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Montgomery County, Iowa

Biography Center

 

World War II Biographical Sketches

Surnames beginning "B"

(with updates and corrections)

 

Bailey, Donald D. served in Company "M", 168th Inf. Regiment, 34th Division, Iowa National Guard, until his discharge on 17 July 1940 as a Corporal. He enlisted in the army on 27 April 1942 and was sent to Aberdeen, Maryland for one month to train on fine instruments (telescopes and binoculars) and wound up repairing tanks and ducks (DUKWs) wherever needed. He was deployed to Casablanca, but before arriving, the ship was hit by a tanker, losing several young men. They limped into Bermuda where they laid over 30 days for repairs before continuing to Casablanca. He served in Africa, Sicily and Italy as a member of the 3156th Ordinance-Base Artillery Fire Central Company as Technician 3rd Grade,(302 Ordinance) Component AUS. He was once sent to Rome, taking 16 men with him, on a special mission. He was awarded 3 Bronze Service Stars, European Theatre Service Ribbon, Good Conduct Medal, Marksmanship Medal and several lapel buttons. He arrived back in the U.S. in 1945. As a Reservist he was called back to duty as an instructor and sent to Korea where he received some ribbons. He was discharged on 15 August 1951 with rank of Staff Sergeant. Civilian occupations: Employed at Central State Hospital as shop foreman and mechanic. Donald died on 4 February 1991 and is buried in Red Oak, Iowa. His flag is a part of the Red Oak Court of Honor. Submitted by sister, Frances Day.

 

Bailey, Edwin C. (17149190) at age 19 was one of the 10 original members of a B-24 bomber crew who took flight training in the western part of the U.S. in late 1944. After completion of his training, Ed joined the U.S. 8th Air Force stationed in England where they were assigned to the 34th Bomber Group based in Mendlesham in Suffolk County, 70 miles from London. The B17 crew was cut to nine and Ed was reassigned. On 14 January 1945, his first mission, for which he had volunteered, the bomber took a direct hit in the bomb bay while flying over Eggstedt, Brandenburg, Germany and exploded in the air. Information concerning his death was taken from captured German records and showed that he was first interred in a civilian cemetery at Eggstedt and later re-interred at the U.S. Military Cemetery at Neuville en-Condroz, southwest of Liege, Belgium. Ed was not yet 20 years old at the time of his death. Submitted by his aunt, Mrs. Clarke Bailey.

 

Bailey, Frank L. (20702018) was born 8 September 1921 in Clarinda, Iowa and enlisted in the Iowa National Guard on 8 September 1940. He was called to active duty with his unit at Cedar Falls, Iowa, when the National Guard was activated into federal service on 10 February 1941. He went to Camp Claiborne, Louisiana, with his company in March 1941. He served with Headquarters Company, 133rd Infantry Regiment. He was discharged at Jefferson Barracks, Missouri on 9 July 1945. His military specialty was Radio Operator, Low Speed. He participated in the campaigns of Tunisia, Rome-Arno and Naples-Foggia. Awards received were three Bronze Battle Stars for his campaigns, Combat Infantryman Badge, American Defense Service Ribbon, European-African-Middle Eastern Campaign Ribbon and six Overseas Bars. He arrived in the European Theatre on 26 January 1942, the African-Middle Eastern Theatre on 3 January 1943 and returned to the States on 25 June 1945. Three years and eleven days of his service was overseas. Rank at discharge was Private. Frank and his wife, Becky, live just outside of Villisca, Iowa.

 

Baker, Arthur R. (6863505) was born 22 October 1913 and enlisted 16 June 1940 at Ft. Crook, Nebraska. He was discharged from service on 29 September 1945 at Camp Chafee, Arkansas. He served with Company "C", 393rd Infantry. He qualified as Combat Infantryman and took part in Rhineland, Ardennes, and Central Europe Campaigns. Awards received were the European-African-Middle Eastern Theatre Ribbon with three Bronze Battle Stars, Good Conduct Medal, and American Defense Service Ribbon. He served eleven months and twenty-two days of W.W.II time overseas. Arthur had previously spent three years in the U.S. Army. His rank at discharge was First Sergeant.

 

Baker, Everett Ernest (17122788) was born 3 August 1922 at Graf, Nebraska and was inducted into the armed forces on 1 September 1942 at Ft. Crook, Nebraska. He served with Co. "L", 26th Infantry. Wounds received in action in Europe resulted in his death on 26 February 1945 at Boch, Germany at age 22. He received the Silver Star for gallantry in action in Sicily, Purple Heart for wounds received in France and an Oak Leaf Cluster for wounds received in Aachen, Germany. He was posthumously awarded the Distinguished Service Cross. Rank at time of discharge was Staff Sergeant.

 

Baker, John L. (0710875) entered service in 1941 and was appointed to pilot training in May 1943. He took his primary training at Chickasha, Oklahoma, basic training at Coffeyville, Kansas, and attended advance flying school at the A.A.F. training Command at Pampa Army Air Force Base Pampa, Texas. He was killed in action on 29 August 1944 on a bombing and staffing mission in his P38 Fighter plane over Laticana railroad bridge in Northern Italy. He had completed 19 missions over enemy territory. He served in the European Theatre of Operations with the 96th A.A.F. Fighter Squadron. He was awarded the Air Medal and Purple Heart. Rank at the time of death was 2nd Lieutenant.

 

Baker, Laurence A. was inducted into service on 14 October 1943 and entered active duty on 23 November 1943 at Ft. Crook, Nebraska. He served as Avn. C with Squad H, 2531st A.A.F. Base Unit. He also served with the 2530th A.A.F. Base Unit, Selman A.A.F., Louisiana. He was discharged to accept commission of 2nd Lieutenant in the Air Corps on 8 September 1945. He was separated from the service on 8 February 1946 at Maxwell Field, Alabama. His military occupation was Pilot 2-E 1051. Rank at time of discharge was 2nd Lieutenant. Rank at the time of discharge was 2nd Lieutenant. Civilian occupations: Farmer

 

Baker, Robert L. (17186201) was born on 27 June 1927 and enlisted in the regular army on 19 February 1946 at Ft. Snelling, Minnesota. He was serrated from service on 2 August 1947 at Ft. Lawton, Washington. His military occupation specialty was Utility Repairman. He received the WWII Victory Medal and Army Occupation Medal for Japan. Robert arrived in the Asiatic-Pacific Theatre of Operations on 18 August 1946 and arrived back in the United States on 30 June 1947. Six months and 19 days of service was in the United States and 10 months and 25 days overseas. Rank at discharge was Corporal.

