Obituaries
submitted by: Julia Johnson - julia.johnson63@gmail.com
 

[ADEL, JENNIE MAY]
Clarinda Herald (Clarinda, Iowa), Wednesday, June 17, 1891, p. 5
ESSEX – Died – Jennie May, the fourth daughter of Mr. and Mrs. A. F. Adel, died Saturday of consumption. She has been sick continually for six months prior to her death and had she lived until the fourth of July she would have been seventeen years of age. Jennie was well and favorably known in and about this place and left many friends who mourn her departure with her parents. She was buried Sunday, the funeral being at the house.

[ANDERSON, OSCAR, INFANT OF, - 1891]
Clarinda Herald (Clarinda, Iowa), Wednesday, February 11, 1891, p. 5
College Springs – Oscar Anderson lost his baby last week with the membranous croup. It was buried in C. S. Monday.

[ANDRICKS, ANNA MAY]
Clarinda Herald (Clarinda, Iowa), Wednesday, March 11, 1891, p. 5
Obituary – Miss Anna May Andricks departed this life March 2, 1891, after suffering long with consumption. She was born April 4, 1868. On the death bed she called the family around her and said, "Good bye, so live that you may meet me in heaven." Her last words were, "Mother, don't worry for me for I am better off, and I have prayed to go."
She has always been a true hearted girl, but never made a public profession of religion.
She was 22 years of age when she died. The funeral services were conducted at her home by Rev. Brown of the Christian church, March 5.

[BAKER, ADDIE VLIET]
Clarinda Herald (Clarinda, Iowa), Wednesday, July 8, 1891, p. 5
Sad News – Our city marshal, D. [avid] Vliet and family received the sad news of the death of their daughter and sister, Mrs. Addie Baker, of Kansas City. Her remains are here awaiting interment. The funeral will be held tomorrow. The many friends of the family heartily sympathize with them in their bereavement.

[BARTON, ELANOR SEIBERT]
Clarinda Herald (Clarinda, Iowa), Wednesday, February 4, 1891, p. 5
Yorktown
This community was shocked at the report of the death of Mrs. John Barton on Sunday, Feb. 1, 1891. Her death was comparatively sudden but few of her friends being apprised of her serious illness, though it is reported that she had not enjoyed good health since suffering a severe attack of la grippe a year ago, the result of which probably caused her late sickness. Two weeks previous to her death she was able to attend church, little thought by her friends that the pastor who administered the word of truth on the memorable occasion would be so soon called upon to conduct her funeral and render words of consolation and encouragement to her numerous friends on their voyage to meet her in the realms of bliss. The deceased was 65 years of age; she was 49 years the faithful companion of the bereaved husband who survives her and was for 50 years a beloved and consistent member of the Presbyterian church. Her funeral was conducted at the Yorktown church on the following Tuesday in the presence of a large and sympathetic audience, Rev. DeLong delivering an effective discourse from the words "there remaineth therefore a rest for the people of God," Heb. IV, 9. An aged husband and four children are left to mourn her departure. The deceased was born May 3, 1825 at East Waterford, Penn. and was married to John Barton Dec. 20, 1842. She became a member of the Presbyterian church Dec. 25, 1840, in East Waterford, Pa.

[BARTON, JOHN, 1818-1899]
Clarinda Journal (Clarinda, Iowa), Friday, May 12, 1899, p. 5
John Barton or Uncle Johnnie as he was familiarly called here, was born near East Waterford, Juniata county, Pa., Nov. 14, 1818. When 24 years of age he was married to Miss Eleanor Seibert. Soon after their marriage they moved to Morning Sun, Ia., from there they moved to La Salle county, Ill. In 1870 they moved to Page county, Ia., and lived in Tarkio and Nodaway townships until near three years ago, when he went to Wahoo, Neb., to make his home with his son, Stewart, where he died Sunday, May 7, 1899, age 80 years, 5 months and 13 days. He was a member of the Presbyterian church for 50 years and was constant and regular in his attendance at preaching and Sunday school. Two sons and two daughters survive him. His wife died eight years ago. He was buried by the side of his wife in the Summit cemetery near Yorktown.

[BARTON, JOHN, 1818-1899]
Clarinda Herald, Clarinda, Iowa, Friday, May 12, 1899, p. 5
Yorktown -- John Barton, or "Uncle John" as he was familiarly known at Yorktown, was born near East Waterford, Juniata county, Pa., Nov 14, 1818. He was married at the age of 24 to Miss Eleanor Seibert, and about a year later started for the west. Finally settling in Morning Sun, Ia. One year later he removed to La Salle county, Ill. In 1870 he sold his farm there and came to Page county, settling in Tarkio township, later he moved to Nodaway township and then to Yorktown, where he has a host of friends. In the fall of 1897 he went to Wahoo, Neb., to make his home with his son Stuart, where he died May 7, 1899, aged 80 years, 5 months and 13 days. His wife died 8 years ago. Two sons, John of Beatrice, Neb., and Stuart, of Wahoo, Neb., and two daughters, Mrs Louisa Stearns and Miss Mary, of Kansas City, survive him to mourn his departure. He was a member of the Presbyterian church 50 years and was faithful in attendance upon the services. The funeral services were held in the Presbyterian church in Yorktown at 2 o'clock, May 10, conducted by Rev J.V. Findley, assisted by Rev T.E. Farley of Yorktown, and Rev J.B. Bartley of Shenandoah. the remains were laid to rest in the Summit cemetery, followed by a large concourse of friends. 

[BEAN, GUY, 1889-1891]
Clarinda Herald (Clarinda, Iowa), Wednesday, June 3, 1891, p. 5
NORWICH – We were sorry to learn of the death Monday morning of Conductor Homer Bean's little boy who was about a year and a half old. As we learn, the diptheria was prevalent in Humeston, their home, and Mr. Bean and his wife and child came to New Market and stayed with relatives awhile to avert the dread disease when he contracted a severe cold developing in pneumonia with the result above. They took the remains, accompanied by a number of friends and relatives, to Humeston Tuesday for burial. The heart-stricken parents have our sympathy in their sad bereavement.

[BROWN, ELIZA MCGILL]
Clarinda Journal (Clarinda, Iowa), Friday, November 30, 1894, [p. 1]
Mrs. Eliza Brown died at 4 a. m. today at her home in this city at age 85 years. She had no particular disease but passed away of old age. She was born in St. Lawrence county, N. Y., and had lived in Clarinda twenty-one years. Her husband died in this city about twelve years ago. Seven children survive her, three sons and four daughters, as follows: Irving J. Brown, Brooks, Kans.; Stillman D. Brown, Clarinda; W. H. Brown, Ashtabula, O.; Mrs. C. M. Henshaw and L. A. Perry of Clarinda; Mrs. D. G. Miller, New Market, and Mrs. Holcomb of New York state. She was a faithful member of the first Free Methodist class formed in Geneseo county, N. Y. Her funeral will be held next Monday at 2 p. m. at the Free Methodist church.

[BROWN, PERMELIA BELL SHOEMAKER]
Clarinda Herald (Clarinda, Iowa), Wednesday, May 13, 1891, p. 4
Obituary – Permelia Bell was born in Xenia, Green county, Ohio, June 22, 1812. Was married to William Shoemaker May 19, 1831 and moved with her family to Louisa county, Iowa, 1839.
Was left a widow Feb. 14, 1846, with two daughters and three sons. Was married to Morton Brown, Aug. 3, 1847, who died in 1855, leaving two little boys.
After living 26 years on the same farm, she moved to Page county with her daughter and son-in-law, John Beam, with whom she has made her home ever since.
She had been a devoted Christian for 50 years, having united with the Church of God in Louisa county. There being no church of that denomination here she united with no other, but the Bible was her everyday study.
Her death was caused from a tumor. She bore her suffering without a murmur and patiently but anxiously awaited the summons home.
She died Friday, May 8, 1891, at 9 o'clock p. m. and the funeral was from the home of John Beam, Sunday, May 10, at 2 o'clock, conducted by Rev. Thos. Wallace.
She leaves six children, a number of grandchildren and a host of kind friends to mourn her loss. All her children were with her the last few weeks but one son who lives in Washington. Four of them, Mrs. John Beam, J. [asper] W. [illiam] Shoemaker, Mrs. I. G. Shepard, of San Francisco, and C.[harles] H. Shoemaker, of Salt Lake City, were with her in her last moments.

[BROWN, VALOROUS]
Page County Democrat (Clarinda, Iowa), Thursday, January 12, 1882
Valorous Brown died at his residence, in Clarinda, on Jan. 10th, at 5:30 a. m., aged 75 years. He has resided in Clarinda for several years, but during the time has been an invalid and for some time, when the weather was pleasant, wheeled himself around in a chair. His friends and family will mourn the loss of him.

[BROWN, VALOROUS]
Page County Democrat (Clarinda, Iowa), Thursday, January 26, 1882
Obituary – Valorous Brown died Jan. 10th, 1882 in the 76th year of his age. He was born in Vermont in 1805, in the town of Wells. When eight years old, he moved with his parents to St. Lawrence county, N. Y. In 1830 he was united in marriage to Eliza McGill of the same place, residing on his father's farm until 1838, when he moved with his family to Erie county, N. Y., near Buffalo, when that large city was but a small place. He lived there forty years. From there he moved with his companion to Clarinda, Iowa, to be near his children, the most of them being here, or about here, in the year of 1875. Since which date, he has been a resident of this place.
Father Brown was converted to God in 1830, the year of his marriage. He was class leader and Sunday school superintendent when in the M. E. church, at whose altar he had been converted, for nearly forty years and filled acceptably that, one of the most important and honored offices of the Methodist church. In 1861 he united with the Free Methodist church at West Falls, Erie county, N. Y., about the date of that church's organization, since which time he has been a faithful and consistent member of that denomination. For a number of years, he was a professor of the blessing of sanctification, a Christian experience held and taught by all branches of the great Methodist family.
For five years father Brown has been almost entirely disabled and confined to the house by rheumatism, which produced stiffness of all his joints. He could neither raise or turn his head only as he turned his whole body; his limbs being so bad he had no use of them whatever and spent his time, day after day, in a wheel chair. The evening before his death he joined in family worship and gave every evidence that he was fully prepared for the change that was so soon to take place. In the language of the Psalmist it may be said, "Mark the perfect man and behold the upright, for the end of that man is peace."
Father Brown leaves a widow with whom he has journeyed fifty-two years and eight married children. His children were ten in number. No deaths occurred in the family until three years ago, when a daughter, Mrs. Achsah Aid, died with typhoid pneumonia. Just one month before his death another daughter, Mrs. Jennie E. Kidney, died with the same disease. Her last words were those of prayer.

