Memories of Dan Goodman and David Morgan
 
Last Saturday two of the pioneers of Page county called on the Herald and it was very interesting to hear them tell of their early day experiences, Dan Goodman and David Morgan, of Hawleyville have lived in this county for half a century and during that time have seen the broad prairies changed into fine farms, and the log cabins of the settlers change into modern residences with all the conveniences of the town rasidences. On one occasion Mr. Morgan went to Savannah, Mo., with an ox team to get the winter supply of groceries, for in those days it was not considered practical to trust to luck in making such a trip in the winter. On that trip he spent just five cents in money and as he was traveling in Missouri the most natural question was, "What did you spend the five cents for? "He said it was for apples that he got in Maryville and that the remainder of the provisions for the trip were taken from home. Compare this trip with the conveniences the people of this county now enjoy and one is amazed for it seems incredible that in so short a time such changes could have been wrought. Both of these pioneers were in the army, Mr. Goodman in the First Nebraska and Mr. Morgan in the Twenty-fifth Missouri. Mr. Morgan was married in 1858 to Mr. Woodman's sister, Susan C., and they lived happily together until two years ago last July when the partner of his lifework was taken by death, since which time he has been spending the most of his time visiting with his children.   It is not usual to have visits from half centu ry residents of this county for there are not many of them left here as death and change of location have taken most of them away.  But it always is a pleasure to meet the early settlers and have a talk over the days gone by, the experiences of
which will never be repeated or duplicated by the pioneers of any of the western wilds for the reason
that under the conditions now prevailing such experience are out of the question. CLARINDA HERALD, Clarinda, Iowa, Oct 11, 1904