Obituaries
submitted by: Julia Johnson - julia.johnson63@gmail.com
 
 

[ACKLEY, NANCY, MRS., - 1896]
Clarinda Herald (Clarinda, Iowa), Friday, March 20, 1896
MORSMAN – Grandma Ackley was taken suddenly ill the last of the week and on Sunday night she passed away. She was 87 years old. The funeral services were held at the home of Mr. and Mrs. L. Ackley, with whom she for some time has made her home. Rev. Rankin of Clarinda preached the funeral services and the remains will be taken to Ohio for burial. The family have the sympathy of all their friends in this their hour of sorrow.

[ANDERSON, HULDA, - 1896]
Clarinda Herald (Clarinda, Iowa), Friday, January 31, 1896
NYMAN – The remains of Hulda Anderson were interred in the North Nyman cemetery; Rev. Frideen conducted the services.


[BECKNER, TAMMA]
Clarinda Journal (Clarinda, Iowa), Friday, February 14, 1896
Miss Tama Beckner, daughter of Mr. and Mrs. F. [rancis] M. [arion] Beckner, died last Sunday evening at 8:15 at the home of her parents in this city, a victim of consumption. She had been in ill health for the past few years. Miss Beckner was a most estimable young lady, of true womanly character and her death causes sorrow and mourning among a wide circle of friends, while to her immediate family it is a most severe affliction—the loss of a very dearly loved one. Miss Beckner was born Jan. 19, 1875, in Fremont county, Ia. In early life she lived with her parents in Shenandoah, there uniting with the Methodist Episcopal church. Later she lived in College Springs with her family and attended Amity college for three years. For nearly four years the family have lived in Clarinda. The funeral was held Tuesday afternoon from the house, conducted by Rev. J. F. St. Clair, pastor of the M. E. church, of which the deceased died a worthy and consistent earnest member. The choir was composed of Misses Mertie Baker and Eliza Kelley and Messrs. John Keener and A. F. Galloway. The bearers were Messrs. William Hunter, Elmo Berry, Lutie Vance, John Abbott, Dallam Thompson and Chad Baker.

[BECKNER, TAMMA]
Clarinda Herald (Clarinda, Iowa), Tuesday, February 11, 1896
Home At Last.
For five long years a fatal lung disease had been gnawing at the vitals and sapping the life blood from the material body of Tama, the only daughter of Mr. and Mrs. F. [rancis] M. [arion] Beckner. For two years past the disease made rapid progress. Last Sunday evening at 8:15 o'clock the work of destruction was completed, and the spirit was released from its earthly bondage and took its flight to the better land. Miss Tama Beckner was born Jan. 19, 1875 in Fremont County, Iowa. The family lived in College Springs several years where she was educated and about three years ago they moved to this place. Although the victim of the dread disease, consumption, Tama was always bright and cheerful and was in reality the light of the home. There is not a doubt that her life was prolonged for many months if not for years by the careful and exacting care of her devoted parents and brother. Everything that was possible was done by them to make the stay on earth as pleasant as possible and it was a heart-breaking ordeal for them to see the loved one gradually slipping away from them. Although dead, she yet speaketh through the influence of her sweet life and although with the Father in the home of bliss, she is present to cheer and comfort the loved ones in the hour of grief. The funeral services were held this afternoon at 3 o'clock conducted by Rev. J. F. St. Clair, the pastor of the Methodist church, of which the deceased was a faithful member almost from infancy.

[BECKNER, TAMMA]
Clarinda Herald (Clarinda, Iowa), Tuesday, February 18, 1896
Obituary – Tama Beckner was born in Fremont county, Iowa, January 19, 1875 and died at the home of her parents in Clarinda February 9, 1896, at the age of 21 years and 21 days. She lived with her parents at Shenandoah, Ia., three years and then moved to College Springs where she attended college three years. They moved to Clarinda in 1892. Some two years ago she was taken down and was confined most of the time to her bed.
She bore her suffering and never murmured, but always used that word, "thank you," to everything that was given her. She never forgot to say to her friends when they would go away, "come again," even to the very last.
When her Spirit was taking its leave of the body, her papa said to her, "Tama, trust your Savior." She could not speak, but by a move of her sweet face she made it plain that her peace was made with God and that she realized that she was being wafted to the blessed home prepared for those who serve the Father with fidelity. She joined the Methodist church at Shenandoah under the ministry of Rev. A. P. Hull when she was but seven years old and all through her life she was an earnest and devoted member.
The funeral services were conducted by Rev. J. F. St. Clair who chose for the basis of his remarks a part of the 9th verse of the 15th chapter of Jeremiah, "Her sun is gone down while it is yet day." It was a touching and earnest discourse and stirred new thoughts in the minds of many of the hearers. Music was furnished by a quartette consisting of Misses Mertie Baker and Eliza Kelley and Messrs. Galloway and Keener, and this too was appropriate and touching. The deceased was a member of Mrs. Green's Sunday school class and eight of the class walked to the grave each depositing a bouquet of flowers in the grave. The floral tributes were very beautiful. And so with the tears and flowers and prayers the mortal remains of the loved one were laid to rest.

[BEEZLEY, JOSEPH]
Clarinda Herald (Clarinda, Iowa), Friday, March 13, 1896
Joseph Beezley, who has been a long sufferer, died Wednesday evening at 6 o'clock. His funeral was preached by Rev. T. C. Smith in the Presbyterian church today at 10:30 a. m. and his remains were laid to rest in the Summit cemetery. He had been a member of the Presbyterian church for over two years and has always lived a good and honest life. He has certainly gone to the better home. The relation have the sympathy of the entire community.

[BEEZLEY, JOSEPH]
Page County Democrat (Clarinda, Iowa), Thursday, March 19, 1896
YORKTOWN – Wednesday evening of last week Joseph Beezley died at 5:30 at his home about two miles northeast of Yorktown, after a long and painful sickness. He was 60 years old the 24th of last January; was never married and his sister Sarah kept house for him. He leaves five brothers and this one sister to mourn his death who have the sympathy of all in their sad bereavement. The funeral sermon was preached by Rev. Grossman, in the Presbyterian church, Friday, he being an honorable elder of that church. Joe, as he was familiarly called, was one of our best citizens and being strictly honest himself he utterly abhorred dishonesty and hypocrisy in others.

[BEEZLEY, JOSEPH]
Page County Democrat (Clarinda, Iowa), Thursday, March 19, 1896
Mr. Joseph Beezley, an old resident and highly respected citizen living out near Yorktown for many years, died the 11th inst. and was buried Friday forenoon. A large number of his old soldier comrades from this city attended the funeral.

 

[BEEZLEY, JOSEPH]
Clarinda Journal (Clarinda, Iowa), Friday, March 13, 1896
Joseph Beezley, a straightforward, upright man, altogether a most excellent gentleman, died Wednesday night at 10:30 at his home in Nodaway township, one and one-half miles northeast of Yorktown. He had been ill for some time and was afflicted with a stomach trouble, to which we understand, his death was due. Mr. Beezley moved to Page county about twenty years ago from near Woodhull, Ill. and accumulated a considerable amount of Page county property. He was 60 years of age the 24th of January, last, on which day he made his will. He had never married, and a sister kept house for him. He also leaves five brothers, David, Paul and Henry, in Page county, and Harrison and Marion, who reside elsewhere. The funeral was held at the Presbyterian church in Yorktown, of which Mr. Beezley was an elder. A number of citizens, including his old Grand Army comrades, went from Clarinda to attend it. He will be greatly missed for his good qualities.

[BOARDMAN, GLENN, 1894 – 1896]
Clarinda Journal (Clarinda, Iowa), Friday, March 20, 1896
COIN - The little child of A. [lbert] E. Boardman and wife died Wednesday of last week and was buried Friday. The sorrowing parents have the sympathy of the entire community in their affliction.

[BROWN, DAN'S INFANT, - 1896]
Clarinda Journal (Clarinda, Iowa), Friday, March 20, 1896
BLANCHARD – The infant son of Mr. and Mrs. Dan Brown died Monday with la grippe. He was about 3 months old. Services were held Tuesday at 3 p. m. at the house by Rev. Redburn and the remains were buried in the Blanchard cemetery.

[BURCH, CONSTANT JOSEPH]
Page County Democrat (Clarinda, Iowa), Thursday, November 27, 1919
C. J. Burch Dies Suddenly Tuesday Afternoon Had Been Ailing for Some Time but Was Up and Around All Day
The sudden death of C. J. Burch occurred Tuesday afternoon at his home on Washington street in Clarinda. Mr. Burch had been ill for some time and was subject to sinking spells but between times was able to be around. Tuesday he was around as usual and in the afternoon, Mrs. Burch was invited to the home of her friend Mrs. C. A. Anderson. After visiting Mrs. Anderson for a while, the two ladies called on Mrs. A. P. Salgren and while they were there Mrs. Burch was called home. Mr. Burch had been taken with a spell during her absence to which he succumbed.
C. [onstant] Joseph Burch was 68 years of age at the time of his death. He was born May 15, 1841. For many years he has been a resident of Page county and for the past nine years has made Clarinda his home. He owned quite a bit of residence property in the city and had land in Page county. The funeral will be held from the residence at 1 p. m. Friday and interment will be at Oak Hill Cemetery, Clearmont, Mo.

[BURCH, CONSTANT JOSEPH]
Clarinda Journal (Clarinda, Iowa), Thursday, December 4, 1919
C. J. Burch – The funeral of C. J. Burch, who passed away in this city Tuesday, November 25, of apoplexy, was held Friday, Nov. 29, 1919, at the family home. The services were conducted by Dr. W. C. Williamson. Mrs. George Gillmor sang, accompanied by Miss Carrie Loranz. The casket was borne by his sons and brothers. The remains were taken to Clearmont, Mo. for burial. The following information has been given The Journal:
C. [onstant] J. [oseph] Burch was born in Greene county, Indiana, May 15, 1851 and died Nov. 25, 1919 at the age of 68 years, 6 months and 10 days. He began a Christian life at an early age. At the time of his death he was a member of the First Presbyterian church of this city. He was married to Sarah Jane Linebaugh, Jan. 29, 1871 and who died June 16, 1910. He was married the second time to Mrs. Mary Notin, Dec. 31, 1910. To the first union were born seven children, all of whom survive. They are Mrs. Oscar Andrew of Blanchard; Mrs. William T. Humphrey of Clearmont, Mo.; Mrs. Grover Damon of Durango, Colo.; Martin F. Burch of Pickering, Mo.; Jacob A. Burch of Clearmont, Mo.; Joseph E. Burch of Kemmerer, Wyo., and Elmer A. Burch of Fruita, Colo. The latter three could not be present. The late Mr. Burch was of a family of thirteen children, six of whom survive, Three brothers and three sisters.
Mr. Burch was an unusually well-educated and intelligent man. He had a great knowledge of the Bible and spoke ably concerning it. Among his other activities he was a farmer and later conducted the hotel near the Clarinda State Hospital. He also was the proprietor at one time of the Transient House, east of the square. He lived most of his life in or near this neighborhood. In the forenoon of the day of his death he was up and around about as usual, except was ailing some. In the afternoon at 3 o'clock he died peacefully in his chair.

[BURCH, CONSTANT JOSEPH]
Page County Democrat (Clarinda, Iowa), Thursday, December 4, 1919
C. J. Burch – C. [onstant] J. [oseph] Burch was born in Greene Co., Indiana, May 15, 1851 and died Nov. 25, 1919, at his home in Clarinda, Iowa. His death was due to apoplexy. The deceased spent practically most of his life in and near this neighborhood. January 29, 1871 he was united in marriage to Sarah Jane Linebaugh who died June 16, 1910.
On the 31st day of December 1910 he was married to Mrs. Mary Notin, who still survives.
To the first union was born seven children, three daughters, Mrs. Oscar Andrew of Blanchard, Mrs. W. T. Humphrey, Clearmont, Mo., and Mrs. Grover Damon of Durango, Colo. Four sons, Jacob A., of Clearmont, Mo., Martin of Pickering, Mo., Joseph E., of Kemmerer, Wyo. and Elmer A. of Fruita, Colo., all of whom survive. Besides these he leaves other relatives and friends to mourn their loss.
At an early age he became a Christian and was affiliated with the First Presbyterian church of Clarinda, Ia., at the time of his death. The funeral was held at the home and a large and sympathetic audience was present. The sermon was conducted by Dr. W. C. Williamson and Rev. Francisco. Two beautiful selections were sung by Mrs. George Gillmor.
The casket was borne by the kind hands of his sons and brothers. The body was laid to rest in the Oak Hill Cemetery at Clearmont, Mo.
[Note: The same obituary was published in the Clarinda Herald, December 4, 1919.]

[BURCH, SARAH JANE LINEBAUGH]
Clarinda Herald (Clarinda, Iowa), Thursday, June 23, 1910
Mrs. Joseph Burch – On Thursday, June 16, Mrs. Joseph Burch died at her home near Clearmont, after an illness of many months. She had spent the winter in California in the hope of being benefitted and came back seemingly stronger, but the hope was a delusion and she lived only a few weeks after her return. The funeral was held from the home Friday, June 17, at 2 p. m. and was largely attended by friends of the deceased. The sons and sons-in-law, all of whom were present, acted as pall bearers and Rev. Corbitt, of the Christian church at Braddyville, conducted the services, the M. E. choir furnishing the music. Interment in Clearmont cemetery.
Sarah Jane Linebaugh was born October 3, 1854 near Clarinda, Ia., and died June 16, 1910, at her home near Clearmont, Mo. She was the daughter of Jacob and Mary Linebaugh, who for many years have been residents of the last named place, but formerly of Page county, Iowa.
The deceased spent practically all her life in and near the neighborhood in which she died.
January 29, 1871, she was married to Joseph Burch. To this union were born seven children, three girls, Anna, Alma and Irmel, and four boys, Jake, Martin, Earl and Elmer. Her husband and all of her children survive her. Besides these she leaves both of her aged parents, a brother, two sisters and other relatives to mourn their loss.
At the early age of thirteen she became a Christian and had been affiliated with the M. E. church for the last 37 years. She was always a sincere and conscientious Christian wife and mother, whose devotion to her family could not be excelled. She was kind, generous and sympathetic and her place among her family and neighbors can never be filled.
Surrounded as was her request, by her broken hearted husband and children, her life gradually ebbed away and she passed into the great beyond to enjoy the blessing of that home prepared by the Lord whom she loved and served in life.

