Missionaries of Southwestern Iowa

Submitted and Transcribed by Danette Hein-Snider <dheinsnider@yahoo.com>

Message from the Submitter:
My Great Aunt Effie Chambers (daughter of Harlow and Mary Ripley Chambers) was a missionary in Armenia and as I was researching material on her life I decided that I would put together a list of other missionaries with Southwest Iowa ties.
 
Sincerely, Danette

Missionaries

MR. & MRS. ROY ADAMS

Mr. and Mrs. Moorehead have received several interesting letters recently from their daughter, Mrs. Roy Adams, who with her husband, sailed from Seattle on December 12 for Japan, where they went as missionaries.

~1 Feb 1917 Tabor Beacon, Tabor, IA

 

SAMUEL ALLIS

Samuel Allis was born in Conway, Franklin Co, Mass Sept 28, 1805. He was reared under Christian influences, his parents being members of the Congregational Church; his education was limited to the opportunities afforded him by the common schools of the day. At the age of seventeen he began to learn the saddlery and harness maker's trade, and followed this avocation at various localities until 1834. In that year he was appointed as assistant to the Rev. Mr. Dunbar, and by direction of the American Board of Foreign Mission, came to the west and locating at Belleview, Neb established a mission supported by the Presbyterian and Congregational Churches. He remained for many years in that state and section, engaged in instructing the Indians. In 1836 he went to Clay County, Mo, and was there married to Miss Emaline Palmer, a native of Mansfield, Conn. He immediately returned to Nebraska with his wife, and renewed his duties as a missionary. They have four children now living: Henry, Martha, Otis and Harriet. In 1851 he came to St. Mary Township, and three years afterward moved to the farm he now occupies on section 12, and comprised of some one hundred and fifty acres. Owing to his knowledge of the Indian dialect, gained while missionary among the savages, he was appointed United States interpreter, and in that capacity once visited the city of Washington; this position was retained by him for some seven years. Since coming to this county Mr. Allis has been closely identified with its interests, and has filled various positions of importance and trust. He is the first white man to ever tread the soil of Mills, who is now living within its bounds. The years of the past have witnessed many changes, but to them Mr. Allis has contributed, and from them gained a competence and a home of comfort.           

  ~ 1881 History of Mills Co IA p. 643 St. Mary Twp  

 

REV. & MRS. A. B. CASE

Tabor College Notes: Rev. A. B. Case, Tabor College '78, has recently received a call from the California Home Missionary Society to become general missionary among the Spanish-speaking people of that state.  It is expected that he will accept.

~21 Mar 1902 Tabor Beacon Fremont County, Tabor, IA

~ A Century of Faith 1852 - 1952 pamphlet Congregational Church, Tabor, IA,

 

MISS ALICE B. CONDITT

Farragut:  Miss Alice B. Conditt, a missionary of the Bible School in the Philippines, will give an interesting lecture in the Congregational Church Tuesday evening.  It will be illustrated by sterioptical views and will be worth attending.  Miss Conditt is one of the first missionaries to return from the Philippines and so brings us messages from a new field.  She has been heard at Shenandoah and her address at that place was pronounced fine.  No admittance is charged, but an offering is taken.

~23 Jan 1902 Fremont County Herald Sidney, IA

 

MARY EFFIE CHAMBERS

Missionary to Turkey-Armenia 1893 - 1912

~ A Century of Faith 1852 - 1952 pamphlet Congregational Church, Tabor, IA,

~Thanks, Tabor, For The Memories by Sidney Newlon

 

MRS. R. C. CULLY:

4 Sept 1910 minute book of the Women's Union, Congregational Church, Tabor, IA

Mrs. R. C. Cully spoke of her experience of missions in foreign lands to the Ladies Union of the First Congregational Church in Tabor, IA.

 

M. L. CUNNINGHAM

18 Jun 1903 Fremont County Herald Sidney, IA

Missionaries are occasionally leaving Fremont county for foreign fields. ML Cunningham sailed on May 15th for China.

 

MRS. DEAN

20 May 1901 Nonpareil, Council Bluffs, IA

The ladies of the Congregational Church will give a missionary tea Thursday afternoon in the home of Mrs. S F Henry of Sixth Avenue. The meeting will be in charge of Mrs. Otis and will be held for the purpose of meeting Mrs. Dean, mother of Dr. F W Dean, who will leave during the early part of August for India, where she will work for four years in the missionary fields of that country.  All members are earnestly requested to attend.