[BUCKNER, DWIGHT]
Clarinda Herald (Clarinda, Iowa), Friday, July 15, 1904, p. 8
SHAMBAUGH – Dwight Buckner, the oldest son of Mr. and Mrs. John Buckner, died at the home of his parents on the Markwell farm Thursday evening, July 7th of general tuberculosis. The funeral was held at the Davis school house Saturday at 2 p. m., conducted by Rev. Mudd of the Free Methodist church. Interment was made in the Davis cemetery.

[CHRISTOPHER, MORTON "MORT"]
Page County Democrat (Clarinda, Iowa), Thursday, December 15, 1881
DIED. – On Thursday last, at his residence, east of town, Mort Christopher, aged sixty-two years. He had lived in Page county for many years; in fact, he was amongst the first settlers. He had seen Clarinda and Page county grow from an open prairie to be populated with more than twenty thousand people. But at the All Wise Being called him home. He will be much missed by his many friends and acquaintances here. He was buried on Friday in the cemetery and the turn out to his funeral was very large. The sympathy of the whole community is extended to the bereaved and stricken family.

[CRAMER, ANSEL BISHOP]
Clarinda Herald (Clarinda, Iowa), Wednesday, December 16, 1891, p. 5
Ansel Bishop Cramer was born in Benson, Vermont, Jan. 23, 1828. At the age of 16 he was converted and joined the Methodist Episcopal church in North Ferrisburgh, Vermont.
In 1850 he removed to Troy, Ohio, where he united with the Wesleyan Methodist church, of which he was a member until that church dissolved.
In 1852 he married Mary F. [rances] Grosvenor. If he had lived until February 15th, they would have spent 40 years in holy wedlock.
In 1860 they removed to Page county, where they have since resided.
Seven children were born to them, of whom two preceded him to the home above.
A lifelong invalid, he bore his suffering with unflinching patience and fortitude.
His life as a man and citizen is well known; what he was as husband and father no words can tell.
At the last he expressed his readiness and willingness to go and wished the end to come speedily; this prayer was granted.
He fell asleep the morning of Dec. 10, 1891, to waken on the resurrection day.
The funeral services were held at the residence Sunday, Dec. 13, at 2 p. m., Rev. T. C. Smith conducting them. He spoke from Zech ix 12, "Turn you to your stronghold, ye prisoners of hope."
After the sermon Senator Clark spoke briefly and tenderly of the priceless legacy which Mr. Cramer had left behind him, a spotless character and a good name.
Many friends were present to sympathize with the family and to attest their affection and respect for the citizen and friend.   T C S.

[CRAMER, MARY FRANCES GROSVENOR]

Clarinda Journal (Clarinda, Iowa), Thursday, December 15, 1921, p. 8
Mrs. Mary F. Cramer – The funeral of Mrs. Mary Cramer, who died in Clarinda, Saturday, Dec. 17, 1921, was held at the home of her son, Walter Cramer, at 2:30 Monday afternoon. Two hymns, "It Is Not Death to Die," and "Home of the Soul," were sung by a quartet composed of Miss Bertha Loranz, Miss Carrie Loranz, Roscoe Applegate and J. D. Keener. Mrs. Henry Loranz was at the piano. The pall bearers were Henry Loranz, J. A. Woods, S. E. Sperry, J. Christensen, Dr. J. P. Brown and D. D. Stitt. The members of Charles Linderman circle, Ladies of the G. A. R., attended in a body as did the members of the Sorosis class of the Presbyterian Sunday school, Mrs. Cramer having been a member of both organizations. The ladies of the Charles Linderman circle gave their beautiful burial service at the grave in the Clarinda cemetery. The following obituary of Mrs. Cramer was written by Mrs. T. E. Powers and Mrs. Mabel Maxwell, Mrs. Cramer's daughter. Dr. and Mrs. Powers were married at the home of Mrs. Cramer. Mrs. Powers having been a friend of Mrs. Cramer for many years was especially fitted to pay the last tributes to her.
"Mary Frances Grosvenor was born in Troy, Ohio, May 17, 1833, and died Dec. 10, 1921, in Clarinda, Iowa, aged 88 years, 6 months and 23 days. She was one of seven children in the family of Daniel and Frances (Barber) Grosvenor and is the last survivor of that family. Her mother was from Ireland.
She spent her childhood and girlhood in Troy and was married to Ansel Bishop Cramer Feb. 15, 1852.
After her marriage she went to Vermont with her husband where they lived for a short time in Mr. Cramer's old home. From there they went to the then far West, Wisconsin. Their next move was to a farm in northeastern Iowa, near Nashua, and "The Church in the Wildwood" made famous in song.
In 1860 they came to Page county and lived until 1863 on the farm south of town now known as the Charles Pfander farm. Then they moved to Clarinda, which, with the exception of a few years of farm life nearby, has been her home ever since. For forty-nine consecutive years she has lived in the old home on South Sixteenth street. Her husband passed away Dec. 10, 1891, just thirty years before she was called.
Mrs. Cramer was the mother of seven children, two of whom, Florence and Freddie, died in infancy. Her surviving children are Otis Ansel of Monte Vista, Colo., Carrie Frances Bisby of Sacramento, Calif., Mabel Irene Maxwell of Lamar, Colo.; Nellie Gertrude Ray of Laws, Calif., and Walter Clarence of Clarinda. There are fifteen grandchildren and six great grandchildren.
In her girlhood she joined the Wesleyan Methodist church of Troy, Ohio. After coming to Clarinda, she attended the Presbyterian church, which she joined under the pastorate of Dr. J. H. Malcolm in 1881 and for more than forty years she has held that membership, being a regular attendant of all the services when her health would permit. She gave her aid and support to all the different women's organizations of the church. The Sorosis Bible class was especially dear to her. She was a member of the choir at an early day and all of her children have been members of the same choir.
She was one of the oldest citizens of Clarinda which she saw grow from the little hamlet of pioneer days to its present beauty and prosperity. She gave her support to all the movements for the uplift of the community and stood always for the good, the true, and the beautiful. She had a bright mind, was a good reader and well informed in the affairs of the world in which she took a keen interest.
She had hoped for the franchise for women and was happy that she lived to see it and exercise that privilege. For at the last presidential election the ballot was taken to her in her home, she being unable to go to the polls.
She was a good wife and mother, a true friend, kind neighbor, consistent Christian and a wise counselor for her youthful friends.
Her sunny, optimistic spirit, her courage and bravery under adversity, was an inspiration to those around her.
Of her it may be truly said—the world is better because of her life. Give her the fruit of her hands and let her own work praise her in the gates."

[CRAMER, MARY FRANCES GROSVENOR]
Clarinda Herald (Clarinda, Iowa), Thursday, December 15, 1921, p. 12
Mrs. Frances Cramer – Mrs. Frances Cramer, known to many as the mother of Walter Cramer, passed quietly to her reward Saturday afternoon at the advanced age of past 88 years, the funeral being held this Monday afternoon from the Walter Cramer home on N. 16th Street, conducted by the Presbyterian minister, Rev. A. B. Marshall, D. D. 
It was an impressive service, her daughter from Lamar, Colo., Mrs. Mabel Maxwell being present and also the grandson, Lowell Cramer, came home from college for the occasion.
The pallbearers were Dr. J. P. Brown, Henry Loranz, S. E. Sperry, Jesse Christensen, Prof. J. A. Woods.
The following brief review of Mrs. Cramer's life was read by the pastor, composed by Mrs. T. E. Powers, who in her girlhood days lived with Mrs. Cramer, having been married at Mrs. Cramer's house and known her as few have had the privilege.
Mary Frances Grosvenor was born in Troy, Ohio, May 17, 1833, and died Dec. 10, 1921, in Clarinda, Iowa, aged 88 years, 6 months and 23 days. She was one of seven children in the family of Daniel and Frances (Barber) Grosvenor and is the last survivor of that family. Her mother was from Ireland.
She spent her childhood and girlhood in Troy and was married to Ansel Bishop Cramer Feb. 15, 1852.
After her marriage she went to Vermont with her husband where they lived for a short time in Mr. Cramer's old home. From there they went to the then far West, Wisconsin. Their next move was to a farm in northeastern Iowa, near Nashua, and "The Church in the Wildwood" made famous in song.
In 1860 they came to Page county and lived until 1863 on the farm south of town now known as the Charles Pfander farm. Then they moved to Clarinda, which, with the exception of a few years of farm life nearby, has been her home ever since. For forty-nine consecutive years she has lived in the old home on South Sixteenth street. Her husband passed away Dec. 10, 1891, just thirty years before she was called.
Mrs. Cramer was the mother of seven children, two of whom, Florence and Freddie, died in infancy. Her surviving children are Otis Ansel of Monte Vista, Colo., Carrie Frances Bisby of Sacramento, Calif., Mabel Irene Maxwell of Lamar, Colo.; Nellie Gertrude Ray of Laws, Calif., and Walter Clarence of Clarinda. There are fifteen grandchildren and six great grandchildren.
In her girlhood she joined the Wesleyan Methodist church of Troy, Ohio. After coming to Clarinda, she attended the Presbyterian church, which she joined under the pastorate of Dr. J. H. Malcolm in 1881 and for more than forty years she has held that membership, being a regular attendant of all the services when her health would permit. She gave her aid and support to all the different women's organizations of the church. The Sorosis Bible class was especially dear to her. She was a member of the choir at an early day and all of her children have been members of the same choir.
She was one of the oldest citizens of Clarinda which she saw grow from the little hamlet of pioneer days to its present beauty and prosperity. She gave her support to all the movements for the uplift of the community and stood always for the good, the true, and the beautiful. She had a bright mind, was a good reader and well informed in the affairs of the world in which she took a keen interest.
She had hoped for the franchise for women and was happy that she lived to see it and exercise that privilege. For at the last presidential election the ballot was taken to her in her home, she being unable to go to the polls.
She was a good wife and mother, a true friend, kind neighbor, consistent Christian and a wise counselor for her youthful friends.
Her sunny, optimistic spirit, her courage and bravery under adversity, was an inspiration to those around her.
Of her it may be truly said—the world is better because of her life. Give her the fruit of her hands and let her own work praise her in the gates.
[Note: The same obituary was published in the Page County Democrat, December 15, 1921, p. 7.]