 

Baker, Robert L. (17206463RA) was born 29 January 1929 at Glenwood, Iowa and enlisted on 6 September 1946 at Ft. Snelling, Minnesota. He received his discharge on 2 January 1948 at Camp Stoneman, California. His military occupation was Squad Leader. He qualified with M1 Rifle. Awards included the WWII Victory Medal and Army Occupation Medal for Japan. Three months and 26 days of his service was in the United States and 1 year and 1 day overseas. His rank at discharge was Sergeant

 

Bakke, Russell "John" entered the Army Air Corps on 8 July 1942 and served 3 1/2 years. On 10 March 1951 he again entered active duty in the U.S. Air Force and served 21 months in the Korean Conflict. His service was in the American and European-African Middle Eastern Theatres of Operation. Units in which he served were the 9th A.F., 442dn Troop Carrier Group, 306th Troop Carrier Squadron and the 2nd A.F., 376th Bomb Squadron, Barksdale A.F.B., Louisiana. He received the Good Conduct Medal, American Theatre Ribbon, the European Theatre Ribbon with 7 Battle Stars, Air Medal with 7 Clusters, Distinguished Flying Cross and Germany Occupation Medal. Rank at discharge in WWII was Master Sergeant. Rank at discharge from Korean Conflict was Captain. U.S.A.F. Reserve time was 10 years. "Serious, but also humorous, was the following  incident. We ditched in the English Channel after being hit by German Flak and our engines were out. Floating in the water in a rubber raft, with the water ice cold, we were rescued by a British patrol boat. The first thing the British Captain said was 'Are you chaps cold?'" Civilian occupations: Vice-President, Mutual of Omaha.

 

Ballain, Clyde (SN9619196) was inducted into service on 2 May 1944 at Omaha, Nebraska and entered the Navy. He was discharged on 12 February 1946 at Minneapolis, Minnesota. His training took place at Great Lakes, Illinois; Camp Bradford, Virginia; Damm Neck, Virginia and Lido Beach, New York. Clyde served aboard the U.S.S. Poseidon, a converted LST used as a repair ship. He was overseas from 20 March 1945 to 1 January 1946, serving in the Marshall Islands, Gilbert Islands, Caroline Islands and Okinawa. He received the American Theatre Ribbon, Asiatic-Pacific Theatre Ribbon, Victory Medal and 1 Star. While the ship was near Okinawa there was a huge typhoon in that area. Orders were given to ride out the storm at sea; instead, they sailed into the thick of it. The main boundary beam of the ship was cracked and much damage was done. For three weeks loved ones at home did not hear a word from him. When a letter finally came that he was okay much happiness was experienced. Prayers had been answered. Clyde was in the service for 21 months. His rank at discharge was Storekeeper 3/C. Civilian occupations: Salesman for National Biscuit Company. Clyde died on 25 November 1991. Submitted by Mrs. Clyde Ballain

 

Bangston, Harley B. entered service on 25 September 1942 at Camp Dodge, Iowa and was separated from service on 2 November 1945 at Ft. Logan, Colorado. He served with the 211th Military Police Company in the Pacific Theatre. Campaigns he participated in were New Guinea, Southern Philippines, Luzon and Japan. He received the WWII Victory Medal, Good Conduct Medal, Philippine Liberation Ribbon with one Bronze Service Star and American Service Medal. Rank at time of discharge was Private First Class. Civilian occupations: Farmer and District Sales Manager for a seed Company. Worked in the Weight & Measure Division of Agriculture. Harley died 10 December 1991. Submitted by Mrs. Harley Bangston

 

Bangston, Homer entered the service the first time in September 1943 at Ft. Cozad, Nebraska. He served two months and seven days and was given a medical discharge. In August 1944 he enlisted at Ft. Des Moines, Iowa and was accepted into service. He was discharged from duty at Ft. Sheridan, Illinois on 6 December 1946. He served in the Pacific Theatre of Operations in Company "M", 108th Infantry in the Southern Philippines Liberation where he participated in the battles at Leyte and Luzon. He was entitled to wear a Bronze Battle Star for each of those battles, Combat Infantry Badge, Sharpshooter Badge, Asiatic-Pacific Theatre Ribbon with 1 Bronze Battle Star, WWII Victory Medal, Good Conduct Medal, Bronze Arrowhead, Army of Occupation Ribbon for Japan and a ribbon for Korea. He did not receive his ribbons until 1987 when they were delivered to his home. Humorous incident: Their joy at winning the Pacific Soft Ball Title. Serious incident: Leading his men with flame throwers into and cleaning out caves along the coast of Mindanao. He finally was able to accept the fact that he did not know how many Japanese he had to kill. He said it was hundreds. He suffered battle fatigue for 17 years. Homer's rank at discharge was Staff Sergeant. Civilian occupations: County Soil Conservation Engineer for three years and then rural mail carrier for 29 years. He died in Hanford, California at age 69 on June 1991. He is buried at Arlington Cemetery in Montgomery County, Iowa in the family plot. Submitted by his wife, Marilyn Bangston.

 

Barr, Arthur W. entered service on 5 December 1942 and served until 8 January 1946. "I was inducted into the service at Camp Crook, Nebraska, then sent to Ft. Leavenworth, Kansas where we received our clothes and other issue; then to Camp Chaffee, Arkansas, to join the 14th Armored. "I was assigned to the 154th Signal Corps as a radio operator. I went to Signal School for 16 weeks, then trained in all kinds of combat for months. We went on maneuvers in Tennessee and Kentucky. "I was then assigned to the 97th Infantry Division, 303rd Headquarters Company at Ft. Leonard Wood, Missouri. From there we were sent to San Luis Obispo, California where we took six months of amphibious training with the Infantry and six months with the Marines. "We were sent to New York and embarked for LaHavre, France, then on to Finland, Belgium, Holland, Luxemborg, Germany, Czechoslovakia, Marshall Islands, Luzon, Leyte, Philippine Islands and Japan. "I installed and operated tactical field radio transmitting and receiving equipment; sent and received messages by International Code, continues wave (voice operated 199, 399, 193 and 284 types of radios. I also maintained records pertaining to the handling of all messages, received and transmitted, and serviced and maintained equipment used. "I received the Good Conduct Medal and Rifle Sharpshooter Badge. "My rank at time of discharge was Private First Class." Civilian occupations: Farmed for 10 years, Standard Oil agent for 22 years, and Amoco Oil jobber for 18 years. Arthur now lives in Red Oak, Iowa.

 

Bass, George Wallace enlisted in the Marine Corps on 6 January 1942 at Des Moines, Iowa and was discharged from service on 24 November 1945. He was assigned to the 4th Marine Division and Participated in action in the Pacific Theatre of Operations. His military occupational specialty was Demolition Man, Telephone. He qualified as M1 Rifle Expert Marksman. He participated in action against the enemy at Roi Namur, Marshall Islands, on 1 February 1944, Saipan on 14 February 1944, Tinian, Marianas Islands on 16 June 1944, and at Iwo Jima, Volcano Island in February 1945 and on 16 March 1945. He was wounded in action on 21 February 1945. George received the Purple Heart and four Campaign Medals. His nickname was "Short Fuse" because he cut fuses rather short. His rank at the time he left the Marine Corps was Sergeant. In 1949 he enlisted again and was assigned to the 6th Army and served in the Korean War. Medals received for this service were the Bronze Medal, Asiatic-Pacific Theatre Medal, Presidential Unit Citation, Korean Service Medal, 2 Overseas Bars, and Occupation Medal for Japan W/C UN Service Ribbon. He left the army on 1 August 1953. George worked at three newspapers in New Jersey before becoming ill and was unable to work. He died on 1 July 1983. Submitted by Gordon Bass

 

Bauer, Max E. (17079094) was born 10 March 1921 at Red Oak, Iowa and entered service on 4 September 1942 at Ft. Crook, Nebraska. He was discharged on 15 November 1945 at Ft. Sheridan, Illinois. He served with Battery "B", 773rd Field Artillery Battalion. His military occupation was Repeater Man, Telephone. He qualified as M1 Rifle Expert Marksman. Max participated in the Northern France, Ardennes, Rhineland and Central European Campaigns. He received the WWII Victory Medal, American Theatre Ribbon, European-African Middle Eastern Theatre Ribbon with 4 Bronze Battle Stars, 2 Overseas Service Bars, 1Service Stripe and Good Conduct Medal. Max arrived in the European Theatre on 27 June 1944 and returned to the States on 12 November 1945. Rank at discharge was Private First Class. Max and his wife Frances, who served in the Waves during WWII, live in Red Oak, Iowa.

