Muscatine County, Iowa

FAMILY STORIES

HISTORY OF THE SAMUEL WILDASIN and CATHARINE WILDASIN
FAMILY and OTHERS

1947

SAMUEL WILDASIN (1815-1884)
CATHARINE WILDASIN (1814-1900)

HENRY WILDASIN Ė The author in his 92nd year

Transcribed by Barry Schuchart and submitted April 17, 2020

Preface

In writing this incomplete history, I might mention that I was never able to learn to what nationality my ancestors belonged. I was under the impression that they came from Southern Europe, but others thought from Northern Europe. But that is neither here nor there. The main reason for the writing of this history is that it might aid someone who wished to extend it into future history or histories. Now if there is anything mentioned in the following history to mar anyoneís feelings, your humble servant wishes to beg pardon.

        Respectfully Yours,
        Henry Wildasin

HISTORY OF THE LIVES OF THE SAMUEL WILDASIN FAMILY
(Compiled by Henry Wildasin)

In the very beginning your humble servant begs pardon, in trying to compile a history of the life and fortune of Samuel Wildasin and others, I will try to give as fair account, and as far as possible and within the knowledge that the compiler might possess, and also some of the hardships they had to bear, all of the early pioneers should be included, in this wonderful State of Iowa (the state where the tall corn grows) especially those who settled quite a distance from the River Towns. (The compiler of this story is a son of our subject Samuel Wildasin.)

Samuel Wildasin settled in Muscatine County, Iowa, which was one of the counties that bordered on the Mississippi River. I might mention here that Iowa in the year 1850, less than four years after it became a state. Before I mention anything more about the above-mentioned subject, I might turn my thoughts back to the time when my Great Grandfather Wildasin emigrated to this country of America. He came with the intention that he might become a citizen of America, and to find a place where he could select some property where he could in the future call his home. His choice fell upon some property about four miles southeast of the now thriving town of Hanover, just north of the Mason and Dixon Line, in what is now known as York County, Pennsylvania.

I my memory serves me right, and from what knowledge I have, there were two Wildasin brothers who came to the vicinity of Hanover as this time. My great grandfather settled, as I mentioned before, southeast of Hanover, and the other brother settled southwest of Hanover in Adams County, Pa. near where or between the town Littlestown and what was known as Sells Station after the railroad was constructed, I might say in the vicinity of Christís Reformed Church.

Now, coming down one generation to my Grandfather George Wildasin and another generation to my Father Samuel Wildasin they were born about 4 miles southeast of Hanover. Now please bear in mind when I use the word Hanover, I mean Hanover in York Co. Pa. Now referring to my father, Samuel Wildasin, as I had mentioned before that he was born in York Co. in the year 1815. My father Samuel Wildasin, being the son of farmer, did not have the privilege as some boys did to gain the necessary education that he might have had, but was educated as farmer boys were at that time in history. As he grew to young manhood, it was his lot to strive for a living and when he had attained his majority, he thought he would go to what was then known as the west, and as he was not blessed with an overabundance of funds at the time, and transportation would be expensive, he then resolved that he would make the journey on foot. The distance between Hanover, and New Lisbon, Ohio, was 249 miles and he made the journey on foot in 6 days carrying what luggage he had.

New Lisbon was in Columbiana Co. Ohio. After his arrival there he readily found employment. He labored faithfully for 2 years, and had saved enough money to purchase a team of horses, which provided him a means of transportation, giving him the privilege of riding on horseback instead of walking. When he arrived at his old home back in York Co. Pa., he being the son of a farmer and the owner of a good team of horses, naturally had thoughts of farming on his own account. But realized that a team of horses was something to have if he wanted to farm, but was not all that he needed.

As one of the great essentials that he needed was a wife or helpmate. In his exploring for a wife, he found one of his liking which was none other than Miss Catharine Menchey of Manchester, Carroll Co. Maryland (Who became my mother). Now we must not forget that Carroll Co. Md and York Co. Pa. were separated by the Mason and Dixon Line so it became necessary for my Mother to become a resident of York Co. Pa. My parents, Samuel Wildasin and Catharine Menchey were married in the year 1841.

My father had purchased a small farm about 4 miles southeast of Hanover. (A daughter of Israel Wildasin, a cousin of mine, married Robert A. Stauffer and they are now residing on this farm.) My parents lived on this farm for about 9 years. Father had read and heard of or people express their opinions about the wonderful opportunities that were offered in the recently born State of Iowa. Now we must remember that Iowa became a state on December 28, 1846. The thought of this great opportunity could not be easily cast aside and in 1848, my father (Samuel Wildasin) and his oldest brother, Jacob M. Wildasin, made arrangements to go and see about these golden opportunities. They knew that they could get transportation over the Balt. And Ohio railroad to Cumberland, Md.

When the day for their departure had come, they went to Baltimore and took passage on the railroad to Cumberland, Md. Then they went by stage coach to Pittsburgh, Pa. and from Pittsburgh they took passage on a steamboat down the Ohio River. They passed Cincinnati, Ohio, and Louisville, Kentucky, and went to Cairo, Ill. Where the Ohio River enters the Mississippi River. Then their voyage was changed from a downstream to an upstream trip, until they arrived at Bloomington, Ia. (now Muscatine). After they had traversed over quite a considerable amount of the prairies and had consulted with some of the scattered farmers who were located on these western prairies, the fact that the soil was free from rocks seemed to induce my Father that this was the place for him to locate. He resolved that he would go back to York Co. dispose of what property he had and follow Horace Greeleyís advice (GO WEST YOUNG MAN).

My Uncle Jacob M. Wildasin did not return with my Father but remained in Iowa. He was employed at several different things at Mt. Pleasant and at Iowa City. In the year 1850, my Uncle Jacob Wildasin and a party by the name of Crum, from Iowa City, decided to go to California (We must not forget that Iowa City was the capital of the state at this time) Others besides my uncle and Mr. Crum made this overland trip to California during a great rush toward the gold fields.

Jacob M. Wildasin remained in California five years. He was fortunate to procure some gold (That is why he was called California Wildasin) He was employed at various things, most of the time at or near Sacramento. Near the end of this stay in California his thoughts were turned towards his old home in York Co. Pa. Instead of returning by the overland route, which would have been long and slow, he chose to take the water route via the Isthmus of Panama. He took a steamer from San Francisco to the Isthmus, crossing Panama from the Pacific Ocean to the Atlantic overland then by steamer on the Atlantic Ocean up the Chesapeake Bay to Baltimore Maryland.

After he arrived in Baltimore, he proceeded to go to his old home about 4 miles southeast of Hanover Pa. After an absence of seven years he found many changes had occurred, and it took him some time to adjust himself to the changed condition, or as we say, to get organized again. He thought he would prepare to do some farming on his own account. He soon realized that if he wished to do some farming, it would be far more congenial if he had a helpmate. He then sought out his old lady friend with whom he had been well acquainted before he took his western trip, in the person of Miss Fannie Schaffer, a sister of the late Jacob Schaffer who used to lead the singing in the early days at the Dubbs Church (now known as St. Paulís Church). About 5 miles southeast of Hanover.

My Uncle Jacob Wildasin one of the leading farmers of the community where he resided. The first farm he purchased was back from the highway. We might call it an inland farm. It was near a small railroad station known as Smithís Station. This station was on the Hanover Junction Branch. Uncle resided on this farm about 15 years and then sold it to a man named Hetrick. He then purchased a farm along what is known as the Jefferson road. This road leads from Hanover to a small town by the name of Jefferson. This farm was about 5 miles southeast of Hanover and he bought it from a man named Dubbs. This farm had poor buildings, but he improved it by erecting large and commodious buildings there on. He first built a large brick house, and then a large Bank Barn. This property is now occupied by his youngest daughter, Fannie Shue (widow of Jacob Shue). Jacob Wildasin and his wife, Fannie Wildasin, had a family of six children. Their names are as follows:

MARTIN WILDASIN the oldest son of Jacob Wildasin, was born in York Pa. in the year 1856. He was educated in the schools of the community and after he gained his majority, he taught school during the winter months in the country schools. After he had procured for himself a wife, in the person Miss Susan Reynolds of Porters Siding, not far from Marburg. He then purchased a farm near Littlestown in Adams Co. Pa. He resided on this farm for quite a number of years.

His wife Susan passed away while they were on this farm, and later he was remarried, but I am not able to recall the name of his second wife. He then disposed of this farm and purchased another near his old home, about one mile east of the hamlet known as Blooming Grove, in York Co. A short time after he purchased this small farm his second wife passed away. Then he married another lady, that was at one time a member of the David Hohf family, that resided near what was called Hohf schoolhouse. Her present name is Mantilla Wildasin, and she now resides in the home which Martin Wildasin had bought at 868 Broadway, and he had only the pleasure to enjoy for so short a time, as he called away by death on Christmas day, 1937, at the good old age of 81. He was a man respected by many, a loss to the community.

Again, turning back to the Samuel Wildasin family, we learn that my Father Samuel Wildasin was the oldest son of my Grandfather George Wildasin. We left off where it had stated that he had returned to his home in Pa. from a trip to newly born state Iowa, to his small farm about 4 miles southeast of Hanover. His desire to go to the state of Iowa was the most prominent thing in his mind. He tried to sell his farm at private sale but was unable to find a buyer. Then in the year 1850, when he was preparing to sell his personal property at public auction, he advertised the farm for sale on the same date as the personal property sale, and it brought more than he had asked for it at private sale. He then went to York (or as it was called at that time, Little York) and purchased two Mexican war land warrants, each good for 160 acres, of what was then called government land. He loaded what little personal effects he had left in his wagon, together with the family, consisting of himself his wife (my Mother) and my oldest brother George, and my three sisters Louisa, Sarah Ann, and Amelia, and went overland to Pittsburgh, Pa. Then they went by steamboat down the Ohio River to where it enters the Mississippi River, then up the Mississippi to Muscatine.

On his arrival he learned that it was almost too late to sow spring wheat, it being the main crop that was raised at that time and this in the fore part of the month of May. But he was not discouraged, and he rented a small farm about 6 miles west of Muscatine in what was at that time known as the Baumgardner community. He plowed 6 acres and sowed it in spring wheat, and harvested enough to supply the family with flour for some time. He also plowed some ground to plant corn, which is known at that time as Iowaís greatest crop. I well remember of hearing my Father tell how he had harrowed the ground after he had it plowed, then he marked it out with a single shovel plow, and that my brother George dropped the seed corn by hand and three kernels per hill. He could drop 8 acres in a day. The days at that time were the same length as today but they worked more hours. There were not so many amusements in those days to attract the young as well as some of the older. But today with so many allurements to attract their attention, as the movies, also the different kinds of ball games, such as foot-base-basket, together with other attractions. Please remember in those days the people worked 10 to 12 hours per day, but did not play ball on Sunday, which is one of the greatest sins of today. The ball games were only played during the week days. There was at that time a desire to respect the Lordís day. It behooves us that we should stop, think and consider seriously about these matters. Turning our thoughts back again, this farm that my Father lived on west of Muscatine, in the Baumgardner community, was the property of this man Baumgardner. He was also county surveyor, and was well posted where there were tracts of government land. He invited my Father to accompany him on a trip to see some of these tracts that belonged to the government in the northern part of Muscatine County, Iowa. This land was located one mile south of where the Town of Wilton now is. He made use of the land warrants he had purchased before he left the state of Pa. He used these land warrants to enter the following described land: on warrant on the southeast quarter of section 12, Township number 78 North range two west of 5th P.M., and the other on the southwest fractional quarter of section seven in Township 78 North of range one west of 5th P.M., This quarter was composed of 200 acres, so my Father bought the extra 40 acres at $1.25 per acre.

When my Father first entered this land, he was still living on the farm west of Muscatine, now this was in the year 1850, and in 1851 he moved to a farm 7 miles north of Muscatine, on what was then known as one of the Fryberger farms. During the same year he built a house on the quarter in section 12, and he moved into this new house the next year. He began to break up some of this virgin soil, which was quite a task, as the roots of the prairie grass were at that time very tough. My Fatherís breaking team consisted of five yoke of oxen and one span of mules, so you can realize that it required some power to move one of those plows. The plow that my Father used was only 16 inches wide. This plow had a very long what is now called land slide. This plow was rigged or hung over a wagon axel with low wheels. At the close of day, they would remove the yokes from the oxen and let them graze on the prairie. In the morning my Father would take a horse and go out on the prairie and round up the oxen for their dayís toil. One morning my Father was out rounding up the oxen he heard a noise in the grass, and he got down from his horse and killed 6 rattlesnakes before he mounted his horse again.

There are some very strange things that happened, for instance I was born in 1855, and with all the prairie there was at that time, I never saw a live rattlesnake until I saw them in different zoos. I saw some dead that other people killed. My youngest brother John who was older than I, was bitten in one of his big toes by a rattlesnake while he was in his bare feet, walking along a path through the grass. Now this house that my Father built on section 12 in the year 1851 was near what at that time known as the State road. This road was between Davenport and Iowa City. Iowa City was the capital of the state of Iowa. There were not very many places for the traveling public to stay overnight. There was a place about 6 miles east of my Fatherís house where they would keep travelers, what was at that time called Center Grove, and to the west they would have to go to a small town by the name of Moscow. This little town was on the banks of the Cedar River.

We must remember that the people in those days did not travel by auto as now, as a great many of them drove ox teams, which means that they moved slowly. Now there were some houses in between these points but they would not accommodate the traveling public. I often heard my Father speak about how they would come, even at night, wanting a place for shelter. Now we must remember that this house of my Fatherís was not very large, and my parents occupied the downstairs bedroom, and the kids along with the hired help occupied the upstairs rooms, so the transients were obliged to sleep on the floor of the living room. I heard my Father say that there were so many some nights lying on the floor, that is he wished to get up there was hardly room for him to set a foot without stepping on someone.

In the year 1853 the old Mississippi and Missouri Railroad was surveyed to Muscatine. The main line was constructed as far as Wilton on Oct. 1, 1855, and the first passenger train arrived the first day of December, 1855. The branch line was completed in the spring of 1856, and they began to operate trains on the branch to Muscatine was constructed on what was known as the congressional township line that separated range one from range 2. It was also constructed on the section line that divided my Fatherís farms placing his home on the west side of the tracks. Quite early in the sixties my Father bought the northwest fractional quarter in section 18, being just south across the road from the farm that was in section 7. He purchased this farm from Phillip Schwartzdrauber, in the early sixties he bought the southeast quarter of section seven. This quarter was still in the virgin state and there were what was known as ponds, being a depression or hole in the land. Some wee as much as three feet deep. When they were full of water in the spring of the year, they would be just filled with wild ducks and geese. I well remember one day my brother-in-law was at work on the home farm when he saw so many ducks and geese alight in these ponds. After noon hour he took an old shotgun along out to the field. Now this 160 was used as pasture land, and my father had quite a number of cattle grazing on this. So, when he saw large flocks of ducks and geese alight on these ponds, he drove the cattle ahead of him until they come up to the pond, and shot at the water fowls with his old gun, killing four geese and 2 ducks.

Again, about these ponds, after the virgin soil was broken up and was cultivated it began to wash some of the soil into those ponds and the course of time they were obliterated. At the present time you would not realize that there were ever any ponds there. So, at that time my father had 760 acres of land and 89 acres of timber land about 4 miles northwest of his home on what was known as Sugar Creek. Prior to the breaking out of the Civil War, produce was of little value. I heard my Father remark more than once of what little value produce was worth at that time. He sold a crib of corn at 8 cents per bushel. The party removed the corn but failed to make payment.

The Civil War made it necessary for the government to furnish food for the men in service. The government began to operate slaughter houses in various places. They established one in Davenport, and Mr. Isaac K Terry, living about 1 mile east of Wilton was appointed purchasing agent for the vicinity of Wilton. He knew that my father had quite an amount of corn on hand, and he advised my father to go around the community and purchase all of the thin cattle and hogs that he could and put them in a feeding lot and feed them with this cheap corn. Mr. Terry would visit my fatherís feeding lot at different times, and if he thought there were some that he could use for slaughtering he would sort them out, whether my father was at home or not, and take them to Davenport to be slaughtered. Later he would bring the money that was coming to my father.

About the year 1867 my father thought he had done a wise thing by leaving the state of Pa. and coming to this newly born state to grow up with the country. As there was considerable raw prairie land in the western part of the state. In his mind he found what he thought would make the garden spot in Iowa. This land was between the forks or branches of the Raccoon River about 40 miles west of the city of Des Moines, in Dallas County. But my mother objected to the movement, saying that she did not care to go into another new territory and help build it up. We must admit that my mother had a pretty hard deal as it was, with a fairly large family of her own, besides the hired help that my father employed. She had no snap. She thought they were getting too old to make the venture.

In the year 1868, an exceptionally hot year, there were so many prostrations on account of the extreme heat, not only men but animals as well. My father bought the first reaper in the community. It was known as marsh harvester, where two men could stand on to do the binding. My brother George and one of the hired men put up a frame and covered it with cloth, so they could stand in the shade to do the binding.