[BURCH, SARAH JANE LINEBAUGH]
Clarinda Journal (Clarinda, Iowa), Thursday, June 23, 1910
Mrs. Joseph Burch – Braddyville, June 21— (Special Correspondence of the Journal)—Sarah Jane Linebaugh was born Oct. 3, 1854 near Clarinda, Ia. and died June 16, 1910 at her home near Clearmont, Mo. She was the daughter of Jacob and Mary Linebaugh and for many years had been a resident of the last named place. The deceased spent practically all her life in and near the neighborhood in which she died. Jan. 29, 1871, she was united in marriage to Joseph Burch. To this union were born seven children, three daughters, Anna, Alma and Irmel and four sons, Jacob, Martin, Earl and Elmer. Her husband and all of her children survive her. Beside these she leaves both of her aged parents, a brother, two sisters and other relatives and friends to mourn their loss. At the early age of 13 years she became a Christian and had been affiliated with the Methodist Episcopal church for the last thirty-seven years of her life. She was always a sincere and conscientious Christian wife and mother. Her devotion to her family could not be excelled. She was kind, generous and sympathetic and her place can never be filled. Surrounded, as was her request, by her broken hearted husband and children, this sweet life gradually ebbed away and passed into her peaceful rest in the Great Beyond to enjoy the blessing of that home prepared by her Lord and Savior, whom she loved and served in life. The funeral services were held on the lawn at her beautiful residence.
The music was in charge of the Methodist Episcopal choir of Braddyville and the sermon was delivered by Rev. J. D. Corbitt, Christian minister of the same place. A large and sympathetic audience of neighbors and friends gathered to show their appreciation of her life among them. The kind and gentle hands of her sons bore the casket and lowered it to its last resting place in the Clearmont cemetery to await the morning of the resurrection.

[BURCH, SARAH JANE LINEBAUGH]
Clarinda Herald (Clarinda, Iowa), Thursday, June 23, 1910
BRADDYVILLE – Earl Burch of Green River, Wyo., has been attending the funeral of his mother.

[BURCH, STACY ANN CARMICHAEL]
Clarinda Herald (Clarinda, Iowa), Tuesday, February 7, 1896
BRADDYVILLE – Mrs. Arthur Burch died of cancer at her home east of Clermont, Jan. 30th, and was buried at the Burch cemetery, east of Braddyville. She had been a great sufferer, losing nearly the whole left side of her face. She was the mother of our townsman, James A. Burch. She leaves a husband nearly 70 years old and several grown up children.

[CALHOON, EMANUEL]           [MONTGOMERY, MABEL]
Clarinda Journal (Clarinda, Iowa), Friday, February 14, 1896
The same day, Jan. 29, there occurred the death of two relatives of Mr. and Mrs. J. N. Calhoon of Clarinda. On the date named, their little granddaughter, Mabel Montgomery, age about 5 years, daughter of Mr. and Mrs. W. T. Montgomery, formerly of this city, died of scarlet fever in St. Joseph, Mo. At Fillmore, Mo., Mr. and Mrs. Calhoon's son, Emanuel Calhoon, formerly of Clarinda, also passed away, dying of cancer. He was of middle age and leaves a wife and one child. In their double affliction the bereaved relatives have the heartfelt sympathy of their numerous friends.

[CALHOON, EMANUEL]
Clarinda Herald (Clarinda, Iowa), Friday, January 31, 1896
Manuel, son of Mr. And Mrs. N. J. Calhoon of this city, died yesterday at Filmore, Mo., of cancer. He leaves a wife and one child. The parents and relatives have the sincere sympathy of Clarinda friends.

[CARVER, PRISCILLA DEXTER SAMPSON]
Clarinda Herald (Clarinda, Iowa), Friday, February 28, 1896
BRADDYVILLE - Died, at the home of her youngest daughter, in Gove county, Kan., on Feb. 19th, 1896, Mrs. Priscilla D. [exter] Carver, aged 69 years. She was the widow of A.[mmi] S. [mith] Carver who preceded her to that better land some 23 years ago. They moved from Illinois in 1856 and settled in a wild prairie farm, four miles west of Braddyville, where Mr. Carver died in 1873. Mrs. Carver lived on here until all children were grown to manhood when she sold the farm and made her home with her children, going around among them where she could do the most good. She was a member of the M. E. church in good standing, a kind and sympathetic mother and neighbor. The relatives here are numbered by the scores who will miss Aunt Percilla in hours of sickness as well as in hours of health. A good woman has left a circle of hundreds of friends in this community.

[COLLINS, JANE ELLER]
Des Moines Register (Des Moines, Iowa), Friday, October 23, 1992
COLLINS – Jane, 74, of 7123 Bellaire Ave., Windsor Heights, died Thursday at Iowa Methodist Medical Center.

[COLLINS, JANE ELLER]
Des Moines Register (Des Moines, Iowa), Tuesday, October 27, 1992
COLLINS – Memorial services for Jane E. Collins of 7123 Bellaire Avenue will be 10 AM Tuesday at Central Presbyterian Church. Private interment Clarinda, IA. Westover Funeral Home, 6337 Hickman Rd.

[COLLINS, ROBERT R.]
Des Moines Register (Des Moines, Iowa), Wednesday, April 12, 1989
Robert R. Collins – A memorial service for Robert R. Collins of 7123 Bellaire Ave., Windsor Heights, will be at 2 p. m. Friday at Central Presbyterian Church, of which he was a member. Burial of the cremains will be in the Clarinda Cemetery. Mr. Collins, 72, died of an aneurysm March 31 in Sun City, Ariz.
He was born in Missouri and retired after 39 years with Allied Insurance Co, last serving as vice president of claims. He was a member of the Polk County and Iowa State bar associations, Reserve and Retired officers associations, the Air Force Association and the Men's Garden Club.
Surviving are his wife, Jane; a son, Richard of Des Moines; a daughter, Barbara Lischer of Dallas, Texas; and three grandchildren.
Memorial contributions may be made to the American Heart Association. Arrangements were handled by Menke Funeral Home in Sun City.

[CRABB, WILLIAM S. "WILLIE"]
Page County Democrat (Clarinda, Iowa), Thursday, April 16, 1896
Willie, the two-year-old son of Mr. and Mrs. John Crabbe, of East River township, died of lung fever at the home of his parents last Monday. Funeral services were conducted Tuesday at the home at 2 p. m. by Rev. Cabbage of Shambaugh and the remains were interred in the Davis cemetery.
[Note: The last name is spelled Crabb on his headstone.]

[CRABB, WILLIAM S. "WILLIE"]
Clarinda Herald (Clarinda, Iowa), Tuesday, April 14, 1896
The two-year-old son of Mr. and Mrs. John Crabb, of East River township, died yesterday morning of bronchitis. Funeral occurs today.

[CRAIG, ALEXANDER P.]
Clarinda Herald (Clarinda, Iowa), Friday, February 28, 1896
Called Home.
Last Friday afternoon W. [illiam] B. [rown] Craig received a telegram stating that his father had died very suddenly at his home in Van Buren county, Ia. The deceased visited here last year and met a great many of our people who will remember him as being an intelligent and pleasant gentleman. Alexander P. Craig was born in Ireland, August 1821 and died Feb. 21, 1896. He was in his usual health at dinner time, at 2 o'clock was taken sick and at 3:30 was dead. He was married in 1824 [?] to Hessie L. Brown and she died Sept. 15, 1894. Seven children were born, six of whom were at the funeral services and one having died in 1881. Father Craig was a consistent and faithful member of the U. P. church and for many years Supt. of the Sunday School. A good man has gone home to his eternal reward.
[Note: The birth date on his headstone is August 1825. Iowa Marriages, 1809 – 1992, gives the marriage date as February 1, 1858 in Van Buren County, Iowa.]

[CRAIG, ALEXANDER P.]
Clarinda Journal (Clarinda, Iowa), Friday, March 6, 1896
Alexander P. Craig, father of W. [illiam] B. [rown] Craig of Clarinda, died recently (Feb. 21) in Van Buren county, this state. W. B. Craig returned home Tuesday morning from Van Buren county where he was called by a telegram announcing the death. The late Mr. Craig was a Clarinda visitor last fall and will be remembered by a number of people here. He was ill but about one and one-half hours. His death is attributed to neuralgia of the heart. He was born in August 1825, in County Down, Ireland, came to America in 1847, locating the year after in Van Buren county, where he lived until his death. His wife preceded him to the grave, dying in September 1894. Six children survive—the elder of whom is Mr. Craig of this city. The deceased had long been a member of the United Presbyterian church. He was buried at Pittsburg, Van Buren county.

[CREAL, WILLIAM, 1823 - 1896]
Clarinda Herald (Clarinda, Iowa), Tuesday, February 11, 1896
Obituary – William Creal was born in the state of New York, Sept. 17, 1823 and died Feb. 6, 1896 at the home of his son, W. [illiam] W. [alter] Creal in Northboro.
Two sons and wives and one daughter and husband were in constant attendance during his last sickness who did all that kindness and tender affection could do for him.
The best medical skill and care that could be had, did all that was in their power to alleviate his sufferings.
He was married to Sarah Sax in 1847, who died in 1867, leaving him with five daughters and two sons, all of whom remain to feel the deep sorrow of parting with a kind and affectionate father.
He enlisted in the volunteer service of the late war and served his country faithfully for thirty-seven months. He belonged to the Post in Northboro and was an enthusiastic adherent to all the G. A. R. regulations. He was always ready with every good word and work to keep loyal liberty loving zeal burning warmly in the hearts of his comrades. His Post comrades took charge of the body while in Northboro.
October 1894 he was converted and united with the Baptist church in Northboro.
A great change took place at this time in his life and conduct morally, after which salvation as he found it in Christ was uppermost in his mind and conversation. Not that he loved his country and comrades less, but that he now loved Christ most, which intensified his love for all good things and all good people.
His funeral ceremonies took place in the Baptist church Saturday at 2:30 p. m. A great concourse of people at this service attests the respect and affection in which he was held by his brethren, comrades and neighbors.
His body was taken to Clarinda and laid to rest by the side of his two only brothers in Clarinda's beautiful cemetery. The Oddfellows took charge of the body on its arrival at Clarinda, and on Sunday morning, Feb. 9th, conducted the burial rites.
Thus dying and now living, "he yet speaketh."   S. J. McCormick, Pastor.

[CREAL, WILLIAM, 1823 - 1896]
Clarinda Journal (Clarinda, Iowa), Friday, February 14, 1896
William Creal, for about twenty years a resident of Page county, died the 6th inst. at 10:35 p. m. of heart trouble, from which he had been in a critical condition about ten days. He passed away at the home of his son, William W. [alter] Creal, at Northboro, with whom he had been living for some years. Mr. Creal was about 72 years of age. He was a native of New York state. He married Sarah Saxe in Lee county, Ia., where his home was until after the war. Later the family lived in Harrison county, this state, then in and near Fairbury, Neb. About twenty years ago he moved to Clarinda and from here he went to Northboro about eight years ago. His wife died a few years after the war. Mr. Creal's occupation was principally farming. He had also been an engineer. He served his country long and faithfully as a member of the Fourteenth Iowa. He leaves the following children: Mrs. Elizabeth Daken of Santa Cruz, Cal.; Mrs. Flora Middleton, Eldorado, Kan.; D. [uff] M. Creal, Clarinda; Mrs. Mary Hill, Oklahoma; Mrs. Addie Myers and William W. [alter] Creal, Northboro. His funeral was conducted last Saturday by the G. A. R. post of Northboro, the sermon being preached by Rev. S. J. McCormick, pastor of the Baptist church of which order and church Mr. Creal was a member. The remains were brought to Clarinda Saturday night, to the home of D. [uff] M. Creal, from which place they were buried in the city cemetery, Sunday morning, with the honors of the Odd Fellows fraternity of this city, he being an Odd Fellow. Rev. T. C. Smith officiated. The deceased was a good man and will be much missed.

[CREAL, WILLIAM WALTER, 1866 - 1940]
Clarinda Herald Journal (Clarinda, Iowa), Monday, September 16, 1940
William Creal – William Walter Creal, son of William and Sarah Saxe Creal, was born in Harrison county, Iowa, on Oct. 12, 1866 and entered his Heavenly Father's Home Aug 28, 1940, from his home in Northboro, Ia, aged 73 years, 10 months and 16 days.
He was the youngest of a family of seven children. His mother died when he was three years old and an older sister cared for the home and family. A few years after the death of the mother, the family moved to White Rock, Nebr and later to Clarinda, Ia, where he attended school. In 1885 he and his father came to Northboro and made their home with his sister, Mrs William Meyers.
Nov 23, 1887, he was married to Eda Viola Hunter who survives him.
His was a strong, resolute character, putting his own interpretation on life's problems and working out his own solutions. He was always deeply interested and very active in community affairs, always ready to do his share. He very greatly enjoyed all clean and wholesome sports and was himself a good sport. He was a fine Bible student and enjoyed religion so sincere and practical that he moulded it into his life and built int into his character.
To him God and Christ were real, and his faith was strong. Prayer was a power to use; God, a heavenly father, a true friend, with all power and ever present to defend and to help; and a lost soul or a wasted life a heavy tragedy. He was a man of deep feelings of great love and loyalty, with a friendship that could be relied upon. He understood and enjoyed young people and prized their friendship.
He lived a busy, useful life, conducted a general store for 23 years and was postmaster 17 years and filled many offices both public and church. The work of the later years of his life was among children and young people and he loved them all.
Of his father's family there is but one member left, a sister, Mrs Hills of Pauls Valley, Okla. Besides his wife and sister, he leaves a number of nieces and nephews.
Another mortal body gone, another spirit hovers nigh, to keep our feet from danger's paths and keeps our thoughts pure and high.
Funeral services were held Friday morning, August 29, at 10:30 at the Methodist church in Northboro, conducted by the pastor, Rev Ida I Roberts. The music was furnished by the high school boys' quartet, Keith Swartz, Robert Hopkins, Lionel Foley and John Henry Armstrong, with Mrs F M McDaniel as pianist. They sang "The Lord Is My Shepherd," "No Night There," and "Home of the Soul." The casket bearers were Alva Chambers, Ben Darby, Lee Whitehill, J D Shough, D E McQueen, R E Pratt, J D Henderson and B E Meyers. The floral offerings were cared for by Mrs B E Standiford, Mrs G L Kryselmier, Mrs R B Murphy and Mrs Ben Darby. Interment was made in the Union Grove cemetery.