 

MYRTLE FOOTE

~ A Century of Faith 1852 - 1952 pamphlet Congregational Church, Tabor, IA, 100th anniversary of the church

 

HELEN GALLOWAY

5 May 1901 Nonpareil, Council Bluffs, IA

Broadway M. E. Church - First Street and Broadway.  "China" will be the subject of an address at the morning hour 10:30, by Miss Helen Galloway, of Chung King, China; Miss Galloway was for six years missionary, returning last October. Every person in the city should hear this address.  The service will be in charge of the W. S. M. S. of the church.  The pastor, W. J. Calfee, will preach at night on "Some Essential Characteristics of God." This will be the first of the services for the summer at the present hour.

 

MR. & MRS. ELMER GALT

Fremont County Cemetery Book

Elmer Galt 1883-1964, buried Tabor Cemetery, Tabor, IA

Altie Cummings Galt  10 Apr 1881-18 May 1952,

buried Tabor Cemetery, Tabor, IA

~ A Century of Faith 1852-1952 pamphlet Congregational Church, Tabor, IA,

~ Thanks, Tabor, For The Memories by Sidney Newlon

 

MR. & MRS. HOWARD GALT

14 Jun 1900 Fremont County Herald, Sidney, IA

Tabor: The imminent danger of Mr. and Mrs. Howard Galt in Tong Chau, China, has been cause of much anxiety among their many Tabor friends this week. It is hoped that the danger will soon pass.

 Editorial:  We call to mind, amidst bloody scenes being enacted in China at this time, that we have a cousin, Mrs. Howard Galt, formerly Miss Louise West, of Tabor, who with her husband is located at Ling Chau, [two different spellings copied exactly as written in the same paper, different articles.] about 14 miles from Pekin. They are presumably in the danger that surrounds all foreigners, especially missionaries in that turbulent locality and we are solicitous concerning their safety.

23 Aug 1900 Fremont County Herald, Sidney, IA

Tabor: The many friends of Mr. and Mrs. H.S. Galt were greatly relieved when last week the report reached here that the allied army had rescued the foreign legations at Pekin. It has seemed impossible for our American friends to escape the barbarians, and now all feel grateful that they are once more in the hands of civilized people.  

17 Jan 1901 Fremont County Herald, Sidney, IA

Farragutt: Mr and Mrs Galt are informed that they are the grandparents to a Japanese baby. In far Japan a baby boy has come into the home of Mr. and Mrs. Howard Galt, who are residing there during the trouble in China.

~ A Century of Faith 1852 - 1952 pamphlet Congregational Church, Tabor, IA,

~Thanks, Tabor, For The Memories by Sidney Newlon

 

GEORGE B. GASTON

Near Oberlin lived a young farmer, George B Gaston, who with true missionary spirit had sought and obtained a commission under the American Board of Commissioners for Foreign Missions among the Pawnee Indians in what is now Nance county, Nebraska. Four years' work among them acquainted him with the wonderful natural resources of the Middle West, and with a Christian statesman's prophetic vision he saw something of the future possibilities of the region. Forced by his wife's ill health to return home to Ohio, he became more acquainted with the early history of Oberlin, and drinking deeply of the consecrated spirit of its early founders, he conceived the plan of planting a similar colony and college on virgin land in the Missouri Valley.

~Todd's Book

 