[CRAIG, DR. – 1891]
Clarinda Herald (Clarinda, Iowa), Wednesday, March 18, 1891, p. 5
HAWLEYVILLE – Dr. Craig died a week ago Saturday night was buried Sunday. He was a member of the United Brethren church of this place; was quite an old man and has been a dependent on the county for some time. His wife has been quite sick for several days.
Mr. Jacob Craig, of Bedford, was here at the time of his father's death but sickness at home called him back before the burial.

[CURRY, MARGARET, - 1891]
Clarinda Herald (Clarinda, Iowa), Wednesday, April 8, 1891, p. 5
HARLAN – Died, on Thursday, March 26, Aunt Margaret Curry at J. C. Dugan's. The principal cause of her death was old age; she had arrived to her 86th year. Her last illness was of short duration; she made a profession of Christ in early life and connected herself to the Reform Presbyterian church and remained there to the last. She was willing to die and go to that Heavenly Kingdom which Christ has prepared for his children. Rev. D. McKee conducted the funeral services. The remains were laid in the Covenanter Cemetery, followed by a goodly number of friends.

[DUGAN, WILLIAM MANTON "WILLIE," 1873 – 1891]
Clarinda Herald (Clarinda, Iowa), Wednesday, April 8, 1891, p. 5 
HARLAN - Died – Left his earthly dwelling place near Page Center, Iowa, for his home in Heaven, March 31, 1891, after an illness of over three months, being heart trouble. The subject of this sketch, Mr. Willie Dugan, eldest son of Mr. and Mrs. Hutchman Dugan, made a public profession of his faith in Jesus last October and since then he has manifested a Christian life. As he began to decline in health, hence confined to his bed most of the time, with what submission and patience he adapted himself to his situation and with what manly grace. He desired to live but was willing to die if it was God's will. The remains were laid to rest in College Springs Cemetery Thursday, April 2. The funeral services were conducted by Rev. McKitrick of Coin. The bereaved friends have the sympathy of this entire community.

[DUGAN, WILLIAM MANTON "WILLIE," 1873 – 1891]
Clarinda Herald (Clarinda, Iowa), Wednesday, April 8, 1891, p. 5 
COLLEGE SPRINGS – Master Will Dugan, who has been sick all winter, was buried in the south cemetery last Saturday. He leaves many friends to mourn his untimely taking off.

[FERRIS, ANNA ROZETTA "ZETTIE"]
Clarinda Herald (Clarinda, Iowa), Wednesday, March 18, 1891, p. 5
NORWICH - Died, Friday night at 11:40 of typhoid fever, Miss Zettie Ferris, oldest daughter of Mr. and Mrs. Geo. H.[enry] Ferris, aged 22 years, 8 months, 17 days. The funeral was preached at the home at 1 p. m. Sunday by Rev. Johnston, to the largest funeral assemblage ever witnessed in this section. Miss Ferris was at prayer meeting Wednesday evening previous and although not feeling well was looking the picture of health to her associate and friends. It seems she had been having a kind of dumb fever at intervals for some time and taking a severe cold or lagrippe it suddenly developed into a typhoid shape and a physician was at once summoned but she only lived a few hours. The shock to the entire community was very great as very few knew of her being sick. She was an exemplary young lady and a devout Christian worker in all Christian societies. The Misses Edna Briggs, Mittie and Lena Burright, Maud Miller, Eva McGhee and Rhoda Stewart, all her associates and active members of the Epworth league, acted as pall bearers. The interment was in the Tarkio cemetery, northeast of town.
Anna Rozzetta Ferris was born in Woodhull, Henry county, Ill., June 26, 1868, died Feb.  [March] 13, 1891, aged 22 years, 8 months, 17 days. She was converted Feb. 18, 1884, and joined the M. E. church Feb. 22, and has always and at all times lives a consistent Christian life.
The text for the funeral sermon was in Rev., 14th chapter, 13th verse, "Blessed are the dead that die in the Lord, from henceforth." "Yea, saith the Spirit that they may rest from their labors and their works do follow them."
"Shall we gather at the river" and "I am saved," two of her favorite songs, were sung at the funeral and at the grave her pastor sang, "I would not live always, I ask not to stay." Notice will be given next week of memorial services to be held by the Epworth League.
[Poem not transcribed.]
Mr. Ferris has been very poorly himself for several days. We learn that since the funeral, Eva, another daughter, about 17 years old, is very low with tonsillitis. This affliction is certainly very sad.

[FERRIS, ANNA ROZETTA "ZETTIE"]
Clarinda Herald (Clarinda, Iowa), Wednesday, March 25, 1891, p. 5
NORWICH - In the obituary last week, it should have read March 13 instead of February.]

[FERRIS, HARRIET FRANCES PIPER "HATTIE"]
Clarinda Journal (Clarinda, Iowa), Thursday, October 18, 1928, p.  7
Mrs. George Ferris – Mrs. Harriet Ferris, widow of the late George Ferris, died at the home of her daughter, Mrs. S. A. King, at Norwich, Tuesday morning, Oct. 16, 1928. Funeral services are being held this afternoon at 2 o'clock at the Methodist Episcopal church in Norwich, Rev. E. B. Stewart in charge of the services. Burial is to be in Baker cemetery.

[FERRIS, HARRIET FRANCES PIPER "HATTIE"]
Clarinda Herald (Clarinda, Iowa), Thursday, October 18, 1928, [p. 1]
Mrs. George Ferris – The funeral of Mrs. George Ferris is being held this Thursday afternoon, at the M. E. Church in Norwich, conducted by the Yorktown-Norwich pastor, Rev. E. B. Stewart, Mrs. Ferris having passed away at 7 Tuesday in the home of her daughter, Mrs. Austin King, southeast of Norwich and will be interred beside the grave of her husband. Mr. and Mrs. Ferris formerly farmed in this vicinity, being among the early residents and finally moving to Clarinda, where Mr. Ferris died. Her maiden name was Harriett Frances Foster [Piper], born Jan. 28, 1840, in Pennsylvania. She came to this country in 1870 and has lived here the past fifty-eight years.

[FERRIS, HARRIET FRANCES PIPER "HATTIE"]
Clarinda Herald (Clarinda, Iowa), Monday, October 22, 1928, p. 3
Mrs. George Ferris – Harriet Frances Piper, daughter of Daniel and Anna Blair Piper, was born in Amberson's Valley, Franklin county, Pennsylvania, January 28, 1840 and departed from this life October 1[6], 1928, age 88 years, 8 months and 17 days.
In 1856 she moved with her parents to Woodhull, Illinois. On January 12, 1860 she was united in marriage to George H. [enry] Ferris. To this union were born eight children, three having departed this life, as also her husband. The five living children are: Henry A., Fred P., Melchoir E., Eva Bohrer, and Ethel King. Besides the five children she leaves 16 grandchildren and 17 great grandchildren.
She united with the United Brethren Church when quite young but later joined the Methodist Episcopal Church with her husband. She was a constant attendant at the church services as long as she was able to go.
Grandma Ferris was the wife of a Civil war veteran. She served as Chaplain of the Women's Relief Corps No. 71 Clarinda for six years.
Uncle George and Grandma Ferris were pioneers in Page County, Iowa. They were very active in assisting all those who in any way needed their help during the trying days in the early period of this county. They were good to strangers as well as to their neighbors and friends. Many a weary traveler found a night's lodging in their home. Ministers in those early days always found a welcome with them.
They were always ready and willing to aid neighbors and friends and all who sought advice and help of them. In those early trying days their advice was much sought, for they were considered to be people with good judgment.
Uncle George and Grandma Ferris early saw the need of a church in their community and in consequence thereof, they, with a few others, became the engineers in the building of the first church at Norwich. Because of their strong faith in God they were abundantly able to assist and uphold those church members and church associates of a weaker faith. Their faith in Christ was their sole guidance to a successful Christian career.
To the immediate relatives, we say to you, that your loss in Mother cannot be estimated. But your loss, in a great measure, is our loss too, for our community is losing a very sympathetic, loving, and much loved citizen. She with her husband lived and gladly sacrificed for the uplifting of humanity which is the noblest purpose that man and woman can attain.
Funeral services were conducted by the Rev. E. B. Stewart at the Norwich Methodist Episcopal Church Thursday, Oct. 18, 1928 at 2:00 o'clock. Burial was made beside her husband in the Baker cemetery, northeast of Norwich.
Friends acting as pallbearers were John Scheibenberg, Fred Miller, Alva Miller, O. Dougherty, Wm. Osing and Dave Cutter. Music was furnished by Mr. and Mrs. Guy Swartz and Mr. and Mrs. C. Burton, a solo being sung by Mrs. Leo Humphrey and a musical reading by Miss Margaret Roscher. The many, many friends of Mrs. Ferris crowded the church in final respect to her memory.