[DAILEY, JOHN EDWARD]
Clarinda Herald Journal (Clarinda, Iowa), Thursday, January 9, 1930
John Edward Dailey – John Edward, son of Albert and Ella Dailey, was born at Lenox, Ia., Jan. 15, 1877. Departed this life at Clarinda, Ia., Jan. 5, 1930, aged 52 years, 11 months, 21 days.
Oct. 19, 1901 he was united in marriage to Miss Clara Sleeth. To this union 8 children were born; two of whom preceeded him in death, Baisel [Basil] and Beatrice. Those remaining, Beulah Ridenour, Bennie, Earnest, Guy, Bonnie and Irene were all present when their father passed away.
He leaves to mourn his death, his wife, 6 children, two brothers and one sister, one uncle, Bird Bailey of Shenandoah, besides many other relatives and a host of friends.
Funeral services were conducted at the Walker Funeral Home by Rev. G. F. Tackett of Gravity, Mrs. Bailey's cousin. He was assisted by Rev. Shenton, pastor of the M. E. church in Clarinda.
Interment in Memory cemetery.

[DAVIDSON, ELIZABETH SNODDERLY LITZENBERG]
Clarinda Journal (Clarinda, Iowa), Friday, January 31, 1896
YORKTOWN – The remains of Mrs. George Davison, a former resident of Lincoln township, came in over the Humeston and Shenandoah railroad last Wednesday from Rushville, Neb. Interment was made the same evening at the Polsey [Polsley] cemetery.

[DAVIDSON, ELIZABETH SNODDERLY LITZENBERG]
Clarinda Herald (Clarinda, Iowa), Tuesday, February 4, 1896
The remains of Mrs. Geo. Davison, who died near Rushville, Neb., some eight months ago, were brought to Yorktown last Tuesday and interred in the Polsley cemetery. Her son, Alex. Litsenberg, had charge of the remains from town to the cemetery.

[DAVIDSON, ELIZABETH SNODDERLY LITZENBERG]
Clarinda Herald (Clarinda, Iowa), Tuesday, February 4, 1896
YORKTOWN – The body of Mrs. Davidson was shipped here from Rushville, Nebr. for burial in the Polsley cemetery. She died out there last summer and her son, Alic Litzenberg had the body moved here on account of other relatives being buried here.

[DAWES, ANNIAS WELLS]
Beloit Gazette (Beloit, Kansas), Thursday, February 27, 1896
A. W. Dawes was born in Wayne county, New York, Oct. 27, 1827 and died Feb. 19, 1896 at the home of his daughter, Mrs. E. [mma] J. [ane] Giles.
His children were in constant attendance during his last sickness and did all that kindness and tender affection could do for him. The best medical skill and care that could be had did all that was in their power to alleviate his sufferings.
He was married to Mary M. [elinda] Roberts Aug. 3, 1848, who, with two sons and two daughters, remain to feel the deep sorrow of parting with a kind and affectionate husband and father.
He enlisted in the volunteer service of the late war and served his country faithfully one year, four months and ten days. He belonged to the Upton post in New Market, Iowa. He moved to Kansas about six months ago on account of failing health. He received a transfer from the Upton post to any other post in the United States, but never lived to hand it in. He was an enthusiastic adherent to all the G. A. R. regulations and was always ready with every good word and work to keep loyal liberty loving zeal burning in the hearts of his comrades.
He was converted and joined the M. E. church in 1866 and remained a faithful member until his death.
The funeral services were conducted by Rev. McPhee and by request he took for the basis of his remarks a part of the 13th verse of the 14th chapter of Revelations. The music was furnished by friends, from Shiloh and Green Mound, which was very appropriate and touching. With tears and prayers, the mortal remains of the loved one were laid to rest in Green Mound cemetery.
[Note: The same obituary was published in The Western Call, Beloit, Kansas, February 28, 1896.]

[DAWES, ANNIAS WELLS]
Clarinda Herald (Clarinda, Iowa), Friday, March 6, 1896
A. [nnias] W. [ells] Dawes, a former resident of New Market and a member of the G. A. R. Post at that place, died at Beloit, Kas., Feb. 19. The deceased was well and favorably known in this vicinity and the family have the heartfelt sympathy of all.

[DRAKE, WILLIAM'S INFANT, 1896 – 1896]
Clarinda Journal (Clarinda, Iowa), Friday, March 6, 1896
The baby of Mr. and Mrs. William Drake, born Feb. 21, died the 4th inst. the little one weighed but three pounds at birth. She was feeble throughout her short life.

[DRAKE, WILLIAM'S INFANT, 1896 – 1896]
Clarinda Herald (Clarinda, Iowa), Friday, March 6, 1896
The 12-day old son of Mr. and Mrs. Wm. Drake died Wednesday of heart trouble. Interment took place at Clarinda cemetery.

[FLETCHER, LESTER]
Clarinda Journal (Clarinda, Iowa), Friday, March 27, 1896
A little negro boy, Lester Fletcher, age 10 years, fell and broke his neck Tuesday afternoon while playing with his playmates at school. He was attending the Firebrand training school in east Shenandoah and would probably have been a missionary had he lived. Funeral exercises were held at 10 a. m. Thursday, the 26th inst.

[FLETCHER, LESTER]
Clarinda Herald (Clarinda, Iowa), Tuesday, March 31, 1896
During the short recess at the Firebrand school at eleven o'clock today, Lester Fletcher slipped and fell to the ground. As he did not arise his playmates and teachers went to his assistance. He made a few grasps and died instantly. The boy was a Mulatto, ten years old, who was sent here by his aunt, Mrs. Alice Knox, of New Market, two years ago. Since that time, he has been kept in the school here and at odds times has worked at the home of Dr. Hanley, father of C. S. Hanley, editor of the Firebrand. It was the purpose to educate the little negro for missionary work. He was an orphan. The remains will be buried from the Firebrand school house at 10 o'clock Thursday. –Tuesday's World.

[HAMILTON, ARCHIE, - 1896]
Clarinda Herald (Clarinda, Iowa), Tuesday, February 25, 1896
A ten-year-old boy by the name of Hamilton was run over by an engine Sunday at Villisca. Both limbs were cut off and he died yesterday morning. The family were once residents of Clarinda.

[HAMILTON, ARCHIE, - 1896]
Villisca Review (Villisca, Iowa), Thursday, February 27, 1896
Fatal Accident.
Archie Hamilton, a son of Fireman James Hamilton, was caught under the wheels of a freight train Sunday afternoon and both feet were so badly crushed that death ensued a few hours later from the effects of the shock to the system. In company with other boys, he was attempting to climb the brakesman's ladders on some freight cars which were in motion in the west part of the yard. In trying to reach the bottom step with his feet, he slipped and fell under the forward truck, both wheels of which passed over, lacerating one foot and crushing the other ankle and foot. He died Monday morning about 8 o'clock. Archie is next to the oldest son and about 10 years old. The funeral services were held Tuesday afternoon at the Presbyterian church, conducted by Rev. Hunter.

[HAMMER, LYDIA MILLS]
Clarinda Herald (Clarinda, Iowa), Friday, February 28, 1896
COLLEGE SPRINGS – Monday morning the telephone announced to Mrs. J. [ob] S. [cott] Beals the sad news of the death of an older sister, Mrs. Hammar, who resides in Des Moines. Mrs. B. started at once to Des Moines to attend the funeral.
[Note: The last name is spelled Hammer on her headstone.]

[HUMPHREY, CLARENCE, 1895 – 1896]
Clarinda Herald (Clarinda, Iowa), Friday, March 27, 1896
SHAMBAUGH – Tuesday evening Mr. Tinlinger, of Farragut, came over with the remains of Mr. and Mrs. Pearl Humphrey's eight months old child, who died Monday evening with congestion of the lungs. Mrs. Humphrey is lying very low with typhoid fever, so low that she is not aware her babe has gone to heaven. The remains were interred in the Butler cemetery.

[HUMPHREYS, JAMES H., - 1896]
Page County Democrat (Clarinda, Iowa), Thursday, January 30, 1896
Thos. Humphrey, living south of the city, received a telegram from New Mexico Tuesday bearing the sad intelligence of the death of his son Charley, who went out there last fall for his health. He was at a small place with no undertaker to embalm the body and was buried yesterday. Consumption was the cause of his death.

[HUMPHREYS, JAMES H., - 1896]
Clarinda Herald (Clarinda, Iowa), Friday, January 31, 1896
PAGE CENTER – The sad news reached us of the death of James Humfrey in New Mexico, formerly of Harlan Twp. The bereaved family have the sympathy of this community.
[Note: The last name is spelled Humphreys on family headstones.]

[HUMPHREYS, JAMES H., - 1896]
Clarinda Journal (Clarinda, Iowa), Friday, January 31, 1896
PAGE - T. [homas] Humphreys received the sad news of the death of his son, James H., who has been in Texas the past year, having gone there for his health. The bereaved family have the sympathy of the entire community.

[KEGRICE, MINNIE SHEETS]
Pioneer Record (Ida Grove, Iowa), Thursday,  March 12, 1896
Mrs. J.W. Kegrice Gone To Rest
The life of uncertainty was again brought to mind when the news of the sudden death of Mrs. J.[ohn] W. Kegrice was spread rapidly over the city last Sunday morning. Only the evening before she had been to a social gathering at the home of S. K. Pettit, she was full of life and jolly as can be.  She returned home about 11 o'clock and retired.  At 12 o'clock she began to coughing, when hemorrhaging of the lungs set in Mr. Kegrice went for help and the Doctor arrived shortly, but at three o'clock the doctor noticed a change for the worse and advised that death would soon follow, which it did at 3: 45. Minnie Sheetz was born in Pennsylvania in 1872.  Her parents died while she was quite young, after which she made her home with her uncle, who was devoted to her. About eight years ago she came to Iowa and in 1893 she moved to Ida Grove.  On November 20,1894 she married J. [ohn] W. Kegrice with whom she lived happily until her death. She was in every way a worthy and estimable woman, attentive to her every duty of her home and always willing to help others. Six sisters and three brothers are left to mourn her loss, none were able to attend the funeral. Funeral services were held Wednesday at the Methodist Church with Rev. Boyer and Rev. Flanigan officiating. The audience was packed to almost capacity. Interment was in the Ida Grove Cemetery.
[Note: The maiden name is sometimes spelled Sheetz.]

[KEGRICE, MINNIE SHEETS]
Clarinda Herald (Clarinda, Iowa), Tuesday, March 17, 1896
The Ida Grove Record, of March 12, gives the obituary of Mrs. Minnie Kegrice, who died at that place March 8, of hemorrhage of the lungs. Deceased's maiden name was Sheets and will be well remembered here as trimmer at Sharp & Cartwright's. the lady has many warm friends here who regret to hear the sad news.

[KEGRICE, MINNIE SHEETS]
Page County Democrat (Clarinda, Iowa), Thursday, March 19, 1896
As many friends of Mrs. J. W. Kegrice, well known here as Miss Minnie Sheets, are inquiring as to the cause of her death The Democrat will state that it was consumption, the immediate cause being a severe coughing spell about 12 o'clock the night of the 7th inst. which produced hemorrhage of the lungs and at 3:45 she breathed her last. The Daughters of Rebekah of her hometown of Ida Grove, Ia., of which she was a member, attended her funeral in a body.

 

[LINDBURG, GEORGE'S INFANT, - 1896]
Clarinda Herald (Clarinda, Iowa), Friday, March 27, 1896
CRAMER CHAPEL – Mr. and Mrs. Geo. Lindburg are called upon to mourn the death of their babe which our Heavenly Father had sent to brighten their home for a few short weeks. They have the heartfelt sympathy of their neighbors in this their bitter loss.

[LUNDSTEDT, ELLEN]               [LUNDSTEDT, ESTHER]  
Clarinda Herald (Clarinda, Iowa), Friday, March 27, 1896
CRAMER CHAPEL – Our neighbors, Mr. and Mrs. J. Lundstedt, have the sympathy of their friends in their sore bereavement. Out of a family of six, their only daughters were called by our kind heavenly father to himself. One was an infant and the other was nine years old. This is indeed a sad blow to them.

[LUNDSTEDT, ELLEN]   [LUNDSTEDT, ESTHER]   [SWANSON, HENRY EDWARD]
Clarinda Journal (Clarinda, Iowa), Friday, March 27, 1896
Three Funerals in Douglas. Henry Swanson and Two Children of Mr. and Mrs. Lundstedt Are Buried.
Our attention was called Friday of last week to Douglas township, where an incident occurred that happens very seldom in a rural district, that three are buried in the same cemetery and at the same time. About 1 o'clock p. m. many friends gathered at the home of Mr. and Mrs. J. [ohn] S. Lundstedt to take part in the sorrowful event—the burial of two of the Lundstedt children: the 8-year-old little Ellen and Esther, the baby of 30 days, the only girls in the family. After appropriate remarks by Reverends Blomstrand and Youngberg, the former from part of the eleventh verse of the sixteenth Psalm, "In thy presence is fullness of joy;" the latter from Isaiah xl, 11, "He shall gather the lambs with his arm," the friends were given an opportunity to take a last look at the two little dear ones, who lay side by side in the little white casket. Indeed, do we sympathize with our friends, the Lundstedt family, and will repeat the remarks made by one of the ministers, "Our joy will be perfect in the presence of the Lord." In a single glance at the church near the cemetery we noticed a large gathering and upon inquiry we were informed that it was the funeral of our friend Henry Swanson—another sad link in our chain of disappointments. Upon entering the church, we found it packed to its full capacity, with Rev. B. M. Holland of Stanton delivering the funeral sermon and now as two funeral processions had joined, we could note friends from besides Douglas, from Stanton, Hepburn, Clarinda, Tarkio, Nodaway and Fremont. After the sermon the choir sang a very nice song and with a last look at the remains, we saw the bright future and hopes for a young couple shattered. We were told that Mr. Swanson had his hope in Christ. May the young widow be sustained in her great affliction by Him who careth for and watches over all. All the mourning relatives have the sympathy of very many friends.

