1914 Biographies
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History of Franklin County, Iowa by I. L. Stuart. 2 vols. Chicago: S. J. Clarke Pub. Co., 1914.
Transcribed by Don Turner, former coordinator of this website.



Jacob J. Sailer

Jacob J. Sailer owns three hundred and twelve acres of land on section 3, Grant township, one hundred and sixty acres on section 34, Reeve township, and two hundred and forty acres in Geneva township, and in the cultivation of this property follows always the most progressive and practical methods, surrounding himself with a gratifying degree of prosperity. He has lived in Franklin county since 1882 but is a native of Germany. His birth occurred May 9, 1856, and he is a son of J. J. and Louisa Amelia (Off) Sailer, also natives of the fatherland. The parents came to America in 1885 and settled immediately in Franklin county, where they resided until their deaths. The father passed away in Osceola township September 14, 1913, and the mother December 28, 1910. Among their children were: Jacob J., of this review; Caroline, the wife of Thomas Sesler, of Osceola township; Charles, a resident of Germany; Fred, of Osceola; Louisa, the widow of G. Hofmeister; John, of Osceola township; and Paulina, the wife of Christ Sailer, of Osceola.

Jacob J. Sailer came to America in 1882 and settled immediately in Franklin county, Iowa, where he has since resided. Two years later he bought eighty acres in Osceola township and cultivated this until 1894, when he purchased three hundred and twelve acres on section 3, Grant township and one hundred and sixty in Reeve township. In 1894 he also purchased one hundred and sixty acres in Geneva township and later purchased eighty acres more in that township. He cultivated this until 1907. His farms have become under his able management among the most valuable in this vicinity.

On the 24th of January, 1888, Mr. Sailer was united in marriage to Miss Anna Marguerita Welland, a native of Germany, and they have become the parents of six children: Louisa, the wife of Louis Kreimeyer, of Geneva township; John H., Maria M., and John Jacob, at home; Charles F., deceased; and Caroline T., at home. Mr. Sailer is a member of the Evangelical church and gives his political allegiance to the republican party. He is now serving as township trustee and in the discharge of his official duties has been found capable, conscientious and trustworthy. Well known throughout Franklin county by reason of his long residence and the extent of his agricultural interests, Mr. Sailer is accounted one of the leading farmers of this part of the state and has the unqualified esteem and confidence of the entire community.

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John Sailer

John Sailer, a progressive farmer and extensive landowner of Franklin county, operating four hundred and ten acres of valuable land in Osceola township, was born in Germany, March 3, 1867. He is a son of John Jacob and Louisa Amelia (Off) Sailer, also natives of the fatherland. The parents came to America in 1885 and took up their residence in Osceola township, this county, where both passed away. The father died September 14, 1913, and the mother December 25, 1910. In their family were eleven children, seven of whom survive, as follows: Jacob J., a farmer of Franklin county; Caroline, the wife of Thomas Sessler, of Osceola township; Charles, a resident of Germany; Fred, of Osceola township; Louisa the widow of G. Hoofmeister; John, of this review; and Paulina, who married Christ Sailer, of Osceola.

John Sailer remained with his parents until he was twenty-six years of age, accompanying them to America in 1885. When he began his independent career he bought one hundred and twenty-four acres in Osceola township, this county, and he has since steadily increased his holdings until they comprise today four hundred and ten acres. In addition to general farming he engages also in stock-raising and has important interests along this line. His farm is well equipped with substantial buildings and modern machinery and. is a valuable property in every respect, reflecting the intelligent care and management of its owner, who is a progressive and practical agriculturist.

On the 4th of April, 1894, Mr. Sailer married Miss Mary Ricksmeier, a daughter of Henry and Sophia (Eichmeier) Ricksmeier, natives of Germany. The father came to America when he was eighteen years of age and located in Illinois, whence he moved in 1882 to Franklin county, Iowa. He located on section 13, Osceola township, and operated a farm there until his death, which occurred February 4, 1911. His wife died October 27, 1909. To their union were born five children: Henry, who is operating the old homestead; Alvina, the wife of Andrew Sessler, of Hardin county, Iowa; Mary, the wife of the subject of this review; Minnie, who married Christ Raisch, of Hardin county; and Lydia, who married L. Warneke, of Geneva township. Mr. and Mrs. Sailer became the parents of four children: Sophia, who is attending Ellsworth College at Iowa Falls; and Lydia, Matilda and Paul, all at home. Mr. Sailer is a member of the Evangelical church and gives his political allegiance to the republican party. His energy and industry have carried him forward into important relations with agricultural interests, and he has won for himself a most creditable reputation by his enterprise and reliability in every connection in which he has been found.

