. It was a small house and everything was consumed. The origin of the fire is unknown, as they had no fire in the stove except early in the evening. His age was 21 years, 3 months and 12 days. He was the son of Geo. Howard and followed farming, in the summer and coal mining in the winter. It is a horrible affair. The funeral took place at 5 o clock last evening. PAGE COUNTY DEMOCRAT, Clarinda, Iowa, Jul 13, 1905

Shambaugh July 12.—One of the most awful accidents which has occurred in the neighborhood, happened Tuesday evening, when Samuel ("Skip") Howard was burned to death in the house where he and his wife and baby were living. For several months "Skip" and his family have been living in a house belonging to Henry Fulk, about a quarter of a mile south of the Linn Point school house.
Tuesday evening Mr. and Mrs. Howard had a late supper, and the weather being chilly they lighted a stove full of papers and trash which had collected in the heating stove. About 11 o'clock they retired and sometime soon after midnight Mrs. Howard was aroused by the smell of smoke. She awakened her husband and picking up her one month old babe started to leave the house. "Skip" was before her and throwing open the partition door landing from their bedroom to the sitting room.  At this the fire and smoke gushed into their bedroom. Mrs. Howard with perfect presence of mind went to the one window in their bedroom, raised the sash and crawled out still holding her babe in her arms.   In the  meantime Mr. Howard was beating vainly about in the room apparently dazed and helpless.   Once in auswer to her call he came to the window and began breaking out the lights with his hands instead of just raising the sash and crawling out as she had done.  Finally the brave girl laid her baby upon the grass at a safe distance from the raging fire and. made three trips into the midst of the smoke and flames in an effort to save her husband.  By this time, however, he was unconscious and laying face downward upon the floor. By the exercise of all her strength she was unable to drag him to safety and the third time she was almost strangled herself and was just able to reach tbe fresh air.  Then barefooted and with no clothing but her night dress she took her infant in her arms and calling for help at every   step she ran  half a mile through the thick timber and across ditches to the home of Mrs. Geo. Howard, who was about as close a neighbor as they had.  Wm. Howard and his cousin, Chas. Furgeson and the neighbors were soon at the scene of the fire, but were unable to do a thing toward saving the body until the intense heat had somewhat subsided.    The body when finally recovered was burned to a char and beyond all recognition.
Mr. Howard with his brother and Lou Majors had just got in operation a coal shaft on Henry Fulk's place that promised to give them a good yield of fine coal.
The funeral services were held at the Methodist church at 5 o'clock Wednesday afternoon by Rev. L. F. Brown. Interment was in the Butler Cemetery.
This is the second sudden death in this family in less than a year and they certainly deserve the sympathy and help of this entire community. CLARINDA HERALD, Clarinda, Iowa, Jul 14, 1905

 

 

 

Howe, E.O.'s BABE -

The little six months old babe of Mr. and Mrs. E. O. Howe died April 29 from dropsy. The funeral was held in the afternoon of the same day. Mr. Howe is ticket agent at the Burlington station. PAGE COUNTY DEMOCRAT, Clarinda, Iowa, May 7, 1914

 

Howe, Joseph Jr -


Joseph Howe, Jr., was born in Clarinda, June 25th, 1903, and departed this life August 30, 1921, at the age of just past 18 years. Besides his parents, Mr. and Mrs. Joe Howe he leaves three sisters and a host of friends to mourn his loss. He was a patient sufferer, stating to his pastor, Tuesday afternoon that he was ready to go. Funeral services in the St. Jacob's A. M. E. church, Friday afternoon were conducted by the Methodist minister, Rev. C. P. Jones with burial in the Clarinda cemetery. CLARINDA HERALD, Clarinda, Iowa, Sep 8, 1921


Howell, Harriet E. Sayre-

HARRIET E. HOWELL
Harriet E. Howell, wife of Wm. M. Howell, aged 73 years, 2 mo, and 10 days, died at the Killingsworth hospital Friday. Funeral services were held at the Harmon Chapel Sunday afternoon at 4:45 p.m., after which the body was taken to Elgin, Ill., for burial  
Deceased was a sister of Mrs. G. Wm. Richardson of this city, and has been ailing for years, still patient through all her suffering. She leaves other relatives, and many friends to mourn her loss. PAGE COUNTY DEMOCRAT, Clarinda, Iowa, Aug 15, 1918

Mrs. Harriet E. Howell, wife of William M. Howell, passed to her reward at the Kennelworth Hospital Sunday morning, Aug. 11th, at the ripe age of more than seventy three years. The body was taken to Harmon's Chapel, where short funeral services were held Sunday afternoon at 4.45, shipment being then made to Elgin, Ill, the sorrowing husband accompanying the remains to the place of burial, in the old home town where deceased has a number of relatives still living. Mrs. Howell was a sister of Mrs. G. Wm. Richardson of Clarinda. Her maiden name was Harriett Sayre. Mr. and Mrs. Howell formerly lived in Maryville, as he was engaged in the lumber business, having several yards in northern Missouri. Later they moved to Arkansas, then to Washington State, until ill health brought them east to be near the home folks.CLARINDA HERALD, Clarinda, Iowa, Aug 15, 1918