[FRENCH, JOSEPH, 1824 - 1891]
Clarinda Herald (Clarinda, Iowa), Wednesday, January 14, 1891, [p. 1]
Coin
Mr. Jos. French died at his home, north of Coin, Monday, after an illness of about a week.

[FRENCH, JOSEPH, 1824 - 1891]
Clarinda Herald (Clarinda, Iowa), Wednesday, January 14, 1891, p. 5
Norwich
Mr. French died Tuesday; his sickness, which lasted but a week, was caused by la grippe.

[GARVIN, THOMAS E.]
Omaha Daily Bee (Omaha, Nebraska), Monday, June 29, 1891, [p. 1]
Drowned in the Platte
Waterloo, Neb., June 28. – (Special telegram to The Bee.) – Thomas E. Garvin a young man employed by W. L. Murray, who lives on an island nine miles south of here, was drowned this morning in the Platte river, which is out of its banks and had flooded all that portion of the country, completely cutting it off from the main land. Mr. Murray had sent him down in the timber to hunt up the horses so as to have them to attend the funeral of his (Murray's) child on Monday morning and after four or five hours a searching party was sent out and after a long hunt the body was found lodged in some drift wood, about a mile from Murray's house. The body is held pending action of the coroner. Garvin was a stranger here, having no relatives in this part of the country and is supposed to have come from Clarinda, Ia.

[GARVIN, THOMAS E.]
Clarinda Herald (Clarinda, Iowa), Wednesday, July 1, 1891, p. 8
Died – T. [homas] Garvin, who ran a photograph gallery in the little blue building on the northeast corner of the square some time ago, died at Waterloo, Neb., last week. His parents live at Streator, Ills. The deceased came to his death by drowning.

[GASTON, MRS., - 1891]
Clarinda Herald (Clarinda, Iowa), Wednesday, March 11, 1891, p. 2
Essex – Mrs. Gaston died Monday morning at 5 o'clock from lung trouble. She has been sick for quite a while, but the end came sooner than expected. The funeral was held Tuesday at 2 o'clock in the M. E. church.

[GLAZEBY, JOHN WESLEY, - 1891]
Clarinda Herald (Clarinda, Iowa), Wednesday, December 16, 1891, p. 5
Obituary – John Wesley Glazeby was born in Burlington, Iowa, and died in this city December 12, 1891, aged 22 years, 3 months and 16 days.
He was for some years a resident of this city with his parents, but in 1888 he went to San Diego, Cal., to accept a position in the office of a Mr. Christian.
By reason of climate and too close application to business his lungs became seriously impaired and he returned home May 1890 and then went to Colorado.
He seemed at first to improve but finally returned home, not better, but worse. Death had marked him for his own.
Although he knew it was a losing battle, yet he retained a cheerful and hopeful spirit to the last.
He was quiet and somewhat reserved in manner, but cheerful and ambitious to succeed in life.
He won the esteem of all who knew him by his kindness and quiet fidelity.
The funeral services were held at the residence of the parents Dec. 14, Rev. T. C. Smith, his pastor and Sunday school teacher, officiating. The text was from Solomon's Song, viii 6: Love is strong as death."
Many of his young friends and associates attended ad assisted in the last sad rites and with other friends laid him to rest in the quiet grave, to await the resurrection morning.   T C S.

[GUSTAVSON, CARL JULIUS]
Clarinda Herald (Clarinda, Iowa), Wednesday, July 15, 1891, p. 5
Drowned
A very sad case of drowning occurred about three miles north of Essex in the Nishnabotna river, Sunday, July 12.
Carl Julius Gustavson had been working for Louis Carlson for 2 weeks. In company with a son of Carlson's and a hired hand he went down to the river bathing. The family were at church; it was therefore about noon when the catastrophe occurred. Young Gustavson got into deep water and the current being swift he was drawn down. His comrades tried to save him but the current being so swift they were unable to do so, and he went down to rise no more.
The alarm was immediately given, and a large crowd of neighbors gathered to help search for the body. They began the search on Sunday at one o'clock but did not succeed in finding the corpse until Monday at 1 p. m.
Carl Julius Gustavson was a native of Sweden and came to this country only 18 months ago. He was a nephew of Daniel Johnson where he made his home. This blow falls very hard on Mr. Johnson, as this is the third nephew that he has lost in this same manner.
The remains were buried in the cemetery of the Lutherans east of Essex. The friends of the deceased desire to extend their sincerest thanks to the kind friends who helped so faithfully in recovering the body and aiding in other ways in this great trouble.

[HADEN, JOHN, - 1891]
Clarinda Herald (Clarinda, Iowa), Wednesday, July 15, 1891, p. 5
ESSEX – Uncle John Haden died Monday night and was buried in Franklin Grove cemetery Wednesday. Rev. Merritt of Red Oak preached the funeral.

[HARRY, FRANK, CHILD OF, - 1891]
Clarinda Herald (Clarinda, Iowa), Wednesday, July 15, 1891, p. 5
COIN – A young child of Frank Harry's was buried at Baldwin cemetery Monday.

[HELLER, EMALINE PETERMAN]
Clarinda Herald (Clarinda, Iowa), Wednesday, February 13, 1889, p. 5
East River – John Peterman was called to mourn the loss of a sister, Mrs. Joseph Heller, last Saturday. The lady died without one moment's warning, of heart disease.

[HELLER, JOSEPH]
Clarinda Herald (Clarinda, Iowa), Wednesday, February 11, 1891, p. 5
North Grove - Mr. Joseph Heller, one of the old settlers in this part of Iowa, died the first of last week. The cause of his death was cancer in the stomach. His remains were interred in the cemetery Thursday, Rev. Andres conducting the services.

[HELLER, JOSEPH]
Villisca Review (Villisca, Iowa), Thursday, February 12, 1891, p. 7
North Grove – Mr., Joseph Heller was buried in North Grove cemetery on Thursday last. Mr. Heller was one of the early settlers in this part of the state and was a jovial, whole souled man. He was afflicted quite a length of time before his decease with cancer in the stomach. Rev. Andres conducted the funeral services.

[HENDERSON, JULIA ANN, - 1891]
Clarinda Herald (Clarinda, Iowa), Wednesday, February 25, 1891, p. 5
Page Center – Miss Julia Henderson was buried Thursday. This was a very sad case owing to the youth of the girl and the circumstances in which the father and brothers are left. They have the sympathy of all. She is free from earthly care and rests in that "undiscovered country from whose bourne no traveler returns."

[HENDERSON, JULIA ANN, - 1891]
Clarinda Herald (Clarinda, Iowa), Wednesday, February 25, 1891, p. 5
Harlan 
DIED -- Feb. 18, 1891, at her home near Page Center, Miss Julia Ann Henderson of quick consumption. Her death was somewhat sudden and unexpected. She was able to be up and around most of the time until within a day or two of her death. She remained conscious until the last.

[HODGENS, JOHN W.]
Page County Democrat (Clarinda, Iowa), Thursday, November 17, 1881
DIED. – At his residence in Morsman, Sunday, Nov. 13, at 4 o'clock p. m., J. [ohn] W. Hodgens, of quick consumption. He was born in Washington county, Penn., and was 66 years old. He moved to Jefferson county, Ohio and in 1864, to Warren county, Ill. In 1876 he came to Page County and bought a farm. He was a member of the Christian church and was a noble, open-hearted man, a kind husband and father, a good citizen—one who was loved and esteemed by all who knew him. His loss is a heavy blow to the bereaved family and they have the sympathy of the community in their loss and bereavement. They have the consolation of knowing that he is at rest and awaits their coming, where all will again united and through eternal ages rejoice and be happy.

[HOFFMAN, LEROY, - 1891]
Clarinda Herald (Clarinda, Iowa), Wednesday, March 11, 1891, p. 5
Shambaugh – John Hoffman's little baby died Sunday night and was buried today; lung fever was the cause of the death, we believe.

[HOSKINS, HARRY OREN]
Clarinda Herald (Clarinda, Iowa), Wednesday, May 27, 1891, p. 4
Obituary – Harry, the youngest son of Mr. and Mrs. J. [esse] H. Hoskins, died at the family home, four miles southwest of Clarinda, May 23, 1891. The deceased was born December 2, 1870, in Illinois, but came to this county when a child, so that he grew up here. He had a severe attack of grippe over a year ago and the disease settled in his lungs and finally turned into consumption, from which there was no hope of recovery. During the last days of suffering he expressed himself very freely on the subject of the great change soon to take place and prayed that the end might be hastened. With this thought in mind Rev. E. W. McDade, pastor of the Methodist church, selected as his text for the funeral occasion the 23d and 24th verses of First Philippians, and from it made a strong appeal to the living to be ready when the Master calls. A very large concourse of relatives and friends attended the services and followed the remains to their last resting place in the beautiful home of the dead in Clarinda. Mr. and Mrs. Hoskins have the profound sympathy of a very wide circle of friends in this great bereavement.

[HOSKINS, HARRY OREN]
Clarinda Herald (Clarinda, Iowa), Wednesday, May 27, 1891, p. 5
HARLAN – Mr. Harry Hoskins was buried Monday. This was a very sad case, owing to the youth of the man, but all must go when the time of their departure comes. The bereaved ones have the sympathy of all. He's free from earthly care and rests in that undiscovered country from whose bourne no traveler ever returns.

[HOWES, JOSIAH]
Page County Democrat (Clarinda, Iowa), Thursday, January 5, 1882
In our rush of business during Christmas we overlooked the noticing of the death of our friend, Dr. J.[osiah] Howes. He died at the residence of his son-in-law, in this city, on December 20th, 1881, aged 62 years. He was born in Maine and lived until manhood and graduated at Bowdoin college. He then went to Cincinnati, Ohio and there graduated in the Cincinnati Medical College and after graduating was for several years an assistant in the college. He came to Burlington, Iowa thirty years ago and for years was the leading physician in that city. He has been making his home in this city for some time with his son-in-law, T. B. Merrill, who took the doctor's remains to Burlington, where they were buried in the family burial ground. The doctor stood at the head of his profession in Burlington and his many friends there as well as here regret and mourn his loss and extend sympathy to the bereaved children that are left.