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Phillip F. Sailer

Phillip F. Sailer is one of the prosperous farmers and business men of Franklin county. He owns one hundred and twenty acres of valuable land on section 3, Osceola township, whereon he successfully engages in general farming and stock-raising. He was born in Germany, May 4, 1864, and is a son of John Jacob and Louise (Off) Sailer, natives of Germany. The parents came to America in 1885 and settled immediately in Franklin county, where the father died September 14, 1913, and the mother December 29, 1910. In their family were eleven children, of whom the following survive: John Jacob, of Grant township; Carolina, the wife of Thomas Sesler, of Osceola township; Charles, a resident of Germany; Fred, of Osceola township; Louisa, the widow of G. Hofmeister; John, a resident of Osceola township; Paulina, the wife of Christ Sailer, of Osceola township; and Phillip F., of this review.

Phillip F. Sailer came to America with his parents in 1885. He was reared at home and during his entire active life has been engaged in farming. In 1894 he and his brother purchased a homestead of three hundred and twenty acres which they divided, Phillip F. Sailer receiving one hundred and twenty acres. This land is located on section 3, Osceola township and under Mr. Sailer's able management has become a productive and valuable property equipped with substantial buildings and modern machinery.

On the 27th of April, 1896, Mr. Sailer was united in marriage to Miss Louisa Beecker and they became the parents of five children: August Frederick, Wilhelm Hermann, Clara Luise and Anna Wilhelmine, at home; and Emma, who has passed away. Mr. Sailer is a member of the Lutheran church and gives his political allegiance to the republican party. He is a man who, through enterprise and honesty, has acquired an excellent reputation in his community.

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Joseph R. Santee

Joseph R. Santee, engaged in general farming and stock-raising upon one hundred and twenty acres of land on section 36, Lee township, was born in Pennsylvania, September 6, 1874. He is a son of Robert C. and Martha M. (Kelly) Santee, also natives of the Keystone state. The parents moved to Iowa in 1876 and located in Muscatine county, whence after four years they moved to Hardin county. There they remained until 1900 and then came to Franklin county, taking up their residence on a farm on section 36, Lee township. Robert C. Santee died March 25, 1901, while the mother resides in Iowa Falls. To their union were born seven children: George L., a resident of Corpus Christi, Texas; Bertha, the widow of Thomas G. Watkins, of New Albany, Kansas; Joseph R., of this review; Elsie G., residing in Iowa Falls; James K., of Dows; Maud, the wife of M. W. Hensley, of Dows; and Mary, who married J. F. Gilbert, of Atlantic, Iowa.

Joseph R. Santee was two years of age when his parents came to Iowa, and he acquired his education in the public schools of Muscatine and Hardin counties. Following the completion of his studies he taught for two years in Hardin county and then turned his attention to farming. He is now operating the family homestead of one hundred and twenty acres on section 36, Lee township and has made this property productive and valuable in the highest degree. In addition to general farming he also raises and feeds stock, and his interests along this line are of growing importance.

On the 1st of September, 1897, Mr. Santee was united in marriage to Miss Ora M. Meeks, a native of Hardin county, and they have become the parents of a daughter, Nada Maxine, born August 18, 1912. Mr. Santee attends the Methodist church and is connected fraternally with the Modern Woodmen of America. He is a republican in his political beliefs and has served as secretary of the school board and is now township assessor. As a resident of Franklin county he has been loyal in his advocacy of everything pertaining to the general welfare and has made some substantial contributions to development and progress.

