1914 Biographies
T, V, W & Y

History of Franklin County, Iowa by I. L. Stuart. 2 vols. Chicago: S. J. Clarke Pub. Co., 1914.
Transcribed by Don Turner, former coordinator of this website.



William F. Thielke

William F. Thielke, engaged in general farming and stock-raising on one hundred and sixty acres of land on section 33, Osceola township, was born in Freeport, Illinois, October 2, 1861. He is a son of August and Dorothy (Richtsmeier) Thielke, natives of Germany, the latter born in Lippe Detmold. The parents came to America about the year 1852 and located in Freeport, Illinois, where they made their home for seventeen years thereafter. At the end of that time, in 1869, they moved to Ackley, Iowa, and, the father purchased one hundred and sixty acres of land on section 33, Osceola township. He died May 29, 1887, when almost seventy-eight years of age, and his wife passed. away September 15, 1878, when she was fifty-eight years of age. They were members of the German Evangelical church. In their family were nine children: August, residing in Hardin county; Henry, of Ackley, Hardin county; Herman, deceased; Amelia, the wife of Louis Hirth, of Franklin county; Mary, who married George Rudolph, of Osceola township; Carolina, the wife of H. C. Richtsmeier, of Hardin county; Minnie and Elizabeth, at home; and William F., of this review. The three oldest children were born in the city of Polle, Kreis Hameln, Hanover, Germany, and the others were all born in Freeport, Illinois.

William F. Thielke acquired his education in the public schools of Freeport, Illinois, and he came to Iowa with his parents in 1869. During his father's lifetime he aided in the operation of the homestead and after his father's death inherited the farm, which he still operates. He gives his attention to general agricultural pursuits and also engages extensively in stock-raising and, being a progressive and farsighted business man, has met with gratifying success in the conduct of his interests. He is a member of the Evangelical church and in politics votes independently, supporting men and measures rather than parties. He is a man of high character and is held in great esteem in his community.

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John Thies

Mr. & Mrs. John Thies
Mr. & Mrs. John Thies


John Thies, who has been a resident of Franklin county since 1874, is numbered among the progressive and representative farmers of Grant township, where he owns five hundred and sixty acres of improved land. He was born in Ogle county, Illinois, December 18, 1867 and is a son of Fred and Louisa (Deaker) Thies, natives of Germany. The father came to America when he was still a boy and learned the tailor's trade, which he afterwards followed for a number of years, later turning his attention to farming. He died in Illinois in 1865, while his wife, who long survived him, was called to her final rest on the 25th of June, 1902. They became the parents of eight children, of whom three are still living: Fred, of Lyon county, Iowa; John, of this review; and Charles, of Iowa Falls.

John Thies was a youth of thirteen when in 1874 he came to Franklin county with his widowed mother, who purchased one hundred and sixty acres of land in Grant township. There he grew to manhood, assisting in the work of the fields until twenty-four years of age, when he purchased eighty acres of his mother's farm, this tract being the nucleus of his later extensive holdings. He possessed a thorough knowledge of farming and by dint of close application and perseverance won almost immediate success in his undertakings as an agriculturist. Progressive, practical and ambitious, he has carried on his farming interest along scientific lines and has achieved a well merited measure of prosperity, being now one of the largest landowners in the vicinity. He has five hundred and sixty acres of improved land on sections 11, 15, 16, 23 and 21, Grant township, and his farming and stock-raising interests have grown every year more extensive and-important.

On the 17th of November, 1885, Mr. Thies married Miss Henrietta Haupt, a native of Franklin county and a daughter of Fred Carl and Hedwig (Helmcker) Haupt, both of whom were born in Germany. Emigrating to the United States, they first located in Pennsylvania and in 1860 came to Franklin county, Iowa, and settled in Osceola township, where they spent the remainder of their lives. They became the parents of five children, three of whom grew to maturity, as follows: Fred, who resides on the old homestead; Mary Elizabeth, the deceased wife of Ernest Brocka, of Butler county, Iowa; and Mrs. Henrietta Thies.

Mr. and Mrs. Thies have become the parents of nine children, namely: Louise H., the wife of John Lehmann, of Grant township; John F., who in October, 1913, wedded Emma Burmaster and now resides in Grant township; Henry A.; Fred W.; Ernest M.; Henrietta M. E.; George C.; Lena A. E.; and Frank Theodore, who died on the 15th of January, 1908.

Mr. Thies is an active member of the Emanuel Lutheran church of Grant township and has served as a trustee of the same for thirteen years. He is also serving as township trustee and the cause of education finds in him a capable and earnest supporter as a school director. During the years of his residence in Grant township he has been carried forward into important relations with agricultural interests and has won for himself an enviable position in both business and social circles. He is now a stockholder of the Bradford Savings Bank of Bradford, Iowa, which he helped to organize in 1906, the bank building being erected the following year.

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Olin W. Thomas

Olin W. Thomas, a representative of a well known family of Franklin county and one of the progressive and successful agriculturists of Hamilton township, is a native son of this locality, born December 13, 1871. His father, Theodore Thomas, was born in Ogle county, Illinois, October 2, 1844, and when he was seventeen years of age enlisted at Byron, Illinois, in Company B, Ninety-second Illinois Volunteer Infantry. He served for three years, taking part in Sherman's march to the sea, and was mustered out at Concord, North Carolina, receiving his honorable discharge at Chicago, Illinois. In the spring of 1868 he moved to Iowa and located near Faulkner, where he remained until 1876. Hethen moved to Franklin county and settled on a farm on sections 23 and 26, Reeve township, whereon he has since resided. He owns two hundred and seven acres of valuable land and is regarded as one of the most successful farmers and stock-raisers of this locality. He and his wife, who was in her maidenhood Miss Elizabeth Wagner, a native of Ogle county, Illinois, became the parents of seven children: Winnie, who died in infancy; Olin W., of this review; Elias W., of Craig, Colorado; Edna Elizabeth, the wife of R. E. Towle, of Hampton; Theodore L. and Frank A., who reside in Geneva; and Henry R., of Hampton.

Olin W. Thomas was reared upon the home farm and acquired his education in the district schools of Franklin county. From an early age he assisted in the operation of the homestead and thus became familiar with the best and most practical agricultural methods. At the age of twenty-three he rented eighty-five acres and after one year rented another tract of one hundred and forty acres. This farm he operated for six years and then moved to Osceola township, where he continued active in agricultural pursuits for eight years. In 1909 he bought one hundred and sixty acres on section 13, Hamilton township, and upon this property has since resided. He has greatly improved the farm, providing it with substantial buildings and modern equipment, and upon the property engages in general farming and stock-raising, both branches of his activities being extensive and important.