[JEWELL, FLOSSIE M.]
Clarinda Herald (Clarinda, Iowa), Wednesday, January 14, 1891, [p. 1]
Yorktown
DIED. – Jan. 11, 1891, little Flossie M. Jewell, aged 6 months and 2 days. This death was very unexpected. The little one retired the previous evening in good health. At 5 o'clock a. m. on the above date it was aroused and fed, taking its food with usual appetite, after which all resumed their sleep. Some two hours later the parents awoke finding their beloved babe a lifeless form by their side. Dr. Clabaugh was quickly summoned but all efforts to restore the child to life were in vain. "Twas gone." The immediate cause of death is not known. Rev. Johnson conducted the funeral on the following day. The deeply grief-stricken parents have the sympathy of all in their sad bereavement.

[JOHNSON, ELIDA CARLSON]
Clarinda Herald (Clarinda, Iowa), Wednesday, July 29, 1891, p. 5
Sad Death – Mrs. Alida [Elida] Johnson, wife of J. [ohn] A. Johnson, of Fremont township, died on last Wednesday and was followed to the grave by a large concourse of sorrowing relatives and friends Friday. Surrounded by all the comforts that go toward making life pleasant on earth she is suddenly called to the world of spirits. She leaves a husband and two children, one a babe a few days old, to mourn her loss.
[Note: Her first name is spelled Elida on her headstone.]

 [JOHNSON, EMMA WILHELMINA, 1874 - 1891]
Clarinda Herald (Clarinda, Iowa), Wednesday, March 4, 1891, p. 5
College Springs – Miss Emma Johnson, who has been sick for some time, died last Sunday morning. She was buried Monday at 2 p. m., the funeral being held in the M. E. church, Rev. Buckner preaching it. Miss Emma leaves many friends to mourn her death.

[JOHNSON, EMMA WILHELMINA, 1874 - 1891]
Obituary – Left her earthly dwelling place near College Springs, Iowa, for her home in heaven, Feb. 22, 1891, after an illness of some months (being consumption), aged 16 years, 2 months and 22 days. The subject of this sketch, Miss Emma Wilhe[l]mina Johnson, youngest daughter of Mr. Charles and Mrs. Charlotte Johnson, made a public profession of her faith in Jesus one year ago at a revival meeting in the M. E. Church of this place. Since then, we have particularly noticed, as we frequently met her, how mature and far above her age was her deportment. As she began to decline in health, hence confined to the house, although of an active nature, with what submission and patience she adapted herself to her situation and with such womanly grace. When her physicians as they felt their duty, kindly and gently revealed to her true situation, how calmly and with what composure she listened to the information.
At one time, after reading to her from the Bible, her mother said to her, "Emma, do you pray?" "Yes, she replied, "I pray all the time and Jesus seems so near that I feel I could touch him." A friend of the family had a dream that Jesus was calling for Emma and when this was told the young girl, she said, "I know it and I trust him with all my heart, and his will is my will." At the last, when in death's struggle, she said to her sister, who faithfully watched her all through her illness, "Anna, I am going now; goodbye;" she also told her sister to say to her mother to not mourn for her, and for not any of them to feel sad. Many other things might be written as evidences of how the gospel of Jesus prepared a trusting soul to triumph over the last enemy. She also left a request that her young associates might meet her on the other shore. For you dear young friends the above account is written, that you too may "remember your Creator in the days of your youth."
[Poem not transcribed.]

[JOHNSTON, AGNES HARE]
Clarinda Herald (Clarinda, Iowa), Wednesday, April 29, 1891, [p. 1]
Obituary – At 2 o'clock p. m. Saturday April 25, A. D. 1891, the beautiful bright sunlight of that fair afternoon was darkened at the home of Father James Johnston, in south Clarinda, as the spirit of Mother Agness [Agnes] Johnston took its flight, leaving her earthly dwelling place for her home in Heaven.
The subject of whose memory we would cherish was born in Ayrshire, Scotland Feb. 14, 1827. She was married to James Johnston, who survives her, at same place November 25, 1849. She was the mother of eight children, five boys and three girls, all of whom survive her, except one son. In 1853, with her husband and two children, she sailed from her birth place, which she loved so dearly and prized so highly, for America, first landing in New York but shortly located in Dane county, Wisconsin, residing there until the autumn of 1872, when, with her family migrated to Page county, Iowa, and has resided in the north part of the county until the fall of 1888, at which time she, together with her two young sons, James and Thomas, and younger daughter, Margaret, moved to south Clarinda, where she resided until the angels of Heaven called her home. 
Mother Johnston's eyesight began to fail her about ten years ago and about five years ago she became almost entirely blind. She, for years, groped her way in darkness in this world and endured untold misery suffering from rheumatism and a complication of diseases with perpetual and tireless patience until the insidious malady had done its fatal work so silently yet so surely through years of suffering endured with such heroic resolution and determination to do womanly battle to the end. That the end since heralded only by the cessation of effort. The brain could no longer frame the mandates of the will, the hand could no longer do homage to the husband and children, the resolute foot could no longer carry the warren [worn?] and wearied body, the pulsations of the heart grew weaker, respiration came no more and her last words, pointing heavenward with her index finger, she exclaimed  in a tender and a soft voice: "Look! Look! Home! Home! Home!" and all mortal life ended. The death was peaceful. The sorely bereaved family look upon a face as placid as life, smiling the inscrutable enigma of death and the sorrow not without hope.
Mother Johnston has been a devoted Christian and a member of the United Presbyterian church from childhood. She was a devoted wife, a loving mother and a kind and obliging neighbor. She was at all times ready to rejoice with those that rejoiced and weep with those that weep, ready to enjoy prosperity and to share and endure adversity.
The funeral service was conducted at the residence on Monday, April 27, at 10 o'clock a. m. by Rev. Graham of the United Presbyterian church. A large number of friends attended the services, and many went in procession the long trip to North Page cemetery where she sleeps in her last resting place. Her bright life went out like the light of a candle, but the perfume of her good deeds will remain.
Mother thou art gone,
     From whence no traveler has returned;
But we your friends rest full assured
     That you are happy in the Lord.        J. R. G.
[Note:  The birth date on her headstone is Feb. 14, 1825.]

[KENDALL, NANCY, MRS.  - 1891]
Clarinda Herald (Clarinda, Iowa), Wednesday, April 8, 1891, p. 5 
HAWLEYVILLE – Died at her residence in town Wednesday, March 25, at seven o'clock in the evening of lung fever, Mrs. Nancy Kendall. She was taken to Clarinda for burial. The deceased has lived in this section of the country a good many years and was well known. The family has the sympathy of friends, she leaves a husband and four children to mourn her loss.

 [LISLE, JOHN EVANS]
Clarinda Herald (Clarinda, Iowa), Wednesday, March 4, 1891, p. 4
In Memoriam
The Guthrian - Death enters and there is no defense." There are diseases that cannot be healed by medicine. There are sufferings that the surgeon's knife cannot relieve and the victim wastes day by day, gradually and certainly nearing the hour when even loving hearts must yield to say, "he is dead."
For weeks past we have occasionally noticed the severe illness of our friend, J. E. Lisle, of East Cass. It was understood that he suffered from cancer of the stomach, an incurable ailment. Monday evening, February 16, those who had so lovingly watched by him through the month of wasting energy and faltering strength, yielded to the certainty, "he is dead."
John Evans Lisle was the son of Joseph and Mary Lisle, who survive him. He was born in Monroe county, Ohio, August 19, 1840. He came to Guthrie county with his parents in the spring of 1861, the family locating in the Middle Coon Valley in Highland township. In March 1864 he enlisted as a recruit in the 4th Iowa Infantry and served on Sherman's line of operations in the Atlanta campaign. He was wounded at Kennesaw Mountain but recovered in time to share in that wonderful military excursion "Sherman's March to the Sea." Dec. 7, 1865, he was united in marriage with Rebecca J. Corner. Eight children were born to them, five sons and three daughters, all of whom survive the father. He gave early attention to religious convictions and in 1854, in his boyhood life before coming west, he united with the M. E. church. Through all after life he was faithful to religious duty and obligation and in work in the Sabbath School in the church and in quiet Christian counsel and reproof in the community in which he moved, his life and conduct modest and free from ostentation, was most useful. His well-ordered home was a paradise and in the circle of his reading quiet family he had a heaven which to pass to heaven. A respected citizen who grew to manhood in near neighborhood with John Lisle has told us that when other neighbors viewing his probable inability to earn a living by rugged labor would talk of his having to go to the poor house in his manhood, Mr. Lisle would quietly but kindly, when no other ear was open to their words, advise and encourage him to seek educational advantages, to restrain himself from evil associations, would point out avenues of business occupation in which he could succeed in life. The truly Christian nature of John Lisle ever impelled him to give a kind word of counsel and to encourage hope in the needy and suffering around him. Such men are not soon forgotten—the good they do lives after the entombment of their dust. Mr. Lisle's health began to fail early last fall. On the morning of his death he knelt with his family, as he had so often knelt, in household worship and led in the devotions. Before the sunlight of the day had passed, he calmly fell asleep. His remains were laid in Linden cemetery, a large concourse of those who had known him many years attending and sorrowing because a good man had fallen. Rev. Mercer, of the M. E. church, conducted the funeral service. In the presence of such a death how forceful the words of the Psalmist: "Mark the perfect man and behold the upright, for the end of that man is peace."

[LYONS, WILLIAM, - 1891]
Clarinda Herald (Clarinda, Iowa), Wednesday, July 15, 1891, p. 5
COIN – On Saturday the news reached here of the death of Wm. Lyons which occurred the day before. He was well known in this community, here having been his early home, but for some years past he had been living near St. Francis, Kan., and was doing an extensive business. His remains were brought to the home of his parents and interred in the Catholic cemetery at that place. E. F. Stitt, A. E. Anderson, C. W. McMichael, E. S. Brock, J. C. Turner and Geo. Wilson from Coin acted as pall bearers.