 

Beals, Robert R. entered service on 15 August 1943 and was discharged on 23 December 1945. He served in the U.S. Navy. His units were boot camp at U.S. Naval Training Center at Farragut, Idaho; radio school at U.S. Naval Training School, University of Chicago, Illinois and U.S.N.O.B., Midway Islands. "Early in 1945 on Midway Island the runways were made longer to accommodate B29 Bombers. Large flights of these B29's landed and refueled at Midway on their way from the United States to their bases in the Mariana Islands. Under the supervision of U.S. Army Air Force Radiomen, I, and other Navy Radiomen, provided long range radio communications to these B29's." Rating at discharge was Radioman 2/C. Robert lives in Red Oak, Iowa.

 

Beck, Donald M. joined the Marine Corps in June 1941 and was commissioned 2nd Lieutenant on 1 November 1941. He served with the 3rd Marine Division. He led a company on Bougainville, Guam, and Iwo Jima. Donald was awarded the Silver Star Medal, Bronze Star Medal, Purple Heart, Presidential Unit Citation, Asiatic-Pacific Campaign Ribbon with 4 Battle Stars, WWII Victory Medal, China Service Ribbon and the National Defense Medal. He retired as a Colonel in 1968. He organized the Marine Corps Junior R.O.T.C. at Caprock High School in Amarillo, Texas. He married Ruth G. Maxell on 24 December 1941 and had two sons and two daughters. One son is a U.S. Naval Academy graduate and fought in Viet Nam, another is also a graduate of the academy and is a Marine Pilot. A grandson is a 1992 graduate of the academy. Donald passed away on 9 June 1993.

 

Beeson, Byron C. was born on 19 February 1915 at Coburg, Iowa and joined the Twenty-Fifth Naval Construction Battalion on 21 April 1942. Byron saw service in the Pacific, participating in the Campaigns at Guadalcanal, Bougainville and Guam. He was discharged from service on 2 October 1045 at San Pedro, California. Civilian Occupation: Owner of Beeson Distributing Co., and farm owner.

 

Beeson, Don entered the U.S. Navy in June 1942 and served 3 1/2 years. He saw service in the European Theatre of Operations, participating in the invasions of Sicily, Italy and Omaha Beach in France. His rating at discharge was Chief Petty Officer. Civilian occupation: Southwest Iowa Learning Resources Center. Don and his wife, Jeanette, live in Red Oak, Iowa and celebrated their 50th Wedding Anniversary on 20 July 1995.

 

Belt, Bert H. served in the U.S. Naval Reserve from 8 April 1944 to March 1946 when he was released to inactive duty. He saw service in the South Pacific Theatre of Operations, Hong Kong, Shanghai and Okinawa. His duty was navigator aboard the U.S.S. Arbdimatus and the U.S.S. Prometheus (AR3). At the time of his discharge he was Lieutenant J.G. Civilian occupation: sales Manager for the Thos. d. Murphy Co., in Red Oak, Iowa. Bert lives in Red Oak, Iowa.

 

Bergren, Merlin J. (37656784) was the son of Mr. & Mrs. Laurence Bergren of Stanton, Iowa. Merlin entered the service on 17 January 1943 at Ft. Dodge, Iowa and was discharged on 24 October 1945 at Ft. Sheridan, Illinois. He served with the 1090th Engineers. His training was taken at Ft. Warren, Wyoming and Camp Claiborne, Louisiana. He was engaged in action in the European Theatre in Northern France. His awards included the European Theatre Ribbon with 1 Silver Star and 1 Bronze Star and 4 Overseas Bars. Merlin was married to Delores Polson of Prescott, Iowa. He was a resident of Massena, Iowa and was employed by the Iowa Highway Commission. Previous to moving to Massena he farmed in the Montgomery County area. Merlin died on 19 July 1972.

 

Bergren, Ralph Eugene "Bergie" was born on 30 October 1920 at Red Oak, Iowa and inducted into service on 5 June 1942. He served for 9 months and 22 days with the 107th A.W. Unit, spending his entire service in the United States. His rank at discharge was Private. Before induction Ralph was a farm worker at Red Oak, Iowa. Civilian occupations: Printer for the Thos. D. Murphy Calendar Co., Red Oak, Iowa; timekeeper for the Tumpane Co., Offutt Air Force Base, Omaha, Nebraska; and time keeper for General Dynamics/Astronautics in Mead, Nebraska around 1962. Ralph died 11 March 1990. Submitted by wife, Winona Bergren

 

Bergsten, Daniel F. (33374559) was born 25 August 1917 at Essex, Iowa and attended school in Rural Montgomery County, Iowa and high school in Red Oak, Iowa. He was inducted into the service 7 September 1942 and entered active duty on 21 September 1942 at Baltimore, Maryland. He received his discharge on 14 October 1945 at Jefferson Barracks, Missouri. He saw service with the 25th Bomb Squadron, 20th Air Force. He qualified as a Carbine Sharpshooter. His military specialty was Airplane Sheet Metal Worker. Daniel participated in the battles and campaigns in India-Burma, Chine, Air offensive Japan, Central Burma and the East Indies. His awards included 5 Bronze Battle Stars for the above campaigns, Unit Citation and Good Conduct Medal and entitled to wear the Asiatic-Pacific Theatre Campaign Ribbon and 3 Overseas Bars. He arrived in the Asiatic-Pacific Theatre on 15 April 1944 and returned to the United States on 2 October 1945. He served 1 year, 5 months and 16 days in the United States and 1 year, 7 months and 22 days overseas. His rank at discharge was Sergeant. Daniel was employed at the Gamble Store in Red Oak, Iowa prior to his service time. He then went to Baltimore, Maryland, where he worked in the Martin Bomber Plant until he entered the Army Air Force.

 

Binns, Glenn H. went into service in the U.S. Navy on 30 May 1944. "I was in two years and twenty-four days, getting discharged on 23 June 1946. "After Navy Boot Camp I went to Electricians School, both in Farragut, Idaho. From there I was sent to the Philippines Islands of Calicon and Samar to a Navy Supply Depot. "I received ribbons for Philippine Liberation, Asiatic-Pacific, American Area and Victory. "I don't know if it was serious or humorous, but when I was at the Farragut training station a German prisoner was on work detail. He had a guard and the guard wandered off. After a while the German noticed the guard was gone and became worried he would get in trouble because the guard was gone, but the guard did return in due time. "I was Fireman 1/C, working as an electrician when I was discharged. "After my discharge I worked at several gas stations in Red Oak, Iowa, including Topps, JD Oil, and Resh. I then went to work for Iowa Power & Light Company for Forty years, starting in the plant in Shenandoah, Iowa after which I went to the plant south of Council Bluffs, Iowa. I was a Control Room Operator when I retired." Glenn lives in Council Bluffs, Iowa.