On the 21st of March 7 1894, Mr. Thomas was united in marriage to Miss May L. Jones, a native of Grundy county and a daughter of John Jones. Mr. and Mrs. Thomas have four children: Wava E., born March 16, 1895; Floyd A., who was born June 9, 1898, and who died December 2, 1900; Mildred E., whose birth occurred September 24, 1902; and Myrna M., born March 26, 1906. Mr. Thomas is a member of the Christian church, and his political allegiance is given to the republican party. He is one of the most progressive and successful of Franklin county's native sons, and his influence has been a tangible force for good in the community.

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Theodore Thomas

Agricultural interests of Franklin county find a worthy and progressive representative in Theodore Thomas, who has been engaged in farming in Reeve township since 1876, winning in the interval a degree of success which places him among the representative agriculturists of his locality. He was born in Ogle county, Illinois, October 2, 1844, and is a son of Elias and Susan (Rice) Thomas, natives of Washington county, Maryland. The parents went to Illinois in 1837, and the father engaged in farming in Ogle county until his death, which occurred in Januarv, 1881. His wife has also passed away, dying September 13, 1907, at the advanced age of ninety-one. She came of a long-lived family, her mother having reached the age of one hundred and three years, four months and three days. Mr. and Mrs. Elias Thomas became the parents of six children: Catherine, deceased; Drusilla, the widow of B. F. Stevenson, of Leaf River, Illinois; Sarah deceased; Theodore, of this review; Barbara, the wife of David Emmett, of Mount Morris, Illinois; and Frances, the wife of William Gaffin, also of Mount Morris.

Theodore Thomas remained at home until he was seventeen years of age and then enlisted at Byron, Illinois, in Company B, Ninety-second Illinois Volunteer Infantry, serving afterward for three years and taking part In Sherman's march to the sea. He was mustered out at Concord, North Carolina, and received his honorable discharge at Chicago, Illinois. He immediately returned to the home farm and in the spring of 1868 moved to Iowa, locating near Faulkner, where he remained until 1876. In that year he moved to Reeve township, Franklin county, settling upon a farm on sections 23 and 26, Reeve township, where he has since resided. He owns two hundred and seven acres of valuable land and in the course of years has by intelligent management and constant supervision made this a very valuable and attractive property. He engages in general farming and stock-raising, both branches being important sources of income to him

On the 2Ist Of March 1867, Mr. Thomas married Miss Elizabeth Wagner, a native of Ogle county, Illinois, and they became the parents of seven children: Winnie, who died in infancy; Olin W., of Hamilton township; Elias W., of Craig, Colorado; Edna Elizabeth, the wife of, R. E. Towle, of Hampton; Theodore L. and Frank A., who resides in Geneva; and Henry R., of Hampton. Mr. Thomas is a member of the Christian church. He gives his political allegiance to the republican party and was township trustee for nine years, serving with credit and ability. He prefers, however, to concentrate his attention upon his business affairs which, capably conducted, have brought him richly merited success.

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James Harvey Tobias

James Harvey Tobias has been connected with agricultural interests of Franklin county since 1875 and has risen in the interval to be one of the leading farmers of Marion township, where he owns two hundred and forty acres of valuable land. He was born in Hamburg, Pennsylvania, July 17, 1861, and is a son of William and Caroline (Krause) Tobias, also natives of the Keystone state. They went from Pennsylvania to Ogle county, Illinois, and there the mother's death occurred in 1869. The father afterward moved to Lafayette county, Wisconsin, and at the end of ten years went to Wichita, Kansas, where he now resides. He and his wife became the parents of nine children, four of whom survive, as follows: Carrie, the wife of H. A. Cunningham, of Maryville, Missouri; Emma J., who married E. J. Rickart, of Texas county, Missouri; James Harvey, of this review; and Samuel, of Enid, Oklahoma.

When James H. Tobias was fourteen years of age he came to Franklin county and began working as a farm laborer continuing thus until 1891, when he rented land. In 1905 he purchased one hundred and sixty acres of land in Scott township and after cultivating this for five years disposed of it. In 1911 he purchased two hundred and forty acres on section 20, Marion township, and here he has since engaged in general farming and stock-raising, meeting with substantial and well deserved success.

Mr. Tobias married Miss Clara E. Carpenter, a native of Galena, Illinois, and they became the parents of two children: a son who died in infancy; and Hazel M., born February 25, 1903. Mr. Tobias is a member of the Methodist church and a republican in his political beliefs. He belongs to the Masonic lodge of Hampton and was master of this organization for two years. He is a man of many sterling traits of character, reliable in business, progressive in citizenship and at all times trustworthy and straightforward.

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Fred Vahlsing

Fred Vahlsing has been connected with agricultural interests of Franklin county since 1889 and now owns eighty acres of land on section 10, Marion township, and also eighty on section 16. He was born in Germany, November 29, 1862, and is a son of Henry and Louisa (Meyers) Vahlsing, also natives of Germany. They came to America in 1866 and located in Cedar county, Iowa, where they spent six years. At the end of that time they removed to Butler county, where the mother died October 29, 1885, and where the father now resides. During the entire period -of. his active life he followed agricultural pursuits but for the last twenty years has lived retired. In his family were eight children: Minnie, the wife of A. H. Dohrmann; Henry, of Seaside, Oregon; Fred, of this review; Dick, a resident of Butler county; Louis, whose home is in Oregon; Louisa, the wife of F. D. Dohrmann, of Marion township; Annie, who married William Debbin, of Floyd county, this state; and Lena, the wife of A. W. Ashworth, of Astoria, Oregon.

Fred Vahlsing remained at home until he was twenty-one years of age and then began farming independently in Butler county. At the end of one year he went west, settling in Lander, Wyoming, where he engaged in the cattle business in 1887 and 1888, during which period he made the acquaintance of Theodore Roosevelt. In the latter year he returned to Iowa and in 1889 took up farming in Franklin county, renting land for two years. At the end of that time he bought eighty acres of land but sold this after one year, purchasing another tract similar in extent on section 10, Marion township. He now has one hundred and sixty acres in the same township and has since engaged in general farming. He has improved ihe property in every respect, erecting substantial buildings and installing modern equipment.

On the 20th of December, 1892, Mr. Vahlslng married Miss Louisa Bruns and they have become the parents of six children: Matilda, born April 5, 1894; William, deceased; a son who died in infancy; Louisa, born December 14, 1899; Fred, born May 13, 1902; and another son who died in infancy.

Mr. Vahlsing is a member of the Evangelical church and is independent in his political views. His long residence here has made him widely known and his upright and honorable life has commended him to the esteem and confidence of his fellow citizens.

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James H. Van Nuys

James H. Van Nuys, a well known farmer of Mott township, was born in Montgomery county, Ohio, November 6, 1843. When he was fourteen years of age he carried mail on horseback from Kokomo, Indiana, to Marion and from Kokomo to Camden, Indiana, remaining in that state until 1858, when with his mother and two sisters he removed to Iowa, locating in Mott township. For many years thereafter he engaged in farming. He owns two hundred and thirty acres of excellent land, equipped with modern buildings and laborsaving machinery, and is today one of the leading agriculturists in this section of the state.

