JOHNSON COUNTY IAGenWeb Project  


Oak Hill Cemetery

Tiffin, Iowa

INDEX
Burial Records
Notable Burials at Oak Hill
More Stories about People Buried at Oak Hill

Burial Records

Alphabetical surname index to burial record pages is below.

A - C D - G H - K L - O P - S T - Z

Noted Oak Hill Burials

Notable Early Johnson County settlers buried in Oak Hill

Honorable Robert Walker
Col. John Williams – promoted in the army and on his return elected county judge.

Hon. George Paul – distinguished factor of Iowa politics
Yale Hamilton
Virgil Lancaster
H. H. Winchester
David Switzer
Sam Holler
John Saxton
Archibald Gillilland
Henry Headly
James Douglas
Jackson Frost & Jarvis Frost

Honorable Robert Walker, born in Schenectady County, New York, in October 1802, and moved to Johnson County in 1838 where he served as the first justice of the peace in the new Iowa Territory. In his official capacity he administered the oath of office to the Capital Commissioners who located the territorial capital in Iowa City. In 1853, he married Hon. Le Grand Byington’s sister. In 1860, he moved to his farm near Tiffin, where he died on October 28, 1879. During his life and Johnson County residence, Judge Walker filled an influential position and earned the respect bestowed him.  His home and property was listed in the 1870 Thompson & Evert Atlas.



A former Indiana resident, Yale Hamilton was persuaded to move to the Iowa Territory along with several others by a close friend Judge Harris.  Hamilton lived for a time in Lucas Township before settling in Clear Creek. Hamilton’s name appears on the 1838 Johnson County Tax List. His household and merchandise was valued at $50. He also owned 8 cattle valued at $200; two cows and 40 cattle more than three years old; and three head of cattle under three years old. At the time he reportedly paid $1.33 for property valued at $265.50.

Hamilton was a member of Claim Association of Johnson County, which represented a number of settlers who lived on land that had not been surveyed. The group adopted a constitution, a code of laws that each one pledged to observe to defend their land claims.

Hamilton’s son J. C. Hamilton married Mary A. Hamilton (March 2, 1862) and lived on the Clear Creek farm near Tiffin. Together they had eight children. Her husband had two children with his first wife. Though Mary A. Hamilton received little formal education she passed examinations to teach school at age 15. She also wrote under the signature of “Kitty Carroll” for leading newspapers in Iowa including the Muscatine Journal, Dubuque Herald, Burlington Hawkeye, Keokuk Post and Tipton Advertiser.  She also wrote a series of local letters from Tiffin which was said to be the genesis of “country correspondence” in the state.


*Many thanks to Pat Pirkl and Linda Schreiber who contributed this Oak Hill Cemetery information to the Johnson County IAGenWeb site

Source Information:

History of Johnson County 1836-1882. Iowa City, Iowa. 1883. A Reproduction by Unigraphic, Inc. 1973. pp 965
History of Johnson County 1836-1882. Iowa City, Iowa. 1883. A Reproduction by Unigraphic, Inc. 1973. p. 586.
History of Johnson County 1836-1882. Iowa City, Iowa. 1883. A Reproduction by Unigraphic, Inc. 1973. pp 270-271,
History of Johnson County 1836-1882. Iowa City, Iowa. 1883. A Reproduction by Unigraphic, Inc. 1973. pp 326.
History of Johnson County 1836-1882. Iowa City, Iowa. 1883. A Reproduction by Unigraphic, Inc. 1973. pp 836.
The History of Johnson County, Iowa and its Townships, Cities and Villages from 1836 to 1882,” Iowa City, 1883. A reproduction by Unigraphic, Evansville, Indiana 1973. pp179-181, 605.

More Stories of People Buried in Oak Hill Cemetery - 

O'BRIEN, MICHAEL CULLEN
 aka
 BRYANT, MICHAEL C
Our gggrandfather was actually born Michael Cullen O'Brien in County Cork, Ireland on 17 March 1828. He immigrated with his parents and a brother through Nova Scotia in about 1834/35. They settled in Georgetown, Mass. Later he married, had children, moved to Rochester, NY and fought in the 108th NY infantry in the civil war. He was injured three times.

In 1872 he headed west by rail, making a brief stop to see a relative in Racine. Suffering from typhus, he was taken off "the cars" (train) in Tiffin, Iowa .  He was taken to Mrs. Beam's Boarding House in Tiffin.  There, he passed away on 4 August 1872 and was interred in Oak Hill Cemetary. 

IMPORTANT! For a number of reasons, some members of the family began using the surname Bryant while in Georgetown. This is the name both he and his brother went by while in the infantry, one in Rochester and the other in Georgetown.
Submitted by Charles E. Tucker

If  you have an ancestor, buried at Oak Hill, and would like to highlight their life with a brief story, please send it to me at cindylee53@aol.com

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Page Created 25 Sep 2015