 

Blackburn, Byron F. (37352766) Byron was born 25 March 1911 at Grant, Iowa and entered the service at Ft. Logan, Colorado on 24 September 1942. He was discharged at Ft. Sheridan, Illinois on 22 October 1945. He arrived in the European Theatre in 1943. Byron served in the 186th Port Company, U.S. Army. He participated in campaigns in Normandy, Northern France, and Rhineland. He received the European-Middle Eastern Theatre ribbon with 3 Bronze Battle Stars, Bronze Service Arrowhead, 4 Overseas Bars, 1 Service Stripe, Good Conduct Medal and Meritorious Unit Award. Byron was a barber and often told of cutting many heads of hair while overseas. Each soldier always had a humorous story to tell him which kept them all laughing. Rank at discharge was Private First Class. Submitted by Helen Blackburn

 

Blank, Kenneth Charles (8719146) was born on 6 March 1925 at Coin, Page County, Iowa, and entered service with the U.S. Navy on 19 June 1043. He was discharged on 8 December 1946 at San Diego, California. He served at the Frontier Base at San Pedro, California and the Naval Air Station at San Diego, California. Kenneth Received the American Area Campaign Medal and the WWII Victory Medal. his rating at time of discharge was Seaman 1/C. Civilian occupation: mail carrier. Submitted by Arleen (Blank) Thompson.

 

Bloomquist, Charles A. entered the Navy on 14 December 1942 at Omaha, Nebraska and was discharged on 12 February 1946 at St. Louis, Missouri. Units and places her served included the Naval Reserve Station, Omaha, Nebraska; Naval Training Station, Great Lakes, Illinois; NASTC, Chicago, Illinois; U.S.N. Sec. Base, Tompkinsville, New York; Lion Three, ABATU, Lido Beach, Long Island, New York; ISMAAB, Dartmouth, Massachusetts; NAAN, Portland Weymoth, England; COMD Task Unit 125; a second time at Lido Beach; RS, Brooklyn, New York; NTS PT, Loma, California; NTC, San Diego, California and U.S. NAAB Navy 416 VARO, Omaha, Nebraska. Charles was a part of the "small boatmen" who had a part in every landing from North Africa to Normandy. His unit made naval history by helping the Army cross inland rivers. The mission was to supply a fast "build up" of men, weapons and ammunition to support the first assault troops. They trained for months with army combat engineers in smaller rivers of France and Belgium, disguising themselves in army field uniforms and helmets and slogging through the mud with the doughboys. The blue hulls of the navy boats were also camouflaged in army olive drab. The big LCM' (landing craft, mechanized) were 50 feet long and 14 feet wide. The heaviest tank conveyors were used to move them on the road and a single out fit was 77 feet long and almost 20 feet high. Many were brought as for as 300 miles over blasted roads, makeshift bridges and through narrow village streets. The LCM's were used to race back and forth over the swollen banks of the Rhine-the carriers marked "Destination Berlin". Charles received the American Area Ribbon, WWII Victory Medal, Good Conduct Ribbon, European-African Campaign Ribbon with 1 Battle Star and a Commendation. His rank at discharge was Motor Machinist Mate 2/C. Charles lived in Red Oak, Iowa from 1955 until he died there in 1981.

 

Boeye, John F. was born in Webster City, Iowa on 21 November 1922 and enlisted in the Air Force in November 1942 at Los Angeles, California. He returned home on 9 December 1945 and was discharged at Camp Grant, Illinois. Following his enlistment he was sent to the Cadet Center at San Antonio, Texas and then to Parks Air College in East St. Louis for his Primary Training. His basic training was received in Garden City, Kansas, where he had a forced landing in a wheat field. He graduated in a class of 431 on 1 October 1943 in Eagle Pass, Texas. From Texas he was sent to Tallahassee, Florida on 28 February 1944; to Thomasville, Georgia for RTU and to Hawaii 7th Air Force (P39's). On 17 April 1944 he was transferred to Ondonga, New Georgia, where he joined the 70th Fighter Squadron called the White Knights. There he began to fly P38Gs. Following duty there he was sent to Munda, New Georgia; Sansapor, New Guinea; and to Morotai, Luzon, Lingayen Gulf, Mindora, Zamboanhga, Laoag and Manila in the Philippines. He took part in the longest flight by a P38 on 18 September 1943. The flight was 7 1/2 hours running at 220 rpm with 15 inches manifold pressure. He was involved in a crash of a P38J on 15 January 1945 at Lingayen Gulf. He was credited with one Hamp kill on 25 November 1944 over Negros in the Philippines. Rank at discharge was Captain Following his military career he attended the University of Iowa and obtained his BSC and LLB degrees and became a practicing attorney in Red Oak, Iowa in 1950. John and his wife live in Red Oak, Iowa.

Submitted by his son, John Billings Boeye.

 

Boll, William Elwood (37194629) was born in Red Oak, Iowa to Frank J. and Bonnie Boll on 10 March 1908. He was inducted into the armed forces at Ft. Des Moines, Iowa on 9 May 1942 and discharged at Ft. Leavenworth, Kansas on 9 December 1945 as a Tech. 5/G. He had served with the 21st Evacuation Hospital. William died on 19 December 1959 and is buried in Evergreen Cemetery at Red Oak, Iowa.

 

Bontrager, Roland D. (37694450) was born at Nodaway, Iowa on 9 April 1907 and entered active service on 4 April 1944 at Camp Dodge, Iowa. He was separated from duty on 9 February 1945 at Jefferson Barracks, Missouri. He served with Company "F", 144th Infantry at Camp Van Dorn, Mississippi. He qualified as a Carbine Expert. His length of service was 10 months and 6 days. Rank at discharge was Private. Civilian occupation: Electrician.

 

Booton, Charles Vinton served in the U.S. Navy. Charles died in the attack on Pearl Harbor on 7 December 1941. His rating was Seaman 1/C at the time of his death. Further information on Charles' service was not available.

 

Braden, Clyde E. (37656928) was born on 22 September 1922 at Elliott, Iowa and entered service on 26 January 1943 at Hastings, Nebraska.