[LUNDSTEDT, ELLEN]               [LUNDSTEDT, ESTHER]
Clarinda Herald (Clarinda, Iowa), Tuesday, March 31, 1896
The seventeenth of this month marks a sad day in the history of Mr. J. T. Lunstead's family. It was then they laid away the mortal remains of their two little girls—the only representations of God's gift to them.
Ellen had been in their home for nine and one-half years past, while Nettie Ruth had been with them but a month—only a passing spirit to bespeak its presence, then leaving a longing in the hearts of parents and brothers.
It is no modern trait to love and when the heart is unbiased by [?] cisms, it is loathe to consign its loved ones to the cold earth though in the end we know a union awaits the individual souls. Forgetting the higher state of happiness which one derives from friendship and which is interrupted by death, it was in a [?] sweet to look into the snow-white casket and see Ellen holding the infant in her loving embrace and a garland of flowers encircling their narrow bed. A spectacle like this—the innocent—helps one to understand the savior's words when he said, "Of such is the kingdom of Heaven."

[LUNDSTEDT, JOHN S.]
Clarinda Journal (Clarinda, Iowa), Friday, October 12, 1906

BETHESDA – J. [ohn] S. Lundstedt died last Thursday Oct. 4 and was buried at Nyman Sunday morning.

 

[LUNDSTEDT, JOHN S.]
Clarinda Journal (Clarinda, Iowa), Friday, October 12, 1906
NYMAN – The remains of J. [ohn] S. Lundstedt of Douglas township was laid to rest at the Nyman church cemetery last Sunday afternoon.

[MARSH, MINNIE]
Page County Democrat (Clarinda, Iowa), Thursday, January 2, 1896
Miss Minnie Marsh died Saturday at the home of her parents, Mr. and Mrs. John Marsh, living southwest of this city, in the 18th years of her age. Nothing is more sad than the "going out" of the life lamp of a bright young lady just blooming into womanhood with all hopes and ambition of a useful and joyous future before her. The funeral took place Monday.

[MARSH, MINNIE]
Clarinda Herald (Clarinda, Iowa), Friday, January 3, 1896
SHAMBAUGH – Died, Sunday, the 29th, Miss Minnie Marsh. She had been in very poor health for over a year. She passes from a world of pain to one of joy. Bright, lovable and kind, she leaves a vacant place with her friends that will be difficult to fill. The sorrowing parents and friends have the sympathy of our people.

[MCLARNON, JANE MAHAFFEY]
Clarinda Herald (Clarinda, Iowa), Tuesday, February 4, 1896
COLLEGE SPRINGS - Mrs. Wm. McLarnon died last Wednesday morning. She had been a great sufferer for a long time. The funeral services were conducted in the U. P. church after which the remains were interred in the Covenanter cemetery. She has for many years lived near here and was ever known as a true and faithful Christian woman.

[MCCULLOUGH, DELLA]
Clarinda Journal (Clarinda, Iowa), Friday, January 31, 1896
COIN -Died, Wednesday morning, about 4 o'clock, Miss Della McCullough, at the home of her brother, Ira McCullough three miles northwest of Coin. Miss McCullough has long been a sufferer from that dreaded disease consumption, and while in the height of youth and beauty succumbed to its fatal power. She was a young lady of rare and exceptional traits and a consistent Christian. Her kindness and gentleness won her friends of everyone with whom she came in contact. Her mother and brother are left to mourn her loss and they have the entire sympathy of the community in their bereavement. The funeral services were conducted at the home Thursday afternoon.

[MCCULLOUGH, DELLA]
Clarinda Herald (Clarinda, Iowa), Tuesday, February 4, 1896
COLLEGE SPRINGS - Last Wednesday the sad news of the death of Miss Della McColough [McCullough] reached her many friends here. She was a former resident of our city and endeared herself to all with whom she became acquainted. She leaves a host of friends to mourn her untimely death. The funeral services were held in Coin, Rev. H. H. Barton, of Missouri Valley, her formerly her pastor here, assisting.

[MCDERMOTT, BLANCHE EILEEN, 1896 – 1896]
HEPBURN - Clarinda Journal (Clarinda, Iowa), Friday, March 20, 1896
Blanche, infant daughter of Mr. and Mrs. Ed McDermott, died at the home of Mr. and Mrs. George Reed Tuesday night. The little one had been with its grandparents only a short time, but it will be missed. The funeral services occurred Wednesday after which the remains were laid to rest by the side of its recently deceased mother in the Rose Hill cemetery.

[MCDERMOTT, BLANCHE EILEEN, 1896 – 1896]
Clarinda Herald (Clarinda, Iowa), Tuesday, March 24, 1896
HEPBURN – Little Blanche McDermot departed this life last Tuesday night and the remains were interred in the Rose Hill cemetery.

[MCDERMOTT, BLANCHE REED, 1861 – 1896]]
Page County Democrat (Clarinda, Iowa), Thursday, March 12, 1896
Thursday, March 5, 1896, Mr. George Reed received a telegram informing him of the sudden death of his daughter, Mrs. Blanche Reed McDermott, at St. Louis, Mo., her mother being present with her daughter at the time of her death. Deceased was aged 34 years, 2 months and 18 days, the greater part of her life having been spent in Page county, some 28 years. She was a popular and efficient teacher in the public schools of our county formerly and was known as a remarkably highly and intelligent young lady. In the year 1893 she was a candidate for county superintendent of schools upon the minority party ticket. The vote she received was indeed a high and deserving compliment to her real merits. Mrs. McDermott was united in marriage on Nov. 25, 1894, to Ed McDermott of St. Louis, Mo., who survives her, to which city they moved shortly after their marriage. The remains were brought to Hepburn on Saturday last, the funeral taking place on Sunday afternoon at 1 o'clock. A large concourse of friends assembled to pay the last tribute of respect to her memory. The services were held at the church at Rose Hill, conducted by Rev. D. Dodds of Hepburn, who took his text, Job, 15:11, "Are the consolations of God small with thee?" After services had been concluded the remains were tenderly laid to rest in Rose Hill cemetery. The sympathy of the entire community is extended to the sorrowing relatives in their hour of sad bereavement. Mrs. McDermott left a babe 8 days old, which will be cared for by her mother, Mrs. Reed.

[MCDERMOTT, BLANCHE REED, 1861 - 1896]
Clarinda Journal (Clarinda, Iowa), Friday, March 13, 1896
SHENANDOAH - Last week we mentioned the death of Mrs. Blanche Reed McDermott, wife of Ed McDermott, which occurred at St. Louis, Mo., the 5th inst. The funeral services conducted by Rev. Dr. Dodds took place at the Rose Hill church, Sabbath afternoon, and were attended by a large number of people. The deceased was the first born of three children of Mr. and Mrs. George Reed and her history dated from Dec. 17, 1861, at which time she was ushered into this vale of mingled joys and sorrows, in Elkhart county, Ind. When about six weeks old she moved with her parents to Michigan, where she resided about six years, when the family settled in Page county, at their present comfortable home in Valley township. She was married to Ed McDermott, Oct. 25, 1894, and immediately took up her residence in St. Louis, Mo. Her sudden death leaves a fond husband and an infant daughter, a father, mother and sister to mourn her loss. But they do not mourn alone, for the departed one was intelligent, agreeable, honest, virtuous and always a lady who made a host of friends wherever she moved in society and those friends will miss her and in their sorrow will sympathize with the bereaved family. Dr. Dodds preached a most excellent funeral sermon based upon the following words found in Job, xv, 11, "Are the consolations of God small with thee?" John Hull was the undertaker on the occasion and the following named persons were the pallbearers: C. N. Crain, John L. Briggs, W. C. Briggs, Will Mills, W. C. Gowdy, and George D. Cagley. The remains were interred in the Rose Hill cemetery. Thus ends the history of one who was for years one of Page county's most intelligent and successful school teachers. We can illy afford to lose this one and certainly need more like her.
[Note: Her headstone gives her birth date as December 7, 1861.]

[MCNERNEY, JAMES]
Clarinda Herald (Clarinda, Iowa), Tuesday, January 7, 1896
COLLEGE SPRINGS – The remains of Jas. McNerny [McNerney], formerly a farmer northwest of town, were interred in the Maple Hill cemetery Friday. He has for some time lived in Omaha and was killed by the cable cars of that city.

[MITCHELL, DORA A. VAWTER]
Clarinda Herald Journal (Clarinda, Iowa), Monday, April 24, 1944
COIN, April 23 -- Mrs Charlie George received word last week of the death of her aunt, Mrs Ed Mitchell of Des Moines. Mrs Mitchell was a former resident of Coin. While residing here, Mr Mitchell operated a hardware store. Funeral services for Mrs Mitchell were held in Des Moines last Wednesday. She was 83 years of age.

[MITCHELL, DORA A. VAWTER]
Clarinda Herald Journal (Clarinda, Iowa), Monday, April 24, 1944
NORTHBORO, April 23 – Mrs Walter Haynie, accompanied by her father, G G Vawters [Vawter], attended the funeral of her aunt, Mrs Ed Mitchell of Des Moines, Wednesday afternoon.

[MITCHELL, EDWARD H., 1857 – 1940]
Clarinda Herald Journal (Clarinda, Iowa), Thursday, July 4, 1940
COIN, July 2 – G G Vawter, Miss Fannie Worley, also Mrs Cora Irvin of Northboro, Mrs Charlie George and Ermal Irvin of Shenandoah attended the funeral of a relative Ed Mitchell at Des Moines. Mr Mitchell formerly lived in Coin and was in business here for a number of years.

[MITCHELL, NANCY HULSIZER]]
Page County Democrat (Clarinda, Iowa), Thursday, March 12, 1896
Mrs. Nancy Mitchell, the aged mother of Ed Mitchell of Coin, died Saturday at Mercy Hospital, Davenport, Ia., where she had been some time for treatment. Her remains were brought home first of the week for interment.

[MONK, SARAH ANN WAINWRIGHT]
Clarinda Journal (Clarinda, Iowa), Friday, March 27, 1896
BLANCHARD – J. W. Vinacke and wife, C. G. Anderson and family and Frank Hooker attended Mrs. Isaac Monk's funeral at Shenandoah Tuesday.

[MONK, SARAH ANN WAINWRIGHT]
Clarinda Herald (Clarinda, Iowa), Tuesday, March 31, 1896
SHENANDOAH – Mrs. C. J. Andrews of Blanchard, Mrs. W. O. Vinacke of Denver and Mrs. Geo. Carey of Chicago, are here, called by the death of their mother, Mrs. Isaac Monk, which occurred last week.

[MONTGOMERY, MABEL]
Clarinda Herald (Clarinda, Iowa), Friday, January 31, 1896
EAST CLARINDA – Mable, daughter of Mr. and Mrs. Will Montgomery of St. Joe, formerly of this city, died of scarlet fever Thursday and will be buried today.

[MONTGOMERY, MABEL]
Clarinda Herald (Clarinda, Iowa), Tuesday, February 11, 1896
Obituary – Died, at St. Joseph, Mo., Jan. 29, 1896, little Mable, the daughter of Mr. and Mrs. W. T. Montgomery. She was a sufferer from that dreadful disease, scarlet fever. She had been visiting her grandparents, Mr. and Mrs. N. J. Calhoon of this city and had only been home nine days when she took the fever and was unconscious until her death.
She was an unusually bright child and was loved by all who knew her. Her innocent look and golden curls attracted almost every one.
Though she was ill but a short time and suffered much, she died with a smile and her little hand lifted up as if to say the Lord had called her.
In a silent church yard yonder
    On a bright mid winter day,
We laid to rest our loved one,
    Our darling little Mable.
She was far too pure and holy
    For a sinful world like this,
So the blessed Savior took her
    To a land of perfect bliss.

[MONTGOMERY, MABEL]
Clarinda Herald (Clarinda, Iowa), Tuesday, February 11, 1896
Died, at St Joseph, Mo., Jan 29, 1896, little Mable, the daughter of Mr and Mrs W. T. Montgomery. She was a sufferer from that dreadful disease, scarlet fever. She had been visiting her grandparents, Mr and Mrs N. J. Calhoon, of this city, and had only been home nine days when she took the fever and was unconscious until her death.

[MONTGOMERY, MABEL]
Clarinda Herald, Clarinda, Iowa, Friday, May 22, 1896
Mabel, the four-year-old child of Mr and Mrs Will Montgomery, who died at St Joseph, Mo., Jan 30, was brought here for final interment last week.



[NELSON, JONAS, 1810 – 1896]
Clarinda Herald (Clarinda, Iowa), Friday, March 27, 1896
CRAMER CHAPEL – Mr. J. [onas] Nelson died at the home of L. P. Daniels last Thursday at the age of eighty-five years. The funeral was held on Sunday and despite the stormy weather, a large crowd of sorrowing and sympathetic friends attended the remains to the Bethesda cemetery where they were interred. Rev. Lindburg conducted the services.

[NELSON, JONAS, 1810 – 1896]
Clarinda Journal (Clarinda, Iowa), Friday, March 27, 1896
CRAMER CHAPEL -   Grandpa Nelson died at the home of J. P. Danielson the 21st inst. He was buried by the side of his wife who died a few months ago at the age of 101. Mr. Nelson was one of the oldest persons in this neighborhood, being 85 years old at the time of his death.
[Note: His headstone gives his death date as March 19, 1896.]

[O'MALLEY, MARIA L. HENDERSON LACKEY]
Clarinda Journal (Clarinda, Iowa), Friday, March 6, 1896
Mrs. M. L. O'Malley died suddenly of heart disease, Sunday morning, at the home of her sister-in-law, Mrs. M. J. Henderson, in this city, age 69 years. Her funeral was held Tuesday afternoon, conducted by Rev. J. F. St. Clair.

