Obituaries

 

 

Albert Ewin

 

IS DEAD IN FRANCE

Albert Ewin succumbs to attack of pneumonia.


LIVED HERE ALL HIS LIFE



He and his brother were members of Old Co. K and were known and liked by everyone in the community.

Another Plymouth County boy has given his life for his country in France. Relatives in this community received a letter from Charles Ewin, of the headquarters company of the 168th Infantry, Monday stating that his brother Albert of the same company was taken ill July 16th with pneumonia and died
in the hospital on July 22nd. For some reason no information relative to his death reached the relatives here through government channels. The first word of his death came through this letter from his brother which was delayed a week or ten days in transit.

Corporal Albert V. Ewin was born at Seney, April 9, 1896, lived there all of his life with the exception of three years in Rutland, Ill, one year at Corsica, S. Dakota and the time he spent in the service. He was with Co. K on the border and until their return home. When the company was called into the service last summer he responded and was one of the seventy from Co. K who went to Des Moines and joined the 168th Infantry which sailed for France

in November and has since made a name for itself as a fighting regiment.  Corporal Ewin seemed to have had poor health much of the time he was abroad as he wrote several times about being in the hospital but gave no particulars as to the nature of the trouble which kept him in the hospital. He is survived by his father, M. Ewin, of Corsica, S. Dakota, three brothers, Will of LeMars, Arthur of Sioux Falls, and Charles in France and three sisters, Mrs. August Witt and Mrs. Ralph Obermier of LeMars, and Mrs. Iona M. Clark of Corsica, South Dakota.

Many people here will remember the Ewin boys in Old Co. K. They were fine young men every inch the soldier and had the respect of all who met them as well as their comrades. The entire community regrets to hear of the death of this young man who so willingly volunteered to face the dangers of camp and battle to protect the honor of his country and the cause of liberty.

 

 

 


-source: LeMars Sentinel Newspaper, LeMars, Plymouth Co., Iowa; 13 September 1918

 

-Submitted by Linda Ziemann
Iowa GenWeb County Coordinator, Plymouth, Monona, Sioux counties http://www.iagenweb.org
Iowa Old Press IAGenWeb Special Project Co-coordinator http://www.iowaoldpress.com/index.html