On the 9th of January, 1870, Mr. Van Nuys was united in marriage to Miss Lucy A. Carbaugh, who was born August 22, 1846, in Fostoria, Ohio, and came with her parents, Samuel and Mary Carbaugh, to Iowa in 1855, settling first on a farm in Geneva township, this county. In 1870 the family moved to Hampton, where her father for a number of years conducted a store. Mrs. Van Nuys and her daughter Lou met a tragic death by drowning in Beed's lake August 18, 1913. In the family were three children: Walter J., who is mentioned below; Lou Emma, who previous to her death was a private nurse in the family of E. P. Ripley, of Chicago; and Florence, the wife of F. J. Scantlebury.

Mr. Van Nuys is a prominent member of the Masonic fraternity, belongs to. the Methodist church and gives his political allegiance to the republican party, being now in the tenth year of his able service as overseer of the port.

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Walter James Van Nuys

Walter James Van Nuys was born in Mott township, this county, September 21, 1873, and is a son of James H. Van Nuys, whose sketch appears above. He was reared at home and acquired his education in the Hampton grammar and high schools. Following the completion of his studies he turned his attention to the mercantile business and has for some time been connected with the Cooney Grocery Company.

On the 7th of September, 1898, Mr. Van Nuys was united in marriage to Miss Clara Jane McNeil, a native of Franklin county, and to their union have been born three children: Donald, Dorothea Lucy and James C. Mr. Van Nuys is a member of the Masonic lodge and belongs to the Methodist church. He gives his political allegiance to the republican party and from 1905 to 1909 served as clerk of the court.

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G. Everett Van Wert

G. Everett Van Wert, a representative of a well known family of Franklin county and now engaged in general farming upon the old Van Wert homestead on section 19, Ingham township, was born in Grundy county, this state, August 13, 1880. He is a son of Justus S. and Elizabeth (Rose) Van Wert, natives of New York, who came to Iowa in 1864 and located in Blackhawk county. From there they moved to Grundy and thence to Franklin county, locating in Mott township in 1888. The father engaged in farming here until his death, which occurred September 6, 1909. His wife survives him and resides upon the homestead. To them were born five children: Rose, the wife of G. C. Borchers, of Nora Springs, Iowa; Frank, deceased; G. Everett, of this review; Emma, the wife of W. H. Caldwell, of Ingham township; and Jessie, deceased. The Van Wert family has been in America since Revolutionary times and its present representatives are descended from the soldier of that name who was one of a party of three to capture Major Andre.

G. Everett Van Wert was reared at home and acquired his education in the public schools of Mott township and in a seminary at Nora Springs. He has been connected with farming interests since he began his independent career and the results of his practical experience are seen in his intelligent management of the homestead ,of four hundred acres on section 19, Ingham township. He follows only the most modern and progressive methods in the development of this property, which he has made one of the finest and most productive in the township.

On the 25th of December, 1903, Mr. Van Wert was united in marriage to Miss Mabel Hansell, a daughter of Othello V. and Isabel (Stewart) Hansell, natives of Iowa, for whom the town of Hansell was named. Her father is now engaged in farming in South Dakota. In his family were five children: Mabel, wife of the subject of this review; Laura who married M. A. Tucker of Hansell; George, of South Dakota; a son who died in infancy; and Gladys, deceased. Mr. and Mrs. Van Wert have become the parents of five children: Lela, who was born February 21, 1905; Mildred, born May 20, 1907; J. S., born January 2, 1910; and Bernice and Earl, both of whom died in infancy.

Mr. Van Wert is a member of the Church of Christ and he gives his political allegiance to the progressive party. He takes an intelligent interest in community advancement and is now serving in a creditable and able way as township assessor. He is one of the successful and progressive young agriculturists of the locality, and his record is a credit to a name that has long been an honored one in Franklin county.

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George William Van Every

George William Van Every, who has devoted his attention to general agricultural pursuits throughout his entire business career, is now the owner of an excellent farm comprising one hundred and eighty-four acres on section 31, Ross township. His birth occurred at Apple River, Illinois, on the 9th of April, 1875, his parents being David Edward and Anna (Goldsboro) Van Every, the former a native of Canada and the latter of England. They were married in Jo Daviess county, Illinois, and took up their abode in Franklin county, Iowa, in 1881, having here remained throughout the intervening thirty-two years. They now reside on a little farm in Richland township and are well known and highly esteemed throughout the community.

George W. Van Every, who was a lad of six years when he came to this county with his parents, remained at home until twenty-two years of age. Starting out as an agriculturist on his own account he first owned and operated a farm in South Dakota but subsequently sold the property. He next owned and cultivated a tract of land in Marion township, this county, and after disposing of that place purchased a forty-acre farm on section 2 Richland township, which he operated successfully for seven years or until 1913. In that year he sold the tract and bought one hundred and eighty-four acres of land in Ross township, where he has resided to the present time. He is an industrious and enterprising agriculturist and success has attended his well directed efforts.

In Franklin county, in 1898, Mr. Van Every was united in marriage to Miss Elizabeth Crawford, a daughter of James Crawford, of Mott township. They now have two children, Edra and Harry. Mr. Van Every is a republican in his political views and has served as assessor of Richland township for five years, while during one term he acted as constable. He has likewise been a school director, the cause of education ever finding in him a stanch champion. Fraternally he is identified with the Modern Woodmen of America at Chapin and the Independent Order of Odd Fellows at that place, being a charter member of the latter organization. The salient qualities of his life have ever commended him to the confidence, good-will and friendship of those with whom he comes in contact, and he has always enjoyed the warm regard of a host of friends.

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John A. Waddington

John A. Waddington has been engaged in the hardware and general merchandise business in Geneva for almost a third of a century and throughout the entire period has maintained a reputation as an enterprising merchant and reliable business man, his commercial methods being at all times commendable and trustworthy. He was born in Yorkshire, England, June 9, 1848, and is a son of Joseph and Ellen (Heigh) Waddington, also natives of England, who came to America in 1849, locating in southern Illinois. They afterward moved to Fort Dearborn, now Chicago, thence to Jo Daviess county, that state, where the father engaged in railroad work until his death, which occurred in September, 1882. His wife died in September, 1910, at the age of ninety-four. To their union were born eleven children: Sarah, the widow of Ezra Turner, of Galena, Illinois; George and Will, deceased; Catherine, the wife of Alfred Bobst, of Reeve township; John A., of this review; Martha, the wife of E. Courtney, of Freeport, Illinois; Mary, twin to Martha and the wife of A. J. Young, of Nora, Illinois; Joe, of Chicago; Ellen, twin to Joe and the widow of Dr. Stauffer, of Nora, Illinois; Albert L., of White Rock, South Dakota; and Gilbert C., twin to Albert L., and a resident of Nora, Illinois.