[O'MALLEY, MARIA L. HENDERSON LACKEY]
Clarinda Herald (Clarinda, Iowa), Tuesday, March 3, 1896
Suddenly Called Home
Last Sunday morning while sitting at the breakfast table, Mrs. M. L. O'Malley, sister-in-law of Mrs. M. J. Henderson, with whom she made her home, was suddenly stricken with heart disease and life was extinct in a very few moments. She was in feeble health but able to be up and around and no thought of her end being so near was entertained.
Maria L. Henderson was born Feb. 18, 1827, near Nashville, Tenn. and removed three years later to Illinois. She united with the M. E. church when 12 years of age and lived a consistent Christian life until her death. In 1857 she was married to Thomas Lackey who died about ten years later. She then went to Texas to live with a sister and afterwards married Arthur O'Malley, an old soldier who died six years ago, when she came to Clarinda, making her home with Mrs. M. J. Henderson. Aunt Maria as she was familiarly known, was of most gentle and patient spirit.
The funeral services were held this afternoon conducted by her pastor, Rev. J. F. St. Clair.

[PENDERGRAFT, AVERY CLYDE]
Clarinda Herald (Clarinda, Iowa), Tuesday, March 31, 1896
The Fatal Gun
Last Friday Mr. and Mrs. Pendergraft, of Hepburn, were called upon to suffer one of the saddest afflictions that can come to us in this life. In the morning their youngest son, Avery Clyde, went hunting and about ten o'clock returned. He had a breech loader and as was his custom, proceeded to remove the shells just as he had entered the house. For some reason, unaccountable, as he broke the gun the load was discharged, the shot going into the floor but the shell flying back struck him just above the eye and penetrated the skull. It of course made a terrible hole in the skull and the brain ran out in large quantities. The shell lodged in the back part of the head. Of course there could be no hope of recovery from such a wound and the remarkable thing is that he lived until about seven o'clock in the evening. The young man was 19 years, 7 months and 6 days old, and was known throughout the community as a young man of most excellent character. His sudden and terrible death has cast a gloom over the entire neighborhood. The afflicted parents have the profound sympathy of a very wide circle of friends. The funeral services were held at the Rose Hill church Sunday afternoon, conducted by Rev. R. C. Sargent, of Clarinda. The services were very impressive, and the deep feeling of the audience was very manifest. The following was contributed by friends.
By the death of Avery his parents have lost an obedient, faithful, loving son; his brothers and sisters a brother whose life was an example of honesty, truthfulness and cheerfulness; always lending a willing hand and cheering smile in time of trouble.
Being the youngest of the family, he had never left home and was the stay and comfort of his aged parents. He was always ready to sacrifice his own enjoyments for the happiness of others. He was a diligent scholar, a kind and loving school mate, and was loved by all. Enemies he had none. Never speaking harm of any one and having a smile for all, made for him a host of friends. His friendship was cherished.

[PENDERGRAFT, AVERY CLYDE]
Page County Democrat (Clarinda, Iowa), Thursday, April 2, 1896
The sad news was brought to this city Saturday morning that Avery C. [lyde] Pendergraft up near Hepburn had died the evening before from the accidental discharge of his breech-loading shotgun. In the morning he went out hunting and on returning to his home he attempted to unload the gun and as he broke the breech the gun was discharged, the load going into the ground and the brass shell striking him in the center of the forehead and penetrating the skull. It is said that he had been in the habit of reloading his shells a long time and using the phosphorous end of a match to prime the cap each time and it is supposed this came in contact with the sharp edge of the barrel and caused the discharge. He was the son of Mr. and Mrs. T. [heodore] T. [itus] Pendergraft, being 19 years, 7 months and 6 days of age and was greatly admired by all who knew him. The funeral took place Sunday afternoon from the Rose Hill church, conducted by Rev. Sargent of this city and his remains laid to rest in the presence of a very large concourse of sympathizing friends.

[PENDERGRAFT, AVERY CLYDE]
Clarinda Journal (Clarinda, Iowa), Friday, April 3, 1896
Soon after 8 am Friday, the 27th inst., our community was shocked at learning of the sudden death of Avery C. Pendergraft whose home was about a mile south of town.  The young man had just returned from hunting ducks and while standing on the porch in removing a charge from his breech loading shoot gun, the cartridge exploded, striking and entering the skull just above the left eye, lodging in the back part of the brain, from whence the shell, a brass one, was removed after he had breathed his last, soon after 7 p. m. the shell made a large hole in the skull from which the entire left brain protruded. His mother, Mrs. Pendergraft, was just inside the door when she heard the report and stepping out on to the porch beheld her son as he lay weltering in blood. Mr. T. T. Pendergraft was only a few yards from the house and ran immediately to see who was hurt and was nearly paralyzed with grief when he beheld the apparently dead body of his son. Avery Clyde was the youngest of four sons of T. T. and Mary Pendergraft. He was born just north of Clarinda Aug. 18, 1876 and was at the time of his death 19 years, 7 months and 6 days of age. It is always sad to hear of the death of a young man just entering upon a sphere of usefulness. And in this instance, it is particularly sad news. Avery, as he was familiarly called, was extremely well and favorably known as a quiet, industrious, pleasant and intelligent young man. . . . He was always pleasant and agreeable. He never meddled with any business except his own. No word of obscenity or profanity escaped his lips. Though he had never made a profession of religion, he gave abundant evidence of being a Christian at heart. His sudden death is a severe blow to his parents, who in their declining years had come to place great reliance upon him for good counsel and assistance in the battles of life. The funeral services occurred Sabbath at the Rose Hill church conducted by Rev. R. C. Sargent of Clarinda, after which the remains were laid to rest in the Rose Hill cemetery. A large congregation of relatives, neighbors and friends were present at the obsequies, to mingle their tears of sympathy with those of grief shed by the bereaved parents.

[POWERS, ANNA PETERSON]
Clarinda Herald Journal (Clarinda, Iowa), Thursday, August 1, 1940
Mrs Anna Powers World Traveler, Taken by Death
Funeral Friday at 4:30; Member of Second High School Class; Relatives Unable to Attend
Clarinda lost a fine citizen early Thursday when death claimed Mrs Anna Peterson Powers, 84, widow of the late Dr Thos E Powers. She undoubtedly was the most widely traveled person in the community, well read and a fine community worker throughout her life.
She had been critically ill for several days. Friends had been anxious about her condition and knew that she could not recover. She died at the home which she loved so well where she has been making her home with the Dr J F Bening family in recent years.
The funeral will be held Friday afternoon at 4:30 o'clock at the Pruitt Funeral home. In absence of Dr A B Thutt, minister of the Presbyterian church, Rev W Frank Lister, Methodist minister, will preach the sermon.
Born in Norway
Mrs Powers was born in Norway and came to these United States when but a girl. She has lived in Clarinda since, being graduated in the second class of Clarinda high school in 1876, along with T E Powers, W W Bisby, E T Farrens and Jos Kirschnor, all of whose names are prominent in community history.
Dr and Mrs Powers' home was always the center of friendly gatherings. Their friends were legion and appreciation between the couple and the friends was extremely mutual. When the Powers made their trips to Europe they returned with the finest of pictures and records of music, always intent on sharing their experience.
In the community the two were always helping the better parts, such as chautauqua literary societies, church groups, etc. She was also a member of the O E S.
Dr Powers Died in 1929
Dr Powers died in February 1929, since which time Mrs Powers continued the home, surrounded by the flowers, the keepsakes and other memories, of two useful lives. Only living relatives of Mrs Powers are a sister, Miss Helen Peterson of Santa Ana, Calif., nephew and niece, C Edwin Dessery and Edna Dessery, the latter dean of the junior college at Taft, Calif. Miss Dessery is now on a trip through the east and has not been reached through efforts to notify her of Mrs Powers' death. The others will not be able to attend the services Friday.
The Eastern Stars will attend the funeral in a body, meeting at the funeral home a few minutes earlier.
[Note: Her Iowa State Death Certificate gives her birth place as Pontiac, Michigan. Her parents were born in Norway according to information given on the death certificate.]

[POWERS, ANNA PETERSON]
Clarinda Herald Journal (Clarinda, Iowa), Thursday, August 8, 1940
Mrs Anna Powers – Anna Peterson Powers, oldest child of Andrew Peterson and Helena Johnson Peterson, was born in Pontiac, Michigan, November 3, 1855 and died at her home in Clarinda, Iowa, August 1, 1940, at the age of eighty-four years, eight months and twenty-eight days. In her early childhood she came with her parents to Page County, Iowa. Her residence has been continuous here since that time.
Her early education was in the rural schools of Page county. She was graduated from the Clarinda High School in 1876, being a member of the second class to be sent out from this high school. Following this she taught in the Washington district rural school one year, next one year in the Oak Grove school east of Clarinda and then accepted a position in the Clarinda schools.
Early in her girlhood she became an active worker in the church life of Clarinda and later united with the Presbyterian church of this city.
May 25, 1882, Anna Peterson was united in marriage to her high school classmate, Dr Thomas Edwin Powers, who preceded her in death February 14, 1929. Since then Mrs Powers has continued to live in the home to which she came as a bride. She and Dr Powers were true pioneers of this community. They pioneered not only in the sense of being among the early residents of this county, but in the larger and greater sense of being always among the first to actively promote each and every project for community betterment. They gave generously, both in substance and in personal effort to church and fraternal groups, to charitable organizations and to community enterprises such as the Page County Agricultural Fair and the Clarinda Chautauqua.
The Powers home was the nucleus of many study groups, such as music clubs, travel clubs, reading societies, art study circles and nature study groups. Both Doctor and Mrs Powers were ardent nature lovers. They made their home grounds a bird sanctuary and lovely as a garden with native wild flowers and shrubs transplanted from Page county hills and valleys.
In the passing of these two beautiful characters the community has lost two of its most constructive builders. But both of them will continue to live in the memories of their legion of friends and in the history of Southwestern Iowa.
Mrs. Powers a member of the First Presbyterian church of Clarinda; the Clarinda Garden Club; the Monday Study Club; the Sorosis Bible Class; and Clarinda Chapter 214 Order of the Eastern Star.
Mrs. Powers leaves many friends but very few close relatives. Her sister, Helen Peterson of Santa Ana, California, is the only one now living of the family of one brother and four sisters. Two nephews, C Edwin Dessery and Verne Williamson and one niece, Edna Dessery, all of Santa Ana, California, survive her.
Pallbearers were Ralph Keeran, William Bening, Virgil Anderson, Clinton Turner, Ernest Borthwick, Herman Dammann.
Honorary pallbearers were R J Matthews, M D, J F Bening, M D, R D Smith, M D, A B Clark, Gerald Graff and J W Hoskins.
Funeral services were conducted in the Pruitt funeral home at 4:30 Friday afternoon, August 2, 1940, by the Reverend W Frank Lister, pastor of the First Methodist Church. Interment was made in the Clarinda cemetery by the side of her late husband.
Helen Hall Hoskinson officiated at the piano and Mrs Harriet Davidson sang, "Jesus Saviour Pilot Me."

[POWERS, ELIZA BUCHANAN SILVER]
Page County Democrat (Clarinda, Iowa), Thursday, March 19, 1896
Mrs. Eliza B. Powers died Tuesday, March 17, 1896, at the home of her son, Dr. T.[homas] E. [dwin] Powers, in west Clarinda, aged 79 years, 4 months and 15 days, after a long and lingering illness of several years.
Eliza Buchanan Silver was born in Springboro, Ohio, Nov. 2, 1816. Her early childhood days were spent in Morgansville, Ky., where her parents both died, leaving her to an uncle, David Silver, when quite a young child. She grew to womanhood a member of her uncle's family in Springboro, Ohio.
In August 1851 she was married in Pendleton, Ind., to Jacob H. [olland] Powers of Muncie, Ind., where the first four years of their married life were spent.
She was the mother of five children, of whom only one, Dr. T. E. Powers, survives her.
In Oct. 1854 she came with her family to Clarinda when the town contained but three families and only three small log cabins were on the public square. In one of these cabins, which stood on the northeast corner of the square, they made their home for six months.
She joined the Baptist church when fifteen years of age and was a member of that church until she came to Clarinda. There being no Baptist organization here at that time she didn't put her letter in any church and poor health in after years prevented her from doing so. She has been a widow for twelve years, her husband having died Feb. 14, 1884.
The funeral took place at 2 o'clock this afternoon from her late residence, conducted by Rev. R. R. Westcott, in the presence of a large concourse of friends and her remains laid to rest in the city cemetery. May the peaceful and painless ending of her earthly life abide with her throughout eternity.

[POWERS, ELIZA BUCHANAN SILVER]
Clarinda Journal (Clarinda, Iowa), Friday, March 20, 1896
Mrs. Eliza B. Powers died Tuesday, the 17th inst., at 11 p. m., at the home of her son, Dr. T. E. Powers, in this city, at the age of 79 years, 4 months and 15 days. Although she had not been in good health for some time it was only during the two weeks preceding her death that her condition became serious, and death, when it came, was more the result of advanced years than any particular disease. She had lived the days allotted to her and passed away, leaving the relatives and friends who had enjoyed her usefulness and companionship, the example of an estimable life, to mourn her departure and the community to sympathize with a mourning household.
Eliza Buchanan Silver was born in Springboro, O., Nov. 2, 1816. Her early childhood days were spent in Morgansville, Ky., where her parents both died, leaving her to an uncle, David Silver, when quite a young child. She grew to womanhood a member of her uncle's family in Springboro, O. In August 1851 she was married in Pendleton, Ind. to Jacob H. Powers of Muncie, Ind. where the first four years of her married life was spent. She was the mother of five children, of whom only one, Dr. T. E. Powers, survives her. In October 1854 she came with her family to Clarinda, when the town contained but three families and only three small log cabins were on the square. In one of these cabins which stood on the northeast corner of the square, they made their home for the first six months. She joined the Baptist church when 15 years of age and was a member of that church until she came to Clarinda. There being no Baptist organization here at that time she did not put her letter in any church and poor health in after years prevented her from doing so. She had been a widow for twelve years, her husband having died Feb. 14, 1884.
The funeral was held yesterday afternoon from the home of the son, Dr. Powers, the services being conducted by Rev. Robert R. Westcott. The choir was composed of Messrs. John Keener and Charles Fulton, Mrs. J. E. Phillips and Mrs. A. F. Beal. They sang first, "Jesus Lover of My Soul," then "Nearer My God to Thee," and finally, "Rock of Ages." The pallbearers were Messrs. William Butler, Jacob Butler, J. H. Dunlap, Abe Pfander, D. C. Chamberlain and G. L. Shaul.