[MARTIN, HENRY, MRS., - 1891]
Clarinda Herald (Clarinda, Iowa), Wednesday, June 10, 1891, p. 5
COLLEGE SPRINGS – Our community was shocked to learn of the death of Mrs. Henry Martin last Tuesday. She was buried in the C. S. cemetery on the next day. Mrs. Martin was a lady loved and respected where ever known. Her husband and children have the sympathy of the entire community. Her death was caused by pneumonia. The funeral services were held at the M. E. church. Rev. Buckner recited a most beautiful and feeling service. A large number of friends accompanied the remains to be grave.

[MARTIN, JAMES, 1822 -1891]
Clarinda Herald (Clarinda, Iowa), Wednesday, June 10, 1891, p. 5
Obituary – Jas. Martin, of Essex, died Friday, June 5; his funeral services were conducted from his home, Sabbath, June 7, by Rev. Barrett, of Shenandoah. The casket was a beautiful one, metallic, with oxidized and gold ornaments, a floral wreath, a cross and many beautiful floral designs were brought by friends. The deceased had accumulated a large estate, which goes to his wife and grandnephew, R. A. Sanderson, with the exception of one or two thousand dollars that he had presented to other relatives. He will be greatly missed from the community as he was so largely identified with its interests.

[MCCULLOUGH, IRA LESTER]
Clarinda Herald Journal (Clarinda, Iowa), Thursday, January 11, 1962, p. 7
Ira L McCullough – Ira L [ester] McCullough, son of George and Mary Zaring McCullough, was born in Scott County, Indiana, on Feb 16, 1867. He came from Indiana with his parents by covered wagon draw by a team of oxen in the fall of 1869 and they settled in Page County, Iowa, near the town of Coin, where they lived until 1902.
On Dec 5, 1889, he was united in marriage to Josephine Webster. She preceded him in death on Feb 2, 1945. One son, Lester, passed away at the age of two years and two sons passed away in infancy.
From 1902 until 1905 Mr McCullough was in the hardware business in College Springs, Iowa. Between 1905 and 1910 they lived on a farm in Blunt, S D. From there they came to Missouri and were in King City until 1914 when they moved to Emporia, Kan.
In 1917 they moved to the state of Oklahoma close to the town of Pond Creek where they remained until 1934 when they returned to King City where he resided until about two years ago when he went to the home of his daughter Mrs. Lorena Montgomery in Cameron, where he passed away at the age of 94 years, 10 months and 17 days.
He is also survived by two sons, Leslie of Liberty, Mo. and Lloyd of Villisca, Ia, nine grandchildren and 20 great grandchildren.
He had been a member of the Methodist Church since early manhood and very active in church work as long as his health permitted.
The fond memory of Mr McCullough's friendliness and pleasant disposition will long be cherished by all who knew him.

[MCCULLOUGH, JAMES ROLLAND "ROLLA", 1871 - 1891]
Clarinda Herald (Clarinda, Iowa), Wednesday, May 6, 1891, p. 5
COIN – Rolla McCullough who has been sick for nearly three years, died Sunday morning at four o'clock and was buried Monday at eleven o'clock in the Coin cemetery.

[MCCULLOUGH, JOSEPHINE AUGUSTA WEBSTER]
Clarinda Herald Journal (Clarinda, Iowa), Thursday, February 8, 1945, p. 6
Former Coin Resident Dies
Mrs. Ira McCullough, a former Coin resident, passed away at her home in King City, Mo. The body was brought to Coin for burial. Grave side services were conducted at the Elmwood cemetery Monday afternoon.

MCCULLOUGH, JOSEPHINE AUGUSTA WEBSTER]
Tri-County News (King City, Missouri), Friday, February 9, 1945, [p. 1]
Mrs. Ira McCullough, 76, Dead After Long Illness
Her Funeral Here Monday, Burial at Coin, Iowa
The funeral of Mrs. Ira McCullough, 76, who died last Friday at her home north of town, was held Monday afternoon at the Methodist church, conducted by the Rev. A. C. Klamm, pastor of the Presbyterian church, assisted by the Rev. S. J. Hawkins and the body was taken to Coin, Iowa, for burial.
Mrs. McCullough's maiden name was Josephine Augusta Webster. She was born in Iowa, Nov. 21, 1868 and her childhood was spent in Coin, Iowa, where she became a member of the Methodist church in early life. She and Ira McCullough were married Dec. 5, 1889. They were the parents of six children of whom two died in infancy and one at the age of 4. The surviving children are Mrs. Lorena Cobb of the home, Leslie McCullough of near King City and Lloyd McCullough of Villisca, Iowa. There are nine grandchildren.
Besides her husband, the children and grandchildren, Mrs. McCullough is survived by two sisters, Mrs. Mae Barkley of Norman, Ok., and Mrs. Grace Kirk of Kremlin, Ok.; and two brothers, J. [oyce] B.[asil] Webster of South Haven, Kas., and B.[laine]  B. [liss] Webster of Roff, Ok.
Mrs. McCullough had been in failing health ever since the family moved here several years ago but she bore her illness with devout Christian fortitude. The sympathy of their many friends and neighbors goes out to the loved ones in their loss.

[MCCULLOUGH, JOSEPHINE AUGUSTA WEBSTER]
King City Chronicle (King City, Missouri), Friday, February 9, 1945, [p. 1]
Rites for Mrs. McCullough
After a lingering illness, Mrs. Josephine Augusta McCullough, wife of Ira McCullough, passed away at her home just north of the city last Friday, January [February] 2nd.
Funeral services were held at the Methodist church at 11 o'clock Monday morning, conducted by Rev. A. C. Klamm, after which the remains were taken to Coin, Iowa, her old home town, for burial. Before leaving, a lunch, prepared by the ladies of the church, was served to the relatives and friends who accompanied the remains to Coin.
Rev. James Hawkins assisted in the services.
Mrs. McCullough, with her husband, has made many friends since their residence in this community, who extend sympathy to the bereaved family.
Josephine Augusta Webster, the daughter of George W. [ashington] and Josephine Bliss Webster, was born in Iowa, November 21, 1868; died February 2, 1945, at 11:55 a. m.
In early childhood she moved with her parents to Coin, Iowa. Here she grew to womanhood. In early life she united with the Methodist church, keeping her membership wherever she lived.
On December 5, 1889, she was united in marriage to Ira McCullough. To this union six children were born: Lester dying at age of four years, two dying in infancy. Those surviving are her husband; one daughter, Mrs. Lorena Cobb, of the home; Leslie McCullough of King City, and Lloyd McCullough of Villisca, Iowa; also, nine grandchildren; two sisters and two brothers: Mae Barkley, Norman, Okla.; Grace Kirk, Kremlin, Okla.; J.[oyce]  B. [asil] Webster, South Haven, Kans.; B. [laine] B. [liss] Webster, Roff, Okla.
The deceased was a very decided, conscientious, Christian character. We feel sure she left this life of care and sorrow to enter into that Heavenly Home promised by her Saviour.

[MCCULLOUGH, MARY ELIZABETH ZARING] 
Clarinda Herald (Clarinda, Iowa), Friday, July 15, 1904, p. 8
COIN – Mrs. Mary McCullough Dead—Interment at College Springs
Mrs. Mary McCullough died Tuesday night at her home at College Springs after a long illness. The funeral services were held at that place Thursday afternoon at one o'clock. Interment at the Elmwood cemetery at Coin. The deceased lived a beautiful Christian life and was prepared and ready to enter life eternal. And while her relatives and friends mourn the loss of a loved one, they can rejoice that all is well with her. 

[MCCULLOUGH, MARY ELIZABETH ZARING] 
Clarinda Journal (Clarinda, Iowa), Friday, July 22, 1904, p. 4
Mrs. Mary Elizabeth McCullough – College Springs, July 19 (Correspondence of The Journal) – After seven long months of illness Mrs. Mary Elizabeth McCullough departed this life July 13, 1904. She was born in Scott county, Ind., Sept. 25, 1849, her age being 54 years, 9 months and 18 days. She was married in 1866 to George McCullough. Four children were born to them, three of whom, also her husband, preceded her to the better land. In 1869 they came to Iowa and settled down [on] a farm near Coin, known then as Snow Hill. About two years ago she and her son moved to College Springs. Mrs. McCullough united with the Methodist Episcopal church at 15 years of age and was a devout member at the time of her death. She took great interest in the Sabbath school and Missionary society and was kind enough to remember the latter in her will. Every means was used for her recovery but to no avail. Those who visited her during her illness spoke in admiration of her cheerfulness, her submissiveness and her unwavering faith and we believe the future life meant a great deal to her. She leaves one son, Ira W. McCullough, a worthy member of the hardware firm, one grandchild to whom she was greatly attached; also, two sisters and two brothers. Funeral services were held at the Methodist Episcopal church on Thursday afternoon, conducted by her pastor, Rev. A. T. Jeffrey, who was a frequent caller by her bedside. He was assisted by Rev. W. W. Shipman of Corning, her former pastor. The text used was one chosen by the deceased to be used on this occasion. The words of the text were, "Thanks be to God who giveth us the victory through our Lord Jesus Christ." The remains were taken to Coin for burial followed by a large number of friends.


[MCKAY, JAMES, - 1881]
Page County Democrat (Clarinda, Iowa), Thursday, December 29, 1881
Killed: -- On Saturday afternoon some five or six persons, who reside in and around Shambaugh, procured some "bug juice" and started for home, got full and others got fuller, until some fell by the wayside or rather railroad track as they were following it home. James McKay, aged about thirty-three, became somewhat overloaded, laid down by the track and was left behind. The others went on home and after supper conclude to return and hunt up James. They found him, but he was dead, having had his head broken, it is supposed by a car wheel. Monday the coroner went down, and the jury brought in a verdict as follows:
"The said jurors, on oath, do say that James McKay came to his death by a train, going north on the C. B. & Q. railroad, on December 24th, 1881."
The deceased leaves a wife and three small children to mourn his loss.