Changing to another subject for a while, I will turn to the church, for fear that I might forget. While my father lived in the state of Pa., he adhered to the Lutheran faith, as most of the Wildasins did in that vicinity. They attended a union church composed of Lutheran and Reformed congregations, in the early day known as Dubbs Church (Now known as Saint Paulís Church). When he first became a resident of Iowa, he attended the Lutheran Church. I well remember when I was only a small lad I went with my father to the Lutheran Church. My baptismal certificate shows that I was baptized by a Lutheran minister. I must confess that I do not know the reason why my father left the Lutheran Church and united with the Reformed Church, which was some time in the early sixties. It might be appropriate to mention at this time, that my fatherís last service for the church was to attend the General Synod as a delegate of the General Synod of the United States, at Baltimore, Maryland. When he was compelled to seek rest, he went to his old home or rather to the home of his youngest brother, John M. Wildasin, about a few days when he fell peacefully asleep, never to awaken again in this world of tears, sin and sorrow.

He passed away on the 19th day of May, 1884

Again, getting back to the things that transpired during his lifetime and that he was interested in. He was one of the organizers of the Farmers and Citizens Bank of Wilton, Iowa, of which he was one of the directors. This bank was organized in the year 1874. He retained his directorship until he was instrumental in the organization of the Union Bank of Wilton, which occurred in the year 1878. After the organizational meeting of the stockholders, he was elected to serve as president of this banking institution, which office he had held until he was suddenly called away by death in 1884. His advice was quite frequently sought, on account of his just and liberal decisions. The taking of Samuel Wildasin away from his immediate associated was like tearing a firm structure into pieces.

CATHARINE (MENCHEY) WILDASIN, (My mother) was born in Carroll county, Maryland, in the year 1814. In her Fatherís family there were four children born as follows: Jacob Menchey, Samuel Menchey, Daniel Menchey and Catharine Menchey. Jacob Menchey who resided on the old homestead in Carroll County, Md. Had a family of nine children, consisting of 6 sons and 3 daughters, as follows: William, Valentine, John, Edward, Jacob, Anthony, Anna Mary, Ellen, and Mandilla. If my memory serves me right, my Motherís brother, Daniel, resided at one time in Hamilton, Ohio, or nearby; and that my Motherís brother Samuel was last heard from somewhere in the state of Missouri. My mother, Catharine Menchey, was the only daughter, and she passed away in the year 1900, at the good old age of 86 years, while in the state of Maryland, she was reared in the Reformed Church.

Again, referring to my Uncle Jacob M. (California) Wildasin, he passed away in the year 1913, being in his 91st year.

MARIE WILDASIN, a daughter of my Grandfather George Wildasin, was born in York County, Pa. in the year 1817. She grew to woman hood in the home of her parents. She was married to Henry S. Giesler, born in York County, Pa. in the year 1853, in York county. They moved to the state of Iowa in the year 1854. Henry S. Giesler was the first postmaster at Wilton Junction, Ia. A short while ago I met a man who had an envelope containing a letter written to a party of Philadelphia, Pa. with the post office address of Wilton Junction, Ia. In the year 1857.

The HENRY S. GIESLER family had 3 children, 2 sons and one daughter, namely Henry F. Giesler, James Levi Giesler, and Mary Giesler, who died when quite young. The older son was born in York Co, Pa. in the year 1853. His father died when this subject was about 8 years old. He grew to manhood in Wilton. He acquired his education as follows: part in the public schools of Wilton, part at a select school taught by Prof. J. B. Harris. He was graduated from the State University of Iowa, at Iowa City. He taught school several years, but finally turned to the banking business, first at Wilton, Iowa, then Carroll, Iowa, then at Oakly, Kans. And finally, at Muscatine, Iowa until the bank was closed. He married Miss Kate Pentzer of Wilton, Ia. They both passed away in the year 1939, at Muscatine. They had no children.

JAMES LEVI GIESLER, was born in the town of Wilton, Ia. In the year 1857. He received what education he had in the public schools of Wilton, and also attended the select school taught be Prof. J. B. Harris. At the age of 16 he entered the banking house of J. L. Reed, and after the death of Mr. Reed his bank quit business. He was employed in the Farmers and Citizens Bank as assistant cashier. I might state here that Mr. Reedís death occurred in the year 1875, and he served in that capacity until the Union Bank of Walton was organized in 1878. He became the first cashier of the newly organized bank. He held the office of cashier until the year 1896, when his health began to fail. He resigned and was employed at various things. A short time later he was appointed as one of the men to liquidate the Ball Bank at West Liberty, Ia. He also was Mayor of the Town of Wilton for one term. He also served one term in the State Legislature. Then in the year 1899, he with others, organized the German American Savings Bank at Muscatine, Ia. He held the office of president and also the office of vice-president. He died in the year 1931, in Muscatine, at the age of 74.

A daughter of my Grandfather (George Wildasin) known as CATHARINE HOFFMAN, was born in York Co. Pa. in the year 1826. She had one daughter, Mary A. Hoffman, born in Baltimore, Md. Mary A. Hoffman, married John H. Rowe from the state of Wisconsin. They had one child, Clara, who married red Jones of Atalissa, Ia. There were 3 daughters born to this union. They are residing with their Mother, who lives at 2120 Glaspell Street, Davenport, Ia. Mr. Jones died in the year 1931.

Again, turning back to a daughter of my Motherís oldest brother, Jacob Menchey. This daughters name was ANNA MARY MENCHEY. She was born in Carroll County, Md., and by marriage she became a niece of my Father (Samuel Wildasin). She was married to John Bankert in Carroll County, Md. They resided in Carroll County for a short time then moved to York Co. Pa. where they remained for about 3 years. They then emigrated to Fulton County, Illinois, where they spent most of their married life. Both Mr. and Mrs. Bankert have passed away, to their reward. This union was blessed with 8 children.

MARY ELIZABETH BANKERT, was born in York Co. Pa. in the year 1863. She came with her parents when they moved to Illinois in the year 1865. She grew to womanhood in the home of the parents in Fulton Co. She became a resident of the state of Iowa in the year 1882. She married Fred Feltman Cedar Co. Iowa, in the year 1883, there were 4 children born to this union. Names as follows: Arthur, Pearl, Effie, and Ralph, who died about 4 months after he was born.

ARTHUR, was born in Cedar Co. Iowa in the year 1884. He grew to manhood in the home of his parents and passed away in Wilton, Iowa, at the age of 22.

PEARL FELTMAN, was born in Cedar Co. Iowa in the year 1886. She grew to womanhood in the home of her parents. She married F.A. Martin, an attorney of the town of Wilton, before the marriage she taught school for some years. To this union there were 4 daughters born, Elizabeth, Mildred, Mary, and Gretchen.

ELIZABETH, was born in Wilton, Muscatine Co. Iowa and grew to womanhood in the home of her parents. She taught school for some years and is now employed in her fatherís law office.

MILDRED MARTIN, born in Wilton, Muscatine Co. and grew to womanhood in the home of her parents. She taught school for some time and then married Henry William Field of Tipton, Cedar Co. Iowa. They have one son, Named William Henry Field, they reside in Tipton, Iowa.

MARY MARTIN, born in Wilton, Muscatine Co. Iowa and grew to womanhood in the home of her parents. She taught school for some time and married Robert Lange of Wilton, Muscatine Co. Iowa, they reside in Wilton.

GRETCHEN MARTIN, was born in Wilton, Muscatine Co. Iowa and grew to womanhood in the home of her parents. She married Marvin Johnson and they have one daughter, Linda Lou, they reside in Lubbock, Texas.

EFFIE FELTMAN, daughter of Fred and Mary Feltman was born in Cedar Co. Iowa grew to womanhood in the home of her parents and practiced teaching for a short time and then married Herman Jarr of Wilton, they resided in Wilton. The Fred Feltman family moved to Wilton in the year 1905, their residence is on West fourth St. Fred Feltman passed away in the year 1917.

JACOB BANKERT, was born in York Co. Pa. in the year 1865. He died in infancy.

FRANK BANKERT, son of John and Anna Mary Bankert, was born in Fulton Co., Ill. In the year 1867, he is a retired merchant and resides in Fulton Co. Ill.

GEORGE BANKERT, was born in Fulton Co. Ill. Being the son of John and Mary Bankert, in the year 1869. He married Edith Gule. 5 children were born to them, three sons and two daughters, they reside in Fulton Co.

ELLEN BANKERT, daughter of John and Mary Bankert, was born in Fulton Co. Ill. And grew up to womanhood in the home of her parents. She married Charles Engel, they have 3 children and now reside in the state of Arkansas.

ANNA BANKERT, daughter of John and Mary Bankert, was born in Fulton Co. Ill. Grew to womanhood in the home of her parents. She married a man by the name of Farrow, they had three children, one dead.

SUSAN BANKERT, daughter of John and Mary Bankert, was born in Fulton Co. Ill. And married Thomas Clark they had 6 children, both Mr. & Mrs. Clark have passed away.

KATIE BANKERT, daughter of John and Mary Bankert, was born in Fulton Co. Ill. She married Andrew Young and had 4 children. And now again I return to the members of the Samuel Wildasin family, are as follows: Samuel Wildasin, father, Catharine Wildasin, mother, there were 6 children, 3 sons and 3 daughters, their names are as follows:

GEORGE WILDASIN, the oldest son of Samuel Wildasin, was born in York Co., Pa. in the year 1842, he spent his first 8 years in York Co. and was permitted to gain some education while in York Co. and in the year 1850 he accompanied his parents and the other children on their journey from Pa. to the new born state of Iowa, after the family was settled on the farm west of Muscatine, George was only 8 years old, but he was quite a help to his father in doing light work, and running errands for his parents, George even in his early youth, was quite handy with most every kind of tool then used on the farm. He was quite a robust lad in his youth before he entered the service in the Civil War. George and one of the hired men, operated the breaking plow part of the time, and at the age of 19 years he enlisted in the army. He was a member of Company G of the 35th Regiment of Iowa Volunteers and served for a period of 3 years. After he was discharged from the service, he assisted on the farms of his father, until he thought he should start out on his own account. So, in the month of December, 1867, he went back to York Co. Pa. to seek a wife. In this venture he was lucky in finding the one of his choice. She was none other than Miss Lucy Stover, daughter of Christian and Elizabeth Stover of York Co. Pa. As I had mentioned before, George was handy man. I might say here that there was considerable snow on the ground in Pa. at this time, and that the farmers and other people who lived in the country districts had only the old-fashioned block sleds. These were made from fair sized trees that had a curve or the curve was made by hand.

Now our father had 2 brothers living in York Co. at this time. One was John M. Wildasin and the other, Jacob M. (California) Wildasin, so my brother George told them if they would furnish the material he would, with their assistance, make each a pair of bobsleds. It was only a short time until these bobsleds were completed and put to use, to the envy of those having the old block sleds. During the time that he was employed on these bobs, his mind was on getting married, and he was married to the woman of his choice, on the 20th day of February, 1868. In the month of March this same year he brought his bride out to the state of Iowa where the tall corn grows.

In the year 1868 out Father began the erection of a new house, where George and his wife were to live when it was completed, which was near the close of the year 1868. In the year 1868 our Father began the erection of a barn built on the Pa. plan or order. This barn was 40 feet wide and 72 feet long, and the posts were 16 feet high to the plate, and a basement under the entire structure of stables for different kinds of stock.

George had a strong desire to dabble with various kinds of machinery. He just seemed to be in his glory if he could tinker at some machine. He had a mania to have a threshing machine and go around and do the threshing for the neighbors, even if he did swallow more dust than food. Now while I am on this subject, I still think his following the threshing business was the primary cause of his death. Robust young man that he was, he died at the comparatively young age of 50 years.

Again, turning back to when he was in the Civil War, we saw that he became attached to his comrades in service. He always had a great desire to meet the boys, as he called them. And I might say that he did not attend every reunion, but that he was there in spirit. In fact, he did not like to miss any reunion, whether it was local, county, or state, and he even attended several national reunions. I well remember when he attended the state reunion at Des Moines. The railroad was short of passenger equipment and only furnished box cars with rough plank seats for the boys to sit on. They were crowded in as if you were loading a stock car. It seemed that nothing could hold them back. The desire was so great that they were afraid that they might miss something. Only a short time ago I came in contact with a party who told me about the time that George attended the national reunion at St. Louis, which occurred almost 60 years ago, that the comrades just went wild while there. I also wish to mention that George never wished to miss the exercises at the cemetery on Memorial Day. I well remember the last Memorial Day of his life, how his mind was on it even during the misery that he had to endure. He passed away just a few days after that Memorial Day. The procession at his funeral was the longest that was ever witnessed at a funeral in this vicinity. It is only a short time ago that I heard a man say that he never saw the equal. This man was only a boy when he attended the funeral.

As I mentioned before that George Wildasin married Lucy Stover, and to the union 5 children were born. The first child died at birth. The four remaining children are:

EMMA S., daughter of George and Lucy Wildasin, was born in Wilton Township, Muscatine Co. Iowa, in the year 1872. She attended the public schools of Wilton Township during the time she was growing toward womanhood, and assisted in the various things that were required to be done on a farm. When she attained her womanhood, she married Elmer Hain of Cedar Co. They at first resided on a farm about 5 miles north of Moscow, a small town in Muscatine Co. After a few years had transpired, they sold out and moved to Moscow to operate a store, and was appointed postmaster which position he filled until they quit business. Then they turned their thoughts to do some trucking business. They continued in this line until Mr. Hain died in December, 1945. Mrs. Hain is still a resident of Moscow, Iowa.

WILLIAM S. WILDASIN, oldest son of George and Lucy Wildasin, was born in Wilton Township, Muscatine Co. Iowa, in the year 1874. He attended the public schools of Wilton Township and spent his boyhood days on his fatherís farm, assisting with the duties that fall upon a farmer boy. But when he attained the age of 18 years, he was unfortunate in having his father pass away, and it fell on his shoulders and those of his mother, to see about managing the farm. We might say that one of the first of their duties was to dispose of the threshing outfit, which was one of the worst handicaps of his father. I might again state that George Wildasin died in the year 1893.

After a few years had transpired William thought he should begin life for himself. So, in the year 1897, on the 20th day of January, he was married to Miss Bertha Hain, a daughter of L.J. Hain of Cedar County, Iowa. A short time after they were married, they moved to what was then known as the L.C. Hain farm in Cedar County, about 5 miles north of Moscow, where they resided for 46 years. They moved to Wilton, Iowa, about the first of October 1942. When they first came to town, they resided in what was called the C.B. Strong home. Later they moved to the Peter Daut Home, where they remained until they purchased the home where they now reside on west 4th street. They celebrated their golden wedding anniversary on January 20, 1947, having present for this occasion 6 of their 8 children, and host of friends and relatives. The names of the eight children born to this union are:

NORA, the oldest daughter born to William S. and Bertha Wildasin, was born in Rochester township, Cedar County, Iowa. She was educated in the country schools and grew to womanhood on the farm. She was united in marriage to Edward F. Duffee in the year 1917. After their marriage they resided on the Frank A. Duffe homestead in Moscow Township. They operated this farm for several years, finally selling out and moving to Wilton, Iowa, to become manager of the Illinois Gas and oil station. They also operated the White Paint store in Wilton. Of recent years Mr. Duffe has become sole owner of the gas and oil station. There were two sons born to this union, Clarence and Bernard.

CLARENCE, was born in Moscow Township, He came with his parents when they moved to Wilton. He was educated in Wilton schools and grew to manhood there. After graduating from high school, he enlisted in the United States Navy, where he spent 5 years of his life. While rusticating in southern California, he became engaged and finally married Julia Hidalgo of San Diego, California. This occurred in the year 1940. They have 2 children, Nora Lee and Edward George. Clarence was employed in the Tri-Cities for some time. They reside in Wilton, Iowa.

BERNARD DUFFE, was born in Moscow Township, He came with his parents when they moved to Wilton, and attended the schools and grew to manhood there. After graduating from Wilton Schools, he entered the State University at Iowa City, where he took a course of Civil engineering, he was in the service of the government for some time, but is employed at Corning, New York. Bernard married a Miss Maxine Jackson of Muscatine, Iowa, in the year 1944.

CHARLES DAVID, the oldest son of William S. and Bertha Wildasin, was born in Rochester Township, Cedar County, Iowa. He was educated in the country schools and grew to manhood on the farm. In 1921 he was married to Ada Tracey of Cedar Co. They have 4 children: Namely, Raymond, Evelyn, Donald, and Darlene. They have resided on several different farms, but when Charles Davidís parents moved to Wilton, he moved onto the home farm in Cedar Co. Evelyn, Donald, and Darlene reside at home with their parents.

RAYMOND, was born in Cedar Co. Iowa, and was educated in the country schools. He grew to manhood on the farm and married Deloris Shafer of Tipton, Iowa. They have on son Gary. They reside in Moscow, Iowa.

BLANCH AMELIA WILDASIN, was born in Rochester Township, Cedar Co. Iowa. She received a country school education and grew to womanhood on the farm. She was married to William Johnson of Muscatine, Iowa. They have one daughter, Patricia, now living in Chicago, Ill. The Johnson family now reside in Muscatine.