[POWERS, ELIZA BUCHANAN SILVER]
Clarinda Herald (Clarinda, Iowa), Friday, March 20, 1896
Eliza Buchanan Silver was born in Springboro, O., Nov. 2, 1816.
Her early childhood days were spent in Morgansville, Ky., where her parents both died, leaving her to an uncle, David Silver, when quite a young child. She grew to womanhood a member of her uncle's family in Springboro, O.
In August 1851 she was married in Pendleton, Ind. to Jacob H. Powers of Muncie, Ind. where the first four years of her married life was spent.
She was the mother of five children, of whom only one, Dr. T.[homas] E. [dwin] Powers, survives her.
In October 1854 she came with her family to Clarinda, when the town contained but three families and only three small log cabins were on the square. In one of these cabins which stood on the northeast corner of the square, they made their home for the first six months.
She joined the Baptist church when 15 years of age and was a member of that church until she came to Clarinda.
There being no Baptist organization here at that time she did not put her letter in any church and poor health in after years prevented her from doing so.
She has been a widow for twelve years, her husband having died Feb. 14, 1884.
Mrs. Powers was in feeble health during the past few years so that her death was not unexpected when the messenger came Tuesday night. The funeral services were held at the residence of her son, Dr. T. [homas] E. [dwin] Powers at two o'clock Thursday afternoon and were attended by a large circle of friends. The services were conducted by Rev. R. R. Westcott, who had officiated at the funeral of the husband and a daughter of the deceased.

[POWERS, JACOB HOLLAND]
Page County Democrat (Clarinda, Iowa), Thursday, February 21, 1884
Jacob H. [olland] Powers died at his residence in Clarinda, Iowa, Thursday, Feb. 14th, at 4 o'clock a. m., aged 76 years, 4 months and 21 days.
The deceased was born in Monongahela county, Va., in 1807, where he lived until 1821 when he emigrated to Wayne county, Indiana. In 1854 Mr. Powers came to Iowa and settled in Clarinda, being one of the first settlers.
He engaged in mercantile business here and by that and the investments in the city and country round amassed quite a fortune. He was, during all his residence here, always ready to do everything that would help build up our city.
During the past year he has been quite feeble but was not considered in a dangerous condition until quite lately. He suffered greatly during the last few weeks of his life but bore it all with fortitude. He leaves a wife and four children and numerous friends to mourn his loss.
The funeral took place at the residence on Saturday at 1 o'clock, Rev. Westcott conducting the services, assisted by Rev. Malcolm. After services Pilgrim Commandery of the Knight Templars held a short service, after which the remains were taken to the cemetery and laid to rest.

[POWERS, THOMAS EDWIN]
Clarinda Herald (Clarinda, Iowa), Monday, February 18, 1929
Powers' Death Is Regarded A Loss To Community
His Passing Removed Prominent Citizen Active in Many Affairs
The death of Dr. T. E. Powers Thursday evening marked the passing of one who has been most influential in local, county and state affairs. For more than forty years he had enjoyed a wide medical practice which he truly merited and as a result was honored in many ways by the community and county.
At the funeral service held Sunday from the Presbyterian church, the pastor, Dr. A. B. Thutt, paid tribute to Dr. Powers' life of service in the community, the church being largely filled with friends, besides sixty members of the Nodaway Lodge, No. 140, A. F. & A. M., who came to pay the last respects to their fellow citizen. Pall bearers included Dr. Max E. Witte, Sr., Dr. E. T. Farrens, Dr. R. J. Matthews, Dr. R. D. Smith, Dr. J. F. Bening and Wall Hoskins. At Clarinda Cemetery the Masonic service was used, W. S. Day, a past master of Nodaway Lodge, leading.
Dr. Powers' parents were among the early settlers of Clarinda, his father, Jacob H. [olland] Powers coming here the year the city was platted from Muncie, Ind., in order to look over the country, returning the following year with his family. The father entered mercantile business which grew to considerable volume and became prominent in local affairs in which his son was to follow. Dr. Powers was born here November 29, 1857, and received his elementary education in Clarinda schools, graduating among the earliest classes of the Clarinda high school.
He entered the Missouri Medical College, now the medical college of Washington University, St. Louis, Mo. and graduated on March 4, 1881. After starting practice at St. Louis, he was called to Clarinda by the illness of his father and from that time on has been one of Clarinda's prominent physicians. He was assistant superintendent of Clarinda State Hospital from 1891 to 1893, his connection making with the present superintendent, Dr. Max E. Witte, a friendship which has continued over many years.
Four Years in Legislature
Dr. Powers was married to Miss Anna Peterson, then a teacher in the Clarinda schools on May 25, 1882, who survives him.
Being made a Mason in 1897, he rose rapidly in the estimation of the lodge members, serving four years as Master of Nodaway Lodge and for a number of years has held the position of district lecturer.
He was again honored by his home county during the years of 1923 to 1925 when he served as representative in the state legislature, also attending the extra session of the legislature which revised the state code when he was instrumental in improving health laws of the state. For the past two years he has been a member of the State Board of Health.
Through all these activities he never lost sight of his chosen profession, continuing his medical practice and managing his private hospital on W. Clark Street which he gave up only recently. His ability as a physician was recognized by the fraternity upon his elevation to the presidency of the Iowa State Medical Society.
A great lover of music in which he was joined by Mrs. Powers, he accumulated perhaps the best musical library in the city and together he and Mrs. Powers have heard personally many of the great singers. Their home for years has been one of Clarinda's beauty spots, coming their love of music with that of flowers.
Dr. Powers had the respect of his own community, which is the greatest tribute which can be paid to anyone.
The following obituary was read at the Sunday afternoon service by Dr. Thutt:
Dr. T. E. Powers – Thomas Edwin Powers was born on Nov. 29, 1857 at Clarinda, Iowa, in the house now occupied by Mr. and Mrs. Walter Anderson. He died at 8:30 o'clock on Thursday evening, February 14, 1920 [1929]. He was the son of Jacob H. and Eliza B. Powers. When he was seven years old, they moved into the present home where he has lived ever since.
Dr. Powers was educated in the Clarinda schools, a member of the second class to graduate from the city high school. The girl who after was to become his wife and three other boys constituted the class. Later he entered the medical department of the State University of Iowa for one year. Then he entered the Missouri Medical College at St. Louis from which institution he graduated on March 4th, 1881. He located at once at St. Louis for practice but on account of the illness of his father, he returned to Clarinda and entered upon active practice of medicine in the town where he was born and with the exception of two years, he has been in constantly active practice. Thoroughly equipped by collegiate training, natural ability and continuous study, he was eminently successful in his chosen profession of physician and surgeon, building up for himself a large practice. For many years he conducted a private hospital.
Twice during these years of practice, Dr. Powers went to Germany to study surgery and to receive instruction from the eminent surgeons of the old world. He also attended their clinics and in this way added much to his knowledge concerning the methods that they used.
His ability has been recognized by his brethren in the profession. For two years he was assistant superintendent of the State Hospital of Clarinda, fourteen years he was one commissioner on the board of insanity. During the year 1926-27 he was president of the state medical society and last year he was appointed to the state board of health by Gov. Hammill.
Dr. Powers represented his county in the state legislature for two terms, elected first in 1922 and re-elected in 1924. During his term of office he attended three sessions of the legislature. The two regular sessions and the called session in 1924 for the revision of the Code.
Dr. Powers was also interested in all the movements for the building up of the community in every way, will[ing] always to take his share of the burden.
Dr. Powers was a member of the Presbyterian church, a Royal Arch Mason, being master of the Clarinda Lodge from 1900-1905, and was a district lecturer in connection with the Grand Lodge, S. A. R. and Fellow of the American College of Surgeons.
In the 25th of May 1882, Dr. Powers was united in marriage with Miss Anna Peterson. Together they lived their life of service for others. And in his passing she is left to mourn his going, but she does not mourn alone, for their many friends mourn with her.

[POWERS, THOMAS EDWIN]
Clarinda Journal (Clarinda, Iowa), Monday, February 18, 1929
Dr. T. E. Powers Departed Citizen and Friend
Many of my friends have passed to the Great Beyond during the years since I have been writing. It is with particular sorrow that I undertake to pay a tribute of respect to the memory of Dr. T. E. Powers, who passed away at his home in Clarinda, Feb. 14, 1929, after weeks of illness from paralysis. From the first intimation of the nature of his illness the reports were such that his condition was regarded as very serious. Of course, there were hopes that he might recover but that he could, appeared to be doubtful, and so when the news came that he was gone, there was the natural sorrow that the report would bring but the news was not a surprise.
Dr. Powers was a physician for many families of Clarinda and vicinity for a long period of years. He was a man of great medical learning and of distinguished attainments as a surgeon. Success in his profession was accomplished in the old home where he was born, Clarinda, and where he was a family physician for practically a lifetime. This city was his home for approximately three score years and ten of his earthly days. Although he did not want the matter published at the time of this city's diamond jubilee, last June, he then privately expressed the belief that he was the oldest surviving person living here whose birth had taken place in the city.
Dr. Powers—whose full name was Thomas Edwin Powers—was the son of Jacob H. [olland] Powers, a pioneer merchant of Clarinda. The parents of Dr. Powers were well known residents of this locality. The son attended the Clarinda public schools and was a graduate of the Clarinda high school under the superintendency of that wonderfully popular educator, Prof. J. A. Woods. Incidentally, it might be observed that in the same high school and graduating class was Miss Anna Peterson. To make a long story short, she eventually became the bride of Thomas Edwin Powers.
After graduating from the Clarinda high school, he attended the Iowa State University at Iowa City, where he had advantage of the facilities of its medical department. Later he attended a medical college in St. Louis, where he started in the practice of his profession. After a short experience as a practitioner in St. Louis he was called home to Clarinda by the illness of his father and having come back here he continued a citizen of Clarinda until the end, which came last Thursday night.
In one of the early years after 1910, Dr. and Mrs. Powers went to Germany where he took post graduate work in his profession. Their visit to that country so pleased them that not very long afterward they made a second trip to it. While abroad they improved their opportunity to visit other countries, among them Norway and parts of Great Britain.
Dr. Powers had extensive experience in both medicine and surgery for a long period of years. He had a large number of patients who were continuously loyal to him. His standing in his profession was noticeably high but he was very modest concerning his successes in the practice of his profession.
In what might be referred to as the earlier part of his practice, he was assistant superintendent of the Clarinda State Hospital for the Insane, under Dr. P. W. Lewellyn, its first superintendent.
Dr. Powers maintained active interest in his profession. He was active in various medical and surgical associations—in his own county, southwestern Iowa, the state of Iowa and some of the national medical societies. Among the organization to which he belonged were the American Medical association and the American College of Surgeons. He was a charter member of the latter. During the year 1927 he was the president of the Iowa State Medical Society. Also, within recent years, he was representative in the state legislature. When he was a Page county representative in the state legislature, he did much legislative work in behalf of health interests. Due mostly to his efforts, important changes were made in laws relating to public health service.
The entry of Dr. Powers into the state legislature was by the election of 1922. He was placed on the Republican ticket for representative by the Republican county central committee to fill the vacancy thereon, caused by the death of J. H. Stimson. Dr. Powers' election followed in November of that year and in 1924 he was re-elected. In the legislature Dr. Powers was given important committee assignments and was one of the state's best legislators.
For a long time during the years that it was common to have in each county pension examining surgeons for survivors of the Union army, Dr. Powers was one of the examiners for Page county. He has served for many years as the medical member of the Page county board of commissioners of insanity. During the World War he was the medical member of the Page county local board which had so much to do with the initial work relating to the entrance or exemption of men in connection with military service. A great deal of the doctor's time was required for his part in the work, for all of which work he would accept no pay from the government. . . . For some time up to the time of his death he was the city health officer of Clarinda and a member of the Iowa state board of health. He had long experience as the surgeon at Clarinda for the Burlington Route.
Dr. Powers was a member of the Presbyterian church.
During the later years of Dr. Powers' life, he was much interested in farming in the state of Oklahoma, where he became the owner of 1200 acres of land near Paul's Valley. He made frequent trips from Clarinda to his land in Oklahoma to see after its care. When he began to invest in Oklahoma soil, he disposed of some of his Clarinda land. Included in the Clarinda real estate he sold was the beautiful site which is now the Clarinda Country club site.
For something like twenty years Dr. Powers had a private hospital in Clarinda, which he or other physicians used for surgical operations and where the ill could be cared for.
Dr. Powers was a distinguished member of the Masonic fraternity. Toward the last years of the Clarinda Masonic bodies occupancy of the hall over the Page County State Bank he was the worshipful master of Nodaway lodge No. 140, A. F. & A. M. and high priest of Clarinda chapter 29, R. A. M. He became a district lecturer for the Iowa Masonic grand lodge. He was one of the most efficient and useful workers in our local Masonry. Among the organizations to which he belonged was Clarinda Chapter, No. 214, Order of the Eastern Star. On attaining the present local Masonic property, he had much to do of a helpful nature. He served as a trustee of Nodaway lodge for a number of years.
Dr. Powers was a member of the Iowa Chapter Sons of the American Revolution.
One of the prominent characteristics of Dr. Powers was his habit of extending hospitality. The home of Dr. and Mrs. Powers was a center for entertaining invited company. Not only was their home open to local residents but many famous people in different walks of life who were strangers here were heartily welcomed as guests at the Powers' home. Both Dr. and Mrs. Powers have taken great pride in making their family home property a delight for comfort and beauty.
My first meeting of Dr. Powers happened to be on the south side of the square in this city, within a short time after I came to Clarinda to live, so my personal relations with him extended for about thirty-five years. I knew him very well.
He was a man of marked ability, with a comprehensive grasp of men, measures and movements. He was strong for the right and a man of firm convictions. In the practice of his profession he was a stickler for the observance of the highest type of honor. As a citizen he was unselfish in cooperating in all good movements for the welfare of his home community.
One afternoon last fall, after I had not seen him for several months, my health permitted me to call on him at his office, where we had an uninterrupted and pleasant visit. There was nothing about his appearance then to give me any intimation that I was not again to see him among the living. I now am very thankful for the visit. I also am thankful for my acquaintance with Dr. Powers and am saddened that another of my old-time friends has gone from among us. – Edwin C. Lane.