CHESTER HOLCOMBE

History of Fremont and Mills County 1901, Lewis Publishing Co. Chicago

Chester Holcombe was born in Winfield, Herkimer County, in 1842, and is a very distinguished man, a diplomat and an author, whose opinions on Chinese matters are regarded as authority. He prepared for college in the old academies in Webster and Sodus and was graduated in Union College in a class of one hundred and fifty-six. He ranked third in scholarship, won the much coveted Phi Beta Kappa prize, and was graduated at the earliest age of any alumnus of that institution. After studying for the ministry he was ordained to preach the gospel in the Presbyterian Church. During the war he went to the south as a teacher, but on account of ill health was forced to discontinue that work, and sailed for China as a missionary under the auspices of the American Board. Soon after his arrival there, Dr. S. Wells Williams, author of "The Middle Kingdom," and secretary of the American legation at Peking, resigned and induced Mr. Holcombe to accept the position of secretary, in which capacity he served until 1884. Since that time he has made various visits to China, going to the empire on commercial and financial business for people in this country. He is the author of a work entitled "The Real Chinaman," a fascinating and valuable treatise on the educational, social and commercial relations of the Chinese. It was issued in a fine volume two years ago by Dodd, Mead & Company, and has had a large sale. Recently Chester Holcombe has completed another work which was published by the same house, in October 1900, and is devoted more especially to the treatment of the governmental matters of the Chinese in China, military and otherwise. He is a constant contributor to the newspapers, magazines, and periodicals, his articles being eagerly read. He has filled all the different posts in our diplomatic service in China. As a member of the commission for that purpose he assisted in the negotiations of two treaties between the United States and China. Associated with Admiral Shufeldt he also negotiated the treaty between the United States and Korea.  In 1884 he was appointed to represent our government at the capital of the United States of Columbia, but declined the appointment. He was twice offered a decoration of high order by the emperor of China, but declined the honor. Mr. Holcombe spent some time in Japan in the early part of 1895, in connection with the negotiation of a treaty of peace between that empire and China. In 1896 at the request of the Chinese government, he prepared in detail, in English and Chinese, the papers for a loan of one hundred million dollars. He also developed in both these languages the detailed plans for about three thousand miles of double track railway, involving an estimate cost of two hundred and forty million dollars, a scheme for raising the necessary funds, and the establishment of schools for the instruction of Chinese in railway construction and management. His health gave way under the intense nervous strain and he was obliged to return to the United States.  He has spent nearly his entire life in the capital of the Chinese Empire and has the reputation of being the best foreign speaker of that most difficult language. He has prepared several books in the Chinese tongue, his first volume in English, being "The Real Chinaman." Mr. Holcombe is a man of broad culture. He is a deep thinker, keen in his perceptions, positive in his beliefs. His magazine articles are sought for by the best publications. His literary style shows that he is a master of pure English in the very best sense, both the diction and subject matter of his work being of the very best. As a speaker he is equally interesting and is much sought after. He delivered a lecture on China to the students of Union College and during a recent campaign he made several political speeches which were models of convincing argument. He is an American of Americans, a staunch Republican, progressive, broad-minded, and interested in charities at home and abroad. He is especially interested in foreign missionary work, being one of the directors of the American board. He has a broad acquaintance with prominent men in this and other countries. He is on terms of friendship with Earl Li Hung Chang and nearly all of the prominent Chinese statesmen, and was a special friend of General Grant. As United States minister, he accompanied him and his party through China on the General's famous tour of the world, and entertained him for several weeks in the legation at Peking.

~ History of Fremont and Mills County 1901, Lewis Publishing Co. Chicago

 

MRS. MARY LAURENCE

Mrs. Mary Laurence spoke of her experience of missions in foreign lands to the Ladies Union of

the First Congregational Church in Tabor, IA. ~4 Sept 1910 Minute Book of the Women's Union, Congregational Church, Tabor, IA

 

REV. & MRS. HAROLD MATTHEWS
~ A Century of Faith 1852 - 1952 pamphlet Congregational Church, Tabor, IA, 100th anniversary of the church.

BIBLIOGRAPHY:

 

Contemporary newspaper accounts  

Minute Book, Woman's Union Missionary Society, Congregational Church, Tabor, IA  

Thanks, Tabor, For The Memories by Sidney Newlon, former publisher of the Fremont-Mills Beacon Enterprise, published by Midwest Publishing, Council Bluffs, IA  

~ A Century of Faith 1852 - 1952 pamphlet Congregational Church, Tabor, IA, 100th anniversary of the church

Missionaries cont.

 

REV. & MRS. PAUL McCLINTOCK

15 Nov 1900 Fremont County Herald, Sidney, IA

Sidney: Praise Service: The Ladies' Home and Foreign Missionary Society will hold their annual praise service at the Presbyterian Church next Sunday evening. Rev. Paul W. McClintock, one of our missionaries at Hainan, China, who was compelled to leave because of the Boxer troubles, will give the address. We hope that Mrs. McClintock will also be with us and speak at the meeting. All are invited to come and bring their offerings.  Mrs. C.C. Laird, Secretary

 

MISS McFARLAND

9 May 1902 Tabor Beacon, Tabor, IA

Elder Weavers, Mr. Porter, and Miss McFarland, of the Hephzibah Faith Home, expect to leave about the 28th of this month for Johannesburg, South Africa, to engage in missionary work.  They had expected to leave sooner, but delay in getting passports from English government

 

DR. & MRS. J. W.  KcKEAN

17 May 1909 Nonpareil, Council Bluffs, IA

Dr. and Mrs. JW McKean Presbyterian missionaries in Siam are visiting Mrs. McKean's sister Mrs. Campbell 523 Sixth Avenue. And their daughter Miss Kate McKean who is making her home with Mrs. Campbell and attending the Council Bluffs High School.

 

LAURENCE S. MOORE

9 May 1909 Nonpareil, Council Bluffs, IA

Laurence S Moore of Essex, IA has been a teacher at Roberts College at Constantinople for four years.