He Arrived in England in October 1944 as a member of the 97th Acorn Division and was assigned to Patton's 3rd Army and saw action in France, Belgium, and Germany. Clyde was killed in action on 2 March 1945 in the Middle Rhine Valley near Trier, Germany at age 22. He was Private First Class at the time of his death. He was posthumously awarded the Silver Star and the Purple Heart. The Silver Star was presented to Clyde's parents at the direction of President Harry Truman through the Commanding General of the Seventh Service Command at Omaha, Nebraska. The citation for the award reads: "For gallantry in action against an armed enemy of the United States near Germany on 2 March 1945. PFC Braden, assigned as a truck driver, left his vehicle under guard and voluntarily organized a carrying party to take vitally needed ammunition and food to the front lines. Disregarding the danger involved, PFC Braden let the detail under enemy observation and fire was fatally injured by shell fragments during the third trip. His initiative and outstanding courage were an inspiration to our troops and are in keeping with the highest traditions of the military service." The first interment for Clyde was in Plot H, Row 6, Grave 144 at the U. S. Military Cemetery in Foy, Belgium. His body was returned aboard the U.S. Transport Haiti Victory. Final burial services with full military honors were held at Perryman Chapel at Red Oak, Iowa on 13 April 1049. Interment was at the Evergreen Cemetery in Red Oak. Clyde's brother, William C. Braden, was also killed in action and a double memorial service was held at the First Christian Church in Red Oak for both of them on 25 March 1945.

 

Braden, Grant Nathanial was born at Griswold, Iowa on 23 December 1918 and enlisted into the services on 10 April 1942. He was called into active duty on 20 October 1942. He served in the 9th Air Force and took his preflight training at Vernon, Texas and Enid, Oklahoma. His final training was at Dodge City, Kansas. He became a B26 pilot. He left for the European Theatre from Savannah, Georgia on 1 April 1944 and served in Africa and England. He had flown over 50 missions when he was killed in action in France on 31 January 1945. He was on a weather reconnaissance flight during a blinding snow storm. The plane hit a mountain near Reims, France and all five crew members were killed. The caskets of the five are buried in on grave at the National Cemetery at Jefferson Barracks, Missouri. Grant's rank at the time of his death was 1st Lieutenant.

 

Braden, Warren H. (17111641) enlisted in the army on 21 August 1942 and went on active duty 5 October 1942 with the 271st Ordnance Medium Maintenance Company. His training was taken at Camp Breckenridge, Kentucky; Camp McCoy, Wisconsin; the Tennessee maneuvers with the 2nd Army; Camp Atterbury, Indiana; and Ft. Jackson, South Carolina. He left for overseas duty 7 December 1944 from Camp Kilmeer, New Jersey. He boarded the S.S. Robin Tuxford on 8 December enroute to England. On 16 March 1945 he left England and debarked at LeHavre, France on 18 March. He went through Luxembourg to Bell, Germany. After a tour in Germany he left on 10 May for the Calais staging area. Embarked 23 June 1945 from Marseille, France aboard the U.S.S. General Weigel. The ship sailed through the Panama Canal on 4 July. There Warren learned his brother, Grant, had been killed in action 31 January 1945 at Reims, France. He went on to Manila and debarked at Batangas, Luzon, Philippine Islands where he stayed from 1 August 1945 until December 1945 when he arrived at Camp Robinson in San Francisco, California. From there he went to Ft. Riley, Kansas to be discharged. He participated in campaigns in the Rhineland, Central Europe, and Philippine Liberation. Citations and decorations received were the Good Conduct Medal, American Campaign Medal, Asiatic-Pacific Campaign Medal, European-African-Middle Eastern Campaign Medal, WW II Victory Medal, Army of Occupation Medal, Philippine Liberation Ribbon and WW II Honorable Service Lapel Button. His rank at discharge was Tech. /3. Civilian occupation: Mechanic in Red Oak, Iowa. Warren presently lives in Bennington, Nebraska.

 

Braden, William C. (37465735) was born at Elliott, Iowa on 1 April 1921 and entered service on 2 December 1942 at Grand Island, Nebraska.

He arrived in France in August 1944 as a member of Co. "D", 104th Timberwolf Division and was assigned to Hodge's 1st Army. William saw action in Belgium and Germany. He was awarded the Purple Heart for wounds received in action November 1944 with clusters added later. He was killed in action while scouting to cross the Ruhr River in the drive on Cologne, Germany on 23 February 1945. His rank at the time of his death was Staff Sergeant. He was first interred in Plot PPP, Row 3, Grave 52 in the U.S. Military Cemetery at Henri-Chappell, Belgium. His body was returned on the transport Robert Burns and final burial services with full military honors was held at Perryman Chapel in Red Oak, Iowa on 10 December 1947 with burial in the Evergreen Cemetery in Red Oak. A letter from one of his closest friends to Bill's father and mother after his death praised him as one of  the best men in their platoon. He reported that Bill had proved over and over what a valuable man he was and he was given command over a section of guns which increased his command to 16 men. He took the duties of a 2nd Lieutenant since they could not get replacements. The men never failed to listen to Bill and were thankful to have him around. His brother, Clyde, was also killed in action and a double memorial service was held for them at the Christian Church in Red Oak, Iowa on 25 March 1945.

 

Bradley, Howard Rolland was born on 31 December 1921. He entered military service on 7 September 1942 at Ft. Leavenworth, Kansas and was discharged at Sioux Falls, South Dakota on 23 November 1945. He served with Squadron A1, 211th Army Air Force Base Unit and took his training in Florida before being shipped to England. He arrived in the United Kingdom on 15 December 1943 and returned to the United States on 11 July 1945. Howard received the European-African-Middle Eastern Theatre Service Medal, the Good Conduct Medal, and the American Theatre Ribbon. In learning to ride a bike in England Howard fell and cut his chin so badly that it needed stitches. His rank at discharge was Corporal (Quartermaster). Civilian occupation: Farmer. Howard died on 1 June 1986 at the Veterans Hospital in Knoxville, Iowa. Submitted by Mrs. Don Means

 

Branan, Clifford Q. (20705522) was born at Villisca, Iowa on 16 October 1921 and enlisted in Co. "F", 168th Regt., 34th Division of the Iowa National Guard on 20 January 1941. The division was called into federal service on 10 February 1941 and Clifford went to Camp Claiborne, Louisiana with the unit on 2 March 1941. He later served in the Anti-Tank Company of the 168th Infantry Regiment. He was discharged from duty at Jefferson Barracks, Missouri on 12 June 1945. His military specialty was cook. Clifford participated in the Algerian, Tunisian, Naples-Foggia and Rome-Arno Campaigns and received 4 Bronze Battle Stars for the forgoing campaigns, the Good Conduct Medal, American Defense Service Ribbon, European-African-Middle Eastern Theatre Campaign Ribbon and 6 Overseas Bars. He arrived in the European Theatre on 12 May 1942, in the African-Middle Eastern Theatre on 8 November 1942 and returned to the states on 7 June 1945. At time of his discharge Clifford was a Tech /5.