[POWERS, THOMAS EDWIN]
Clarinda Journal (Clarinda, Iowa), Monday, February 18, 1929
Funeral Service For Dr. Powers Held Sunday
Many Friends Gather in Presbyterian Church to Show Last Respects—Masonic Brethren Attend in Body
The funeral services for Dr. T. E. Powers, who died at his home in this city Thursday night were held Sunday afternoon at 4 o'clock at the Presbyterian church, Dr. A. B. Thutt officiating. The main auditorium was filled with those who had gathered to pay the last tribute to Dr. Powers. The annex room was also opened to provide for additional seating there.
The ushers at the church were members of the DeMolay chapter. They were Gerald Bogan, Oliver Cook, Loren Shields and Hugh Louden.
One entire section of the church was reserved for the Masonic fraternity, there being about one hundred and twenty-five Masons present. Members of the Page County Medical association were also seated together, the out of town physicians being Dr. J. F. Aldrich, Dr. H. McKay Bunch, Dr. B. S. Barnes and J. O. Weaver of Shenandoah and Dr. W. A. Kitchen of New Market.
The pallbearers were Dr. Max E. Witte, who had been a close friend of Dr. Powers since early manhood, Dr. E. T. Farrens, whose friendship with Dr. Powers dated back to boyhood days, Dr. J. F. Bening, Dr. R. J. Matthews, Dr. R. D. Smith and J. W. Hoskins.
Charles Cavender of Paul's Valley, Okla., who has been associated with Dr. Powers for many years in managing the doctor's land interests in Oklahoma, was here for the services.
At the grave in the Clarinda cemetery, the impressive Masonic burial service was given by Past Master W. S. Day for Nodaway lodge 140, A. F. and A. M. The Bible was carried by C. C. Bullock and L. F. Abbott acted as marshal.

[RAIL, HARRY]
Clarinda Herald (Clarinda, Iowa), Friday, January 10, 1896
HAWLEYVILLE – Mrs. Cass Bean was called to Villisca by the death of her little nephew, Harry Rail. He is a victim to that most dread disease, diphtheria. Vera is convalescent, Zella some better and little Minnie just taking it. We sincerely hope the remaining children will recover and express our sympathy to the very bereaved parents. Mrs. Bean will not return until all possible danger of her doing so is removed.

[REED, GEORGE ELIAS, 1836 – 1907]
Clarinda Journal (Clarinda, Iowa), Friday, January 18, 1907
A telegram received this morning by C. N. Crain at Hepburn stated that George Reed, a former resident of this county, died yesterday at Marshall, Ill. the remains will arrive in Clarinda tomorrow and the funeral will be held Sunday at the Cagley church north of this city.

[RENANDER, ERWIN ARVID]
Clarinda Journal (Clarinda, Iowa), Friday, March 13, 1896
BETHESDA - After a long illness, little Erwin, son of E. G. Renannander [Renander], died last Thursday at the age of 6 years and was buried last Sunday afternoon in the Bethesda Cemetery, Rev. A. G. Freden of Nyman conducting the services. It is very hard for the parents and relatives to leave their small children, yet a much better place is awaiting them in the beyond, where we all shall see them, we hope before long.

[RICHARDS, ELIZABETH SUPPLEE]
Clarinda Herald (Clarinda, Iowa), Friday, January 31, 1896
J. [ohn] H. Wheeler returned from Cedar Co., Mo., Saturday, where he was at the death bed of his mother-in-law, Mrs. T. [homas] J. [acob] Richards, who died Jan. 22. Mrs. R. was a resident of this community for years, until about two years ago.

[RICHARDS, THOMAS JACOB]
Clarinda Herald (Clarinda, Iowa), Tuesday, January 26, 1897
Supervisor Wheeler was in town last Friday attending court and while in town he received a telegram announcing the death of his father-in-law, T. [homas] J. [acob] Richards at Jerico, Mo. the deceased was an old time resident of this county and was held in great esteem by all who knew him. His wife died one year before him, to the very day.

[RICHARDS, THOMAS JACOB]
Page County Democrat (Clarinda, Iowa), Thursday, January 28, 1897
J. [ohn] H. Wheeler of Washington township was attending the district court last week as a witness. While here he received a telegram from his wife announcing the death of her father, T. [homas] J. [acob] Richards, at Jerico, Mo., but he was unable to get away in time to attend the funeral. Just one year ago the same day Mr. Richards' wife passed away to the better land.

[RICHARDS, THOMAS JACOB]
Clarinda Herald (Clarinda, Iowa), Tuesday, February 2, 1897
NORTHBORO – T. [homas] J. [acob] Richards, formerly of an old resident of this locality, died at Jerico, Mo., Jan. 21. He was close to 80 years old.

[RIDENOUR, BEULAH V. DAILY]
Clarinda Herald Journal (Clarinda, Iowa), Thursday, November 23, 1944
Mrs G Ridenour Dies Wednesday Funeral Services Held Friday Burial at Memory Cemetery
Mrs. Gilbert Ridenour, 41, who was born in Taylor county, died Wednesday at 7:20 a m at the farm home northeast of Clarinda after a lingering illness.
The funeral services will be at the Walker Funeral Home Friday at 3:30 with Rev. Fred Tackett of the Free Methodist Church in Shenandoah officiating. Burial will be in Memory cemetery.
She is survived by her husband, Gilbert Ridenour, her mother, Mrs. Clara Dailey, three brothers, Benny Daily of Clarinda, Earnest Dailey, in the navy, and Guy Dailey of Clarinda, and two sisters, Bonnie Semmons and Irene Hankins.

[RIDENOUR, GILBERT RUSSELL]
Clarinda Herald Journal (Clarinda, Iowa), Thursday, July 17, 1958
Box Car Crushes Gilbert Ridenour Husband of Melody West Is Wheat Harvest Casualty
A former Clarinda farmer was crushed between his tractor and a car of wheat at Sheridan, Mo., Monday, killing him instantly as others who assisted at the elevator watched.
Gilbert Ridenour, 58, had been pulling train cars filled with wheat as part-time employee of the MFA elevator at Sheridan, Mo. He lived on the farm to which he moved from northeast of Clarinda about five years ago.
The chain to which his tractor was connected to the car apparently developed slack as the car began to move faster than the tractor. The chain was said then to have caught the wheel of the boxcar, pulling the tractor back and crushing its operator against the railcar.

Relatives from here went immediately to be with his wife, the former Melody West, and five children, Mona Rae 11, Charlotte 9, Jessie 7, Betty 5 and Johnnie 3.
New Market Burial
Funeral services for Mr. Ridenour were held this Thursday at Bedford and burial was to be at the Old Memory Cemetery near New Market. Among those who came from a distance to the services were a sister, Mrs Blanche Sandos of Western Nebraska and a brother, Raymond, of Ravenna, Nebr.

The family were tenants on the L D Walker farm northeast of Clarinda for a few years prior to moving to Missouri and earlier they had lived in Clarinda.

[ROLLSTIN, ROBERT ARTHUR]
Lansing State Journal (Lansing, Michigan), Sunday, December 21, 2008
Robert Arthur Rollstin, M. D.
Robert Arthur Rollstin, M. D., formerly of East Lansing and Ft. Myers, FL, was born on December 24, 1922 in Winterset, Iowa, to Arthur and Clara Rollstin, and died on December 17, 2008, in Lansing, Michigan. Dr. Rollstin was raised in Des Moines, Iowa, where he attended high school, graduating in 1940. After the attack on Pearl Harbor, he enlisted in the Army Air Corps in 1942.
During World War II, he was stationed in Guam and served the United States until 1945. After his discharge, he returned to Pella, Iowa, attended Central College and met his wife of 61 years, Wilma, "Billie," Hugh (Shields). They were married on October 18, 1947 and moved to Iowa City, Iowa. He enrolled at the University of Iowa and the couple's first child—Bobbie Frank (Comisar)—was born during his undergraduate studies. He graduated from University of Iowa School of Medicine in 1953 and completed his internship with the United States Army at Tripler Army Hospital in Honolulu, Hawaii, in 1954.
After his internship, Dr. Rollstin joined General Motor' Oldsmobile Division in Lansing, Michigan and became the Medical Director in 1958. During his 26 years at Oldsmobile, Dr. and Mrs. Rollstin had two more children—William Arthur and Gerry Ann (Larkin). He cared for thousands of sick and injured Oldsmobile employees and oversaw the operations of the Medical Department during his service to General Motors. Although the practice of medicine was his passion, he truly enjoyed the camaraderie of his fellow Oldsmobile employees.
During his years at Oldsmobile, Dr. Rollstin enjoyed boating on Lake Michigan, keeping several boats in Holland, Michigan. In 1972, he built a cottage in Lake City, Michigan, on Lake Missaukee, where he enjoyed spending time with his family and friends, boating, snowmobiling and socializing.
After retiring from Oldsmobile in 1980, Dr. and Mrs. Rollstin moved to Cape Coral, Florida where they resided until 1992. During this time, he enjoyed boating and fishing in the Gulf of Mexico and the adjoining waterways. In 1992, they moved to Fort Myers, Florida and resided there until moving back to Michigan in 2008. While in Fort Myers, he pursued his favorite sport—golfing. He carded his first and only hole-in-one on the 12th hole at his home course, Olde Hickory Country Club in 1996.
Dr. Rollstin enjoyed working crossword puzzles with his wife every morning. He was an avid reader of every kind of fictional genre and daily news sources. He maintained his medical license after his retirement and regularly attended professional meetings and seminars. Throughout his lifetime, he never lost his desire to learn.
He was preceded in death by his father, mother, brother Rolland Clare, and his sister, Shirley Faith (Bush). Dr. Rollstin cherished his three grandchildren—Clayton, Jenna and William. He is survived by his daughter's husbands, Bruce R. Comisar and Charles J. Larkin and by his son's wife, Lisa D. Rollstin. His wit was enjoyed by those he called his friends and by all members of his family.

[ROLLSTIN, ROBERT ARTHUR]
Clarinda Herald Journal (Clarinda, Iowa), Thursday, January 15, 2009
Robert Arthur Rollstin, M. D. – Robert Arthur Rollstin was born on December 24, 1922 in Winterset, Iowa to Arthur and Clara (Simons) Rollstin and died on December 17, 2008 in Lansing, Michigan. He grew up in Des Moines, Iowa and after graduating from high school he served 4 years in the Army Air Corps during World War II.
In 1947 he and Wilma (Billie Shields) were married and he attended the University of Iowa where he graduated from medical school in 1953 and later interned in Honolulu, Hawaii. He then joined General Motors Oldsmobile Division in Lansing, Michigan where he became Medical Director until his retirement in 1980 when he and Billie moved to Florida, moving back to Michigan in 2008.
Dr. Rollstin was preceded in death by his father, mother, brother Rolland and sister Shirley (Bush). He is survived by his wife, Billie, his daughters Bobbie Frank Comisar (Bruce), Gerry Ann Larkin (Charles), and his son William Arthur (Lisa), three grandchildren, Clayton, Jenna and William, two sisters-in-law, Twyla Rollstin and Waive Shields, and fourteen nieces and nephews.
He had donated his body to the University of Iowa College of Medicine.

 

[SLEETH, JOHN A.]
Clarinda Herald Journal (Clarinda, Iowa), Monday, June 20, 1938
John Sleeth Is Buried Tuesday
Had Worked in Produce Business Since 1914; Dies at Age of 82 Years
John A. Sleeth who has worked for W E Keeney and A D Miller in the produce business here since 1914, died at his home Sunday afternoon at 3:15 o'clock, following a critical illness of several days. Funeral is to be held at the Walker Funeral Home Tuesday afternoon at 2 o'clock, with burial in Memory cemetery near New Market.
Mr. Sleeth lived at New Market before coming to Clarinda, but was originally of Worth county, Missouri. He was 82 years, 10 months and 2 days old. Two daughters survive, Mrs. Amanda Hays and Mrs. Clara Daley.

[SLEETH, JOHN A.]
Clarinda Herald Journal (Clarinda, Iowa), Thursday, June 23, 1938
Mr and Mrs W B Hays and Mrs Hershel Hays of Sioux City came Monday night to attend the funeral of their grandfather, Mr John Sleeth, Mrs Hershel Hays remaining the balance of the week to visit her parents, Mr and Mrs A P Salgren.

[SLEETH, SARAH JANE TACKETT]
Clarinda Herald Journal (Clarinda, Iowa), Thursday, March 9, 1933
Sarah Jane Sleeth – Sarah Jane Tackett, daughter of James and Elizabeth Tackett, was born in Cedar Co., Mo., Feb. 17th, 1857 and departed this life at her home in Clarinda, March 5th, 1933, age 76 years and 16 days.
In the year of 1863, she moved with her parents to LaSalle Co., Ill., where she lived till the close of the civil war. The family again moving to Worth Co., Mo., where Sarah Jane grew to womanhood. On September 17th, 1876 she was united in marriage to Mr. John Sleeth. To this happy union three children were born, all girls, the youngest having preceded her mother to the Great Beyond. Mrs. Sleeth leaves to mourn her going, her faithful husband, John Sleeth, two daughters, Mrs. John Daily and Mrs. Will Hayes, both of Clarinda, Iowa. One brother, Thomas Tackett of Tabor, Iowa, and one sister, Vina Smith of OsKosh, Nebr. Twelve grandchildren and five great grandchildren, with many other relatives and a great host of true friends.
Grandma Sleeth was a good and true wife, a loving mother, a valuable citizen and a true Christian and friend to all. Early in life she gave her heart to God, and united with the Zoin Baptist Church and remained faithful to her church and to her God till death. Mother Sleeth was an invalid for many years through which she bore her suffering patiently knowing that her redeemer liveth and that he at his good pleasure would call her from labor to refreshment when her work was finished.
Services were held Tuesday at the Walker Funeral Home, sermon by the Rev. Carl Lyle Windsor, pastor of the Church of United Brethren in Christ. Burial was in Memory cemetery near New Market. The pall bearers were the grandchildren, Bennie Daily, Ernest Daily, Guy Daily, Vollie Hays, Claude Blair and Buddie Hughes.