URSULA SUSAN WILDASIN, was born in Rochester Township, Cedar Co. Iowa. She was educated in the country schools and grew to womanhood on the farm. She was married to Roger Bolton of Cedar Co. Iowa. They have two children, John William, now a student at the State University of Iowa at Iowa City. Marilyn Susan is at home with her parents, on the farm 5 miles southeast of Tipton, Iowa.

LEVI JOHN WILDASIN, was born in Rochester Township, Cedar Co. Iowa. He was educated in the country school and grew to manhood on the farm. He married Mildred Johnson, daughter of Paul and Elizabeth Johnson of Wilton, Iowa. They have 2 children, Monyeen and George Lee, and reside on a farm about 2 miles southeast of Wilton.

GEORGE LINDEN WILDASIN, was born in Rochester Township, Cedar Co. Iowa. He received part of his education in the country schools and was graduated from Wilton high school. He later graduated from Pella College, Pella, Iowa. He was a bright young man, but fate was against him, and in the month of December, 1942, he passed away at the age of 32 years.

GRACE WILDASIN, was born in Rochester Township, Cedar Co. Iowa and was educated in the country schools. She grew to womanhood on the farm and married Earl J. Johnson, they have 3 children: namely Carl, Harlan, and Sonia. They reside in California.

ODETTA WILDASIN, was born in Rochester Township, Cedar Co. Iowa. She was educated in the country schools and grew to womanhood on the farm. She married Curtis Cromer and they have one child, William. They reside on a farm about 5 miles southeast of Tipton, Iowa.

SAMUEL WILDASIN, son of George and Lucy Wildasin, was born in Wilton Township, Muscatine Co. Iowa, in the year 1877. He was educated in the country school in Wilton Township, Muscatine Co. Iowa and grew to manhood on the old home place where he was born. In 1899 he, with his mother, Lucy Wildasin, and his brother Frank S. Wildasin, moved to a farm near Royalton, Minnesota. He remained in the state of Minnesota for several years, and then moved to the state of Oregon where he still resides. While in the state of Minnesota, he married Miss May Fleck. They have no children and now reside near Veneta, Oregon, not far distant from Eugene, Oregon. Samuel was somewhat like his father, having a great desire to be tinkering with machinery.

FRANK S. WILDASIN, son of George and Lucy Wildasin, was born in Wilton Township, Muscatine Co. in the year 1879. He was educated in the country school and grew to manhood on the old farm. He went with his mother and brother, Samuel, to Minnesota. He along with Sam, looked after their motherís farm near Royalton, Minnesota, until she sold it. Then he bought a farm for himself, which was nearby where they lived. In a few years he sold this farm and moved to northern Minnesota, near a small town by the name of Wilton, not far from Bemigi. He married Belle Trask. They have one daughter, Vera, and she has one son, David. They all reside on the farm near Wilton, Minn.

Lucy Wildasin, widow of George Wildasin, died June 6, 1922

Again, turning back to things that pertain to my Father (Samuel Wildasin) in the spring of the year 1858. My father thought he would rent the farms and move to Wilton, at this time only a small town. His family consisted of his wife, three sons and two daughters. At that time, they resided on east 4th Street, in the house now occupied by the Roy Barkalow family. During the time that he resided in town, the Pikeís Peak, Colorado gold rush was on. With others he started on a trip for Pikeís Peak. But when they arrived at Fort Kearney, Nebraska, they encountered someone who had been at Pikeís Peak and related that it was a fake, so the caravan that my father was with decided that they might as well return home. In due time they arrived back in Wilton again, being tired and dirty and not much the wiser. On their journey they procured mush, they procured some Buffalo meat and brought some home with them. It was not a profitable trip.

Father then began to realize that a large family was better off on the farm, so in the year 1859 he thought he would improve the farm in section 7 by erecting a fairly comfortable new house there on. We must not forget that section 7 was on the east side of the newly constructed railroad to the town of Muscatine. The first house that he built was on the west side of the railroad. This new house was built on a plot of ground containing about three acres, and was separated from the other land by a small creek that passed through this farm. Now this part or parcel of ground was covered with hazel brush as high as a horse when this house was completed, which was in the month of October, 1859. Then my Father proceeded to move the family back to the farm again, into this newly constructed house which became my home for about 33 years, 19 years under the supervision of my Father and 14 years under my own supervision.

I also well remember when my father moved from town back to the farm. My oldest sister Louisa and I walked from town out to the farm, and we had to cross mud creek. My sister crossed on the foot log that was placed there for that purpose, and I just like a boy, insisted that I should wade through the water, which I did. The water in the creek at this place was about 6 or 8 inches deep and about 8 feet wide.

During the winter of 1860 and 1861, just before the Civil War broke out my father was preparing to build a new barn on this plot of ground that this small creek had separated from the other land. As I had previously stated, my fatherís timber was about 4 miles away over on Sugar Creek. During these winter months my Father had quite a number of hard maple trees cut down and brought home so the carpenters could hew them in shape for this new barn. Now these maple trees were from one foot to one and half feet in diameter and this barn was to be built in the year 1861. Also, I must not forget to state that the winter of 1860-61 was quite a cold winter with very much snow. The sleighing that winter lasted almost three months, so that my father could do the major part of hauling on the bobsled. As I had remarked before that the timberland was about 4 miles away, and the rest of the material had to be hauled from Muscatine about 11 miles away. Muscatine at that time had several large saw mills, cutting pine trees into lumber after being floated down the Mississippi River in large rafts. Some of these maple trees were 40 feet in length after they were hewn into shape. They were to be used as sleepers in this new barn.

This was one of the first large barns built in this community. The barns in those days that were built out on the level prairie land had on basements for stock. Now this barn was 40 feet wide and 64 feet long with 16-foot posts to the plate. There was a basement under the entire structure, with four stables with stalls for stock, two for horses and two for cattle. It also contained two feeding rooms for halls where you would place the feed in troughs for the stock. Before my Father built this barn, he had stables and sheds in which to keep stock. Some were compelled to get what shelter they could from straw piles. I mentioned a small creek or slough that cut off a small tract of the farm, upon which my father built these new buildings.

In the very early days, long before my father came to this community, the buffalo would collect when the flies were bad. They would gather in these ravines after a heavy rain would fall and the water would rush down the ravines. The buffalo got in this water to try to keep the flies off, and tramp around so much the prairie grass would be killed. The water rushed down so fast that it washed great holes in the earth, some as much as 18 feet deep. The water would remain in these holes the entire year. That was the reason that my Father located near the small creek or slough. But after the country began to become settled more of the land was brought under cultivation it began to wash some of the solid away and these holes eventually filled up and there was no water for the stock except when it rained. So, in order to have water for the stock it became necessary to pump water from wells that had been sunk in the ground. The first wells in the early years were about 15 to 30 feet deep.

Coming back again to the time when my Father built this new house, and the distance this house was from the little town of Wilton, was as follows: If we went to town by the highway it was 2Ĺ miles and if we walked on the railroad track it was only 1Ĺ miles, or went through the fields over the foot log that I remarked about, which was across Mud Creek and on the property of a man by the name of Fred Nolte, whose land adjoined my Fatherís farm.

Again, I wish to mention the interest that my Father took concerning the affairs of the Reformed Congregation at Wilton. At this time the Reformed Congregation at Wilton had no place of worship of their own. I might remark right here that when the Reformed Congregation was organized at Wilton, they held their services in the public-school building in Wilton. This being a very inconvenient place to worship, they then sought a more convenient place to worship engaging alternate Sunday dates of worship in the Congregational Church. The winters were very severe in those days and this church was very hard to heat comfortably. The Presbyterian congregation had just erected a fine new brick church, which they leased to hold services each alternate Sunday. This was about the year 1866. In the year 1870 the minister who was serving them thought that it would be far better if the congregation had a place of worship of its own.

I well remember of hearing the minister and my father discussing the matter. My Father thought that the congregation was not able to build a church building. The minister thought that they might be able to raise the necessary funds for the building. Then my father made the following suggestion: To start the ball rolling he said he would give as much as any other two members. This gave the minister a starting point. In his canvassing or soliciting for funds, he found two that would give $250 each toward the fund. That required my father to subscribe $500 toward the fund. The other members came to the rescue and they concluded that they would erect a house of worship of their own, and that then they could manage their affairs to suit their own desires. We must remember that in those days a dollar was a dollar, money was not trifled about as in this day and age. The church building cost $3,000 and was erected on the west end of 5th street, where Giles Filling Station now is.

Again, turning back to the family of James Levi Giesler, a son of Henry S. and Marie Giesler. This subject was better known as J. L. Giesler. He was married in the year 1880 to Miss Sadie Stone of Newburgh, New York. They had one child, Edna S. Giesler. Mrs. Sadie Giesler passed away in the year 1884, in early part of the month of May.

EDNA S. GIESLER, was born in Wilton, Iowa, in the month of April, 1883. She received her early education in the Wilton public schools. She also took a course in the school known as St. Katharineís school in Davenport, Iowa. When her father moved to Muscatine, she accompanied him. After she became a resident of Muscatine she took a course to fit herself for a public library in Muscatine, then for a time in the public library in Toledo, Ohio, and then she became the public librarian at Davenport, Iowa, where she remained until she became married to a man from Muscatine, Iowa, by the name of Davidson. But this union was of short duration, for her husband passed away in a few months after they were married. She remained in Muscatine for a short time, and at the present time she is in California, and she may make that state her future home.

Again, coming back to J.L. Giesler. As I had before mentioned that his wife Sadie had passed away leaving this young daughter. He was in need of having someone to see after her, and he thought it best for him to get another wife, which he found in the person of Miss Millie Hilbert of Scott County, Iowa. They were married in 1885. Two sons were born to this union Harold L. and J. Raymond Giesler. These two sons were born while the Giesler family were residents of Wilton. Mrs. Millie Giesler, wife of J.L. Giesler passed away at their home in Muscatine, Iowa, in the year 1900. As this placed Mr. Giesler in a sad position again, and having a home and no one to look after it, he again proceeded to find a wife. He found one in the person of Miss Ida Schafnit, a daughter of Henry Schafnit of Muscatine. They were married in the year 1902. Mrs. Ida Giesler passed away in the year 1946 at her home in Davenport, Iowa.

HAROLD L. GIESLER, a son of J.L. Giesler, was born in the town of Wilton, in the year 1886. He received his early education in the Wilton public school, and after moving to Muscatine he attended the public schools there. Later he took a course in law department of the State University of Iowa. After graduating from the law department of the State University, and his health not being the best, he went to Los Angeles, California, to practice his profession. He became associated with an elderly attorney, who was known as a celebrated criminal attorney, with who he practiced his profession as best he could until after the death of his associate. He then took up the reins as a criminal attorney. Now when Harold L. Giesler was a boy in Wilton he was known as ďTotĒ Giesler, and in Muscatine by the name of Harold Giesler, and in California by the name of Jerry Giesler. You have undoubtedly read about Jerry Giesler defending some notable characters who had fallen into trouble, such as Alexander Pantages, Errol Flynn, Charles Chaplin, and no doubt many others. He resides in southern California, is married, has one sone, Michael, and 2 daughters, one 12 years old and one 30 years old.

J. RAYMOND GIESLER, a son of J.L. Giesler, was born in Wilton, Iowa, in the year 1895, moved with his parents to Muscatine, was educated in the Muscatine schools. He was at one time employed in the German American Savings Bank of Muscatine. He was in the service during World War I. He was for some time interested in the manufacturing of grave vaults. He is now a resident of Los Angeles, California. His wife passed away in the early part of the year 1947. They had no children.

Now again turning back and starting with the Samuel Wildasin family. His second daughter, SARAH ANN, was born in York Co. Pa, in the year 1846 and she came with her parents to Muscatine Co. Iowa, in the year 1850. She passed away at her fatherís home south of Wilton in the year 1856.

AMELIA WILDASIN, was the next in order in the Samuel Wildasin family. She was born in York, Pa. in the year 1848, and came to Iowa with her parents in the year 1850. She was never married and remained at home on the farm until her parents moved to Wilton in 1880. She finally made her home with her parents, until both passed away. Her father died in York Co. Pa. in the year 1884, and her Mother passed away in 1900. After the death of her Mother, she had a new house built for her use, and she remained there until called away by death in the year 1937. It seems that some people have a hobby of some kind. She could tell the age of all relatives, unless too far distant, give date of birth of quite a number of other people. She just lacked a few days of being 89 years old when she passed away, and had what you might call a fair memory up to the last. In her later days her eyesight became quite poor.

JOHN WILDASIN, the second son in the Samuel Wildasin family, was born on a farm 6 miles west of Muscatine, Muscatine Co. Iowa, in the year 1850. He remained on the farm with his father until he had gained his majority. He was somewhat of stocky build, while he was slender, his average weight being about 135 pounds. When he had about reached his 21st birthday, he said to his father, ďIf I had the money I would go to California.Ē At this time my oldest sister Louiseís husband was delivering wheat at the market in Muscatine. My father told the latter to go to the railroad station in Muscatine and purchase a ticket from Wilton, Iowa to San Francisco, Ca. as at that time the Wilton ticket office did not handle coupon tickets. If my memory serves me right it was about the first of September in the year 1871, and his 21st birthday was on the 12th day of October, 1871.

He boarded the train out of Wilton on Monday morning and arrived at Council Bluffs, Iowa, some time Monday night. This was just about 2 years after the railroad was completed to California, but at this time there was no bridge across the Missouri River between Council Bluffs, Iowa and Omaha, Nebraska. They had to disembark and get on a ferry boat to cross the river. By the time his train arrived at Sacramento, about Saturday noon, he got acquainted with a man on the train who lived in California. But this man was formerly from a little town west of Muscatine known as Letts. This man said he needed some help, and if he wished to earn a little money, he might go to his home which was near Wheatland, Yuba Co. California. When they arrived at this manís ranch, he gave my brother the job of herding turkeys, which was undoubtedly a queer thing for him to do. He continued on the job for some months. He did not like the job, and being away from his motherís cooking did not set well with him. I must admit that my mother was a wonderful cook to please a growing boyís taste.

After collecting his wages, he had a ticket to take him to San Francisco, so he first went there. But things did not suit him, and thinking about home and mother, he took passage on the train far back as Cheyenne, Wyoming. He learned that a rancher wanted some help, but this rancherís hut was some distance from the city of Cheyenne, out on the plains. So, he started to walk out, but he did not get very far before he met the rancher who wanted help. This man told him to come to his dugout, and he asked my brother what he had with him to protect himself. This man had a large revolver and a long knife in his belt, which did not set very well with my brother. He got to the dugout about dusk and the man prepared something to eat but my brother thought that his days were numbered. He could not eat for fear. But when the time came for them to lie down on their crude beds, this man reached into a hole in the wall and brought out a testament and he read a few passages of scripture and put the testament back again.

Let us remember that it has been well said, that the scriptures are the power of God unto Salvation to those who believe. After this man had read those few passages, my brother said that all fear disappeared. We must remember that the power of the gospel does wonders. He said that he had a sound night sleep. After he had earned a few dollars, which would help him to get as far as Denver, Colorado, he went up there. Upon arriving in Denver, he learned that the Kansas Pacific Railroad wanted some men on their construction train in western Kansas and eastern Colorado, so they transferred him there. That was so much towards getting him so much nearer where he could put his feet under his motherís table. He earned some money while he was on the construction train, and the railroad passed him over their line. He arrived at the Mississippi River and worked his way from Hannibal, Missouri to Davenport, Iowa. From there he went to work for a farmer near Blue Grass, Iowa, which was about 20 miles from home. But the farmer let him go so he thought he would do as the prodigal son, return to the home of his Father where he could find plenty to eat. So, he arrived home in the early part of July, in the year 1872. He went to the barn to sleep until morning. In the morning one of my Fatherís hired men went to the barn to feed the horses and he found my brother sleeping in the hay in the feeding room. The hired man thought he was a tramp, but he finally convinced him who he was and then came up to the house, which brought much joy to the family about equal to the return of the prodigal son. He was then willing to help on the farms, but did not last long.

He soon told father that he wanted to go to school. So, he registered at a certain school, but in a few days, he was back home again so he could put his feet under his motherís table and enjoy her cooking.

Now for a little on the other side. My brother John had a wonderful memory, and he was far above a great many people in committing things to memory. His brothers were not possessed with the memorizing ability. I well remember when he was between 16 and 20 years of age, he would give me his testament to see if he was repeating exactly right. Also, quite frequently on Mondays, when we were at work in the field and we would give the horses a little time to rest, he would begin to repeat the sermon the minister had given the day before. He was far ahead of his brothers in that line. He was married in the year 1878 to a young lady from Illinois by the name of Miss Lena Crusius. To this union there were born 3 daughters. Louise and Florence in Iowa, and Lena in California. I might say here that after he was married, he farmed for about 5 years, then became dissatisfied and sold his personal property at a public sale and moved to the state of California in the year 1884. He then sold his 200-acre farm to my sister Amelia, and he purchased a small farm just outside of the city limits of Los Angeles, California. The city built around him on all sides. He passed away in the month of October 1928, being in his 78th year. His wife has since passed away. His 3 daughters are maiden ladies living in the city of Los Angeles. The birth of his daughters was as follows; Louise, 1879, Florence in 1881, and Lena in 1885.