 

ALICE MURPHY

~ A Century of Faith 1852 - 1952 pamphlet Congregational Church, Tabor, IA, 100th anniversary of the church

 

MR. & MRS. PORTER

26 Jun 1900 Fremont County Herald, Sidney, IA

Sidney: Mr. and Mrs. Porter, who departed for South Africa as missionaries, arrived at London and on account of the war being so vigorously prosecuted, {Boer War---newspapers talk of the Transvaal] concluded not to continue to their destination, but will return home and wait until war subsides or peace shall have been declared.

9 May 1902 Tabor Beacon, Tabor, IA

Elder Weavers, Mr. Porter, and Miss McFarland, of the Hephzibah Faith Home, expect to leave about the 28th of this month for Johannesburg, South Africa, to engage in missionary work.  They had expected to leave sooner, but delay in getting passports from English government.

 

LAURA STECKLEY

21 May 1909 Beacon Enterprise, Tabor, IA

Sunday, May 23, will be observed as missionary day at the Tabor Faith Home, when farewell meetings of the out-going missionary band to India will be held.  Those who will soon leave for India are Mr. and Mrs. Zook; Laura Steckly, and Myrtle P. Williams of Tabor, and Mr. and Mrs. HC Hess of Newton, Kansas, all of whom will be present at the farewell meetings.  Sunday morning there will be a missionary sermon, Sunday afternoon at 3 o'clock the missionaries will speak, and at 7:30 p.m., there will be a general farewell meeting.  The missionaries will be leaving Monday for other points, and expect to sail from New York about the last of July.

 

BLANCHE IONE STEVENS:

27 April 1906 Tabor Beacon, Tabor, IA

Tabor College News: Tabor's Student Volunteers held missionary meetings at Glenwood and Sidney last Sunday.  Elmer Galt and Katherine Hanley spoke at Sidney, and Anna Howard, Grace Boyd, Blanche Stevens, George Brown, and Truman Galt at Glenwood.

 20 July 1911 Tabor Beacon, Tabor, IA

Blanche Stevens: Missionary to Korea

~ A Century of Faith 1852 -

1952 pamphlet Congregational Church, Tabor, IA, 100th anniversary of the church

 

BERT THORNTON

May 28, 1903  Fremont County Herald Sidney, IA

T. D. Thornton is in receipt of a letter from his son, Bert, who is now in Jules City, Oregon, stating that he would sail for Japan as a missionary on May 30th.

June 18, 1903 Fremont County Herald Sidney, IA

Missionaries are occasionally leaving Fremont county for foreign fields, on May 30th D. H. Thornton sailed from Seattle, Washington, for Japan.

 

LOUISE TORRANCE

~ A Century of Faith 1852 - 1952 pamphlet Congregational Church, Tabor, IA, 100th anniversary of the church

~ Thanks, Tabor, For The Memories by Sidney Newlon

 

HARRIETT TOWNSEND

~ A Century of Faith 1852 - 1952 pamphlet Congregational Church, Tabor, IA, 100th anniversary of the church

 

MISS TRIMBLE

5 Apr 1902 Tabor Beacon, Tabor, IA 'Doings at the County Seat'

Miss Trimble, a returned missionary from Foo Chow, China, will speak in the M.E. Church Tuesday evening, April 8.

 

EULA VAN VRANKEN

27 Apr 1902 Tabor Beacon, Tabor, IA

Miss Eula Van Vranken, a former well-known Tabor girl. Has been assigned work by the Presbyterian Board of Foreign Missions and will sail from San Francis about the middle of August for Laos, her first field of labor.  Prior to sailing she will visit New York for final instructions and hopes to spend a short time with IA friends on the return trip to the coast.  Her home is at Milton, Oregon, where she has been teaching the past year, and where her parents have resided for some time.

29 Jun 1906 Fremont County Herald, Sidney IA

Tabor: Miss Eula Van Vranken arrived Monday noon, leaving Wednesday morning. She is under the appointment to go as a missionary to Siam, under Presbyterian auspices, and will sail about the middle of August in company with eight others who go to various points in Siam. She is just returning from New York where she conferred with the board, receiving instructions, etc.

 

NELLIE WAINWRIGHT (MARY ELLEN WAINWRIGHT)

~ A Century of Faith 1852 - 1952 pamphlet Congregational Church, Tabor, IA, 100th anniversary of the church 

~ Thanks, Tabor, For The Memories by Sidney Newlon

 

ELDER WEAVERS

9 May 1902 Tabor Beacon, Tabor, IA

Elder Weavers, Mr. Porter, and Miss McFarland, of the Hephzibah Faith Home, expect to leave about the 28th of this month for Johannesburg, South Africa, to engage in missionary work.  They had expected to leave sooner, but delay in getting passports from English government.