Harriet E. Howell,
Harriet E. Howell, wife of William M. Howell, died at 1 o'clock Sunday morning at the Kennelworth hospital in this city. Services were held Sunday at 4:45 p.m., at Harmon's chapel.
Mr. Howell accompanied the remains to Elgin, Ill., for burial. Mrs. Howell had been in failing health for some time. Last May she and Mr. Howell came here from their home in Seattle, her last weeks having been spent in Missouri and Clarinda. Mrs. Howell was 73 years 2 months and 10 days.
She was a sister of Mrs. G. Wm. Richardson of this city, and Mrs. J. E. Phillips who formerly lived there, and has visited with these sisters many times, and had many friends and acquaintances in this community. CLARINDA JOURNAL, Clarinda, Iowa, Aug 15, 1918

 

 

 

Howell, J.E. -

J E Howell died Friday at the home of his son, J. R. Howell, in East River township, aged 62 years. The funeral was held Sunday afternoon. PAGE COUNTY DEMOCRAT, Clarinda, Iowa, Oct 19, 1911

 

Howendobler, Amzi M. -

A. M. Howendobler.
We have already mentioned the death of A. M. Howendobler at his home in Maryville, Mo. last Monday evening. His cousins, Mrs. C. H. Oates and Mr. and Mrs. M. C. McVay of this city, were present at the funeral. Mr. Howendobler was at one time in business in Clarinda and was widely known here at an early day, consequently much interest will be felt by many of our readers in the following taken from the Nodaway Democrat:
He was a devout member of the First Methodist Episcopal Church, and was perhaps its most liberal giver. If all men were as faithful and true, according to their ability, as he has been there would be more worshippers and need of more churches. Year after year he lived his life camly and unfaltering, as though trials, grief, afflictions and temptations had no part in it. His great sorrow was the loss of his wife, a noble, lovely woman.
The funeral services took place at the Howendobler home Wednesday afternoon at 2:30 o'clock, the Rev. Grant A. Robbins officiating. The pallbearers were John W. Airy, C. C. Corwin, Judge Ira K. Alderman, George B. Baker, John C. Curfman and William F. Smith.   Burial in Miriam cemetery.
Amzi M. Howendobler was a native of Ohio, and was born in Champaign county, July 26 1843. When he was about six years old his parents moved to Darke county, of the same state, and when he was sixteen they came to Missouri, locating in Livingston county, this being in February of 1860. During the following fall Clarinda, Iowa, became their home till 1869, when Mr. Howendobler came to Maryville.
He was educated in Darke county, Ohio, and Clarinda, Iowa, and had been in the drug business since 1861
He was married in Maryville, December 26, 1877, to Miss Ella Moses, a daughter of Hezekiah and Mary (Boyd) Moses, both natives of Ohio. Mrs. Howendobler was born in Miami county Ohio, February of 1854. Her death occured August 15, 1890. They had three children- Francis V., Audrey M., and Clifford J., and they are now left to mourn the father's death. Also the sister-in-law, Miss Nannie Moses, who took charge of Mr. Howendobler's home when her sister died, and cared for and raised the children.
August 15, 1881, Mr. Howendobler took a partner in the drug business in his brother John M. Howendobler, who died at his home in Maryville a few weeks ago. Three brothers now survive them,-Elmer and Edward E. Howendobler of Perry, Oklahoma, and Joseph Howendobler of Spencer, Iowa. CLARINDA HERALD, Clarinda, Iowa, Nov 1907

Amsi Howendobler, a cousin of Mrs. C. H. Oates and M. C. McVay of this city, died Tuesday morning at his home at Maryville, Mo., aged 63years. Mrs. Oates and Mr. and Mrs. McVay, went to Maryville Wednesday morning to attend the funeral which occured at 2:30 that afternoon. Mr. Howendobler was a great worker in the Methodist church at Maryville and was an influential and highly respected citizen. CLARINDA HERALD, Clarinda, Iowa, Nov 22, 1907

 

 

Howendobler, John -

M. C. McVay received a telegram Saturday morning announcing the death of his cousin, John Howendobler, at Maryville, Mo., Friday night. Mr Howendobler was unmarried and was 51 years old at the time of his death.

. CLARINDA HERALD, Clarinda, Iowa, Oct 8, 1907

 

Howes, Warren -

Little Warren, the seven months old baby of Mr. and Mrs. Earl Howes, died at the Howes home on Chestnut street Wednesday evening about 11:30. The funeral will be this (Thursday) afternoon, at 3:30, from the home, and the interment will be in the Clarinda cemetery. CLARINDA HERALD, Clarinda, Iowa, Apr 30, 1914