John A. Waddington left home at the age of twenty-one and began working as a farm laborer, continuing thus for one year. At the end of that time he went to Kansas, where he secured a position as a cattle driver and also took up a homestead claim, upon which he resided for a number of years. For about two years prior to his marriage, which occurred in 1880, he was engaged in the hardware and tinning business with his brother-in-law, A. J. Young, at Nora, Illinois. Soon after his marriage he disposed of his interest at Nora and came to Franklin county, locating at Geneva, where he bought a hardware store. He afterward added general merchandise and has since conducted both branches of the business very successfully. He carries a full line of stock and has built up a large and profitable concern. In addition to his store he owns eight hundred and sixty-five acres of land lying mostly in Reeve and Geneva townships, this county, and upon this property he specializes in breeding high grade stock. He has a fine herd of Jersey cattle and his animals took eight blue ribbons and four red at the fair held in 1913.

On October 14, 1880, Mr. Waddington was united in marriage to Miss Louise Lawrence and they have become the parents of two children: Ellen Louise and Ray Allen. Mr. Waddington is a member of the Modern Woodmen of America and his political support is given to the republican party. He served for a number of years as school treasurer. During the long period of his residence in Geneva, he has contributed to the progress of the city along commercial lines and in other ways has supported movements for the general good. His many excellent characteristics have given him high standing in the community, and he is accounted a substantial and representative citizen.

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Will Heigh Waddington

Will Heigh Waddington, connected with general mercantile interests of Geneva as a member of the J. A. Waddington Company, was born in East Dubuque, Illinois, January 29, 1877. He is a son of Will and Elsie (Consalus) Waddington, natives of Pennsylvania. The father was a railroad man and engaged in this line of work throughout the entire period of his active life. He and his wife became the parents of five children: Sarah Ellen, the wife of Francis F. Clark, of Morgan Park, Illinois; Herbert Allen, of Council Bluffs, Iowa; Will Heigh, the subject of this review; Hollis E., the wife of L. L. Quinby, of Omaha, Nebraska; and Merrill, also a resident of Omaha.

Will H. Waddington acquired his education in the public schools of East Dubuque, Illinois, and after graduating from the high school came to Franklin county, Iowa, where he became associated with his uncle in the mercantile business. At the end of fourteen years he turned his attention to farming, following this occupation in Franklin county for two years. He then went to Los Angeles, California, where he was for three years in the grocery business. At the end of that time he returned to Franklin county and with his uncle organized the J. A. Waddington Company, operating a large general store in Geneva. They do an extensive business, which is constantly increasing as their straightforward business methods become more widely known.

In Franklin county, January 21, 1902, Mr. Waddington was united in marriage to Miss Martha Kieslich. Mr. Waddington is a member of the Methodist church, belongs to the Masonic fraternity and is a republican in his political beliefs. He is well known in commercial life in Geneva, and his personal characteristics have gained him a wide circle of friends.

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George Edgar Wagner

George Edgar Wagner, a representative and popular citizen of Faulkner, well known in business circles of that city and of Ackley, was born in Franklin county, February 26, 1873. He is a son of Isaiah and Sarah E. (Jacobs) Wagner, natives of Illinois, of whom further mention is made elsewhere in this work.

George E. Wagner acquired his early education in a district school and later attended the academy at Ackley. Following this he turned his attention to farming in Franklin county, and at the end of three years became a partner with F. S. Whitney in the general mercantile business. After two years Mr. Wagner purchased his partner's interest and ran the business alone for fifteen years, meeting with gratifying success. After he disposed of this enterprise he invested in Ackley, where he has since conducted a garage in partnership with Charles W. Blake. They handle the Cadillac, Empire, Detroiter and Metz cars and do a large business, both being reliable, progressive and active business men. Mr. Wagner makes his home in Faulkner, where he owns a comfortable. modern residence. He is also the proprietor of the telephone system there and is well known and highly regarded in business circles.

On the 1st of June, 1898, Mr. Wagner was united in marriage to Miss Grace E. Finch, and they have become the parents of three children: Finch I., born December 14, 1901; Fay E., born October 23, 1903; Lynne Opal, born October 2, 1909.

Mr. Wagner is a republican in his political beliefs and he takes an intelligent interest. in public affairs. He is recognized as a business man of marked energy and laudable ambition, who seldom fails to carry forward to successful completion whatever he undertakes.

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Isaiah Wagner

Isaiah Wagner, one of the most respected and valued residents of Osceola township, has made his home in Franklin county since 1867. This has covered the period of the county's greatest growth and progress and in the work of general development he has borne his full share as the years have gone by. He owns one hundred and twenty acres of land on section 9, Osceola township, and operates also one hundred and eighty acres belonging to his wife. He was born in Ogle county, Illinois, December 11, 1839, and is a son of Henry and Elizabeth (Hoover) Wagner, natives of Maryland. The father engaged in farming during his entire active life and died in Ogle county. His wife passed away in Franklin county, this state. To their union were born eleven children: Jonathan, Joseph, Snaveley and Caroline, deceased; Sarah, the widow of John Donaldson, of Rockford, Illinois; Horatio, of Leaf River, Illinois; Ahymus and Rosella, deceased; Henry, of Alden, Iowa; Isaiah, of this review; and Elizabeth, the wife of Theodore Thomas, of Geneva.

Isaiah Wagner was reared in Ogle county, Illinois, acquiring his education in the public schools. On the 7th of September, 1861, he enlisted in Company H, Thirty-fourth Illinois Volunteer Infantry, and served for three years in the Civil war. He received a severe wound during the battle of Shiloh, being shot through the thigh. Following his discharge he returned to Illinois and in 1867 came to Iowa, settling in Franklin county, where he has since resided. For a period of forty-seven years he has been closely connected with agricultural interests here and is today one of the prosperous and representative farmers of his locality. He owns the farm upon which he located in 1867 and operates this in conjunction with one hundred and eighty acres which belong to his wife. The place is well improved, being provided with substantial buildings and excellent machinery.

On the 25th of December, 1866, Mr. Wagner was united in marriage to Miss Sarah E. Jacobs, a daughter of Enos and Rachel (Barnes) Jacobs, natives of Maryland. The father died in Illinois and the mother in Franklin county, Iowa. In their family were eleven children:, Francis T., deceased; Angeline, the wife of H. Hibarger, of Wichita, Kansas; Josephus, of South Dakota; Sarah E., wife of the subject of this review; Margaret Ann, who married D. Geeting, of South Dakota; Mary Jane, the wife of H. Baker, of Washington; Barbara Ellen, who married M. Myers, of Beaman, Iowa; Foneticus, residing in Illinois; Emma, who died in childhood; Martha, formerly the widow of William Piper, but now the wife of Andrew Dame, of South Dakota; and John, deceased. To Mr. and Mrs. Wagner nine children were born: Hattie May, the wife of J. B. Huff, of North Dakota; Enos, deceased; George E., of Faulkner, Iowa; Bessie, the wife of Guy French, of Faulkner; John H. and Hezekiah, residents of Faulkner; Franklin, of Wisconsin; Wava Grace, at home; and one child that died in infancy.