 

Brannan, Robert C. was born on the family farm near Villisca, Iowa on 5 December 1916 to John C. and Viola Bunker Brannan. He joined the Marine Corps on 21 December 1939 and was discharged from duty on 6 February 1946. His boot training was taken in San Diego, California from 16 September 1940 to 7 May 1941. He was stationed at Ewa, Hawaii from 7 May 1941 to 1 December 1941; on Midway Island in the South Pacific from 7 December 1941 to 1 June 1942; at San Diego and Santa Barbara, California from 1 June 1942 to 3 February 1943; at Ewa, Hawaii: New Hebrides: Bougainville: Green Island: Luzon in the Philippine Islands from 3 February to 19 April 1945 and at El Toro, California 19 April 1945 to 19 December 1945. He was on military leave from 19 December 1945 to 6 February 1946. His overseas service was in the Pacific Theatre with Marine Aviation. The actor, Brian Keith, was in his unit at one time. Robert contracted malaria while serving in the Philippines and suffered from extreme chills for years afterward. He participated in the defense of Midway Island and saw action at Bougainville. At the time of his discharge he was a Warrant Officer. He married Irma Bornand on 10 October 1942 and was the father of three sons and a daughter. Robert loved to reminisce about he Marines and felt that those years were an important part of his life. After his WW II service he moved to Iowa and engaged in farming from then until his retirement in 1984. Robert died 27 March 1994. Submitted by Robert B. Brannan

 

Branning, Frank Eugene (37480848) was born on 7 June 1920 at Red Oak, Iowa and inducted into service on 27 May 1943 and went on active duty on 3 June 1943. He received his discharge at Ft. Leonard Wood, Missouri on 4 December 1945 where he served with the 17th Headquarters, Headquarters Detachment, Special Troops, Second Army. His military specialty was Rifleman and he qualified as a Carbine Marksman. He participated in the Central Europe Campaign and received the European-African-Middle Eastern Theatre Medal, WW II Victory Medal and the American Theatre Medal. He spent 2 years and 23 days of his service in the United States and 5 months and 14 days overseas.

On 5 December 1945 he reenlisted in the army at Ft. Leonard Wood, Missouri and was assigned to Headquarters and Headquarters Company, 1st Battalion, STR. In his enlistment he served a year and 3 months and received his discharge on 7 May 1947 at Ft. Benning, Georgia. At that time he was recommended for further military service. Frank's rank at discharge was Private.

 

Brees, Deane W. entered the U.S. Navy at Des Moines, Iowa on 29 March 1944 and was discharged at Ft. Snelling, Minnesota on 4 February 1946. He took his boot training at Great Lakes, Illinois, Training Center; attended Signal School at the Service School Command, Great Lakes; and Pre Com at Naval Station, Seattle, Washington. On 8 November 1944 he boarded the U.S.S. Gallatin APA169 at Astoria, Oregon. This was an attack transport in an amphibious group assigned to the Pacific Fleet. Among other activities the Gallatin landed troops on Leyte. In October 1945 the Gallatin was caught in a typhoon 13 miles outside of Yokohama harbor. the storm lasted 3 nights and 2 days. The ship put out both anchors but was only able to travel 3 miles during that time. The radar screen was torn off and the radio antennas were lost but otherwise the ship came through the storm with little damage. Deane's rating at discharge was Signalman 3/C. After he left the service he returned to farming.

He and his wife, Darlene, live near Nodaway, Iowa.

 

Brenning, Herman (37490339) was born in Red Oak, Iowa on 21 February 1912 and inducted into the army on 25 January 1944. He entered active duty on 15 February 1944 at Ft. Crook, Nebraska. He was discharged on 24 March 1946 at Ft. Leavenworth, Kansas. He served with the 133rd Ordinance Med. Maintenance Company. His military occupation specialty was General Carpenter. He qualified for the Combat Infantry Badge and received the Asiatic-Pacific Theatre Ribbon with 2 Battle Stars, Philippine Liberation Ribbon, WW II Victory Ribbon and Good Conduct Medal. Herman participated in the Southern Philippines Campaign and the Ryukus Campaign. He was wounded, receiving a burn on his back from shrapnel, but did not report it. He was stationed in Hawaii at one time and was in the battle at Okinawa. Herman served 6 months and 29 days in the United States and was overseas for 1 year, 7 months and a day. At the time of his discharge his rank was Tech. Sgt. 4. Civilian occupations: Began work for the City of Red Oak, Iowa around 1946, working at the cemetery for a few years then was transferred to the water department. He worked for Randy Swanson as a carpenter from 1965 to 1968 then worked for Larson Plumbing and Heating until he retired in 1977. Herman died on 23 July 1992. Submitted by his wife, Mary Jo Brenning

 

Brenton, Dencil K. (20705554) was born 25 June 1916 and entered active service with the mobilization of Co. "F", 2nd Bn., 168th Infantry Regiment, 34th Division on 10 February 1941 at Villisca, Iowa. He went with the unit to Camp Claiborne, Louisiana. He was separated from service at Jefferson Barracks, Missouri on 10 June 1945. His military occupation specialty was Truck Driver. Dencil led an automatic rifle squad, directing them in combat against the enemy. He participated in the campaigns in Algeria, Tunisia, Naples-Foggia and Rome-Arno. Awards received were 4 Campaign Stars, Distinguished Unit Badge, Combat Infantryman Badge, Good Conduct Medal, American Defense Service Ribbon, European-African-Middle Eastern Theatre Ribbon and 5 Overseas Bars. He served in the United States 1 year, 7 months and 5 days and was overseas for 2 years, 8 months and 26 days. Dencil and Vera Henry were married during Dencil's basic training time at Camp Claiborne, Louisiana, at Marksville, Louisiana on 5 August 1941. His rank at discharge was Tech. /5. Dencil presently lives in Sherwood, Oregon.

 

Bridges, Jack served in the United States Navy from 1942 to 1945 in the American Theatre. His civilian occupation was sheet metal and gutter worker in Detroit, Michigan. Jack died 24 April 1992.

 

Briggs, Clair M. (20706746) was born at Red Oak, Iowa on 14 March 1920. He was a member of Co. "M", 168th Infantry Regiment, 34th Division in Red Oak, Iowa when it was federalized on 10 February 1941 and went with the unit to Camp Claiborne, Louisiana on 2 March 1941. He received his discharge on 9 August 1945 at Ft. Sheridan, Illinois. His military specialty was Supply Clerk and he qualified for the Combat Infantry Badge. Clair participated in the Algeria-French Morocco, Tunisian, Naples-Foggia, tome-Arno, Northern Appennines and Po Valley Campaigns. He received 1 Service Stripe, Good Conduct Ribbon, American Defense Service Ribbon, European-African-Middle Eastern Theatre Ribbon with 1 Silver Battle Star, and 1 Bronze Battle Star and 6 Overseas Bars. His service in the United States was for 1 year, 2 months and 6 days and he served overseas for 3 years, 3 months and 24 days.He arrived in the European Theatre on 2 March 1942, was back in the United States on 22 October 1944, returned to the European Theatre on 23 December 1944 and was back in the United States on 29 July 1945. Clair was Tech./5 at the time of his discharge.

 

Briggs, Orval Pershing was born on 17 September 1918 in Red Oak, Iowa to Romania Porter and Sarah Elizabeth (McKnight) Briggs. He entered the U.S. Navy on 6 March 1940. He was on the U.S.S. California and two days at sea when Pearl Harbor was bombed, on his way to serve aboard the U.S.S. Atlanta. The Atlanta joined the Pacific Fleet and helped guard a convoy to New Caledonia, then participated in the Battle of Midway 4 to 6 June 1942. She remained a part of the fleet through the Guadalcanal landings and the Battle of Eastern Solomons. Against great odds she took part in the naval battle of Guadalcanal on 13 November 1942 and was severely damaged by at least 1 torpedo and 49 Japanese shells. She survived the night but was too badly damaged to be saved and was scuttled off Lunga Point. In this fight 79 men were wounded and 172 died. Orval was one of the 172 who lost their lives. He Received a Purple Heart, five Battle Stars and a Citation from President Franklin Roosevelt.