HENRY WILDASIN, the youngest of the Samuel Wildasin family and the compiler of this history, was born in Wilton Township, Muscatine Co. in the month of October 1855. He grew to manhood, being employed on his fatherís farms. What little education he received was from the country schools. He also took a course of 36 weeks in a select school, taught by Professor J.B. Harris. The boys on the farm were kept pretty close to their work. I was born a short while before the railroad began to run trains on the Muscatine branch. There were trains operated into Wilton before I was born, but only the time would be numbered by days, not months. But when we were boys, we thought our father was a little too strict, but we must remember that those were thoughts of boys. As I grew older, I found that my father had a pretty wise head, and as I am now typing this on a typewriter machine, and being in my 92nd year, and of sound mind and deposing memory, I must confess that the Lord dealt graciously with me.

But getting back to the things that have transpired. A short time after I gained my majority, my father and mother thought they were getting old, and they wished that they might retire and move to Wilton. This was in the year 1880. Some time prior to this our father and mother deeded the farms to their 3 sons, as follows: the farm that George got was in section numbered 12, containing 200 acres, my brother John, older than I, was next in order and his land was situated in section 18, also containing 200 acres; and I being the youngest in order, the land that I received was in section 7, also containing 200 acres. I sold my farm in the year 1898, I farmed on my own account for 14 years, then rented the farm and moved to Wilton, Iowa.

After I became a resident of Wilton, I was employed in the Union Bank of Wilton and later in the Union Savings Bank of Wilton. And I was in their employ until the year 1906, when I resigned and quit the banking business. While I was employed in the Union Savings Bank, I was serving as Vice President. I was elected Secretary of the White Pigeon insurance association in the year 1896, and held that office until the year 1923. In the year 1894 I was elected a member of the Town council for a term of 3 years, and elected to the same office in the year 1908 to serve 2 years. In 1914 I was appointed as Town Clerk, which office I held for 4 years. I served 5 years as secretary of the Wilton Fair Association. I have been wanting to retire for the last 20 years, but it seems as though I must be dabbling with something. I find when I am idle that it is not the best thing, but when I can keep my mind at work it acts on my constitution like a health pill.

I presume that the old saying is right, ďWhere there is a will there is a way.Ē I have stood up before a Sunday School class for more than 30 years, and I wonder, I wonder, I wonder if there will be any good come out of it? The scriptures tell us, if we cast our bread upon the waters that it will return after many days. When we think about the saying, ďCan any good come out of Nazareth?Ē when the best that the world has ever seen and talked came out of Nazareth. I am still affiliated with the Evangelical and Reformed Church.

I should not forget one, if not the greatest, event in a manís life, when he gets married. Well your humble servant married Miss Susan Stover, a product of York County, Pa. on the 5th day of October in the year 1880. The wedding ceremony was performed by the Rev. Samuel C. Long, pastor of the Reformed Church at Wilton. To this union there were born 3 daughters, Ida Belle, Hattie Amelia, and Irma Susan.

IDA BELLE, was born in Wilton Township, Muscatine Co. Iowa on the first day of August in the year 1881. She attended the common country schools until she was about 11 years old, when she accompanied her parents when they moved into the town of Wilton, in the year 1892. Then she attended the Wilton schools, and after graduating she taught school for a short time. She then attended Brownís Business College in Davenport, Iowa, and was employed at the White Lilly Washing Machine Co. as a stenographer. After she left this company, she was employed at the Red Jacket Pump Co., also in Davenport. She remained there until she was married in the year 1907. She was married to the Rev. John B. Bloom of Lisbon, Iowa, while the Rev. Bloom was pastor of the Wilton Reformed Church at Wilton, where he remained as pastor until the month of Nov. 1909. Then he and the family moved to St. Joseph, Missouri, where he became pastor of the First Reformed Church at St. Joseph. Rev. Bloom resigned as pastor of this church after serving it for 38 years. He also was married on August 10, 1947 to Mrs. Edith L. White of St. Joseph, and their present address is 2236 Francis St., St. Joseph, M. Mrs. Ida B. Bloom passed away in the month of Nov. in the year 1929. There were 2 sons born to this union. John Henry Bloom born in Wilton, and William Wildasin Bloom, born in St. Joseph.

JOHN HENRY BLOOM, son of J.B. and Ida B. Bloom, was born in Wilton, in the year 1908. He was taken with his parents when they moved to St. Joseph, Mo. In the year 1909. He grew to manhood in the city of St. Joseph. He was graduated from the St. Joseph high school in 1927, received his B.A. degree from Cornell College of Mount Vernon, Iowa, and his M.A. degree in music from Iowa State University. After he taught voice at Buena Vista College in Storm Lake, Iowa, until the year 1938, when he became instructor of voice at Drury College, Springfield, Mo. Where he remained until the year 1945. At this time, he became director of the conservatory of music at Muskingum College at New Concord, Ohio, where he now is. His title has been changed from merely John Bloom to Prof. John H. Bloom. He has taken advanced work at Columbia University, New York City, for a number of summers and has studied voice under some of the ablest teachers in New York.

Now turning back in time, a little, I must not forget to remark that John Bloom was married to Miss Eleanor Olsen of northern, Iowa, a former instructor in the public schools, at Wilton, Iowa. The ceremony was performed by his father, the Rev. John B. Bloom, pastor of the First Evangelical and Reformed Church of St. Joseph, Mo., at the home of his grandfather, Henry Wildasin, in the presence of relatives in the year 1935. This union has been blessed by the birth of 2 daughters. The oldest, Susan was born in the city of Springfield, Mo., in the year 1940, and the youngest, Billie Joanna, was born in the same city in the year 1942.

WILLIAM WILDASIN BLOOM, son of John and Ida B. Bloom, was born in the city of St. Joseph, Mo. in the year 1914. He graduated from the St. Joseph high school and attended Junior College for 2 years. He was employed at various jobs in St. Joseph before he entered the Mid-West Building and Loan Association. In the year 1941 he was drafted into the service of the government and was stationed at Fort Leavenworth for about nine months. He was then serving as a private. He took officers training at Duke University at Durham, North Carolina, for 3 months. He was then transferred to the finance department at Camp Wheeler and was advanced to the office of second Lieutenant. Camp Wheeler was near Macon, Georgia, and he remained for the period of 3 years. While he was at Camp Wheeler, he was advanced from second Lieutenant to first Lieutenant, and later to Captain. Also, while there, he was fiscal head of the finance dept. He was discharged in February, 1946, returning then to his old home in St. Joseph.

Now turning back again, we find that William Wildasin Bloom and Miss Ann Elle Miller were married at Macon, Georgia, April 20, 1945, while Capt. Bloom was still in service at Camp Wheeler. Upon his work at the Mid-West Building and Loan Association, and at the present time they are residing with Capt. Bloomís father, but are seriously thinking of building a new home for themselves.

The next in order would be HATTIE AMELIA WILDASIN MASON, who was born in Wilton Township, Muscatine Co. Iowa, in the month of January 1883. At the age of 9 she came with her parents to Wilton, to make it their home. Mrs. Mason was graduated from the Wilton high school, and also graduated from Brownís Business College at Davenport. After graduating from the business college, she found employment at the Union Savings Bank of Wilton, as a stenographer, where she remained until she married in the year 1910. She was married to Dr. H.P. Mason of Wilton, Iowa, at the home of her father by the Rev. John Bloom, St. Joseph, a brother-in-law of Mrs. Mason. There were 2 children born to this union, a daughter, Harriet Lillian Mason, in the year 1912, at Wilton, and a son, Robert Philson Mason, was also born in Wilton. Dr. H.P. Mason was born in Farmington Township, cedar County, Iowa. He passed away in the month of February, 1942, after having practiced medicine in Wilton for about 40 years.

HARRIET LILLIAN MASON, daughter of Dr. H.P. and Hattie Amelia Mason, was born in Wilton, Muscatine Co. Iowa, in the year 1912, graduated from the Wilton high school in 1929, attended Coe College at Cedar Rapid in 1930 and 1931, and was graduated from State University of Iowa in 1933 with a B.A. Degree. She married Carl F. Schomberg in July 1935, who was employed in the Central State Bank, Muscatine, Iowa. They moved to Muscatine in 1937 and moved to Chariton, Iowa in 1942, when Carl became agency manager for the Des Moines Register and Tribune. Carl entered the United Sates Navy in Oct. 1943 and was discharged in November, 1945. He served on the U.S. Steamer William T. Powell on convoy duty, being in Panama, Bermuda, Bizerte, Tunisia, Palermo, Sicily, New Finland, Halifax, Nova Scotia, Londonderry, Ireland and Liverpool, England. During that time Harriet was agency manager at Chariton for about 6 months, payroll clerk at Charlestown Navy Yard, Charleston, S.C., for some time, same position at Naval Operating Base, Norfolk, Virginia, about 5 months clerk in Recording and Statistical Corporation at Boston, Mass., about 5 months clerk at the Rath Packing Plant, Houston, Texas. Upon Carlís discharge he became agency manager of the Des Moines Register and Tribune at Muscatine, Iowa, which was in November 1945, and is still holding down the job.

ROBERT PHILSON MASON, was born August 2, 1913 in Wilton Junction, Iowa. He attended grade and high school in Wilton, graduating in 1930. While in high school he won letters in basketball, baseball and track. While in the grammar grades he played 4 summers on Dr. H.P. Masonís Junior Baseball team. He attended Brownís Business College, Muscatine, Iowa, the year after finishing high school, graduating in the spring of 1931. Robert entered the State University of Iowa in Iowa City in the fall of 1931. He received an B.A. degree in 1938. While in college he won 3 varsity letters in baseball, in the years 1934-35-36. In the spring of 1936, he joined the Boston Red Sox farm system as a shortstop and played at Ayden, N.C. in the Coastal Plain League. In 1937 he played for Danville, Virginia, in the Bi-State League, and in 1938 for Rocky Mount, N.C., in the Piedmont League. He entered medical school at this time, and due to the length of the school year, it was deemed advisable that he sever his connections with the Red Sox. He continued playing ball during summer vacations in 1939-40, for Crookston, Minn. In the northern League and in 1941 for Moline, Illinois, in the Three-1 League.

In January 1942 he was examined and found physically qualified for the United States Naval Reserve and received a commission as an ensign in March 1942. On May 10, 1942, he was graduated with an M.D. degree. While in college Robert belonged to Sigma Phi Epsilon social fraternity and Nu Sigma Nu medical fraternity. On May 25, 1942, he was married to Doris Elaine McCormic of Danville, Virginia. Interned at Methodist Hospital in Indianapolis, Indiana, from June 1, 1942 to May 20, 1943. On May 10, 1943, Robert Philson Mason, Jr. was born at Methodist Hospital, Indianapolis, Indiana. He was called to active duty as a Lieutenant (J.G.) U.S.N.R., on July 10, 1943, reported at Great Lakes, Illinois, and served in the U.S. Naval Hospital at that station until August 18, 1943, at which time he was ordered to overseas duty with Acorn 18. After several months of organization at Port Hueneme, California, left the states November 21, 1943, attached to Acorn 21, having been transferred to this unit from Acorn 18 while at Port Hueneme. Arrived at Pearl Harbor December 1, and was assigned to temporary duty at the dispensary at Naval Air Station, Barberís Point, Oahu. Left Oahu with the fourth Marine Division on January 19 and landed at Roin-Namur in the Marshall Islands, February 1. Was stationed there until July 10, 1944 at which time was transferred to Pearl Harbor and attached to the 129th Naval Construction Battalion. On December 1, 1945, was advanced to the rank of Lieutenant. On April 26, left Pearl Harbor with his battalion and arrived at Samar, Philippine Islands, May 19. Was ordered back to the States on July 19, and was assigned on Sept. 3, 1945 to the U.S. Naval Separation Center at Camp Shelton, Norfolk, Va. Was separated from the service April 10, 1946, with the rank of Lieutenant.

IRMA SUSAN WILDASIN, being the youngest daughter of Henry and Susan Wildasin, was born in Wilton Township, Muscatine Co. Iowa, in the month of July, 1891, on the Henry Wildasin homestead. In the year 1892 she came with her parents when they moved into the town of Wilton. When she became of proper age to attend school, she entered Wilton Public schools and graduated in the class of the year 1910. Then she enrolled at Cornell College at Mount Vernon, Iowa. After graduating from Cornell in the year 1914 with a B.A. degree, she taught in the following high schools: Britt, Woodbine, Wilton and Oelwein, in Iowa, and for 6 years in the Streater high school in Illinois. In the year 1928 she came home to take care of her mother, who had become an invalid. After the death of her mother, which occurred in July, 1932, she remained at home as a housekeeper for her father, which occupation she is at present filling, being in the town of Wilton, Muscatine Co. Iowa.

JOHN M. WILDASIN, youngest son of my Grandfather George Wildasin, was born in Heidelberg Township, York Co. Pa. in the year 1828. He was educated in the schools of the community at time and grew to manhood in the home of his parents. He was married to Lydia Bricker, a product of York Co. The family always resided in York Co. most of the time being spent on the old homestead of my grandfather George Wildasin, about 4 miles southeast of Hanover. The building stood on an elevation along Furnace Creek. Later moved to Blooming Grove, York Co. Pa. There were 3 children born to this union that grew to manhood, as follows: Alfred Wildasin, Israel Wildasin, and Isaiah Wildasin. Lydia Wildasin, wife of John M. Wildasin, died in the year 1894. He was later married to another lady, but I cannot recall her name. John M. Wildasin passed away in the year 1904, on the 4th day of March, at his home in Blooming Grove, at the age of 76 years.

ALFRED WILDASIN, oldest son of John M. and Lydia Wildasin, was born in Heidelberg Township, York Co. Pa. on September 4, 1859. He was educated in the schools of the community and grew to manhood in the home of his parents. He was married to Miss Ida Markle, who was born in York Co. Pa., in the year 1869. There were 6 children born to this union, as follows: Della, Edwin, Fannie, Alta, Raymond and Robert.

DELLA WILDASIN, oldest daughter of Alfred and Ida Wildasin, was born in Penn Township, York Co. Pa. She was educated in the schools of the community and grew to womanhood in the home of her parents. She was married to John P. Bankert of York Co. Pa. Their address is Route 2, Hanover. To this union there were 5 children born as follows: Walter A., Richard E., Pauline I., Grace A., and John A.

WALTER A. BANKERT, oldest son of John P. and Della Bankert, was born in Penn Township, York Co. Pa. in 1908. He was educated in the schools of the community and grew to manhood in the home of his parents. He was married to Miss Mildred E. Markle of York Co. Pa. They have one daughter, Gladys R. Bankert. The Walter A. Bankert family resides at 212 Fair Avenue, Hanover, Pa.

RICHARD E. BANKERT, son of John and Della Bankert, was born in Penn Township, York Co. Pa., in the year 1910. He was educated in the schools of the community and grew to manhood in the home of his parents. He was married to Miss Ruth E. Wetzel of York Co. Pa. To this union 5 children were born, as follows: Vernon L. in 1930, Donald R. in 1937, Glenn E in 1938, Larry E. in 1940, and Doris L. in 1942. The Richard Bankert family resides on Route 2, Spring Grove, York County, Penn.

PAULINE L. BANKERT, oldest daughter of John P. and Della Bankert was born in Penn Township, York Co. Pa. in the year 1914. She was educated in the schools of the community and grew to womanhood in the home of her parents. She was married to Austin G Zumbrum in 1943. Austin G Jr., in 1941 (Born), Darlene M. Zumbrum in 1943, and Vernon Jean Zumbrum in 1946, Patricia May in 1937, Byron Lee in 1938. The Austin G. Zumbrum family resides at 212 Fair Avenue, Hanover.

GRACE E. BANKERT, youngest daughter on John and Della Bankert, was born in Penn Township, York Co. Pa., in the year 1918. She was educated in the schools of the community and grew to womanhood in the home of her parents. She was married to William J. Snyder of York Co. Pa. There was born to this union one daughter, Caroline Jean Snyder, in 1946. The William J. Snyder family resides at 602 York Street, Hanover Pa.

JOHN A. BANKERT, youngest son of John and Della Bankert, was born in Penn Township, York Co. Pa. in 1923. Educated in the schools of the community, he grew to manhood in the home of his parents, with whom he now makes his home, on Route 2, Hanover. The John P. Bankert family resides on the old John M. and Alfred Wildasin homestead in Penn Township, York Co. Pa.

EDWIN WILDASIN, oldest son of Alfred and Ida Wildasin, was born in 1889. He was educated in the schools of the community and grew to manhood in the home of his parents. He was married to a Miss [Elsie] Utz of York Co. Pa. One son, Norman, was born to this union in the year 1908. Edwin Wildasin passed away in the year 1935. The family resided in the 100 block on McAllister Street, Hanover, Pa.

FANNIE WILDASIN, second daughter of Alfred and Ida Wildasin, was born in Penn Township, York Co. Pa. in the year 1891. She was educated in the schools of the community and grew to womanhood in the home of her parents. She was married to Claude H. Zartman of York Co. Pa. There were 2 children born to this union, Lonna and Raymond.