Mr. Wagner attends the Methodist church, is connected fraternally with the Grand Army of the Republic and gives his political allegiance to the republican party. At the age of seventy-four he is still active in the world's work and seems yet in his prime in spirit, and interests. He has ever been a busy man and his active and useful life has won him the confidence and good-will of his fellowman by reason of the honorable and straightforward policy which he has ever followed.

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John Homer Wagner

John Homer Wagner, engaged in general farming upon a quarter section of land in Osceola township, was born on a farm on section 9, this township, and is a son of Isaiah and Sarah Wagner, of whom extended mention is made elsewhere in this work. He was reared at home and from an early age became familiar with the best methods of farm operation. When he was twenty-one he rented eighty acres of land on section 9, Osceola township, and he has since increased this to a quarter section. He engages in general farming and stock-raising and has a fine herd of registered Holstein cattle. His interests are all carefully and capably managed and they have brought him a gratifying measure of success.

On the 8th of October, 1902, Mr. Wagner was united in marriage to Miss Ethel Le Valley, a native of Butler county, and to them have been born two children: Theodore Glenn, whose birth occurred February 18, 1905; and Robert Russell, born October 16, 1908.

Mr. Wagner is a member of the Methodist church and gives his political allegiance to the republican party. As a native son of Franklin county he has been loyal in his advocacy of everything pertaining to the welfare of the community and has made some substantial contributions to its development and progress.

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O. M. Webber

General farming and stock-raising interests command the attention of O. M. Webber, who since 1881 has owned and operated one hundred and sixty acres of excellent land on section 7, Grant township. He was born in Maine, June 10, 1858, and is a son of M. A. and Olive L. (Dyer) Webber, the former a native of Maine and the latter of New Hampshire. The parents came to Iowa in 1875 and located on section 15, Grant township, where the father engaged in farming for a number of years. He later moved to Iowa Falls, where he was for some time in the brick and tile business. He spent the later years of his life in retirement in Iowa Falls, where his widow still resides. To their union were born four children: Ida Ella, who passed away in 1877; O. M., of this review; Ora W., a resident of Spirit Lake, Iowa; and Scott I., of Iowa Falls.

O. M. Webber came to Iowa with his parents in 1875, being at that time seventeen years of age. He afterward assisted with the operation of the homestead until 1881, when he purchased one hundred and sixty acres on section 7, Grant township. Upon this property he has since resided, and the years have brought him steadily increasing success, so that today he is numbered among the representative farmers of his locality. He has steadily carried forward the work of improving his homestead and has provided it with substantial buildings and modern equipment. He engages in general farming and stock-raising, his interests along both lines being extensive and important.

On the 17th of September, 1879, Mr. Webber was united in marriage to Miss Zilpha A. Lyman, a native of Wisconsin, and they have become the parents of three children: Guy Russell; Ida May, who married James M. Smith, of Bradford, and has one son, Lyman W.; and Zera D., the wife of Clinton B. Stockdale. Mr. and Mrs. Stockdale have one son, Forrest W. Guy Russell Webber acquired his education in district school and in Ellsworth College at Iowa Falls, from which he was graduated in June, 1899. He afterward engaged in railroad work as fireman for the Illinois Central Railroad Company for three years and one year as engineer and then turned his attention to farming. He is now operating Mr. Webber's property in Spirit Lake, Iowa.

O. M. Webber is a member of the Christian church and gives his political allegiance to the republican party. He has held all of the township offices and is now filling the position of township clerk. He has rendered excellent service in this capacity and in all relations of life has proven himself upright, honorable and straightforward, well worthy of the high regard in which he is uniformly held.

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Claud H. Welty

Claud H. Welty
Claud H. Welty


Claud H. Welty is closely associated with mercantile interests of Hampton as a successful druggist. He was born in this city September 20, 1877, and is a son of William H. and Josephine (Hamilton) Welty, the former a native of Maryland and the latter of Wisconsin. They are now residents of Hampton. To their union were born two children: Gourney, of Chicago, Illinois; and Claud H., of this review.

The last named acquired his education in the grammar and high schools of Hampton and since laying aside his books has been connected with the drug business here, his long experience in this line being one of the important factors in his success. He passed his examination as a registered pharmacist in 1900 and in 1906 formed a partnership with O. E. Hickethier in the drug business. Five years later he purchased his partner's interest and since that time has conducted the store alone. He carries a complete line of drugs and sundries and controls a patronage which is constantly increasing in volume and importance, owing to his straightforward business methods, his reasonable prices and his earnest desire to please his patrons.

On the 28th of February, 1901, Mr. Welty married Miss Alice Hickethier, and both are well known in social circles of Hampton. Mr. Welty is a member of the Baptist church, is connected fraternally with the Knights of Pythias and the Benevolent Protective Order of Elks and gives his political allegiance to the democratic party. He is a progressive business man and through legitimate lines of trade is now building up a growing business, that is indicative of his spirit of enterprise and determination.

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Benjamin Wright White

For a long period Benjamin Wright White was closely connected with the agricultural and stock-raising interests of Franklin county, but in his later years he lived retired, enjoying the fruits of his former toil. He passed away March 27, 1907, and was then but fifty-three years of age. Within the period of his active life he acquired success that many an older man might well envy. He was born near Milwaukee, Wisconsin, September 3, 1853, a son of Mathew and Alta (Taylor) White. The father was a native of England and when a lad of fifteen crossed the Atlantic to America, settling in New York. There he married Alta Taylor, a native of that state. On removing westward to Wisconsin they took up their abode near Milwaukee, where Mr. White followed the occupation of farming. In 1870 he came to Franklin county, Iowa, where he remained for several years with his family. He afterward returned to Wisconsin, but again came to Franklin county in 1876, settling in Marion township, where he resided until his death, which occurred in 1887. His wife passed away in December of the same year. In their family were seven children: Joseph, who followed farming in Franklin county but is now deceased; Mary, the widow of Joseph Taylor, of Hampton; Eugene; Sarah Green, who has passed away; Harriett, the widow of W. M. Place, formerly of Wisconsin but now a resident of Hampton; Benjamin Wright; and Viola, the wife of M. E. Ferris, of Bismarck, North Dakota.