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Charles H. Scantlebury

Charles H. Scantlebury, who since 1911 has filled the responsible position of manager of the Farmers Elevator and has conducted a prosperous and growing business in this connection, was born in Jo Daviess county, Illinois, August 26, 1868, and is a son of Edward D. and Elizabeth (Ormrod) Scantlebury, both of whom were natives of England. They came to America in 1848, settling in Jo Daviess county, Illinois, where they remained until 1873. They then went to California and two years were passed on the Pacific coast. In 1875 they came to Iowa and in 1878 came to Franklin county, where Mr. Scantlebury continued to engage in general agricultural pursuits until his life's labors were ended in death on the 28th of February, 1897. His widow survives him and makes her home in Hampton. In their family were six children: William F., now a traveling salesman who resides in Des Moines; Charles H.; Josephine, the wife of H. J. Henderson, of Hampton; F. J. also living in Hampton; Ella, the wife of Frank O. Roberts, of Fresno, California; and Edward C., a veterinary surgeon engaged in practice in Hampton.

Charles H. Scantlebury spent his youthful days upon the home farm, early becoming familiar with all the duties and labors that fall to the lot of the agriculturist. At length he rented one thousand acres of land, which he cultivated for three years and on the expiration of that period returned to Sheffield, where he engaged in buying grain for a year. He next purchased eighty-seven acres in Washington township and thereon resided from 1894 until 1903. He now owns one hundred and sixty acres of rich and valuable land adjoining Hampton. In 1911 he was made manager of the Farmers Elevator and conducts the business in connection with the supervision of his farm. He is an energetic, practical and progressive farmer and business man and thus contributes much to the substantial development of the community.

On the 26th of November, 1894, Mr. Scantlebury was united in marriage to Miss Rose Kempthorne, a native of Franklin county and a representative of one of the pioneer families. Unto Mr. And Mrs. Scatitlebury have been born five children: Charles Clay, born December 8, 1897; Bernice Etha, born February 5, 1900; Ronald Earl, born January 20, 1901; Russell Lowell, born May 7, 1907; and Hazel May, born March 24, 1912.

In his political views Mr. Scantlebury is a republican, earnest and constant in support of the party, yet never a politician in the sense of office seeking. His fraternal relations are with the Independent Order of Odd Fellows and with the Knights of Pythias, while his religious faith is evidenced by his membership in the Methodist church. From early boyhood to the present time he has lived in Franklin county and has always been identified with its agricultural interests, his practical and progressive methods contributing to the splendid reputation which Iowa justly bears as one of the leading agricultural states of the union.

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H. G. Schaefer

H. G. Schaefer, who has been successfully identified with mercantile interests in Sheffield for a number of years, is the owner of a handsome brick block and conducts the largest store in the town, the main building being utilized in the sale of ladies' apparel, dry goods and groceries, while there is another department devoted to clothing and men's furnishings. The period of his residence in Franklin county covers thirty-six years. His birth occurred in Dodge county, Wisconsin, on the 15th of October, 1858, his parents being William and Caroline (Zimmerman) Schaefer, the former a native of Hanover and the latter of Berlin, Germany. Throughout his active business career William Schaefer devoted his attention to general agricultural pursuits in Dodge county, Wisconsin. Both he and his wife have passed away.

H. G. Schaefer began working in a store when a youth of thirteen and at the age of nineteen came to Franklin county, Iowa, here being employed as a farm hand for a number of years. Subsequently he was engaged in the mercantile business in Sheffield as a partner of L. P. Holden for seven years and afterward spent a similar period in association with I. N. Reynolds. In 1900 he purchased the interest of his partner and during the intervening thirteen years has been in business alone. He owns a substantial brick block, the main building of which is occupied by dry goods, ladies' apparel and groceries, while another department is given over to clothing and men's furnishings. Mr. Schaefer employs five clerks and enjoys an extensive trade, for he carries a large and well selected stock of goods at reasonable prices and is at all times in a position to meet the demands and wishes of his patrons.

In Franklin county Mr. Schaefer wedded Miss Minnie Bolk, a native of Germany, by whom he has five children, as follows: Alvin C., who is married and assists his father in the mercantile business; William H., who is married and is also in his father's store; Rose L., the wife of C. W. Schmidt, of Sheffield; and Harvey C. and Lucile, both at home.