LONNA ZARTMAN, daughter of Claude H. and Fannie Zartman was born in the year 1915. She was married to Francis Small of York Co. Pa. 4 Children were born to this union, as follows: John in 1933, Robert in 1935, Harry in 1940, and Gordon in 1944. The Francis Small family resides at 239 Eagle Avenue, Hanover, Pa. Fannie Zartman, wife of Claude H. Zartman, passed away in the year 1934.

RAYMOND ZARTMAN, son of Claude H. and Fannie Zartman, was born in the year 1917. He married Pauline Kress, who was born in the year 1920. They have 3 children, as follows: Raymond Jr. born in 1937, Roger born in 1940, and Ronald born in 1942.

ALTA WILDASIN, youngest daughter of Alfred and Ida Wildasin, was born in Penn Township, York Co. Pa. in the year 1893. She was educated in the schools of the community and grew to womanhood in the home of her parents. She was first married to Charles Rust [Rusk], who passed away in 1923. She later married to Ephraim Bollinger. There were 3 children born to this union, as follows: Edwin in 1931, William in 1933, and David in 1935.

RAYMOND J. WILDASIN, son of Alfred and Ida Wildasin, was born in Penn Township, York Co. Pa. in the year 1897. He was educated in the schools of the community and grew to manhood in the home of his parents. He was married to Miss Ruth Naugle, who was born in the year 1897. There were 4 children born to this union, as follows: Mary L. Wildasin, Robert C. Wildasin, Charlotte A. Wildasin, and Donald L. Wildasin. Mary L. Wildasin was born in the year 1922, Charlotte A. Wildasin was born in the year 1926, And Donald was born in 1934, and Robert C. Wildasin was born in the year 1922.

ROBERT W. WILDASIN, youngest son of Alfred and Ida Wildasin was born in Pa. He was educated in the schools of the community and grew to manhood in the home of his parents. He was first married to Hattie E. Haverstock, who was born in the year 1898. Robert W. Wildasin was born in the year 1901. There were 2 children born to this union, Dorothy and Martha B. Wildasin.

DOROTHY WILDASIN, daughter of Robert W. and Hattie E. Wildasin was born in the year 1920. She was educated in the schools of the community and grew to womanhood in the home of her parents. She was married to Clair E. Wise, who was born in the year 1920.

MARTHA B. WILDASIN, daughter of Robert and Hattie E. Wildasin was born in the year 1929. She was educated in the schools of the community and grew to womanhood in the home of her parents.

Mrs. Hattie E. Wildasin, wife of Robert Wildasin, passed away in the year 1942. Robert Wildasin was later married to Stella Maurren [Murren], who was born in the year 1914. They have one daughter, Margaret Wildasin, who was born in the year 1945.

ISRAEL WILDASIN, second son of John M. and Lydia Wildasin, was born in Heidelberg Township, now Penn Township, York County, Pa. May 5, 1862, on the old homestead near Furnace Creek. He was educated in the schools of the community and grew to manhood in the home of his parents. He was married to Miss Sevilla Reynolds, who was born in York Co. Pa. on June 1, 1859. They were married in 1887. There were 5 children born to this union: Estie, Rena, George, Effie and Johnny.

ESTIE WILDASIN, oldest daughter of Israel and Seville Wildasin, was born in Penn Township, York Co. Pa., June 25, 1888. She was educated in the schools of the community and grew to womanhood in the home of her parents. She was married to Claude Mummert of York Co. Pa., August 25, 1907. There were born to this union twelve children:

ROMAINE M. MUMMERT, oldest daughter of Claude and Estie Mummert, was born in Heidelberg Township, York Co. Pa., February 15, 1908. She was educated in the schools of the community and grew to womanhood in the home of her parents. She was married to Leroy Strawbaugh [Strausbaugh], who was born in York Co.

NORMAN E. MUMMERT, oldest son of Claude and Estie Mummert, was born in Heidelberg Township, York Co. Pa., April 7, 1909. He was educated in the schools of the community and grew to manhood in the home of his parents. He was married to Ada Myers of York Co. Pa. They have one son, Glenn. His wife, Ada Mummert, passed away some time later. Sometime after the death of his wife, he was married to Anna Myers of York Co. Pa. There were 5 children born to this union, as follows: Betty, Frieda, Shirley, Gladys and Charlotte.

ROY A. MUMMERT, son of Claude and Estie Mummert, was born in Heidelberg Township, York Co. Pa., September 24, 1910. He was educated in the schools of the community and grew to manhood in the home of his parents. He was married to Miss Anna Warner of York Co. Pa. They have one son.

GUY L. MUMMERT, son of Claude and Estie Mummert, was born in Heidelberg Township, York Co. Pa., April 27, 1912. He was educated in the schools of the community and grew to manhood in the home of his parents. He was married to Pauline Berwerger [Berwager] of York Co. Pa. There were 4 children born to this union: Donald, Deloris, Gorman and Larry.

ARTELLA M. MUMMERT, daughter of Claude and Estie Mummert, was born in Heidelberg Township, York Co. Pa., August 27, 1914. She was educated in the schools of the community and grew to womanhood in the home of her parents. She was married to John Little of York Co. Pa. There were 3 children born to this union: John Jr., Doris, and Clyde

LEON H. MUMMERT, son of Claude and Estie Mummert, was born in Heidelberg Township, York Co. Pa., June 6, 1916. He was educated in the schools of the community and grew to manhood in the home of his parents. He was married to Mary Ruby, York Co. Pa. They have one son, David.

TREVA R. MUMMERT, daughter of Claude and Estie Mummert, was born in Heidelberg Township, York Co. Pa., February 16, 1918. She was educated in the schools of the community and grew to womanhood in the home of her parents. She was married to Clyde Brillhart of York Co. Pa. They have no children.

NADINE E. MUMMERT, daughter of Claude and Estie Mummert, was born in Heidelberg Township, York Co. Pa., December 7, 1919. She was educated in the schools of the community and grew to womanhood in the home of her parents. She makes her home with her parents at Route 3, Hanover, Pa.

LESTER G. MUMMERT, son of Claude and Estie Mummert, was born in Heidelberg Township, York Co. Pa., December 6, 1921. He was educated in the schools of the community and grew to manhood in the home of his parents, with whom he now resides at Route 3, Hanover, Pa.

STEWART C. MUMMERT, youngest son of Claude and Estie Mummert, was born in Heidelberg Township, York Co. Pa., April 3, 1925. He was educated in the schools of the community and grew to manhood in the home of his parents. He was married to Thelma Shaffer of York Co. Pa. They have no children. He died in 1947.

DOROTHY L. MUMMERT, daughter of Claude and Estie Mummert, was born in Heidelberg Township, York Co. Pa., February 16 1927. She was educated in the schools of the community and grew to womanhood in the home of her parents, with whom she still lives.

THELMA M. MUMMERT, youngest daughter of Claude and Estie Mummert, was born in Heidelberg Township, York Co. Pa., August 24, 1929. She was educated in the schools of the community, and resides at the home of her parents.

RENA WILDASIN, daughter of Israel and Sevilla Wildasin, was born in Penn Township, York Co. Pa., May 9, 1890. She was educated in the schools of the community and grew to womanhood in the home of her parents. She was married to Robert C. Stauffer of York Co. Pa. in the year 1912. There were 4 children born to this union: Raymond D., Alvin D., Arleen C., and Wilmer.

RAYMOND D. STAUFFER, oldest son of Robert C. and Rena Stauffer, was born in Penn Township, York Co. Pa., August 30, 1912. He was educated in the schools of the community and grew to manhood in the home of his parents. He was married to Sterlen Nace of York Co. There were 2 children Marie and Robert Jr., born to this union. His wife, Sterling [Sterlen] passed away, and he later married Edna Stambaugh. One daughter, Judy, was born to this union. They live at Route 3, Spring Grove, York Co. Pa.

ALVIN C. STAUFFER, son of Robert C. and Rena Stauffer, was born in Penn Township, York Co. Pa., April 22, 1914. He was educated in the schools of the community and grew to manhood in the home of his parents. He was married to Dorothy Luckenbaugh of York Co. Pa. Two children were born to this union, namely, Charles and Gordon.

ARLEEN C. STAUFFER, daughter of Robert C. and Rena Stauffer, was born in Penn Township, York Co. Pa., June 30, 1917. She was educated in the schools of the community and grew to womanhood in the home of her parents. She was married to Lloyd Snyder of York Co. Pa. 2 children were born to this union: Phyllis and Glen.

WILMER STAUFFER, youngest son of Robert C. and Rena Stauffer, was born in Penn Township, York Co. Pa., May 28, 1921. He was educated in the schools of the community and grew to manhood in the home of his parents. He was married to Bernice Senft of York Co. Pa. They have one son, John Stauffer.

GEORGE WILDASIN, son of Israel and Sevilla Wildasin, was born in Penn Township, York Co. Pa., January, 1892. He was educated in the schools of the community and grew to manhood in the home of his parents. He was married to Miss Mary Milheim of York Co. Pa., November 21, 1914. Three children were born to this union, as follows: Melvin, Myrtle, John.

MELVIN M. WILDASIN, oldest son of George and Mary Wildasin, was born June 30, 1915. He was educated in the schools of the community and grew to manhood in the home of his parents. He was married to Geraldine Mummert. They have one son, Paul H.

MYRTLE R. WILDASIN, daughter of George and Mary Wildasin, was born August 17, 1917. She was educated in the schools of the community and grew to womanhood in the home of her parents. She was married to Wilmer H. Heindel. They have one son, Lee C.

JOHN P. WILDASIN, son of George and Mary Wildasin, was born March 31, 1922. He was educated in the schools of the community and grew to manhood in the home of his parents. He was married to Ruth Kitzmiller and they reside at 538 Locust Street, Hanover, Pa.

EFFIE WILDASIN, daughter of Israel and Seville Wildasin, was born in Penn Township, York Co., February 16, 1897. She was educated in the schools of the community and grew to womanhood in the home of her parents. She married Emory Boyer, May 21, 1921. There were 3 children born to this union, as follows, Gladys M., Mearl R., and Dean L.

Turning back again to Israel Wildasin and his wife, Sevilla Wildasin, we find Israel Wildasin died in the year 1931, at the age of 69 years, and his wife Seville passed away, February 9, 1924, at the age of 64. Also, Johnny Wildasin, son of Israel and Sevilla Wildasin, was born in Penn Township, York Co. Pa., July 4, 1899, and passed away July 26, 1905.

ISAIAH E. WILDASIN, youngest son of John M. and Lydia Wildasin, was born on the old homestead of his Father and Grandfather, George Wildasin, on the banks of Furnace Creek in Heidelberg Township in York Co. Pa., in the year 1870. He was educated in the schools of the community and grew to manhood in the home of his parents. He was married to Miss Mary S. Shue, who was born near the Mason and Dixon line, between the States of Pa. and Maryland. They were married in the year 1890. There were born to this union eleven children, as follows: Anna Mabel, Elsie, Horton, Lillie, Harry, Emory, Treva, Ralph, Mary Margaret, Pauline, Dorothy, and Virginia.

ANNA MABEL WILDASIN, oldest daughter of Isaiah E. and Mary S. Wildasin, was born in Carroll Co. Maryland, in the year 1890. She was educated in the schools of the community and grew to womanhood in the home of her parents. She was married to George William Snyder, who was born in the year 1884. They were married in the year 1917. Two children, Dorothy Virginia and Ruby, were born to this union.

DOROTHY VIRGINIA SNYDER, was born in 1918. She was educated in the schools of the community and grew to womanhood in the home of her parents. She was married to Earl Edgar Stevens, who was born in the year 1912. Two children, John William, born in 1937, and Earl Nelson, born in 19441, blessed this union. The Stevens family and Ruby Snyder reside on Route 2, Hanover, Pa. Ruby Snyder was born near Hampstead, Maryland, in the year 1920. The George William Snyder family live in Hampstead, Maryland.

ELSIE WILDASIN, second daughter of Isaiah E. and Mary S. Wildasin, was born in Carroll Co. Maryland, in the year 1892. She was educated in the schools of the community and grew to womanhood in the home of her parents. She was married to Irvin Armstrong, who was born in the year 1885. They were married in 1917, and 2 children were born to this union, Eileen and Pauline.

EILEEN ARMSTRONG, oldest daughter of Irvin and Elsie Armstrong, was born in Carroll County, Maryland, in the year 1920. She was educated in the schools of the community and grew to womanhood in the home of her parents. She was married to Rev. Norman Bortner, who was born in the year 1915. They were married in 1943, and their address is Frostburg, Maryland.

PAULINE ARMSTRONG, was born near Lineboro, Maryland, in the year 1920. She was educated in the schools of the community and grew to womanhood in the home of her parents. She was married to Donald Folk, who was born in the year 1922. They were married in the year 1943. There were 2 children born to this union, Elaine Folk in 1945 and Robert A. Folk in 1947.

HORTON WILDASIN, oldest son of Isaiah E. and Mary S. Wildasin, was born near Manchester in Carroll Co., Maryland, in the year 1894. He was educated in the schools of the community and grew to manhood in the home of his parents. He was married to Clara Virginia Myers, who was born in the year 1897. They were married in the year 1914, and now reside near Manchester, Md.

LILLIE WILDASIN, daughter of Isaiah E. and Mary S. Wildasin, was born in Carroll Co. Maryland, in the year 1897. She was educated in the schools of the community and grew to womanhood in the home of her parents. She was married to Vernon Bucher, who was born in the year 1898. They were married in 1915. There were born to this union 6 children: Mary, Esther, Catharine, Frances, Vernon Jr., and Reva.

MARY BUCHER, oldest daughter of Vernon and Lillie Bucher, was born in Carroll Co., Maryland, in the year 1916. She was educated in the schools of the community and grew to womanhood in the home of her parents. She was married to Harry E. Claggert, who was born in the year 1910. They were married in the year 1944.

ESTHER BUCHER, daughter of Vernon and Lillie Bucher, who was born in Carroll Co., Maryland, in the year 1918. She was educated in the schools of the community and grew to womanhood in the home of her parents. She was married to Francis E. Murray, who was born in the year 1920. They were married in the year 1946. Their address is Hampstead, Maryland.

CATHERINE BUCHER, daughter of Vernon and Lillie Bucher, was born in the year 1921. Her address is Baltimore Co., Maryland.

FRANCES BUCHER, daughter of Vernon and Lillie Bucher, was born in the year 1922.

VERNON BUCHER, son of Vernon and Lillie Bucher, was born in the year 1926.

REVA BUCHER, daughter of Vernon and Lillie Bucher, I have no record.

HARRY EMORY WILDASIN, son of Isaiah E. and Mary S. Wildasin, was born in Carroll Co., Maryland, in the month of May, in the year 1899. He was educated in the schools of the community and grew to manhood in the home of his parents. He was married to Bessie Clara Snyder of Hanover, in the year 1918, who was born in the year 1898. They reside in Manchester, Maryland. There were born to this union 6 children: Betty Rosalie, Thelma Carlene, Emory Burnell, Miriam Arlene, Claire Ann, and Julia Louise.

BETTY ROSALIE WILDASIN, oldest daughter of Harry Emory and Bessie Clara Wildasin, was born in Carroll Co., Maryland, on the 20th day of September, 1921. She was educated in the schools of the community and grew to womanhood in the home of her parents. She was married to Guy Welton Bortner of Hanover, Pa. in 1938. They have one son, Edward Jacob Bortner.

THELMA CARLENE WILDASIN, the second daughter of Harry Emory and Bessie Clara Wildasin, was born in Carroll Co. Maryland, on the 18th day of October 1923. She was educated in the schools of the community and grew to womanhood in the home of her parents. She was married to William Ross Calary, of Snydersburg, Maryland, on December 27, 1946.

EMORY BURNELL WILDASIN, son of Harry Emory and Bessie Clara Wildasin, was born in Carroll Co., Maryland, August 14, 1925. He was educated in the schools of the community and grew to manhood in the home of his parents.

MIRIAM ARLENE WILDASIN, daughter of Harry Emory and Bessie Clare Wildasin, was born in Carroll Co., Maryland, December 7, 1926. She was educated in the schools of the community and grew to womanhood in the home of her parents. She was married to Roy Robert Masemore of Snydersburg, Maryland, January 27, 1943. There were born to this union three children, Ruth Ann, August 5 1943, Peggy Jean Masemore, October 16, 1946.

CLAIRE ANN WILDASIN, daughter of Harry Emory and Bessie Clara Wildasin, was born in Carroll Co., Maryland, December 7, 1933.

JULIA LOUISE WILDASIN, youngest daughter of Harry Emory and Bessie Clara Wildasin, was born in Carroll Co., Maryland, July 26, 1936.

TREVA A. WILDASIN, daughter of Isaiah E. and Mary S. Wildasin, was born in Carroll Co., Md., in 1901. She was educated in the schools of the community and grew to womanhood in the home of her parents. She was married to Albert C. Graf, who was born in 1897. They were married in 1920. There were born to this union 2 children, Vernon and Frances.

VERNON GRAF, son of Albert C. and Treva Graf, was born in 1921. He was married to Edna Graf of some southern state, who was born in 1918. They were married in 1941 and have one daughter, Linda Sue, born in 1946.

of TREVA GRAF, I have no record.