 

MR. & MRS. FRED WEISS

19 Nov 1896 Fremont County Herald, Sidney, IA

Shenandoah: A report from Fred Weiss and his wife of their work in Mapumulo, South Africa.  The Congregational Church in Shenandoah has maintained a station in Mapumulo for nearly fifty years.

 

MARY (MAY/MAE) WELPTON

3 Feb 1910 Tabor Beacon, Tabor, IA 

From Marash, Turkey     

  Miss May Welpton at Home on Furlough - Visits Malvern

Leader: Miss May Welpton, for several years a resident of Malvern, was the guest of Mr. And Mrs. C. W. Black Friday between trains, where a number of friends had the pleasure of meeting her.  For the past eight years Miss Welpton has been engaged in mission work at Marash, Turkey, and was a sorrowful eye-witness of the frightful atrocities inflicted upon the defenseless Armenians by the terrible Turk. She is home on a fourteen months furlough and her time is fully occupied in making addresses and disseminating information touching the work in he field in which she has been very successful.  In June she expects to be in Malvern again, at which time the pubic will have the opportunity of hearing greatly enjoys the work assigned to her on the Turkish field. The climate conditions also seem to agree perfectly with her health and she returns rugged and in the best of spirits and enthusiastic and hopeful for the future.

 24 Dec 1912  Malvern Leader, Malvern, IA

May Welpton died October 1 of cholera at Marash, Turkey.  She went to Turkey 11 years ago to teach music at Marash College; she also taught History, English, sewing, and Bible and was treasurer of the college.

 ~ A Century of Faith 1852 - 1952 pamphlet Congregational Church, Tabor, IA, 100th anniversary of the church

 

HARRIETT WYMAN WILDER

~ Thanks, Tabor, For The Memories by Sidney Newlon

 

MYRTLE P. WILLIAMS:

21 May 1909 Beacon Enterprise, Tabor, IA

Sunday, May 23, will be observed as missionary day at the Tabor Faith Home, when farewell meetings of the out-going missionary band to India will be held.  Those who will soon leave for India are Mr. and Mrs. Zook; Laura Steckly, and Myrtle P. Williams of Tabor, and Mr. and Mrs. HC Hess of Newton, Kansas, all of whom will be present at the farewell meetings.  Sunday morning there will be a missionary sermon, Sunday afternoon at 3 o'clock the missionaries will speak, and at 7:30 p.m., there will be a general farewell meeting.  The missionaries will be leaving Monday for other points, and expect to sail from New York about the last of July.

 

MARY WINCHELL

~ A Century of Faith 1852 - 1952 pamphlet Congregational Church, Tabor, IA, 100th anniversary of the church

 

L. B. WORCESTER

11 Feb 1898 Tabor Beacon, Tabor, IA

We learn from the Sent of God, a paper published by the Hephzibah Faith Home Association that LB Worcester and Mr. and Mrs. D. W. Zook, who left Tabor about two years ago and have been doing missionary work in Yokohoma, Japan, recently left for India.

24 Mar 1904 Fremont County Herald Sidney, IA

Going To South Africa: Wm. Worcester and wife, of the Tabor Faith home, expect to start for South Africa, where they go for religious work under the auspices of the Home. They will first visit Portugal and remain several months to study the language. During a former visit Mr. Worcester was arrested as a spy by the Portuguese authorities in South Africa and thrown into prison. A later investigation made clear his benevolent purpose, and with great attempts at making amends he was released. Rev. L.W. Worcester plans to leave a little later with several missionaries from the Home, and going by the western route visit India, China, and Japan.

 

MR. & MRS. D. W. ZOOK

11 Feb1898 Beacon Enterprise, Tabor, IA

We learn from the Sent of God, a paper published by the Hephzibah Faith Home Association that LB Worcester and Mr. and Mrs. D W Zook, who left Tabor about two years ago and have been doing missionary work in Yokohoma, Japan, recently left for India.

 21 May 1909 Beacon Enterprise, Tabor, IA

Sunday, May 23, will be observed as missionary day at the Tabor Faith Home, when farewell meetings of the out-going missionary band to India will be held.  Those who will soon leave for India are Mr. and Mrs. Zook; Laura Steckly, and Myrtle P. Williams of Tabor, and Mr. and Mrs. HC Hess of Newton, Kansas, all of whom will be present at the farewell meetings.  Sunday morning there will be a missionary sermon, Sunday afternoon at 3 o'clock the missionaries will speak, and at 7:30 pm, there will be a general farewell meeting.  The missionaries will be leaving Monday for other points, and expect to sail from New York about the last of July.