In his political views Mr. Schaefer is a republican, considering the principles of that party most conducive to good government. He has done able service on the city council and also as a member of the school board. He holds membership in the Methodist Episcopal church and acts as superintendent of its Sunday school. Mr. Schaefer is popular among his friends, having the attractive social qualities which gain high regard. He is ambitious, resolute and energetic, and whatever he undertakes, whether in business or other connections, is carried forward to successful completion.

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Jacob Schachterle

One of the extensive landowners and prosperous farmers of Franklin county is Jacob Schachterle, owning and operating four hundred acres of land in Osceola township. He was born in Germany February 14, 1855, and is a son of Jacob and Phillipina (Auf) Schachterle, also natives of the fatherland. The parents have passed away, leaving two children: Jacob, of this review; and Henrv, residing in Germany.

Jacob Schachterle acquired his education in the public schools of his native country, studying until he was twenty-one. He spent three years in the German army and later, in 1880, emigrated to America, making his home in Franklin county. Soon afterward he bought a tract of eighty acres in Osceola township and to this original farm has added from time to-time until he now has four hundred acres, all in Osceola township. Mr. Schachterie engages in general farming and has followed alwavs the most progressive method, so that he has. met with gratifying and well deserved success.

On the 21st of June, 1882, Mr. Schachterle was united in marriage to Miss Mary Sessler and they have become the parents of nine children: Elizabeth, the wife of Earl Jernegan, of Hampton; Henry, John, William, Fred, Charles, Ella, Amelia and August, all at home.

Mr. Schachterle is a member of the Lutheran church and gives his political allegiance to the republican party. He has been honored by his fellow citizens by election to various positions of public trust and responsibility and has served as school director and township trustee. He is now treasurer of the school board and the cause of education finds in him a loyal and earnest supporter. He has lived in Franklin county for over thirty years, and during that time he has contributed substantially to agricultural development and growth winning a gratifying degree of success and a high place in the ranks of progressive farmers and useful citizens.

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Leonard Schinagel

Mr. & Mrs. Leonard Schinagel
Mr. & Mrs. Leonard Schinagel


Leonard Schinagel, who devotes his attention to general agricultural-pursuits on section 21, Ross township, where he owns two hundred and forty acres of rich and productive land, is a self-made man who owes his present prosperity entirely to his well directed industry and wise management. His birth occurred in Bavaria, Germany, on the 31st of August, 1864, his parents being John Leonard and Mary (Komm) Schinagel, who passed away in the fatherland many years ago.

Leonard Schinagel spent the first sixteen years of his life in 'the land of his nativity and then sailed for America, desiring to test the truth of the-many favorable reports which had reached him concerning the opportunities and advantages of the new world. During the first three years of his residence in the United States he was employed in the car shops and as fireman with the Chicago, Burlington & Quincy Railroad Company at Aurora, Illinois, while subsequently he worked by the month as a farm hand in Kane county. In 1888 he came to Franklin county, Iowa, and during the following three years cultivated a rented tract of land on section 21, Ross township, which he then purchased and which is still in his possession. It was merely wild prairie when he first located thereon, but he has since developed and improved the property until it is now very desirable, and erected a set of substantial farm buildings. His place embraces two hundred and forty acres of valuable land and in its operation he has won a gratifying measure of success, annually harvesting excellent crops, which find a ready sale on the market.

In Kane county, Illinois, Mr. Schinagel wedded Miss Minnie Rhutassel, a native of that county, by whom he has four children. Ella, married Henry Gerfin, of Ross township, on the 1st of January, 1914, and they are farming the Tom Williams farm in that township. George, Lillie and Clarence are at home. Mr. Schinagel was reared in the Lutheran faith and will not depart therefrom but attends and contributes to the support of the Congregational church, to which his wife and children belong. He is widely recognized as a progressive and enterprising citizen, and is the owner of an automobile. Coming to the new world in early life, he eagerly availed himself of the opportunities here afforded and has worked his way steadily upward to a position among the substantial and representative citizens of Franklin county, where he has now resided for a quarter of a century.