RALPH WILDASIN, son of Isaiah E. and Mary S. Wildasin, was born in Carroll Co., Md., in 1902. He was educated in the schools of the community and grew to manhood in the home of his parents. He was married to Madeline Little of Hanover, Pa., who was born in 1915. They were married in the year 1935. Two children were born to this union, Henry Martin in 1939, and Sallie Susan in 1944.

MARY MARGARET WILDASIN, daughter of Isaiah E. and Mary S. Wildasin, was born in Carroll Co., Maryland, in the year 1904. She was educated in the schools of the community and grew to womanhood in the home of her parents. She was married to Wilbert Sterner, who was born in the year 1899. They were married in 1922. Two children, Kathleen and William A. were born to this union.

KATHLEEN STERNER, was born in the year 1923. She was married to Robert Brenner, who was born in 1911. They were married in the year 1945, and have one daughter, Dawn Marie, born in 1946.

WILLIAM A. STERNER, was born in 1932. His address is McAllister Street, Hanover, Pa.

PAULINE WILDASIN, daughter of Isaiah E. and Mary S. Wildasin, was born in Carroll Co., Md., in 1906. She was educated in the schools of the community and grew to womanhood in the home of her parents. She was married to Landle [Landis] Garrett, Hanover, Pa. who was born in 1906.

DOROTHY WILDASIN, daughter of Isaiah E. and Mary S. Wildasin, was born in Carroll Co., Md., in 1909. She was educated in the schools of the community and grew to womanhood in the home of her parents. She was married to William Schwinn of Westminster, Maryland, who was born in 1908. They were married in 1933, and have one son, William Jr., born in 1939.

VIRGINIA WILDASIN, youngest daughter of Isaiah E. and Mary S. Wildasin, was born in Carroll Co., Md., in the year 1912. She gained most of her education in the Hanover schools. She grew to womanhood in the home of her parents, and was married to Albert Spangler of Gettysburg, Adams Co., Pa., who was born in 1915. They were married in 1940.

Isaiah E. Wildasin is the only one left to the John M. and Lydia Wildasin family.

Once more turning back to the Samuel Wildasin family (my Fatherís family). We will now make mention of the oldest daughter of his family, Louisa. She was born in York Co. Pa., July 24, 1844. She was in her sixth year when she came with her parents in the year 1850 to the state of Iowa. She was also accompanied by one brother and 2 sisters. After arriving in Iowa, what education she had, she received from the public schools of the county. She was a very dutiful daughter towards her parents, in helping her Mother with house work. Also, before her marriage she would read the news to her father in the evening after the dayís work was done. I might say she was an apt child in adapting herself to the many things that were to be done in a household of 10 or more persons. When the Civil War broke out, she was about sixteen years old, and she took a wonderful interest in what was happening at that time. She would read the news of the war, and how the men or boys, as they were called at this time, were faring from this vicinity. It seems that the things that were transpiring were so firmly implanted in her mind that she could tell you the day each battle was fought, and where it was, and the number of men lost in each battle from this community.

She had another qualification. She was a wonderful knitter, and she could knit a pair of menís mittens in one day. I well remember when several of the business men of the town of Wilton came to my parentís home to get an old-fashioned dinner. These men were from Pa. and had married yankee wives and were not getting the dinners that they were craving for. After the dinner dishes were done my sister, Louisa, got out her knitting material. These men were so enthused at her knitting that each one ordered her to knit a pair of double strength, what was at that time known as checked made of blue and scarlet yarn. In the year 1865 she married one of my fatherís hired men by the name of Samuel F. Creitz, of Lehigh Co. Pa. That same year my father built a house on the land south of the highway on Section 18, and my sister and her husband moved in when it was completed. Also, I might say that my father built the barn in the year 1866. The barn was built on the Pennsylvania order, 40 feet wide, 66 feet long, 16 feet to the plate, with basement under the entire structure for stock. These buildings are still in use. The farm is now owned by the Martz sisters.

My father had given this farm to my sister and husband, but in the year 1871 my brother-in-law persuaded my father to take this back, and in turn gave them the Hickory Grove farm in Poweshiek Co. Iowa. My father had bought the Hickory Grove farm in 1869. Then in the fall of the year 1871, my sister and husband moved to the Hickory Grove farm, and they resided there until the year 1900. They built a house in Deep River, Poweshiek Co. Iowa. Mr. Creitz died in the year 1903, and my sister Louisa died in the year 1925, at the age of 81 years.

Now turn back again in time. My sister had 4 children, 2 sons and 2 daughters. The oldest son was Samuel F. Creitz, Jr., born in Wilton Township, Muscatine Co., Iowa, in August 1866. He was a lad of five years of age when his parents moved to the Hickory Grove farm, and he grew to manhood there. After he was married, he lived for some time on one of his fatherís farms. He married Miss Jessie Sperry of Deep River Township, Poweshiek Co. Iowa. To them were born 3 children, 2 sons, and one daughter, Maydonna Estell, who died in infancy.

FORDYCE FRANKLIN CREITZ, was born in Deep River Township, Poweshiek Co., Iowa. He accompanied his parents when they moved to Fort Morgan, Colorado, in the year 1899. He later on was graduated from the School of Pharmacy in Des Moines, Iowa. He clerked in different drug stores, and later he became manager of one of Schlegelís Drug Stores in Davenport, Iowa. During the year 1946 he and his family moved to California. He married a lady from Washington Co., Iowa, and they have one son. The family address is 426 South Hill Street, Los Angeles, Ca.

RAYMOND PERKINS CREITZ, was born in Deep River Township, Poweshiek Co., Iowa. When his parents moved to Colorado, he accompanied them. He had been married and had one daughter, Shirley. His wife has passed away and he was an auto mechanic in Denver, Colo. He died in 1947.

Again, turning back to Samuel F. Creitz, Jr., and Jessie Creitz, his wife. The Creitz family moved to Colorado on account of Mrs. Creitzí health. She passed away in 1906, and Mr. Creitz died in 1938.

MARY E. CREITZ, oldest daughter of Samuel F. and Louisa Creitz, was born in Wilton Township, Muscatine Co., Iowa, August 4, 1868. She moved with her parents to the Hickory Grove farm in Deep River Township, Poweshiek Co., Iowa, in 1871. She was educated in the public schools of Poweshiek Co., and grew to womanhood in the home of her parents. She was married to Arthur W. Capehart of Deep River Township, Poweshiek, Iowa, on September 2, 1901, at Deep River, Iowa. There were 5 children born to this union, as follows: Clark H., Born in Deep River Township, Poweshiek Co., Iowa, June 27, 1902, not married, resides in Santa Paula, Cal.; Mary A. Capehart, born in Deep River Township, July 25, 1904, married Lester E. Mayo of Las Vegas, Nevada, September 15, 1934. Lester died January 1, 1936. Mrs. Mayo now resides in Ventura, California. They had no children. Scott Capehart was born in Deep River Township, October 10, 1906. Not married, he resides in Almont, Colorado. Helen Capehart was born in Deep River Township, October 10, 1906. She grew to womanhood in the home of her parents. She was married to Collier R. Gibbs at Lexington, Missouri, June 10, 1930. They have one son, Milo H., born September 19, 1937, at Kansas City, Missouri. They now reside at Tinley, Ringgold Co., Iowa, November 22, 1909. Not married, he resides in Santa Paula, California. The Capehart family moved from the Deep River community in the year 1908 to Tinley, Ringgold Co., Iowa. Then they moved from Ringgold Co., Iowa to Tina in Carroll Co., Missouri, and then to Archie in Bates Co., Missouri. From there they went to Santa Paula, California, where Mrs. Mary E. Capehart now resides.

HATTIE ELIZABETH CREITZ, daughter of Samuel F. and Louisa Creitz, was born in the Hickory Grove farm in Deep River Township, Poweshiek Co., Iowa, March 12, 1872. She lived in Poweshiek Co. all her life and was at one time employed in the Cox Store in Deep River. She moved with her parents to the town of Deep River. She never married, and died January 17, 1941.

HENRY GARFIELD TILDEN CREITZ, youngest son of Samuel F. and Louisa Creitz, was born on the Hickory Grove farm in Deep River Township, Poweshiek Co., Iowa, August 31, 1882. He was educated in the country schools and grew to manhood in the home of his parents. He was married to Miss Lillie May Rhine of Creston, Union Co., Iowa, December 28, 1904, at Creston. They lived on a farm in Deep River for 6 years. Then the family moved to Texas in January 1911. They now reside near Adrian, Texas in Oldham County. This union was blessed with 4 children, as follows: Dorothy Louisa, Lorin Rhine, Henrietta Elizabeth, and Rex Edward.

DOROTHY LOUISA CREITZ, oldest daughter of Henry Garfield Tilden and Lillie May Creitz, was born in Deep River Township, Poweshiek Co., Iowa, March 27, 1907. She received her education in the state of Texas, and grew to womanhood in the home of her parents. She was married to R.V. Cooper of the state of Texas, on July 14, 1927, at the city of Amarillo, Texas. They now reside in Vega, Oldham Co., Texas, where all 6 of there children have been born, as follows: Evelyn Louise on October 24, 1928, Henry Calvin on September 7, 1930, Helen Elaine Cooper on December 15, 1931, James Robert on February 1, 1934, Doris Ruth on January 29, 1941, and Hazel Elizabeth on August 3, 1942.

LORIN RHINE CREITZ, oldest son of Henry G. Tilden and Lillie May Creitz, was born in Deep River Township, November 28, 1908. He was educated in the schools of the state of Texas, and grew to manhood in the home of his parents. He was married to Armenia Elliott of the state of Texas, March 22, 1941, at Amarillo, Texas. This union was blessed with 2 children, both born near Adrain, as follows: Terry Lynn Creitz, on January 3, 1942, and Paula Madelyn on December 15, 1944.

HENRIETTA ELIZABETH CREITZ, the youngest daughter of Henry Garfield Tilden and Lillie May Creitz, was born near Adrain, Oldham Co., Texas, November 12, 1912. She was educated in the state of Texas and grew to womanhood in the home of her parents. She is now a trained nurse, being employed at present in Amarillo, Texas.

REX EDWARD CREITZ, youngest son of Henry and Lillie Creitz, was born near Adrain, Texas, November 6, 1916. He received his primary education in the schools of Texas and grew to manhood in the home of his parents. He is at present taking a C.P.A. course in the city of Denver, Colo. He is now married and makes his home in Denver.

HARRIET WILDASIN HORN, the youngest daughter of my Grandfather, George Wildassin, was born in York Co., Pa., in the year 1830, in what is now known as Penn Township. She grew to womanhood in York Co. and was educated in the York Co. schools. She was married to Henry Horn of York Co., Pa., in 1865. They remained in York Co. until 1869, when they moved to Iowa. They resided near Wilton, Iowa, for about one year. Early in the year 1870, they moved from the Wilton vicinity to Hickory Grove farm in Deep River, Poweshiek Co., Iowa, where they resided for two seasons. After they had erected some buildings on their own land in Deep River Township, they moved there on (the Hickory Grove farm where the Horns had resided was the property of my father, Samuel Wildasin) at that time. There were 6 children born to them, as follows: Aaron, Albert, William, all born in York Co., Pa., and Eli, Mary, and Charles, born in Deep River Township, Poweshiek Co., Iowa. I might mention here that the oldest son, Aaron, died in York Co., Pa., during the holiday season, in the year 1876. He had been attending schools at the Gettysburg College, at Gettysburg, Pa., when he was taken ill and passed away quite suddenly in the town of Hanover.

ALBERT HORN, being the next son in order of Henry and Harriet Horn, was born in York o., Pa., in 1865, he remained there until his parents moved from York Co. to Muscatine Co., Iowa in 1869. When his parents moved to Deep River Township, Poweshiek Co., Iowa, in the early part of 1870, he accompanied them. He grew to manhood in the home of his parents there, and was educated in the country schools. He then took a course in the Norton Normal and Scientific Academy of Wilton, Iowa. He was employed in a grocery store in Denver, Colorado, for some time. He next returned to Deep River Township, Poweshiek Co., Iowa, where he was married to Miss Kara Belle Wardrip, of Mahaska Co., Iowa, who was born August 23, 1870. They then moved to Des Moines, Ia., where he operated a grocery store for some time. After disposing of the grocery, he operated a wholesale store for some time. Then he disposed of it and now his time is taken up in overseeing the various houses he has for rent. This union was blessed with 3 children, as follows: Harriet Mabel, Albert Sidney, and Dorothy Marie.

HARRIET MABEL HORN, oldest daughter of Albert and Belle Horn, was born in Des Moines, Iowa, in May, 1899. She was educated in the Des Moines schools and grew to womanhood in the home of her parents. She married Orville Bunker, and they have one son, Orville William Bunker, born in Newton, Jasper Co., Iowa, where the Bunkers are still living.

ALBERT SIDNEY HORN, only son of Albert and Belle Horn, was born in Des Moines, Iowa, and grew to manhood in the home of his parents. He was educated in the Des Moines schools and also took a course in law. He married Gretchen Gilchrist of the state of Wisconsin. He operates a collect in Indianapolis, Indiana, where they now reside. The Horns have no children.

DOROTHY MARIE HORN, youngest daughter of Albert and Belle Horn, was born in Des Moines, Iowa, in 1910. She was educated in the Des Moines schools and later graduated from the State Normal School at Cedar Falls, Iowa. She is a school teacher by profession. She taught in Davenport, Iowa, and now in the Des Moines schools. She resides with her mother. Her father, Albert Horn, died in July 30, 1947, and was buried in Des Moines, Iowa.

ELI HORN, son of Henry and Harriet Horn, was born on the Hickory Grove farm in Deep River Township, Poweshiek Co., Iowa, in 1870. He was taken with his parents in the year 1871, when they moved from the Hickory Grove farm to the Henry Horn homestead also in Deep River Township. He was educated in the country schools, and also attended the Norton Normal and Scientific Academy at Wilton, Iowa. He grew to manhood in the home of his parents. He taught school in the country for several winters. He was married to Miss Sadie Moore of Keokuk Co., Iowa. To this union 4 children were born: Raymond, Lela May, Velma, and Henry E. Eli Horn resided on the old Henry Horn homestead until about 8 years ago, when he and his wife moved to What Cheer, Keokuk Co., Iowa, where they now reside. Eli had some experience in the baking business in What Cheer. He is now living what we might call a retired life.

RAYMOND HORN, oldest son of Eli and Sadie Horn, was born in Deep River Township, Poweshiek Co., Iowa. He was educated in the public schools of the county and grew to manhood in the home of his parents. He was married to Ada Ham of Adair Co., Iowa. There were 4 children born to this union, as follows: George, Marvin, Henry and Frances Berendean. Raymond lived for quite a number of years on his fatherís farm, that his Uncle, William H. Horn lived on before they moved to Montezuma, Iowa. He now resides on the old Henry Horn homestead.

LELA MAY HORN, oldest daughter of Eli and Sadie Horn, was born in Deep River Township, Poweshiek Co., Iowa, on the old Henry Horn homestead. She was educated in the country schools and grew to womanhood in the home of her parents. She was married to Edwin Goodman of Keokuk Co., Iowa. They have no children, and live on one of her fatherís farms in Washington Co., Iowa.

VELMA HORN, youngest daughter of Eli and Sadie Horn, was born in Deep River Township, Poweshiek Co., Iowa on the old Henry Horn homestead. She was educated in the country schools of the county and grew to womanhood in the home of her parents. She was married to Cleo McMaines of Deep River Township, Poweshiek Co., Iowa. They have one daughter, Alice Fay McMaines. They reside on one of her fatherís farms, being the old home where her Uncle William H. Horn lived.

HENRY HORN, the youngest son of Eli and Sadie Horn, was born in Deep River Township, Poweshiek Co., Iowa, on the old Henry Horn homestead. He was educated in the country schools and grew to manhood in the home of his parents. He was married to Frieda Watner of Tilton, Deep River Township, Poweshiek Co., Iowa. They have o children, and reside on one of his fatherís farms.

MARY HORN, only daughter of Henry and Harriet Horn, was born in Deep River Township, Poweshiek Co., Iowa, in June 1872. She was educated in the country schools of the county and grew to womanhood in the home of her parents. She was married to John Jennings of Keokuk Co., Iowa. Three children were born to this union, as follows: Irma, Edna, and Cecil. Mrs. Jennings passed away in the month of November, 1945.

IRMA JENNINGS, the oldest daughter of John and Mary Jennings, was born in Keokuk Co., Iowa. She was educated in the country schools and grew to womanhood in the home of her parents. She was educated otherwise, and is now employed in the telephone office of Des Moines, Iowa. She is still unmarried.

EDNA JENNINGS, daughter of John and Mary Jennings, was born in Keokuk Co., Iowa. She was educated in the schools of the community and grew to womanhood in the home of her parents. She was married to Glenn Holderness of Deep River Township, Poweshiek Co., Iowa. They have one daughter, Irene Manfield Holderness, who resides with her parents at their home.

CECIL JENNINGS, only son of John and Mary Jennings, was born in Keokuk Co., Iowa. He was educated in the schools of the community and grew to manhood in the home of his parents. He resides with his parents on their farm in Keokuk Co., Iowa, and is not married.