Mr. White pursued his education in the rural schools of Wisconsin and spent his youthful days upon the farm, remaining under the parental roof until twenty-two years of age. In 1876 he married and came to Franklin county, reaching Hampton on the 15th of March of that year. Mr. White had rented some land four miles north of Hampton, and for three years he continued to cultivate a farm which he leased. During that period he carefully saved his earnings, practicing close economy, and at the end of that time was enabled to purchase forty acres in Marion township. He also farmed the Clemmer place for five years and then purchased two hundred acres in the same township, upon which he continued to make his home until he retired from active business life in 1900 and removed to Hampton. He was a very energetic and progressive farmer and an extensive stock-raiser. In later years he specialized in the raising of thoroughbred shorthorn cattle and Poland China hogs and did much to improve the grade of stock raised in his part of the county. Both branches of his business proved profitable, because of his capable management and unfaltering energy. In the meantime he acquired additional land, owning about five hundred acres at the time of his death. When he retired in 1900 he rented his place and thereafter lived in the enjoyment of an income which resulted from his wise and judicious investment in property.

On the 14th of March, 1876, Mr. White was married in Monroe, Wisconsin, to Miss Lena Eitle, who was born near that place, a daughter of John G. and Magdelena (Fishes) Eitle. The father, a native of Germany, came to America in 1848 or 1849, settling in the state of New York. After a few years he removed westward, taking up his abode near Monroe, Wisconsin. He enlisted in the Union army during the Civil war, joining the twenty-first Wisconsin Volunteer Infantry in 1863 and serving until the close of hostilities. He died in August, 1898, having for about twelve years survived his wife, who passed away in 1886. She, too, was a native of Germany. In their family were seven children: Louis, a resident of Texas; Mary, who was the widow of Adam Schindler and who died in Wisconsin in 1906; Robert, a resident of Marshall, Minnesota; Paulina, the wife of S. T. Blain, of Hampton, Iowa; Mrs. White; John, living in Hampton; and Edward, a resident farmer of Hawkeye, Fayette county, Iowa.

Mr. and Mrs. White became the parents of a son, Earl Stanley, who died in infancy. Mr. White was essentially a home man and spent all of his leisure hours at his own fireside. His political support was given to the republican party, but he never sought nor desired office. He was always faithful in friendship, loyal in citizenship and devoted to the welfare of his wife and his relatives. That he possessed excellent business ability is indicated in the results which he achieved, bringing him from a most humble financial position to a place among the prosperous residents of his state. In 1913 Mrs. White built a beautiful and modern residence on Fifth street in Hampton, where she spends her time amid most pleasant surroundings, having the warm friendship of Hampton's best people.

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F. S. Whitney

Among the early settlers in Franklin county and the men who have been for many years powerful forces in the development of its agricultural and business interests is F. S. Whitney, who settled in this county in 1866, following a period of honorable service in the Union army. He was born March 2, 1840, and is a son of William E. and Mary (Scott) Whitney, natives of New York.

He was one of the first to respond to the call for seventy-five thousand volunteers by the president following the bombardment of Fort Sumter on the 12th day of April, 1861. On the 18th of April of that year he enlisted in Company H, Twelfth Illinois Volunteer Infantry, and in September reenlisted in Company B, First Battalion Yates Sharpshooters. At the end of nine months' service in that regiment he was discharged on account of disability, but he later enlisted in Company F, One Hundred and Fifty-first Illinois Infantry, serving until the close of the war. He was mustered out at Columbus, Georgia, and discharged in Springfield, Illinois.

With a creditable military record Mr. Whitney returned home and in the spring of 1866 moved to Franklin county, Iowa, settling in Osceola township. He turned his attention to farming and followed that occupation until 1880. He then became a grain dealer at Faulkner and at the end of about five years also embarked in general merchandising, in which he continued successfully for eleven years. He afterward discontinued that enterprise but continued buying and shipping grain, an occupation in which he was active and successful for about thirty years, being associated with The J. A. Carton Company, afterward J. C. Lusch & Company.

Mr. Whitney has been twice married. In September, 1864, he wedded Miss Effie Dow, a native of Michigan, who died in March, 1902, leaving three children: Lenna A., the wife of Charles W. Raisch, of Osceola township; James E., a resident of Hampton, Iowa; and Mary A., the wife of Madison Greer, of Los Angeles, California. On the 26th of August, 1908, Mr. Whitney married Miss Lydia Fossler, a daughter of John and Sarah (Kembel) Fossler, natives of Pennsylvania. The son James E. was born in Osceola township, and after attending the public schools of Ackley took a course in the Teachers' Training School of Oregon, Illinois. He afterward taught for a number of years in the rural and graded schools of Ogle and Lee counties, Illinois, but in 1896 returned to Iowa and located in Hampton in 1900, since which time he has been connected with the railway mail service. He has also served for six years as a member of the board of education of Hampton.

Mr. Whitney is a member of the Presbyterian church and connected fraternally with the Masons and the Grand Army of the Republic. He gives his political allegiance to the republican party and for the past six years has held the office of county supervisor, discharging his duties in a trustworthy and capable manner. No man is more prominently or widely known in Franklin county than Mr. Whitney, for he has made his home within its borders for almost a half century and has contributed in substantial measure to its development along many lines.

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C. E. Wilhelm

Mr. & Mrs. C.E. Wilhelm
Mr. & Mrs. C.E. Wilhelm


C. E. Wilhelm, who has lived retired in Sheffield for the past eleven years, where he is now serving as a member of the city council, was long and successfully identified with agricultural pursuits and still owns eighty acres of land in Cerro Gordo county and one hundred and ninety acres adjoining Sheffield. His birth occurred in Bedford county, Pennsylvania, on the 15th of March, 1854, his parents being Henry and Matilda (Lepley) Wilhelm, who were likewise natives of the Keystone state and came of German descent. However, the great-grandparents of our subject on both the paternal and maternal sides were born in America. In 1865 Mr. and Mrs. Henry Wilhelm located on a farm in Butter county, Iowa, the terminus of the Illinois Central Railroad being then at Waverly. In 1868 the family returned to Pennsylvania. Both the father and mother of Mr. Wilhelm of this review passed away in Butler county, Iowa.

C. E. Wilhelm spent his early life in his native county and well remembers some of the events of the Civil war, recollecting that he saw a number of Confederate soldiers. In 1875 he returned to Iowa and in 1878 came to Sheffield, here conducting a restaurant for four and a half years. At the time of his arrival Sheffield was a village of but two or three hundred inhabitants and the railroad had been built through just five years before. In 1883 he purchased a quarter section of land in Cerro Gordo county, the operation of which claimed his time and energies during the following nineteen years. In his undertakings as an agriculturist he won a gratifying measure of success, annually gathering bounteous harvests, which found a ready sale on the market. He still owns eighty acres in Cerro Gordo county and sold his sons a half section of land in that county. Mr. Wilhelm also owns one hundred and ninety acres adjoining the city of Sheffield, where he has now lived retired for eleven years, enjoying well earned rest.

As a companion and helpmate on the journey of life Mr. Wilhelm chose Miss Amanda Ikenberry, a native of Butler county, by whom he has nine children, as follows: Clyde, who resides on a farm in Cerro Gordo county; Effie, who gave her hand in marriage to William Funk, an agriculturist of Cerro Gordo county; Etta, the wife of Silas Ingebretson, a farmer of Franklin county; Clarence, who is married and resides on a farm in Cerro Gordo county; Mabel, the wife of Raymond Jule, a farmer of Franklin county; Frank; Roy; Pearl; and Irma.