 

Brown, Ethric Lavern "Brownie" (9621324) was born at Brooks, Iowa on 4 June 1929. He was inducted into service on 30 June 1944 at Omaha, Nebraska and served in the United States Navy. He was discharged from service on 7 March 1946 at the U.S. Naval Personnel Separation Center at Shelton, Virginia. His service on vessels and stations include Naval Training Center, Great Lakes, Illinois; NATTC, Norman, Oklahoma; NAGS, Miami, Florida; VTB-2, OTU, NAS, Miami, Florida; NARU (V-5) Muhlenberg College, Allentown, Pennsylvania and CASU-21, Norfolk, Virginia. In Norfolk he served in a support group for Air Group 74 commanded by Commander Blackburn who was the first man to set a plane on the deck of the carrier "Midway". He was a line mechanic on the Norfolk air base the last six months of his time in the Navy. At the end of the war he was attending flight training school at Muhlenberg College in Allentown, Pennsylvania. Ethric worked in an essential war industry, the Glenn L. Martin Aircraft Company at Ft. Crook, Nebraska before entering the service, where he worked at building the B-26 Martin Marauder, a medium bomber. His rating at discharge was Aviation Machinists Mate 3/C. Brownie and his wife, Neeva, were married in Corning, Iowa on 16 July 1940 and were the parents of two children, one of whom since has died. Civilian occupation: Employed by R.E.A. till November 1948. Worked for Eveready Battery Plant in Red Oak, Iowa until retirement in 1979. He and his wife live in Red Oak, Iowa.

 

Brown, Lloyd C. was a member of Company "F", 168th Infantry Regiment, 34th Division at the time it was mobilized into active service on 10 February 1941 at Villisca, Iowa. He went to Camp Claiborne, Louisiana with the unit on 2 March 1941. Following Pearl Harbor he was sent to Officers Candidate School and, on graduating, was assigned to Company "F", 114th Infantry at Ft. Lewis, Washington. He served in the American Theatre and the European-African-Middle Eastern Theatre of Operations, participating in the campaigns of Northern France, the Rhineland and Central Europe. His awards included the American Theatre Ribbon with 3 Bronze Battle Stars, WWII Victory Medal and 2 Overseas Service Bars. Lloyd's rank at discharge was Captain. He joined the 168th infantry, 34th Division of Iowa National Guard following World War II and was serving as Battalion Executive Officer when he transferred to the Army Reserve Corps where he served until his retirement. At that time he held the Army Reserve rank of Lieutenant Colonel. Civilian occupation: He spent most of his life following WWII as a farmer near Villisca and Clarinda, Iowa. In 1962 he left the farm and went into sales until he retired. He lived in the Walker, Minnesota area a number of years after leaving the farm and passed away there in May 1991. Submitted by his daughter, Sandra K. Thompson

 

Bruce, Floyd L. was born to Mr. & Mrs. Robert Bruce on 15 February 1912. He was inducted into service with the army on 4 April 1944 and received his discharge in 1946. He went overseas in February 1945 where he served in the European Theatre. Part of his service was with the German occupation forces. Floyd's civilian occupation was work at the Hotel Johnson in Red Oak, Iowa from 1946. He died 6 December 1948 at Red Oak, Iowa.

 

Bryan, Clarence Russell was born in Red Oak, Iowa on 12 April 1923. He graduated from Red Oak High School in 1940 prior to entering the U. S. Naval Academy on an appointment from his native state in 1941. Following graduation from the Naval Academy in June 1944 he attended Submarine School in New London, Connecticut and from there reported to Commander, Submarines, Seventh Fleet in the Southwest Pacific Theatre. During the remainder of World War II he made two successful submarine war patrols on U.S.S. Hammerhead (SS 364), then was Engineer Officer in U.S.S. Becuna (SS 319). He went from the Submarine Force, Pacific to the Massachusetts Institute of Technology in 1949 for a 3-year postgraduate course in Naval Architecture and Marine Engineering where he earned the Professional Degree of Naval Engineer.

Prior to attaining Flag rank his assignments included service in Mare Island and Portsmouth Naval Shipyards as Ship Superintendent and as Design Superintendent; concurrent assignment in Ship Design, Bureau of Ships and as Chairman, Submarine Design Committee of the Polaris Steering Task Group; special Assistant and Administrative Aide to Chief, Bureau of Ships; Assistant Chief of Staff (Material) for Commander, Submarine Force, Atlantic; and Project Manager for Submarine Acquisition and Maintenance in the Naval Ship Systems Command. Hid duties since selection for Rear Admiral in 1969 include Assistant Chief of Staff and Fleet Maintenance Officer for the Commander-in-chief, Atlantic Fleet; Deputy Commander for Production, Naval Ship Systems Command; Deputy Commander for Submarines, Naval Sea Systems Command and Director, Ships Maintenance and Modernization Division, Office of the Chief of Naval Operations. On 24 August 1976 he was promoted to rank of Vice Admiral. On 30 August 1976, he reported for duty as Commander, Naval Sea Systems Command,  where he was responsible for the design, engineering and construction of all naval ships and their combat systems. On 1 April 1980 he retired from active Navy duty. He was installed as President of Webb Institute of Naval Architecture on 1 July 1980 and retired from that position on 1 August 1986.

Vice Admiral Bryan is qualified to wear the Submarine Officers Insignia and was awarded the Submarine Combat Insignia with Gold Star in World War II. His other military decorations include the Distinguished Service Medal, The Legion of Merit, Navy Commendation Medal, China Service Medal, American Defense Service Medal, American Campaign Medal, Asiatic-Pacific Campaign Medal, WWII Victory Medal, Navy Occupation Service Medal, National Defense Service Medal, Korean Service Medal, Philippine Liberation Ribbon and Philippine Liberation Ribbon and the Expert Rifleman. He has the Professional Degree of Naval Engineer from the Massachusetts Institute of Technology and is a member of the honorary engineering fraternity of Sigma XI. The Navy's Engineering Duty Officer School established the VADM C.R. Bryan Award for the student whose performance best exemplified the high standards of professionalism established by VADM Bryan during his leadership of the Engineering Duty Officer Community from 1976 to 1980. He is a past President of the American Society of Naval Engineers and a member of the Society of Naval Architects and Marine Engineers. His many activities since retirement include the Visiting Committee of the Department of Ocean Engineering, MIT; The Marine Board, National Research Council; the Board of Directors of the Accreditation Board for Engineering and Technology; and the Board of Directors of the Naval Submarine League. In 1992 he was awarded the Distinguished Public Service Medal by the Commandant of the United States Coast Guard for his contributions as Chairman of the Advisory Committee to the Coast Guard Academy. Vice Admiral Bryan and his wife, Ardis (Froyd) Bryan, reside at Crystal River, Florida.