Turning back to the members of the Henry and Harriet Horn family to correct an error, by placing the William Henry Horn family fifth in the family when it should have come third in line. We hope no harm has been done.

WILLIAM HENRY HORN, son of Henry and Harriet Horn, was born in York Co., Pa., on January 26, 1868. His parents brought him from their home in York Co., Pa. to Muscatine Co., Iowa, in the year 1869. His parents resided for about one year in Muscatine Co., and in the early part of 1870, they moved to the Hickory Grove farm in Deep River Township, Poweshiek Co., Iowa. The family remained on this farm for 2 years and in the fall of 1871, they moved to their own farm in Deep River Township. William attended the schools of the community and grew to manhood in the home of his parents. He also attended the Norton Normal and Scientific Academy at Wilton. He also taught schools during the winter months. He was married to Lila Belle Wood, who was born Sept. 29, 1872, at Brooklyn in Poweshiek Co. They were married in the year 1897. They reside on a farm in Deep River Township, Poweshiek Co., Iowa, until the year 1914, when the family moved to Montezuma, Iowa, where they now reside. Two children were born to this union, as follows: Geneva Venafrum and Leona Geraldean.

GENEVA VENAFRUM HORN, daughter of William Henry and Lila Belle Horn, was born in Deep River Township, Poweshiek Co., Iowa, December 25, 1900. She attended the schools of the community and grew to womanhood in the home of her parents. She was married to Clarence A. Cutshall of Dallas Co., Iowa, who was born January 9, 1901, in Dallas Co., Iowa. There were 4 children born to this union, as follows: Geneva Mabelle, Hazel Leona, Dale Arthur, and Margorie.

HAZEL LEONA CUTSHALL, was born December 7, 1931, in Dallas Co., Iowa.

DALE ARTHUR CUTSHALL, was born July 17, 1933, in Dallas Co., Iowa.

MARJORIE ANN CUTSHALL, was born March 5, 1940, in Dallas Co., Iowa.

LEONA GERALDEAN HORN, daughter of William Henry and Lila Belle Horn, was born April 5, 1903, in Deep River Township, Poweshiek Co., Iowa. She was educated in the country schools until her parents moved to Montezuma, Iowa. She then attended the Montezuma schools and later went to college. She grew to womanhood in the home of her parents. She taught school for quite a number of years, but of later years she has remained at home to help her mother, who was not blessed with the best of health. Mrs. Lila Belle Horn passed away on June 17, 1943, being in her seventy-first year. Geraldean is now looking after the home for her father.

CHARLES HORN, the youngest son of Henry and Harriet Horn, was born in Deep River Township, Poweshiek Co., Iowa, in the year 1874. He was educated in the schools of the community and grew to manhood in the home of his parents. He also attended the Norton Normal and Scientific Academy at Wilton, Iowa. He was for several years employed in his brotherís grocery store in Des Moines, Iowa. He also managed the Union Pacific Tea Store in Council Bluffs, Iowa. He was married to Maud Roper, of Council Bluffs, Iowa, while employed in his brotherís store at Des Moines. They had 3 daughters. He also operated a vineyard for some time. He died April 30, 1926, at his home in Council Bluffs. One daughter married C.H. Stevenson of West Palm Beach, Florida. There were 2 other daughters, Pauline and Ruth, one of who was in Cleveland, Ohio, for some time. Charles Horn was buried in Walnut Hill Cemetery, Council Bluffs.

Now turning back to an early date, to the time when the George Wildasin (my Grandfather) family resided about 4 miles southeast of Hanover. Their home was what is called an inland home, not being situated along any road. It stood on the higher ground along a creek, known as Furnace Creek. Grandfather married a Miss Motter. I think her first name was Maria. Their family consisted of 7 children, three sons and four daughters, as follows according to age: Elizabeth, Samuel (my father), Marie, Jacob M., Catharine, John M., and Harriet.

The oldest daughter, who I called Elizabeth was married to William Ruggins [Huggens], who resided in Heidelberg Township, York Co., Pa. As far as my knowledge will permit me to go, there were three daughters born to this union. The oldest, Sarah, by name, married a farmer by the name of Adam Hann [Hahn]. They resided on the road that leads from the Jefferson road to the Black Rock road on the south side of Furnace Creek, in a stone house. There were 2 sons born to this union, John and Rufus.

The next daughterís name was Catharine and she married a man by the name of Daniel Snider [Levi R. Snyder]. They resided a short distance north of what is now known as Marburg, and the youngest daughters name was Elizabeth. She married a man by the name of Runkel. They also reside in the vicinity of Marburg in York Co.

Now turning back again to the family of Jacob M. (my Uncle) and Fannie Wildasin.

SARAH WILDASIN, the oldest daughter of Jacob M. and Fannie Wildasin, was born in Heidelberg Township, York Co., Pa., September 5, 1861. She was educated in the schools of the community and grew to womanhood in the home of her parents. She was married to George W. Rudisill of Penn Township, York Co., Pa., who was born October 2, 1862. Their marriage took place October 15, 1882. There were born to this union 10 children, but only seven grew to manhood and womanhood. The names of these are as follows: Pius, Anna, Minnie, Jennie, Margaret, Paul, and Andrew. The names of the children of George W. Rudisill who passed away when quite young were as follows: Jacob, Mary, and George. The George Rudisill family lived for many years on a farm near what is known as Stone Church. Mr. Rudisill owned several farms near where he lived. Quite a number of years ago he met with a very serious accident, causing the loss of one of his arms.

PIUS RUDISILL, the oldest son of George W. and Sarah Rudisill, was born in York Co., Pa., in the year 1883. He was educated in the schools of the community and grew to manhood in the home of his parents. He was married to Miss Ann M. Snyder of Brodbecks, York Co., Pa, October 15, 1907. There were born to this union 6 children, as follows: George, Pius Jr., Paul, Nevin, Elsie, and Pauline. Pius Rudisill Sr. passed away in the year 1941. The widow still resides near Gambrill Station in the state of Maryland.

ELSIE RUDISILL, oldest daughter of Pius and Anna M. Rudisill, was born in York Co., Pa., educated in the schools of the community and grew to womanhood in the home of her parents. She was married to David Prumphrey [Pumphrey]. There were 2 children, Marjory and Joan, born to this union. Their residence is unknown to the compiler.

GEORGE RUDISILL, oldest son of Pius and Anna M. Rudisill, I have no record of.

PIUS RUDISILL JR., son of Pius and Anna M. Rudisill, married Miss Grace ------ [McKay]. No children were born to this union.

PAUL RUDISILL, son of Pius and Anna M. Rudisill, unmarried, passed away.

PAULINE RUDISILL, daughter of Pius and Anna M. Rudisill, was married to George Stokes. No children.

NEVIN RUDISILL, son of Pius and Anna M. Rudisill, was married to Miss Grace ----- [Robey]. They have one daughter, Linda Mae Rudisill. Mr. Nevin Rudisill has passed away.

Next in order would be, ANNA RUDISILL, oldest daughter of George W. and Sarah Rudisill, who was born near Brodbecks, York Co., Pa., in 1884. She was educated in the schools of the community and grew to womanhood in the home of her parents. She was married to Leon Rife. They reside in or near Spring Grove, York Co., Pa., and have one daughter, Florence Rife. She was married to Joseph Harvey, and their residence is not known to the compiler.

MINNIE RUDISILL, daughter of George W. and Sarah Rudisill, was born near Brodbecks, York Co., Pa., in the year 1888. She was educated in the schools of the community and grew to womanhood in the home of her parents. She married Samuel Keller. They reside on York Street, Hanover, Pa. Mrs. Keller passed away in 1946, and they had no children.

Next in order, JENNIE RUDISILL, daughter of George W. and Sarah Rudisill, was born near Brodbecks, York Co., Pa., in 1890. She was educated in the schools of the community and grew to womanhood in the home of her parents. She married Allen Warner. They have no children, and reside on York Street, Hanover, PA.

Next in order is, MARGARET RUDISILL, youngest daughter of George W. and Sarah Rudisill, who was born near Brodbecks, York Co., Pa., in 1899. She was educated in the schools of the community and grew to womanhood in the home of her parents. She moved to Hanover with her parents in 1929. After her mother died in 1933, she remained as housekeeper for her father until he died in 1946. She never married and still lives in the family home.

PAUL RUDISILL, son of George W. and Sarah Rudisill was born near Brodbecks, York Co., Pa., in 1902. He was educated in the schools of the community and grew to manhood in the home of his parents. He was married to Miss Florence K. ------ [Florence Pauline Kaltreider]. There were born to this union 6 children, as follows: Margaret, Dorothy, Paul Jr., Carroll, Florence, and Nancy. They all are single and reside with their parents. The Paul Rudisill family reside on the old homestead of George W. and Sarah Rudisill, near Brodbecks, York Co., Pa.

Next in order is ANDREW RUDISILL, youngest son of George W. and Sarah Rudisill, who was born near Brodbecks, York Co., in 1904. He was educated in the schools of the community and grew to manhood in the home of his parents. He came to Hanover in 1929 with his parents, and was married to Miss Magie S. ------ [Margie N. Snyder]. They have no children, and their residence is not known to the compiler.

George W. and Sarah were buried in the cemetery at the Stone Church, near Brodbecks, York Co., Pa.

LUCY WILDASIN, daughter of Jacob M. and Fannie WIldasin, was born in Heidelberg Township, York Co., Pa., June 28, 1863. She was educated in the schools of the community and grew to womanhood in the home of her parents. She was married to Samuel Huggins [Huggens], who was born in Porters [Porterís Sideling], in West Manheim Township [Heidelberg Township], York, Pa. on the 7th day of October in the year 1865. The Samuel Huggins [Huggens] family resided for some time on a farm between Marburg and the town of Jefferson in York Co. Later on, they resided near what is known as Hokes [Hokes or Hokes Station, Manheim Township, York County]. Mr. Huggins [Huggens] now resides on High Street in the city of Hanover, Pa. There were 5 children born to this union, as follows: Harry, Jennie, Samuel Jr., Jacob, and Mary. Mrs. Lucy Huggins [Huggens], wife of Samuel Huggins [Huggens], Sr., has passed away.

HARRY HUGGINS [HUGGENS], oldest son of Samuel Huggins [Huggens], Sr., and Lucy Huggins [Huggens], was born near Marburg in Manheim Township, York Co., Pa., December 31, 1894. He was educated in the schools of the community and grew to manhood in the home of his parents. He was married to Miss Viola Rohrbaugh, of Heidelberg Township, York Co., Pa., who was born March 1, 1899. There were 2 children, Ralph and Louise, born to this union.

RALPH HUGGINS [HUGGENS], was born September 28, 1925, near what is known as Hokes Station. He was educated in the schools of the community and grew to manhood in the home of his parents. He was married to Miss Esta Roselle Smith of Zion View in the state of Pa., who was born Feb.13, 1925. They reside on the corner of Princess and Penn streets in the city of York, Pa.

LOUISE HUGGINS [HUGGENS], was born near Hokes Station, February 11, 1927. She was educated in the schools of the community and grew to womanhood in the home of her parents. She was married to George Hulshart of Stewartstown, York Co., Pa., who was born October 28, 1919. The Hulshart family reside near Lineboro in Maryland.

JENNIE HUGGINS [HUGGENS], oldest daughter of Samuel Huggins [Huggens], Sr., and Lucy Huggins [Huggens], was born near Marburg, York Co., Pa., August 14, 1896. She was educated in the schools of the community and grew to womanhood in the home of her parents. She was married to Walter E. Cooper of Glenville, York Co., Pa., who was born January 4, 1895. Two children were born to this family, as follows: Clarice and Mary.

CLARICE COOPER, was born at the village of Sticks [Codorus Township] in York Co., Pa., April 19, 1918. She was married to Alton Dubbs of Brodbecks, York Co., Pa., who was born April 27, 1914. They reside near Brodbecks, York Co., Pa.

MARY COOPER, was born near Hokes Station, York, Pa., October 28, 1925. She is at home with her parents. Mr. and Mrs. Walter E. Cooper, who reside on High Street, Hanover, Pa.

SAMUEL HUGGINS [HUGGENS], Jr., son of Samuel Huggins [Huggens], Sr. and Lucy Huggins [Huggens], was born near Marburg, York Co., Pa., July 20, 1898. He was educated in the schools of the community and grew to manhood in the home of his parents. He was married to Gussie A. Myers of Sinsheim, Codorus Township, York Co., Pa., who was born August 22, 1902. Two sons, Joyce S. and Sterling D., were born to this union.

JOYCE S. HUGGINS [HUGGENS], was born near Sinsheim, York, Pa., May 30, 1920. He married Violet Dickensheets, who was born June 18, 1918. 2 children were born to this union, Phyllis, June 12, 1942, and Dennis, August 6, 1946. [Joyce S. Huggens was known as J. Samuel Huggens]

STERLING D. HUGGINS [HUGGENS], was born near Sinsheim, York Co., Pa, March 13, 1922. He resides with his parents on Route 3, Hanover, Pa.

JACOB HUGGINS [HUGGENS], youngest son of Samuel Sr. and Lucy Huggins [Huggens], was born near Marburg, York Co., Pa., September 7, 1900. He was educated in the schools of the community and grew to manhood in the home of his parents. He was married to Miss Grace V. Rohrbaugh of Sinsheim, York Co., Pa., who was born October 25, 1907. They have 2 children, Gene M. and Faye G.

GENE M. HUGGINS [HUGGENS], was born in Hanover, Pa., September 21, 1926. He was married to Miss Harriet Ann Spangler of New Oxford, Adams Co., Pa., who was born October 7, 1923. They reside with his parents, the Jacob Huggins [Huggens] family, at 423 W. Middle Street, in Hanover, Pa. Mr. Jacob Huggins [Huggens] prepared the list of names and dates of birth, and places of residence of the descendants of Samuel Huggins [Huggens] Sr., and Lucy Huggins [Huggens].

MARY HUGGINS [HUGGENS], youngest daughter of Samuel Huggins [Huggens] Sr., and Lucy Huggins [Huggens], was born near Marburg, York Co., Pa., April 8, 1902. She was educated in the schools of the community and grew to womanhood in the home of her parents. She was married to Curtis Hohf, who was born near the Hohf school in York Co., Pa., April 17, 1902. Three children were born to this union, as follows: Curtis Hohf, Jr., who was born near Hanover, January 9, 1926, Dale Hohf, who was born in Hanover, Pa., November 8, 1936, and Philip Hohf, who was born in Hanover, March 7, 1939. The Curtis Hohf, Sr., family and children all reside at 500 Fulton St., Hanover, Pa.

ALBERT WILDASIN, youngest son of Jacob M. and Fannie Wildasin, was born in York Co., Pa., January 24, 1868. He was educated in the schools of the community and grew to manhood in the home of his parents. He was married to Sarah J. Miller, June 22, 1890. Miss Miller was born in Maryland in 1868. There were born to this union 6 children, as follows: Jennie May Wildasin, Harry M. Wildasin, John M. Wildasin, Fannie Matilda Wildasin, Jacob Earl Wildasin, and Albert LeRoy Wildasin.

JENNIE MAY WILDASIN, oldest daughter of Albert J. and Sarah J. Wildasin, was born in York Co., Pa., in 1891. She was educated in the schools of the community and grew to womanhood in the home of her parents. She was married to Harry R. Miller of York Co., Pa., who was born in 1890. Mr. & Mrs. Harry Miller celebrated their 50th wedding anniversary a few years ago. Eight children were born to this union. Anna Viola, Andrew Ralph, Kenneth Eugene, Solomon Edward, Woodrow Wilson, Leon Paul, Mary Alverta, Albert Wildasin. The address of the Harry R. Miller family is Manchester, Maryland.

ANNA VIOLA MILLER, oldest daughter of Harry R. and Jennie May Miller, was born in York County, Penna., in 1908. She was educated in the schools of the community and grew to womanhood in the home of her parents. She was married to Kenneth LeRoy Epply [Eppley] of York County, Penna., who was born in 1908. They have one son, Kenneth Leroy, Jr., born in 1926. The Epply [Eppley] family address in Millers, Maryland.

ANDREW RALPH MILLER, oldest son of Harry R. and Jennie May Miller, was born in York County, Penna., in 1910. He was educated in the schools of the community and grew to manhood in the home of his parents. He is married, but has no children. He and his wife live at Hampstead, Maryland.

KENNETH EUGENE MILLER, second son of Harry R. and Jennie May Miller, was born in York County, Penna., in 1911. He was educated in the schools of the community and grew to manhood in the home of his parents. He is married and has six children. The family address is Hanover, York County, Penna.

SOLOMON EDWARD MILLER, third son of Harry R. and Jennie May Miller, was born in York Co., Pa., in 1913. He was educated in the schools of the community and grew to manhood in the home of his parents. He is married and has two children, as follows: Shirley Ann, and Dorothy May, born in 1937. The family address is Millers, Maryland.

WOODROW WILSON MILLER, fourth son of Harry R. and Jennie May Miller, was born in York County, Penna., in 1915. He is married and has one daughter, Janet May, born in York Co., Pa., 1n 1936. The family address is Hanover, Pa.