Mr. Wilhelm is a staunch republican in politics and for eighteen years held the office of township clerk in Cerro Gordo county. He has several times been chosen a member of the city council and is serving on that body at the present time. His influence and support are ever given on the side of progress and improvement, and he was one of the councilmen who recently voted that the streets be lighted by electroliers. His wife is a devoted and consistent member of the Methodist Episcopal church. Mr. Wilhelm is a dignified, courteous gentleman of kindly spirit and strong principles, who through his marked individuality has left an impress for good upon the community in which he has so long resided.

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Henry Witte

Henry Witte, who since 1906 has owned and operated a fine farm of eighty acres on section 10, Mott township, was born in Germany, November 7, 1872. He is a son of Henry and Sophia (Harmann) Witte, also natives of Germany, where the mother passed away in May, 1904, and where the father still resides. They became the parents of eight children: Henry, of this review; Minnie, the wife of William Fink, of Franklin county; Fred, of Latimer; William, of Germany; Herman, also of Latimer; Sophia, the wife of William Meyer, of Latimer; August, of Hampton; and a child who died in infancy.

Henry Witte remained at home until he was sixteen years of age and then came to America, settling in Franklin county, Iowa, where he turned his attention to the carpenter's trade. In 1906 he abandoned that occupation and began farming, buying eighty acres of land on section 10, Mott township. He has built a modern residence upon this property and substantial barns and outbuildings and has striven in every way possible to make the farm productive and valuable. He follows always the most practical and progressive methods and has been very successful in the conduct of his interests.

On the 15th of November, 1905, Mr. Witte was united in marriage to Miss Clara Fink, a daughter of Christ and Elizabeth (Hendricks) Fink, natives of Germany. In their family were four children: William, of Franklin county; Emma, the wife of William Bramer, of Mott township; Clara, wife of the subject of this review; and Joseph, of Mott township. Mr. and Mrs. Witte have one son, Wilbert F., born May 1, 1909.

Mr. Witte is a member of the Lutheran church and gives his political allegiance to the. republican party. Although he takes an intelligent interest in public affairs he is not active as an office seeker, preferring to concentrate his attention upon his business interests, in which he is meeting with well deserved success.

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William Wolf

William Wolf, who since 1874 has been closely connected with agricultural interests of Franklin county and who is known today as one of the leading farmers and stock-raisers of Mott township, was born in Germany, September 5, 1845. He is a son of Michael and Margaret (Magley) Wolf, natives of Germany, who came. to America in l846 and located in Ann Arbor, Michigan, where the mother passed away. The father afterward moved to Madison, Wisconsin, and there followed the baker's trade and also engaged in farming. He died in 1871. He and his wife were the parents of six children: Abraham, a resident of Bismarck, North Dakota; William, of this review; Caroline, who married William Uphoff, of Chicago, Illinois; George, who died at the age of one year; and two other children, who died in infancy. After the death of his first wife the father married Mrs. Rosina (Lasse) Klonsia, and to this union were born six children: John, of Kimball, South Dakota; George, of Mount Vernon, Washington; Rosa, the wife of Frank Smith, of Platte, South Dakota; David, of Kimball, South Dakota; and Adolph and Dora, also of Kimball.

William Wolf acquired his education in the public schools of Wisconsin and was obliged to walk three miles to reach the schoolhouse. When he was between sixteen and seventeen years of age he enlisted in the First Wisconsin Cavalry. While he was with an advance guard of about one hundred and fifty men at Langee Ferry, Arkansas, they were surrounded by a force of rebels over six hundred strong and would have been captured had not the regiment to which they belonged come to their assistance in time. During the skirmish many were killed and our subject was wounded seven times and still carries a rifle ball in his leg and part of the buckshot received then in the head and neck. He received his honorable discharge after one year's service at Cape Girardeau, Missouri, and returned thence to Wisconsin, where he remained until 1874. In that year he came to Franklin county, Iowa, and immediately turned his attention to farming, buying eighty acres of land in Mott township. He has since added to this property until it now comprises four hundred and forty acres, and he owns, besides, a half interest in two hundred and eighty acres in Ingham township. Upon the first farm he has erected a modern two story home, substantial barns and outbuildings and has provided the place with all modern equipment. He is also a stockholder in the State Savings Bank. Success has rewarded his well directed efforts, and he is today in control of a valuable property, which reflects everywhere the care and supervision he bestows upon it.

On the 1st of January, 1874, Mr. Wolf was united in marriage to Miss Cecelia Shockely, and they became the parents of six children: Katie, who married Simon Wolf, of Mott township; Edith A., the wife of Theodore Wolf, of Mott township; Charles F., also of Mott township; Mary H., who lives at home; George M., a farmer in Mott township; and Reuben G., at home. Mr. Wolf is a member of the Grand Army of the Republic and belongs to the Christian church. He gives his political allegiance to the republican party and has served efficiently and conscientiously as township trustee. He has been for thirty-nine years numbered among the progressive and active farmers and stock-raisers of Franklin county, and his success is well merited, as it has come to him as a reward of labor.

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Arthur Lewis Wood, D.V.S.

Dr. L.W. Wood, DVS
Dr. Arthur L. Wood


Dr. Arthur Lewis Wood, a successful veterinary surgeon of Hampton, was born in Prairie City, Iowa, February 27, 1878. He is a son of George M. and Margaret (Ryan) Wood, the former a native of Illinois and the latter of New York. In their family were two children: Arthur Lewis, of this review; and Roscoe David, deceased.

Arthur L. Wood acquired his early education in the public schools of Prairie City, Iowa, and later attended Iowa State College at Ames, graduating from the department of veterinary surgery in 1902. In the same year he moved to Franklin county and located at Hampton, where he has since engaged in the practice of his profession. His ability has become widely recognized, and he has built up a large and steadily growing patronage. He has a completely equipped establishment in Hampton, provided with all the apparatus necessary in the treatment of diseases of animals.

On the 18th of December, 1902, Dr. Wood was united in marriage to Miss Anna Haines, of Prairie City, Iowa, a daughter of Anson and Isabel (Yuill) Haines. The father is a farmer of Jasper county, Iowa, but the mother has passed away. To the union of Dr. and Mrs. Wood have been born four children: Lawrence A., George Robert, Roscoe David and Isabel. Dr. Wood is a member of the Methodist church and connected fraternally with the Masonic order and the Modern Woodmen of America. He gives his political allegiance to the republican party and for the past eight years has creditably filled the position of assistant state veterinarian. He has won gratifying success in his profession, and he holds the respect and confidence of all who are in any way associated with him.