[MCKIE, WILLIAM D., 1821 – 1891]
Clarinda Herald (Clarinda, Iowa), Wednesday, March 4, 1891, p.8
Killed By a Horse – The Herald made mention last week that Hon. J. R. Good received a telegram stating that his father-in-law had been killed but gave no particulars. Mr. and Mrs. G. and daughter Allie went across the country Wednesday to the home of the deceased and remained until after the funeral, returning home Friday. From Mr. Good we learn the particulars of the sad accident as follows. A neighbor by the name of Fleming came after Mr. McKie about three o'clock Tuesday afternoon to get assistance in doctoring a horse that had its stifle joint dislocated. A small rope was put around the opposite limb of the animal, as is usual in such cases, and each man took an end to draw it tight, which of course was painful and caused more or less struggling. Mr. McKie told Fleming that it was tight enough and reached for the other end of the rope and there the history of the case stops for a time. The next known of it as Mr. F. gives it is that when he recovered consciousness he was lying in the corner of the stable back of the horse and Mr. McKie was toward the front lying motionless. He went to Mr. M. and raised him up, but he only gave a little gasp and was dead. How the horse could have knocked both men down so suddenly and fatally is a mystery but that is all that is known about it. A bruise on the temple and a cut on the hand is all that was visible on the body of the deceased. Wm. D. McKie was born in North Carolina in 1821, came to Savannah, Mo., when about 21-years-old; in 1861 moved to the vicinity of Hopkins where he has made his home ever since. He was a saddler by trade and was employed by the government during the war at Leavenworth, Kansas. His family of five boys and two girls are all grown up and doing for themselves. He was a good neighbor and citizen and his loss is keenly felt by all who knew him.



[MILLER, JAMES T., 1871- 1891]
Clarinda Herald (Clarinda, Iowa), Wednesday, June 24, 1891, p. 9
COLLEGE SPRINGS - It is with sorrow we write the fact of Mr. James Miller's death just when we understood he was mending slowly. Last Sunday morning at 7 a. m. the dread messenger came. James was a young man of unusual ability, honest and industrious. During the last year he has been attending the Burlington Business College and during the past winter he contracted typhoid pneumonia; he was tenderly cared for in one of Burlington's hospitals and as soon as he was moved home, but the change was too late to benefit him; he rallied at first but an abscess forming in one of his [words unreadable] which resulted in his death in his 20th year. The funeral services which were very touching, were presided over by Prof. Moffatt, of the U. P. church. He was buried in the south cemetery and was followed to the graves by many bereaving friends.

[MUCKEY, GEORGE, 1870 - 1891]
Clarinda Herald (Clarinda, Iowa), Wednesday, March 4, 1891, p. 5
DIED. George Muckey on March 1, at the home of his parents, Mr. and Mrs. Jasper Muckey, living near Hepburn. Funeral services conducted by the writer and sermon from the text, "If a man die shall he live again." The deceased was born in Page Co. Iowa on Feb. 15, 1870. Was taken ill Feb. 15 and lived but two weeks. He was aged 21 years and 13 days.
The hearse from Clarinda was in attendance. The remains were laid to rest in the Rose Hill cemetery, Monday, March 2, followed by a large concourse of friends.
One by one, although each name
     Providence or death will sever,
Jesus Christ is still the same
     Yesterday, today, forever.
Rev. Levi P. Huntzinger.

[OSBORN, GLEN]
Clarinda Herald (Clarinda, Iowa), Wednesday, July 29, 1891, p. 8
Died. Glen, little 3-year-old son of Mr. and Mrs. Rev. E. [li] B. [aldwin] Osborn, died yesterday afternoon after a brief illness which began with whooping cough. He was the youngest son and his sudden departure brings a heavy weight of grief to the family. The funeral services will be held at the Baptist church at 2 o'clock this afternoon, conducted by the Rev. Seay of Clarinda. Interment will be made at Clarinda this evening. – Clearfield Enterprise

[OSSMAN, ISAAC, INFANT DAUGHTER OF, - 1891]
Clarinda Herald (Clarinda, Iowa), Wednesday, July 15, 1891, p. 5
SHAMBAUGH – Died – Infant daughter of Rev. and Mrs. Ossman, on Friday morning, July 9. It was buried in the Butler cemetery the next day, Rev. Posten conducting the funeral services. They have the sympathy of the entire community.

[PAUL, GEORGE T., 1847 - 1891]
Clarinda Herald (Clarinda, Iowa), Wednesday, April 1, 1891, p. 5
NORWICH – Died, at his home two miles southwest of Bingham, Geo. T. Paul. We did not learn his age. Mr. Paul had been lingering for a long time with la grippe, when complicated lung trouble set in; he leaves a wife and two children.

[RASEL, PHILIP, MRS., - 1891]
Clarinda Herald (Clarinda, Iowa), Wednesday, February 18, 1891, p. 8
Died – Mrs. Philip Rasel of Valley township, died Monday. She will be buried at the Page Center cemetery Thursday.

[RASEL, PHILIP, MRS., - 1891]
Clarinda Herald (Clarinda, Iowa), Wednesday, February 25, 1891, p. 5
NORTH GROVE – Mrs. Philip Rasel died Monday a week and Wednesday the body was taken to Page Center for interment. She leaves a husband, father, mother, brother and sister to mourn her loss.

[RASEL, PHILIP, MRS., - 1891]
Clarinda Herald (Clarinda, Iowa), Wednesday, February 25, 1891, p. 5
PAGE CENTER – Mrs. Rasel was buried in the Polsley cemetery Thursday, her remains were brought here from the vicinity of Hepburn. After many months of terrible suffering she rests from all sorrow and care. Her relatives have the sympathy of all in this community.

[RAWLINGS, WILDA]
Clarinda Herald (Clarinda, Iowa), Wednesday, May 27, 1891, p. 5
Obituary – Died at the home of her father, Capt. G. W. Rawlings, May 24, 1891, of consumption, Miss Wilda Rawlings, aged 29 years, 5 months and 7 days.
A large concourse of friends gathered at the home so sadly bereaved on the afternoon of the 26th to pay the last tribute of affection to one who had lived and wrought and died in their midst.
The many who were overcome with their grief as they looked upon the familiar face so quiet, even beautiful in death, testified more eloquently than could have been done in words the universal and deep sorrow at the loss of one in the very flower of young womanhood.

"Behold how they loved her."
A choir of trained voices sang the hymns faith and hope, and Rev. T. C. Smith, of the Presbyterian church, conducted short but impressive services.
The body was laid to its final rest in the cemetery adjacent to her home.
There is no death. The stars go down
     to rise upon some fairer shore,
And bright in Heaven's jeweled crown
     They shine forever more.

[RICKEY, WILLIAM, 1813 - 1891]
Clarinda Herald (Clarinda, Iowa), Wednesday, May 27, 1891, p. 5
Gone To Rest – Our venerable friend, Dr. J. [oseph] K. [err] Rickey, received the sad news this morning that his oldest living brother, William Rickey, died from an attack of grippe May 18. He was a little past 79 years old at the time of his death and lived at Topaz, California. He went to the coast in 1850 and was a witness to the wonderful development of that country. He was the father of senator T. B. Rickey, of Carson City, Nevada, who is known as one of the most extensive and successful cattlemen of the west. The Doctor will have the sympathy of his many friends in this time of sorrow.

[RUSSELL, WILLIAM W., DAUGHTER OF, - 1881]
Page County Democrat (Clarinda, Iowa), Thursday, December 1, 1881
DIED. – A three-year-old daughter of W. [illiam] W. Russell and wife, on the 23d ult., of membranous croup. In this sad bereavement they have the sympathy of our whole community.

[SCOTT, JANET, - 1891]
Clarinda Herald (Clarinda, Iowa), Wednesday, March 11, 1891, p. 5
HEPBURN - Died, March 5th, at the residence of her nephew, Mr. George Wood, Miss Janet Scott in the seventy-fifth year of her age. The funeral sermon was preached by Rev. D. Doss at the U. P. church of which she was consistent member. The remains were taken to Kirkwood, Ill., for interment.

[SHAW, MRS., - 1890]
Clarinda Herald (Clarinda, Iowa), Wednesday, February 4, 1891, p. 5
YORKTOWN - Our neighbor, Joseph Shaw, recently received the sad intelligence of the death of his aged mother in Ireland, who passed off the stage of action Nov. 23, 1891 [1890?], at the ripe old age of 98 years. Mr. Shaw now 70 years of age has the sympathy of his friends in the sad news he has received.

[SHERMAN, ELIZA A. FREEMAN]
Clarinda Herald (Clarinda, Iowa), Wednesday, January 21, 1891, p. 5
WALKERVILLE - Mrs. David Sherman died of brain fever Jan. 17. The funeral services were held Sunday at West Point school house and remains interred in Union Grove cemetery. Mrs. Sherman was a kind wife and mother and her many friends sympathize with the bereaved husband and family.

[SIMS, EMMA, - 1891]
Clarinda Herald (Clarinda, Iowa), Wednesday, July 15, 1891, p. 4
DIED. At her home in East Clarinda at 2:30 P. M., Wednesday, July 8, Miss Emma Sims, aged twenty-one years, nine months and twenty-two days.
The funeral occurred on Friday afternoon, conducted by Rev. E. W. McDade.
After a long and painful illness, she is now at rest. She was sick about seven weeks, first with the typhoid fever which developed into consumption. She was an amiable, pretty young woman and will be greatly missed by her associates. July 4th was to have been her wedding day, but Providence has decreed otherwise and he to whom she was betrothed is left appalled at his almost unbearable bereavement.
"The rose is reddest when it is budding new.
As hope is brightest when 'tis born
     Of fear;
The rose is reddest when wet with morning dew,
As love is loveliest when embalmed in tears."