 

Bryant, Wayne O. was born on 15 July 1921 and entered the service in the U.S. Naval Reserve on 7 June 1942 at Des Moines, Iowa. He was discharged from duty on 13 December 1945 at the Navy Personnel Separation Center at Great Lakes, Illinois. He served for 3 years, 6 months and 6 days in the American and Pacific Theatres. Awards received were American Area Campaign Ribbon, European-African-Middle Eastern Area Campaign Medal with 5 Bronze Battle Stars, Asiatic-Pacific Theatre Ribbon, Good Conduct Medal and WW II Victory Medal. He took part in five invasions - Anzio, Salerno, Elbe-Gela, Sicily and Southern France. Wayne participated in the following Naval Engagements while aboard the U.S.S. LCI (L) 237: Tunisian Campaign, 1 July to 7 July 1943; Sicily Campaign, 8 July to 17 July 1943; invasion of Italy at Salerno, 6 September to 15 October 1943 and the invasion of Southern France 15 August to 27 August 1944. He served a total of 23 months on the LCI (L) 237. On 27 October 1943 at 19:30 hours the LCI 237 struck a German water mine in the Ionian Sea that blew 42 feet from the bow of the ship. The resulting loss of life was 33 dead British Commandos and 1 #237 member. Points of interest: "I lived in Morton Mills and graduated from Villisca High School. After joining the United States Navy I attended boot camp at Great Lakes, Illinois and U.S.N.R. Radio School at Miami University in Oxford, Ohio. I was then assigned to the LCI at Boston, Massachusetts. "We departed from Norfolk, Virginia on 1 April 1943. After returning returning to the United States in December 1944 I was assigned to the U.S.S. Merrick VSS #97 as Radioman 1st Class. Duty consisted of taking supplies to many Pacific Islands. I witnessed the vast destruction caused by the "A" Bomb at Hiroshima and Nagasaki. "We arrived at Battleship Row in Hawaii on V-J Day in 1945. "I have been actively involved with the U.S.S. National LCI Association for the past five years and am servicing as State of  Iowa Director attending National Conventions." Wayne lives in Underwood, Iowa.

 

Bryson, Don E. entered the service on 3 November 1942 and received his discharge from duty on 29 November 1946. He was attached to the 347th Fighter Squadron, 350th Fighter Group. He participated in the Rome-Arno, African, Sicilian, Po Valley and North Appennine Campaigns and the invasion of Southern France. Don served as a Fighter Pilot. He received the Air Medal with 4 Oak Leaf Clusters, the European-African-Middle Eastern Theatre Ribbon, American Theatre Medal, WW II Victory Medal and the Distinguished Flying Cross. The Citation with the DFC reads in part, "For extraordinary achievement while participating in aerial flight as pilot of a P47 type aircraft. On 21 December 1944, Lieutenant Bryson flew in a fighter-bomber attack upon enemy communication lines in Northern Italy. Flying through an almost solid overcast. Lieutenant Bryson sighted a concentration of rolling stock at Lonato. Immediately diving to minimum altitude, Lieutenant Bryson released his bombs with precision accuracy, destroying ten freight cars loaded with supplies and damaging the railroad tracks. Continuing in attack against other targets in the area in the face of strong enemy resistance, Lieutenant Bryson destroyed or damaged one locomotive, three oil tank cars, three motor transports, several gun emplacements and three enemy air craft breaking off and returning safely to base. On more than sixty-five combat missions his outstanding proficiency and steadfast devotion to duty have reflected great credit upon himself and the Armed Forces of the United States." Don was discharged from service with rank of Captain. Civilian Occupation: Owner of P&B Oil Co. in Grant, Iowa for 42 years. Don and his wife, Dorothy, live in Grant, Iowa.

 

Bryson, Elmo K. (37189254) was born in Montgomery County, Iowa on 3 April 1907 and inducted into the Infantry on 24 March 1942 at Ft. Des Moines, Iowa. He was separated from service on 7 June 1945 at Jefferson Barracks, Missouri. At the time he left the army he was a member of Headquarters Company, IRTC Joseph T. Robinson, Arkansas. He previously had served in the Aleutians in the Asiatic-Pacific Theatre. He received or was entitled to a Bronze Star for the Aleutians Campaign, the Good Conduct Medal, Asiatic-Pacific Theatre Campaign Ribbon and 3 Overseas Bars. Elmo's military occupational specialty was Light Truck Driver. He Saw overseas service for 1 year, 8 months, and 3 days and served in the United Stated for 1 year, 6 months, and 11 days. His rank at discharge was Private First Class. Civilian occupation: Farm hand.

 

Bryson, Robert D. was born near Guss, Iowa to Mr. & Mrs. A. J. Bryson on 4 October 1925 and entered the U. S. Marine Corps following his graduation from Grant, Iowa High School with the class of 1944.  He took his basic training on the West Coast and shipped overseas with Company One, 26th Regiment. The unit landed on Iwo Jima on 28 February 1945. He was killed in action there on 13 March 1945 at the age of 19 years.  Robert was a Private at the time of his death.

 

Buehler, Darwin Faye (3219177) enlisted in the regular Navy on 1 March 1944 and served until 16 April 1947. "My basic training, boot camp, was at Great Lakes, Illinois; Mechanical School at Great Lakes; Diesel School at Gulfport, Mississippi; Diesel School at Richmond, Virginia and crew training at Camp Bradford, Virginia. "LST 894 was built in Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania and after it was commissioned we sailed down the Ohio and Mississippi Rivers to New Orleans, Louisiana where we took on stores and ammunition. We sailed through the Panama Canal to the Pacific Ocean where we went to many islands in the North and South Pacific, including Japan after the war was over. "What I remember most about Japan is that there were no buildings left standing after all the bombing. There was only bank vaults left standing that survived the bombs and cemeteries were repaired as they didn't have any stones that looked like they were disturbed. "I had one battle star on the Asiatic-Pacific Ribbon and that was for the invasion of Okinawa where we sustained damage to the hull when we beached and tore a hole in the forward compartment bilge control room, which then filled with water. Ribbons earned were American Area, Asiatic Pacific with 1 Battle Star, Good Conduct and WWII Victory Medal. While in the Okinawa area we rode out three typhoons and that was rough sailing. "I was promoted to Motor Machinist Mate 2/C. "I was on the 894 when it was decommissioned in the Philippines and stayed on it for a couple of months after that until it was taken over by the French. It was last known to be sailing up and down a river in China carrying cargo. "I also served on the U.S.S. LSM(R)S406 where I spent my last days sitting in San Diego, California harbor. "I was discharged at the Great Lakes Naval Hospital on 16 April 1947. "After I came home I worked for the Railway Express until I started working for the CB&Q Railroad as a baggage and mail handler. I held various jobs until I was transferred to St. Joseph, Missouri, where I spent most of my time with the railroad in the sales department." Darwin presently lives in Red Oak, Iowa.

 

Bull, Lester entered the army at Ft. Crook, Nebraska on 15 September 1943. His military occupational specialty was that of typing and fingerprinting which he did for eight months before being dent to Aberdeen, Maryland for ordnance training. Three months later he was sent to Camp Stoneman, California, and left for overseas duty in August 1944. He died in 21 August 1944 in the Pacific area as the result of an accident. He was 21 years old. Lester was a corporal at the time of his death.