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John Wunn

John Wunn
John Wunn


John Wunn, one of the well known and respected citizens of Sheffield, has here been continuously engaged in business as a blacksmith for the past thirty-five years, and his labors have been a factor in the growth and upbuilding of the city. His birth occurred in Pennsylvania on the 12th of June, 1853, his parents being Nicholas and Catherine (Jenewein.) Wunn, both of whom were natives of Rhenish-Prussia, Germany. The father, who as a boy emigrated to the United States in company with his mother, brothers and sisters, grew to manhood and was married in Pennsylvania. He was a carpenter by trade and in 1855 established his home in Platteville, Wisconsin. His demise occurred in Grant county, that state, when he had attained the age of sixty-seven years, while his wife there passed away at the age of seventy-nine.

John Wunn, who was but two years of age when taken to Wisconsin by his parents, spent his boyhood in Grant county, that state. His father believed that rural surroundings were best in youth and therefore purchased a farm, sending our subject to the district schools. As a young man John Wunn began to learn blacksmithing and had not yet thoroughly mastered that trade when he came to Sheffield, Iowa, in 1878. He joined his brother-in-law in 1879 in a partnership, subsequently purchasing the latter's interest. He has here remained in business continuously for more than a third of a century and is an experienced workman, enjoying a gratifying and profitable patronage. At the time of his arrival Sheffield was a town of two hundred inhabitants. The railroad had been built through several years before, but the country was still new and prairie fires were frequent. The district was sparsely settled and, as no tiling had been done, was one vast swamp in the springtime. In the winter Mr. Wunn has seen as many as forty men shoveling snow to keep the railroad track clear. On one occasion he saw a man killed while looking out of the door of a box car, the door, which was caught on a bank of snow at the side, being pushed shut and crushing the man's skull. The dangers and hardships of pioneer days are only a memory now, for the work of progress has been carried steadily forward and the conveniences and comforts of modern civilization have long been known here. When Mr. Wunn came to Franklin county the McCormick self-rake and another harvest machine called the Buckeye were in use. Next was introduced the Marsh harvester, on which he bound for some time. Mr. Wunn also remembers the Manny reaper used in Wisconsin, a man walking behind the machine and raking the grain off with a fork. Then came the John P. Manny reaper, on which the farmer could seat himself. Since his youth Mr. Wunn has been a hard-working, industrious man, and the prosperity which he now enjoys is indeed well merited.

In this county Mr. Wunn wedded Miss Sarah Greer, now deceased, by whom he had four daughters, as follows: Eliza, who is engaged in teaching at Charles City, Iowa; Pearl, who follows the profession of teaching at Beloit, Wisconsin; Mamie, at home; and Carrie, who is employed as a stenographer at Beloit, Wisconsin. For his second wife he chose Miss Minnie Eno.

In his political views Mr. Wunn is a republican, exercising his right of franchise in support of the men and measures of that party. He has ably served as a member of the city council for nine years and for a period of ten years was on the school board. His religious faith is indicated by his membership in the Methodist Episcopal church, while fraternally he is identified with the Odd Fellows and with the Masons, having belonged to Pearl Lodge, NO. 426, for thirty years. Energetic, diligent and persevering, he is always found reliable in all his business connections and stands for the progressive element in citizenship and. for trustworthiness in every relations.

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George S. Yaw

George S. Yaw, a successful and representative citizen of Franklin county, has resided within its borders for nearly three decades and during that entire period has devoted his attention to farming and stock-raising, owning a valuable tract of land embracing one hundred and four acres on section 6, Scott township. For the past seven years he has also been engaged in the butcher business at Alexander and in this connection enjoys a gratifying and extensive patronage. His birth occurred in Lafayette county, Wisconsin, on the 3d of February, 1867, his parents being Harvey C. and Mary E. (Smith) Yaw, the former a native of Ashtabula county, Ohio, and the latter of Galena, Illinois. The maternal grandparents of our subject came to America from Scotland, first settling in New York and subsequently in Galena, Illinois. Mr. and Mrs. Harvey C. Yaw followed their son George to Franklin county, Iowa, and have since remained respected and substantial residents of the community, now living in a comfortable home at Alexander. Their children are as follows: Albert E., born August 12, 1865, who conducts a hardware store in Alexander and is the second oldest business man of the town; George S., of this review; W. H., a resident of Scott township, this county; Mrs. Charles Hanson, living in Scott township; Mrs. E. J. Vanness, of Algona, Iowa; and Minnie, who lives with her parents in Alexander. All the above named are natives of Lafayette county, Wisconsin. Albert E. and George S. Yaw were the first members of the family to come to this county, the others arriving here later.

It was in 1886, when nineteen years of age, that George S. Yaw came to Franklin county, locating on a farm in Scott township, where he has carried on agricultural pursuits continuously and successfully since, cultivating the cereals best adapted to soil and climate and also devoting considerable attention to stock-raising. His property comprises one hundred and four acres on section 6, Scott township, and is well improved in every particular. On the 10th of December, 1907, Mr. Yaw embarked in business as a butcher of Alexander and has there conducted an establishment of that character to the present time with gratifying and well merited success. His undertakings as an agriculturist and merchant demand his entire time and have been carried forward so diligently and ably that he has long been numbered among the prosperous and esteemed citizens of the community.

On the 31st of January, 1888, Mr. Yaw was united in marriage to Miss Nellie Thomas, who was born in Lafayette county, Wisconsin, on the 15th of September, 1871, and was there reared and educated. Her father, James Thomas, spent his entire life in Lafayette county, Wisconsin, being born on the 26th of December, 1843, and passing away in October, 1907. Her mother, Mrs. Ellen (Phillips) Thomas, who was born in that county on the 17th of August, 1848, died in Alexander, Iowa, on the 15th of January, 1911. Five of their children grew to maturity, namely: Mrs. Clara Yaw, who was born on the 11th of October, 1867, and resides in Alexander; Mrs. Nellie Yaw; Mrs. Charles Brown, of Platteville, Wisconsin; Arthur, a resident of Alexander; and Mrs. Eugene Nichols, deceased. All were born in Wisconsin. To Mr. and Mrs. George S. Yaw have been born four children, as follows: Mrs. Bertha Rodcmeyer, whose birth occurred on the 27th of September, 1891, and who is now a resident of Alexander; Bessie, who was born December 12, 1894, and resides with her parents; Verne, who has passed away; and Albert, who was born April 5, 1903, and is attending school in Alexander. The children of this family were all born in Scott township.

Mr. Yaw gives his political allegiance to the republican party and has ably served in the capacity of township assessor for eight years, while for seven years he was a member of the town council. He belongs to the Business Men's Association of Des Moines and is identified fraternally with the Modern Woodmen of America and the Royal Neighbors of Alexander. He is interested in all that pertains to general progress and improvement and is a public-spirited citizen and reliable business man, while his friends esteem him for his genuine personal worth.

 

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1914 Biography Index

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