[STEVENS, ISAAC, 1798 - 1881]
Page County Democrat (Clarinda, Iowa), Thursday, December 1, 1881
DIED. – On the 23d day of Nov., Isaac Stevens. He was born in Montpelier, Vermont, Oct. 6, 1798. He was the father of our fellow townsman, Ira B. Stevens. He lived to a good old age, but time levelled him and now his relative mourn his loss and have the sympathy of our people in their bereavement.

[STEVENS, ISAAC, 1798 - 1881]
Page County Democrat (Clarinda, Iowa), Thursday, December 29, 1881
The Hancock, Indiana, Democrat, in speaking of the death of Isaac Stephens, who died in this city a few weeks ago, has this to say about him: "He trusted and aided more poor men and did more than any other man in the county for its development. Hundreds of children had material reasons "rise up and call him blessed." If it be true (who doubts it?) that "He that giveth to the poor lendeth to the Lord," Isaac Stephens had an abundance of obligations laid up in the hands of Him who never dishonored His word or forgot His mercies.

[STOOPS, JOHN, 1812 - 1891]
Clarinda Herald (Clarinda, Iowa), Wednesday, March 25, 1891, p. 4
DIED – Mr. John Stoop was born in Treble Co., Ohio, Sept. 26, 1812; departed this life March 22, at the age of 78 years, 5 months and 27 days; has been a member of the U. P. church for many years. He leaves a widow, 4 grandchildren and 5 great grandchildren. His last words were, "I am willing to go." The funeral services were conducted by the pastor of the Christian church of Clarinda, in the U. P. church, Page Center, March 24.

[STOOPS, LEWIS, -1882]
Page County Democrat (Clarinda, Iowa), Thursday, January 12, 1882
January 4th, Lewis Stoops fell dead in East River township. The coroner was summoned and went over, but after he got there the proof was so strong that Stoops died in a fit that no inquest was held.


[STUMP, CATHERINE SMITH]
Clarinda Herald (Clarinda, Iowa), Wednesday, April 1, 1891, p. 5
NORWICH – Died, April 1, 1891, at 1:30 in the a. m., Mrs. Cathrine Stump, aged 73 years, 1 month and 5 days. Mrs. Stump was the daughter of John and Hannah Smith and was born in Franklin Co., Penn., Feb. 26, 1818. She moved with her parents to StarbeCo., Ohio, in 1825 and on Oct. 9, was joined in marriage to Mr. F. Stump and in the spring of 1855 with her husband and little family they moved to Iowa, finally settling in Louisa Co. where they lived until 1875, arriving in Page Co. Dec. 31 of that year. Seven children blessed their home, five sons and two daughters, of whom three sons and the daughters are yet living and with their aged father mourn the loss of a a dear mother. Grandmama as she was usually called, embraced religion in her youth and has truly lived an exemplary Christian life. In her last hours she was a great sufferer, but never for a moment lost sight of her Jesus, whom she called blessed to the last. The funeral was held in the M. E. Church at 11 a. m. Thursday, April 2, by Rev. Ossman, of the Church of God, assisted by Rev. Bartley.

[THOMAS, JOSEPH M. C., 1838 - 1891]
Clarinda Herald (Clarinda, Iowa), Wednesday, January 14, 1891, [p. 1]
Hawleyville
Departed this life January 8, 1891, Joseph Thomas, aged 54 years. There was a week of intense suffering, then death released him from all the ills of this world. Deceased was a resident of this place and vicinity for a number of years. He leaves six children, the youngest of whom has found a good home at Mr. Goodman's. H was a soldier, served three years in the civil war and was buried with the soldier's funds at Clarinda. Rev. Dodds of Hepburn preached his funeral discourse. He was an Adventist in belief though never belonging to any church.

[THOMPSON, BETSY, MRS., - 1882]
Page County Democrat (Clarinda, Iowa), Thursday, February 2, 1882
Died. Betsy, wife of S. F. Thompson, at their residence in Clarinda, Friday, January 28, 1882, aged 62 years.
Mrs. Thompson was born and raised in Central New York. Twenty-nine years ago, she was married to Mr. Thompson and sixteen years ago removed to Clarinda and has resided here ever since. Death in its mildest and most natural form is sad and heart rending but when it comes as this did, it is more sad. On Thursday night, Mr. Thompson, as usual, came down town and she went to a neighbor's nearby to spend the evening. About ten o'clock she went home and about one hour later Mr. Thompson returned. There being no light in the house he went to the neighbors and learned that she had went home. He went back and examined the premises and discovered the cellar door open. She had opened the door, thinking it the door into the hall, and fell, fracturing her skull. She was carried to her home but remained unconscious until the time of her death. She was a noble, Christian woman. Thus a pleasant and happy home is torn to pieces. She leaves no children. The sympathy of our whole community is with Mr. Thompson in his bereavement. The funeral services were held at the house of the deceased, was conducted by Rev. Malcolm. The remains were taken to the cemetery and there laid away, where it will mingle with the dust from whence it came.

[TRIMBLE, GEORGE G., 1888 – 1891]
Clarinda Herald (Clarinda, Iowa), Wednesday, February 11, 1891, p. 5
College Springs – Newt. Trimble's little boy who has been down with the scarlet fever, but took a bad turn and contracted membranous croup, died last Saturday and was buried Sunday in the south cemetery.

[TRUEDSON, AXEL, -1891]
Clarinda Herald (Clarinda, Iowa), Wednesday, May 13, 1891, p. 4
Another Victim of Drink
Alex Truedson, a Swede in Valley Township, Commits Suicide
Yesterday about noon Coroner Millen and Sheriff Skinner received word that Alex [Axel] Truedson, a Swede, had shot and killed himself at the home of Oscar Anderson [Swanson] in Valley township and left immediately for that place.
S. M. Elrick, H. C. Elrick and J. W. Beavers were summoned as a jury and after the witnesses were examined found that deceased had come to his death from a wound received from a 32-caliber revolver in his own hands.
Truedson had been working for Oscar Swanson and had several times threatened to kill himself, which he did successfully at 10:30 a. m., May 12, about 25 feet from Swanson's door, the ball entering the middle of the forehead and lodging in the brain.
His parents live in Sweden and are reported to be quite wealthy; Truedson is a civil engineer, finely educated and about 35 years old; it seems that he has been a spendthrift all his life and since coming to this part of Iowa would work until he had accumulated a snug little sum of money and would then go on a protracted spree; one instance is told of when he went through $300 in four days and at another time he drank and gambled $60 away in two or three days. Before shooting himself, he wrote a note to Mr. Swanson and some the neighbors, thanking them for their kindness to him and requesting that he be "planted" in town.

[TURNER, ARTHUR LEROY]
Page County Democrat (Clarinda, Iowa), Thursday, January 12, 1882
Died. – Arthur Leroy, son of Mr. and Mrs. Willis Turner, on Saturday, aged eight months. He was buried in the cemetery on Sunday. The parents have the sympathy of our community in their bereavement.

[TUTTLE, PHILO T.]
Clarinda Herald (Clarinda, Iowa), Wednesday, January 7, 1891, p. 7
An Old Settler Gone
Philo T. Tuttle, an old and respected citizen living near College Springs, dropped dead from his chair last Friday afternoon. He had just returned from church and had entered the house when he fell to the floor and the fatal [words unreadable] when he expired the next morning. He was 86 years old when he died. He was born in the state of New York and lived there until after he was 35 years old, when he moved to College Springs in 1846, when there were only two buildings there. He planted out the largest cottonwood trees that now adorn that place. He has always been a carpenter of no small ability. He has put up some of the best mill frames on the Nodaway river, and barns almost without number all over the country. His mind and memory were excellent up to his last moments. The funeral took place at the U. P. Church of which he was a Christian member, last Sabbath. His remains were followed to his last resting place by a large concourse of friends and relatives. He sleeps the last sleep in the beautiful cemetery at College Springs. The saddened countenances of all betoken that a good man has passed away and left a void that only time can heal.  N. W. W. –Braddyville News

[VAN EATON, ALBERT]
Page County Democrat (Clarinda, Iowa), Thursday, March 9, 1882
DIED. – J. W. McKinley informed us that Albert Van Eaton, who used to reside at Amity, but removed to Washington Territory several years ago, died out there recently. He was a Lieutenant in Company F, 23d Iowa, and an old army friend of the writer. The may boys in this county who belonged to the company will regret to learn this sad news.

[VEST, GRACIE, MRS., - 1891]
Clarinda Herald (Clarinda, Iowa), Wednesday, February 25, 1891, p. 8
DIED – Thursday morning, Feb. 19, Mrs. Gracie Vest (colored). Deceased was the mother of Mrs. Moses Carter and was 83 years of age. She was buried Saturday in the Clarinda cemetery.

[WALLACE, ETHAN ALLEN, JR.]
Clarinda Herald (Clarinda, Iowa), Wednesday, July 15, 1891, p. 8
Obituary – E. [than] A. [llen] Wallace, son of E. [than] A. [llen] and P. [hebe] J. [anette] Wallace, was born in Newburg, Cuyahoga Co., Ohio, Dec. 8, 1845. He removed with his parents to Illinois in the year 1861. He enlisted in Co. A, 77th Illinois Regiment Feb. 22, 1864 and served until the close of the war.
December 18, 1865 he was married to Mary L. Biggerstaff. He remained in Illinois until 1881 when he removed with his family to Missouri; He remained in Missouri about seven years, coming to Page county in the year 1888 where he has since resided.
He died at his home in Clarinda July 12, 1891, aged 45 years, 6 months and 25 days.
He was converted January 20, 1891, and shortly afterward united with the United Brethren church of which he remained a faithful member until his death and he is now enjoying the fellowship of the church triumphant.
The funeral was held Tuesday at 11 o'clock conducted by his pastor, Rev. L. P. Huntzinger, assisted by Rev. Custer, Rev. Lane and others.
To the members of the Grand Army of the Republic the thanks of the family are especially tendered and also to all the kind friends who aided so kindly to ease his journey over the stormy water to the peaceful shores that lie beyond.