LEON PAUL MILLER, fifth son of Harry R. and Jennie May Miller, was born in York County, Pa., in 1916. He is married and has two sons, as follows: Leon Paul Jr., born in 1940 and Robert Rill, born in 1943. The family address is Manchester, Maryland.

MARY ALVERTA MILLER, youngest daughter of Harry R. and Jennie May Miller, was born in York County, Pa., on February 14, 1918. She was educated in the schools of the community and grew to womanhood in the home of her parents. She was married to Raymond Schaffer, April 27, 1937. They have four children, as follows: Evelyn Mae, born October 9, 1937, she married Clarence Bull of Baltimore, Maryland, they have four children, as follows: Thomas Eugene, Patricia May, Michael Van, and Timothy Ray. Ray Eugen Schaffer was born 9-3-39, and is now married and has one son, Ray Eugene Schaffer, Jr. Mary Ann Schaffer was born April 4, 1941, she married Raymond Spangler, and they have one daughter, Vicki Lynn, born September 24, 1961. Jean Louise Schaffer, born November 24, 1943, she is married to William R. White, there are no children.

ALBERT WILDASIN MILLER, youngest son of Harry R. and Jennie May Miller, was born in Lineboro, Maryland, in 1923. He is married and has two sons, as follows: John Henry, born in 1942, and Michael Albert, born in 1944. The Albert Wildasin Miller family address is Manchester, Md.

HARRY M. WILDASIN, oldest son of Albert J. and Sarah J. Wildasin, was born in Adams County, Pa., May 15, 1892. He was educated in the county schools and grew to manhood in the home of his parents. He now resides in Lancaster Co., Pa. There is no record of any children.

JOHN M. WILDASIN, son of Albert J. and Sarah J. Wildasin, was born in Adams Co., Pa. He was educated in the county schools and grew to manhood in the home of his parents. He was born November 17, 1897. He resides in Jefferson, York Co., Pa. No record of children.

FANNIE MATILDA WILDASIN, daughter of Albert J. and Sarah J. Wildasin, was born in Adams Co., Pa., December 3, 1901. She was educated in the county schools and grew to manhood in the home of his parents. She was married to Paul Masemore. They now reside in Parkville [Penn Township], a suburb of Hanover, Pa. No record of children.

JACOB EARL WILDASIN, son of Albert J. and Sarah J. Wildasin, was born in York Co., Pa., December 17, 1903. He was educated in the county schools and grew to manhood in the home of his parents. He resides in Marburg, a short distance from Dubs Church (now St. Paulís Church). No record of children.

ALBERT LEROY WILDASIN, youngest son of Albert J. and Sarah J. Wildasin, was born in York Co., Pa., August 10, 1907. He was educated in the county schools and grew to manhood in the home of his parents. He resides in Hanover, Pa. On February 5, 1927, Albert J. Wildasin was stricken when he went to his garage to get his car to take a daughter home. He was found somewhat later by his wife, unconscious in the front seat of the auto. He passed away early the next morning. His place of residence was at 234 York Street, Hanover, Pa. Sarah J. Wildasin, widow of Albert J. Wildasin, passed away at her home, 234 York Street, Hanover, in 1931.

FANNIE WILDASIN, youngest daughter of Jacob M. and Fannie Wildasin, was born in Manheim Township, York Co., Pa., December 3, 1871. She was educated in the schools of York Co. and grew to womanhood in the home of her parents. She was married to Jacob Henry Shue, November 1, 1896. Mr. Shue was born in York Co., Pa., December 7, 1871. To this union were born six children, as follows: Annie, Mabel, Florence, Viola, and Albert Jacob.

JOHN SHUE, oldest son of Jacob Henry and Fannie Shue, was born in Manheim Township, York Co., Pa., December 26, 1897. He was educated in the schools of York Co. and grew to manhood in the home of his parents. He never married and resides with his mother and superintends the management of the home farm, situated in Manheim Township along the Jefferson Highway, being the highway between Hanover and the town of Jefferson in York Co., Pa.

ANNIE SHUE, the oldest daughter of Jacob Henry and Fannie Shue, was born in Manheim Township, York Co., Pa., October 8, 1901. She was educated in the schools of York Co. and grew to womanhood in the home of her parents. She was married to Chester F. Bechtel, January 5, 1924. Mr. Bechtel was born in Penn Township, York Co., Pa., February 15, 1902. They have one son, Jacob C. Bechtel, who was born August 6, 1926, in Penn Township. He was educated in the schools of Hanover and grew to manhood in the home of his parents. He married Bernadine M. Paxton, August 10, 1946. Miss Paxton was born near what is known as Menges Mills in York Co., Pa., in November 1926. The Bechtelís all reside at 500 Baer Avenue, Hanover, Pa.

MABEL SHUE, second daughter of Jacob Henry and Fannie Shue, was born in Manheim Township, York Co., Pa., February 25, 1904. She was educated in the schools of the community and grew to womanhood in the home of her parents. She was married to Earl G. Shorb, November 30, 1929. Mr. Shorb was born in North Codorus Township, York Co., February 27, 1906. Four children were born to this union, two dying in infancy. Those living are David E. Shorb, born in Manheim Township, York Co., February 24, 1934, And Roselie M. [Rosalie Marie] Shorb, born in Manheim Township, York Co., October 8, 1943. They reside on Route 2, Hanover.

FLORENCE SHUE, third daughter of Jacob Henry and Fannie Shue, was born in Manheim Township, York Co., Pa., March 21, 1908. She was educated in the schools of York Co. and grew to womanhood in the home of her parents. She married Richard J. Mummert, October 6, 1935. Mr. Mummert was born in Penn Township, September 23, 1909. Four children were born to this union, two dying in infancy. Those living are, Shirley A. Mummert, born January 18, 1936, and Larry J. Mummert, born November 7, 1940. Richard J. Mummert died July 16, 1944.

VIOLA SHUE, youngest daughter of Jacob Henry and Fannie Shue, was born in Manheim Township, York Co., Pa., August 25, 1911. She was educated in the schools of York Co. and grew to womanhood in the home of her parents. She was married to George E. Messenger [Messinger], April 17, 1937. Mr. Messenger [Messinger] was born in Jackson Township, York Co., February 20, 1914. There were born to this union 3 children: Darlene M., born in Manheim Township, October 10, 1938, James E., born in Manheim Township, December 27, 1942, and Larry A. born in North Codorus Township, June 5, 1945.

ALBERT JACOB SHUE, youngest son of Jacob Henry and Fannie Shue, was born in Manheim Township, York Co., Pa., May 21, 1915. He was educated in the schools of York Co. and grew to manhood in the home of his parents. He is not married, and resides with his mother along the Jefferson Highway in York Co.

We must not forget that Jacob Henry Shue, husband of Fannie Shue, passed away on the 11th day of January, 1938. The remains of Jacob Henry Shue were buried in the cemetery at Dubs Church. Mrs. Fannie Shue resides on the old homestead of the late Jacob M. and Fannie Wildasin along the Jefferson Highway between Hanover and the town of Jefferson in York Co. Mrs. Fannie Shue is the only one now living of the Jacob M. and Fannie Wildasin family.

After compiling a History of the Samuel Wildasin Family and relatives, I thought it might not be amiss to compile a short sketch of the family of her parents of the wife of Henry Wildasin (The compiler of this history, which is as follows:

HISTORY of
CHRISTIAN and ELIZABETH STOVER

The parents of Susan (Stover) Wildasin were Christian and Elizabeth (Resh) Stover of York County, Penna. Their family was composed of two sons and six daughters, as follows: Magdalena, Lucy, Michael, Elizabeth, Cornelius, Emma, Lydia, and Susan.

MAGDALENA STOVER, oldest daughter of Christian and Elizabeth Stover, was born in York Co., Pa., in the late 1830ís. What education she attained was in the schools of the community. She grew to womanhood in the home of her parents and was married to Michael Wildasin, also a resident of York Co., Pa. There were born to this union, during the years of the late 1860ís and early 1870ís, three children that grew to Womanhood and Manhood. Their names were: Emma, Charles, and Harvey.

EMMA WILDASIN, was born in the late 1860ís in York Co., Pa. She was educated in the schools of the community and grew to womanhood in the home of her parents. She was married to Michael Bowman, also born in York Co., in the late !880ís. There were two children born to this union, Estie and Ralph. They were born in York Co. If my memory serves me right, Estie is married and lives in Hagerstown, Maryland, and Ralph Bowman operates a store in Brodbecks, York Co., Pa. Michael Bowman and Emma Bowman both passed away in the month of January 1937, and were buried in the Mount Olivet Cemetery, Hanover, York Co.

CHARLES WILDASIN, oldest son of Michael and Magdalena Wildasin, was born in York Co., Pa., in 1866. He received some education in the schools of the community and grew to manhood in the home of his parents. He also learned the art of telegraphing in the Oberlin College at Oberlin, Ohio. He acted as telegraph operator for the Wisconsin Central Railroad in the state of Wisconsin for quite a number of years. Then he was promoted to the office of agent at the station in North Saint Paul, Minn., which position he held until he was pensioned in 1930. He was married to a lady from the state of Wisconsin. They had four children. The name of the oldest was Eunice, but I am not able to recall the other names. Charles Wildasin passed away in September 1946. He was buried in the cemetery at North Saint Paul. His wife is still living at last reports. His daughter, Eunice was married to a man by the name of E.W. McNerney. At last reports they reside in North Saint Paul.

HARVEY WILDASIN, the youngest son of Michael and Magdalena Wildasin, was born in York Co., Pa., and grew to manhood in the home of his parents. He did odd jobs around, and passed away in 1931 at the home of his sister, Emma Bowman. He was never married.

LUCY STOVER, daughter of Christian and Elizabeth Stover, was born in York Co., Pa., in the late years of 1830. She grew to womanhood in the home of her parents and was married to George Wildasin of Wilton Junction, Iowa, in 1868. There were four living children born to this union (Find sketch in the history of the Samuel and Catharine Wildasin family). Lucy Wildasin passed away in the year 1922 and was buried in the cemetery at Wilton Junction, Iowa.

MICHAEL STOVER, oldest son of Christian and Elizabeth Stover, was born in York Co., Pa., and educated in the schools of the community. He grew to manhood in the home of his parents, and was married to Anna Mary Ziegler, who was born in York Co., Pa. There were three children: Clara, Harry, and Harvey, born to this union. Clara Stover was married to Charles Kirschner of York Co., Pa. I am not posted on their family except that they reside in the neighborhood of her old home for some time. Mrs. Kirschner passed away some time ago.

HARRY STOVER, oldest son of Michael and Anna Mary Stover, was born in York Co., Pa. He grew to manhood in the home of his parents. He was a day laborer. His last act was performed at the home of his sister-in-law, Mrs. Ellen Stover, where he was employed. He passed away quite suddenly, August 30, 1946.

HARVEY STOVER, youngest son of Michael and Anna Mary Stover, was born in York Co., Pa. He was educated in the schools of the community and grew to manhood in the home of his parents, and was married to Ellen Hohf, daughter of the late David Hohf. There are no living children. Harvey Stover passed away November 11, 1944. Mrs. Stover still resides on the old David Hohf homestead, near what is known as Hohf schoolhouse.

CORNELIUS STOVER, youngest son of Christian and Elizabeth Stover, was born in York Co., Pa. He was educated in the schools of the community and grew to manhood in the home of his parents. After he had attained his majority he went west, first to the state of Ohio, and later to Iowa, where he found employment for several years. He then returned to Ohio, where he was married to an Ohio lady. Two children, Nora and Clara, were born to this union. Nora Stover was married to a man named Charles Heigel. They now reside near Leipsic, Ohio. Clara Stover was also married and lives near Leipsic, Ohio. Cornelius Stover lost his life while in the act of blasting stumps with dynamite. His widow resides with her daughter Clara.

ELIZABETH STOVER, daughter of Christian and Elizabeth Stover, was born in York Co., Pa. She lived as a maiden lady for quite a number of years, but then later in life she was married to Henry Garrett. They first resided near Marburg, York Co., Pa., and later moved to what is known as York Road Crossing in York Co. They have both passed to their reward.

EMMA STOVER, daughter of Christian and Elizabeth Stover, was born in 1848, in York Co. She was educated in the schools of the community and grew to womanhood in the home of her parents. She was married to George M. Leitner of Carroll County, Maryland. Eight children were born to this union, as follows: Mary, Greenberry, Ida, George, Forney, Nelson, Hattie, and Mabel.

MARY LEITNER, was born in York Co., Pa. She was married to John Lease and for some time they resided in or near Hampton, Adams Co., Pa. They lost one son who was in the service in World War I. Mrs. Lease has passed away.

GREENBERRY LEITNER, son of George M. and Emma Leitner, was born in York Co., Pa. He married but had no children. He passed away some years ago.

IDA LEITNER, daughter of George M. and Emma Leitner, was born in York Co., Pa. She grew to womanhood in the home of her parents and was married to George Lease. Two sons were born to this union and both now reside in Hanover. Both George and Ida Lease passed away a few years ago.

GEORGE LEITNER, son of George and Emma Leitner, was born in York Co., Pa. He died quite young.

FORNEY LEITNER, son of George M. and Emma Leitner, was born in Wilton Junction, Iowa. When he became a man, he followed the trade of plasterer. He was married, and has passed away some years ago. His home was New York City.

NELSON LEITNER, son of George M. and Emma Leitner, was born in Wilton Junction, Muscatine Co., Iowa. He is at present a resident of Washington, D.C.

HATTIE LEITNER, daughter of George M. and Emma Leitner, was born in York Co., Pa. She grew to womanhood in the home of her parents. She was married to Clayton Alvin Bange of Hanover, York Co., Pa. They had three children. Clayton Alvin Bange passed away in 1930. Mrs. Hattie Bange resides at 635 Broadway, Hanover, Pa.

MABEL LEITNER, daughter of George M. and Emma Leitner, was born in York Co., Pa. She grew to womanhood in the home of her parents, and was married to Maurice Fleming of Hanover, Pa. I have no knowledge of any children. They reside on Spring Avenue, Hanover, Pa.

LYDIA STOVER, daughter of Christian and Elizabeth Stover, was born in York Co., Pa., July 12, 1851. She was educated in the schools of the community and grew to womanhood in the home of her parents. She was married to Ezra W. Lightner of York Co., Pa., in 1882. There were 5 children born to this union, as follows: Elizabeth, Austin, Amy, Minnie, and Paul.

ELIZABETH LIGHTNER, oldest daughter of Ezra and Lydia Lightner, was born in Hanover, York Co., Pa., in 1883. What education she attained was gotten in the Hanover schools. She grew to womanhood in the home of her parents. She is a maiden lady and has been employed at various kinds of jobs. She is employed at present at the Hanover General Hospital, and resides at 420 Baltimore Street, Hanover, Pa.

AUSTIN LIGHTNER, son of Ezra W. and Lydia Lightner, was born in Hanover, York Co., Pa. He was educated in the Hanover schools and grew to manhood in the home of his parents. He was married to Miss Helen Biggs. He is a machinist by trade and was employed for some time at Harrisburg, Pa., but now woks in Bridgeport, Conn., where he resides at 134 Vine Street.

AMY LIGHTNER, daughter of Ezra W. and Lydia Lightner, was born in Hanover, Pa. She was educated in the schools of Hanover and grew to womanhood in the home of her parents. She was married to Arthur D Garrett, also of Hanover, Pa. They have one son, Richard.

RICHARD GARRETT, was born in Hanover, and educated in the Hanover schools. He grew to manhood in the home of his parents. He also took a course of Pharmacy at the Gettysburg College, at Gettysburg, Pa. He was called into the service and was there several years. He was married to a Miss Sterner of Hanover, Pa. They have twin sons and reside in Lancaster, Pa.

MINNIE LIGHTNER, daughter of Ezra W. and Lydia Lightner, was born in Hanover, York co., Pa., in 1890. She was educated in the schools of Hanover and grew to womanhood in the home of her parents. She is a maiden lady, a seamstress by occupation, and resides at 420 Baltimore street, Hanover, Pa.

PAUL LIGHTNER, son of Ezra W. and Lydia Lightner, was born in Hanover, in the year 1892. He was educated in the schools of the community. He grew to manhood in the home of his parents. He served in World War I, and was overseas for some time. He was married to Miss Helen Keller of Hanover, Pa. They have one son, Philip Paul Lightner, who was in the service during World War II. He was seriously wounded, and at present is able to walk only with canes or crutches. He is now a student at Gettysburg College at Gettysburg, Pa. When at home he resides with his parents at 808 Broadway, Red Lion, York Co., Pa. Philip Paul Lightner is preparing for the ministry.

SUSAN STOVER, daughter of Christian and Elizabeth Stover, was born in York Co., PA., in 1853. She was married to Henry Wildasin, of Wilton Junction, Muscatine Co., Iowa. There were 3 daughters born to this union, more fully shown in the History of the Samuel and Catharine Wildasin family.

This closes an incomplete History of the Christian and Elizabeth Stover Family, including children, grandchildren and great grandchildren. The Christian and Elizabeth Stover family have all passed to their reward.

END

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