[STREET, SARAH, - 1896]
Clarinda Herald (Clarinda, Iowa), Tuesday, January 7, 1896
Miss Sarah Street, a former resident of Clarinda but who moved to Michigan a few years ago, is dead. Nothing could be learned as to the particulars.

[SURENKAMP, CHARLOTTE "LOTTIE" SUNDERMAN]
Page County Democrat (Clarinda, Iowa), Thursday, February 27, 1896
A telegram was received here Friday announcing the death of Mrs. Surenkamp at her home in southern Indiana. She was a sister to William, Fred and Henry Sunderman, northeast of the city.

[SWANSON, HENRY EDWARD]
Page County Democrat (Clarinda, Iowa), Thursday, March 19, 1896
Mr. Henry Swanson died yesterday at his home in Douglas township. He had been sick since December and his disease baffled all physicians. The immediate cause of his death is said to have been Bright's disease. He leaves a wife to mourn the loss of a husband after only six months of married life.

[SWANSON, HENRY EDWARD]
Clarinda Journal (Clarinda, Iowa), Friday, March 20, 1896
Henry Swanson died Wednesday at 2 p. m. at his home in Douglas township, after a lingering illness. He was about 26 years of age and had been married since last fall, when Miss Hilda O. Engstrom became his wife. He was a brother of C. J. Swanson of this city, who, accompanied by his wife, went to Henry's home Tuesday and will remain there until after the funeral, which takes place at 1 o'clock this afternoon, at the Swedish Lutheran church, Bethesda. The late Mr. Swanson was a good and highly esteemed man. His death is a great sorrow to a large circle of relatives and friends.

[SWANSON, HENRY EDWARD]
Clarinda Herald (Clarinda, Iowa), Friday, March 20, 1896
H. E. Swanson – A great many of our readers will be greatly surprised and shocked to learn of the death of H. [enry] E. [dward] Swanson of Douglas township, which occurred Wednesday afternoon at 1: 30 o'clock. He has been sick for three months and so firmly did the fatal disease hold its grip upon him that the best medical skill could not break it. He fully realized that his end was near but as his mind was perfectly at peace with God, there was no fear manifested as he drew near to the shore. The deceased was born in Henry county, Ill. and was 26 years and 13 days old. He was married the 25th of last September and the young wife, thus so soon a widow, has the profound sympathy of all. He leaves a father, mother, four brothers and three sisters, all of whom were at his side when he died, except one sister who lives in Kansas and she arrived soon after. He was a brother of Charley Swanson, who has for many years been employed in J. D. Hawley's store. The funeral services were held at the residence this afternoon and were largely attended by sympathizing friends and neighbors. In this connection the family of the deceased desire to extend their thanks for the kind assistance rendered by their neighbors during the illness.

[SWANSON, HENRY EDWARD]
Clarinda Herald (Clarinda, Iowa), Tuesday, March 24, 1896
HEPBURN – A number attended the funeral service of Mr. Swanson last Friday. Mr. Swanson was well known here, and the friends have our sympathy in this hour of bereavement.

[THOMPSON, JAMES, 1824 – 1901]
Clarinda Journal (Clarinda, Iowa), Friday, November 1, 1901
James Thompson died in this city Oct. 30, age nearly 77 years. His funeral is at 2 o'clock this afternoon. He will be buried at the Covenanter cemetery.

[THOMPSON, JAMES, 1824 – 1901]
Clarinda Herald (Clarinda, Iowa), Friday, November 1, 1901
James Thompson, one of the oldest settlers of Page county, died at his home in this city, Wednesday, October 30, 1901.
Mr. Thompson was born in Columbiana county, Ohio, November 9, 1824. On January 24, 1850 he was united in marriage to Miss Tabitha Barrett, who preceded him to the better land only a few years. Shortly after his marriage he moved to Warren county, Iowa, where while working with a threshing machine he lost his right arm. In 1858 he came to Page county, living on a farm three miles south of town for three years, when he moved to Clarinda, which has ever since been his home. For about forty years he has been draying and teaming about town and was one of the most familiar figures on our streets. He was a member of the Presbyterian church and was highly respected by all who knew him. Sixteen children were born to him, eight of whom are still living, as follows: Mrs. Kate Truesdale, John F., Grant and Albert, who live in Clarinda; Mrs. Jane Landers and George, of Arcadia, Neb.; Mrs. Elizabeth Fisher, of Denver, Colo., and Mrs. Hulda Pickett, of Albia, Iowa. The funeral services were held from the Free Methodist church at 2 o'clock this afternoon, conducted by Rev. J. F. Mudd, interment taking place in the Covenanter cemetery south of town.

[THOMPSON, TALITHA EDITH GARRETT]
Page County Democrat (Clarinda, Iowa), Thursday, April 16, 1896
Mrs. Tatiltha [Talitha] Thompson, wife of James Thompson, died yesterday morning, April 15, 1896, at 5 o'clock, at her home in north Clarinda, at the advanced age of 69 years. She had been in very poor health for the past two and a half years and a great sufferer most of the time. She was born in Maryland and afterwards removed with her parents to Jackson county, Ohio, where she was married Jan. 24, 1850, to Mr. Thompson. In Sept. 1859, she came to Clarinda with her husband where they have since resided. She was the mother of sixteen children, eight of whom were twins, one pair of them, and one each of the other pairs, having died in infancy. They reared eight children whom with her husband now survive her. The funeral took place at 1:30 this afternoon from her late residence, conducted by Rev. Rankin, assisted by Rev. Miller and her remains laid to rest beside four of her children in the Covenanter cemetery south of the city.

[THOMPSON, TALITHA EDITH GARRETT]
Clarinda Herald (Clarinda, Iowa), Friday, April 17, 1896
Talitha, wife of James Thompson, died at her home in Clarinda on Wednesday, April 14, at 5 p. m., aged 69 years. The funeral services took place in Clarinda yesterday conducted by Revs. Rankin and Miller. Interment at Covenanter cemetery. Deceased was loved and respected by all who knew her, and the bereaved family have the sympathy of all. An obituary will appear in Tuesday's issue.

[THOMPSON, TALITHA EDITH GARRETT]
Clarinda Journal (Clarinda, Iowa), Friday, April 17, 1896
Mrs. Talitha, wife of James Thompson, died at her home in this city, the 15th inst., at 5 a. m., age 69 years. The funeral was held yesterday afternoon at the late residence of the deceased, conducted by Rev. I. C. Rankin, assisted by Rev. E. N. Miller. The burial was in the cemetery of the Reformed Presbyterian church in Harlan township. The late Mrs. Thompson was a most excellent woman. Beside her husband she leaves several children and a large circle of relatives and friends to mourn her death.

[WETMORE, ARTHUR JAY]
Clarinda Journal (Clarinda, Iowa), Friday, March 6, 1896
Died. Arthur J. [ay] Whetmore, son of Mr. and Mrs. O. [restus] Whetmore was born in Illinois Jan. 26, 1866, and died Feb. 28, 1896 of consumption, age 30 years, 1 month and 2 days. He was married Nov. 1, 1893, to Hester Dewhurst. He leaves a wife and a small girl, parents, two brothers and two sisters to mourn the loss of a good husband, brother and son. He had been a sufferer for about two years but never complained. He went to South Dakota for the benefit of his health, staying about six months and then came home. He died sitting up in his chair. His funeral was preached Saturday afternoon at 2 p. m. by Rev. Redburn at the M. E. church and the remains were laid to rest in the Blanchard cemetery. May the berefts look to Him that doeth all things well to them that love and serve him.
[Note: The last name is spelled Wetmore on his headstone.]

[WETMORE, CORDELIA JANE DAVIS]
Clarinda Journal (Clarinda, Iowa), Thursday, October 19, 1916
BLANCHARD – Grandma Wetmore passed away at her home in Idaho Monday morning and was brought here Friday evening, accompanied by her sons, Hugh of California and Clifford of this place, who had been spending the last few weeks there with their mother since her illness. Mrs. Wetmore made her home here until a few years ago when Mr. Wetmore died, she went to Idaho where she has made her home with her daughter. Funeral services were held at the home of her son, O. [restus] C. [lifford] Wetmore Saturday afternoon at 2 o'clock. Interment in the Blanchard cemetery.

[WETMORE, CORDELIA JANE DAVIS]
Clarinda Journal (Clarinda, Iowa), Thursday, October 19, 1916
COLLEGE SPRINGS – The funeral services of Grandma Wetmore was held at the home of her son, Clifford Wetmore, in Colfax township, last Saturday afternoon at 3 o'clock, Rev. Carl Brown officiating. She and her husband came to this country over 50 years ago and were known far and wide for their goodness and hospitality. The old gentleman preceded her to the better world some 10 years ago. She was over 88 years old and while she had outlived her day of usefulness, she will be greatly missed by her host of friends and relatives just the same.

[WETMORE, ORESTUS CLIFFORD]
Clarinda Herald Journal (Clarinda, Iowa), Thursday, March 23, 1950
O C Wetmore – O [restus] C [lifford] Wetmore, son of Orastus [Orestus] and Cordelia Wetmore, was born in 1863 in Illinois, county of Taswell. He died March 17, 1950.
Clifford came to Page county, Iowa, with his parents at the age of three years and has lived in Blanchard all of his life.
He was married to Eva May Crosby. To this union were born four children: Minnie Ola, deceased, Earl S. Wetmore of Chico, Calif; Mrs Harry H Rigler of Torrington, Wyo; Mrs Joe E Luhr of Mexico, Mo.
Mr. Wetmore helped establish the first rural mail deliveries out of Blanchard and also helped to build rural telephone lines. He served in its company as officer. He was a school director of the Horne district and at a later date a member of the College Springs high school board.
Mrs. Wetmore preceded her husband in death in 1935. Several years later, O C Wetmore married Mrs John Iker, who also is a long-time resident of the Blanchard community.

[WETMORE, ORESTUS CLIFFORD]
Clarinda Herald Journal (Clarinda, Iowa), Thursday, March 23, 1950
BLANCHARD, March 20 – Hold Funeral Services
Funeral services for Clifford Wetmore were held at the Methodist church Sunday afternoon at 2:30, conducted by Rev Verne Weigel and Rev Waldo Mitchel. Pallbearers were Glen Turnbull, don Hensleigh, Morris Whigham, Jr, Charles Whigham, Clarence Whigham and Ray Louden. Music was by Mrs Guy Thurman and Miss May Bean. Mrs Grace Huffaker at the piano. Flowers were in charge of Mrs Edgar Leonard, Mrs Morris Whigham, Jr and Mrs Will Copeland. Interment was in the Blanchard cemetery. Two daughters, Mrs Harry Rigler of Torrington, Wyo and Mrs Joe Luhr and husband from Mexico, Mo, were here for the funeral. Mr and Mrs Earl Schultz came from Chicago and left Sunday evening to return home. Mr and Mrs Walling came from the Clearmont home for the funeral service and took Mrs Clifford Wetmore back to her room at their home as they returned late Sunday afternoon. Mr and Mrs Dee Louden came from Clarinda and many people from College Springs. Mr Wetmore had lived near here almost all his life.

[YOUNG, JAMES STINSON, - 1896]
Parsons Daily Eclipse (Parsons, Kansas), Thursday, January 2, 1896
Death of J. S. Young
J. [ames] S. [tinson] Young, an old and well-known resident of Parsons, died suddenly on Wednesday morning of pneumonia. He had been employed on the new grain elevator and worked until Saturday evening when he was taken down. He leaves a wife and two grown daughters and a large circle of friends to mourn his demise. He was about sixty years of age.

[YOUNG, JAMES STINSON, - 1896]
Parsons Daily Sun (Parsons, Kansas), Friday, January 3, 1896
Death of J. S. Young.
J. [ames] S. [tinson] Young, one of the early settlers of this section of the state, died at his home in this city Wednesday morning, after a short illness of pneumonia, aged 65 years.
The deceased came to Parsons before the town was platted and resided here up to the time of his death. He was a contractor and builder and aided in the construction of many of the first houses erected in Parsons.
He was an old soldier and a member of Pioneer Lodge No. 10, Knights of Pythias, of this city, and served the city as a member of the Board of Education from the Fourth ward. For a number of years, he was in the employ of the M. K. & T. railroad, when an unfortunate accident befell him which crippled him for many months and caused him to leave the service of the company.
The funeral service will take place from the Methodist church at 2 o'clock Sunday afternoon and will be conducted by the Knights of Pythias.
The deceased leaves a widow and two grown daughters, one of whom, Miss Hattie Young, is a teacher in our public schools and a large circle of acquaintances, who regret his death.
[Note: The same notice appeared in the Parsons Weekly Sun, January 9, 1896.]

[YOUNG, JAMES STINSON, - 1896]
Clarinda Herald (Clarinda, Iowa), Friday, January 3, 1896
BRADDYVILLE – Mrs. Kate Winter received a telegram from her sister at Parsons, Kan., that her brother-in-law, S. Young, died early New Year's morning. Sad news for the new year.

[YOUNG, JAMES STINSON., - 1896]
Parsons Daily Sun (Parsons, Kansas), Tuesday, January 7, 1896
The funeral of J. S. Young took place from the Methodist church Sunday afternoon and was largely attended by friends and acquaintances. The remains were laid at rest at Oakwood cemetery under the beautiful burial ceremony of the Knights of Pythias.