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Hans Schonemann

Hans Schonemann, one of the self-made men of Franklin county who has risen by his own efforts to a place of importance and prominence in agricultural circles, was born in Denmark, April 3, 1854. He is a son of Jeppe and Mary Schonemann, both of whom died in Denmark.

Hans Schonemann came to America when he was twenty-eight years of age and settled first in Cerro Gordo county, Iowa, where for two years he worked by the month upon a farm. At the end of that time he moved to Franklin county and bought a farm of one hundred and sixty acres on section 5, Richland township. At the time this came into his possession it was only slightly improved but Mr. Schonemann has carried forward the work of its development with characteristic energy, and he has today a valuable and productive farm. It is equipped with substantial buildings and modern machinery and reflects in every department the care and supervision of the owner, who is a progressive and practical agriculturist. Mr. Schonemann recently purchased another farm of one hundred and twenty acres in this township and intends to give this over to the management of his son.

Mr. Schonemann married Miss Elsie Marie Petersen, a native of Denmark, and they have become the parents of eight children: Christina, the wife of Nels Raun; Marie, who married Albert Johnson; Henrietta, the wife of Richard James; Lauritz, who will operate his father's newly purchased farm; Elisa; Sina; William; and Henry.

Mr. Schonemann is a member of the Lutheran church and gives his political allegiance to the republican party, taking an intelligent interest in public affairs. Starting out in life a poor man, he has by his own efforts worked his way upward to success, contributing to the agricultural development of this locality two fine farms, which are a visible evidence of his life of industry and thrift.

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John William Schwieger

Not only is John William Schwieger the owner of a prosperous farm in Morgan township, but he is also treasurer of the Farmers Cooperative Elevator Company, showing himself an able business man in this position. Mr. Schwieger was born in Franklin county, Morgan township, June 12, 1874. He is a son of Johann C. and Gertrude (Blum) Schwieger, the former born August 17, 1835, and the latter October 27, 1844. Both parents have passed away, the mother dying March 21, l912, and the father January 16, 1913. They were natives of Germany and were married in Freeport, Illinois, on the 7th of February, 1871. The father settled in Iowa in 1870. They had eight children: Emma, the wife of E. H. Capellen; John William; Martha, the wife of H. J. Benz, of Charles City, Iowa; Lydia R., who married Rev. A. W. Gauger, of McGregor, Iowa; Louis E., of Dows; George B., of Twin Falls, Idaho; Fred C., who resides on the old family homestead; and Grace E., of Franklin county.

John W. Schwieger was reared under the parental roof and in acquiring his education attended the schools in the neighborhood of his father's farm. He early became acquainted with farm work and took this up when lie started upon his independent career, buying eighty acres of land on section 23, Morgan township. He has made excellent improvements upon the land and his acres are carefully cultivated. His buildings are kept in good repair, and he has erected a silo with a capacity of one hundred tons. He engages in general farming, following the most modern methods.

On September 27, 1898, Mr. Schwieger was united in marriage to Miss Flora E. Melcher, a native of Floyd county, Iowa, and a daughter of Lewis and Caroline (Stoeber) Melcher, the former a native of New York and the latter of Grant county, Wisconsin. Years ago they came to Iowa, and they are now residing in Charles City. The father is a veteran of the Civil war. The parents had eight children: Sylvanus G. and Henry E., deceased; Flora E., wife of the subject of this review; Charles O., of Charles City; Evelyn E., the wife of J. Stratte, of Idaho Falls, Idaho; Herbert O., deceased; Clarence L., of Charles City, Iowa; and Mabel E., who married Louis Schneider, of Charles City. Mr. and Mrs. Schwieger have three children: Oliver W., born August 14, 1899; Viola E., born January 26, 1902; and Howard W., born August 12, 1907.

Mr. Schwieger is public-spirited and interests himself in township affairs to quite an extent. He is a republican and for some time served as township assessor. He has also been treasurer of the local telephone company and is now treasurer of the Farmers Cooperative Elevator Company. He is not only a successful agriculturist but a shrewd and able business man and his services have been of great benefit to the corporation of which he is an officer. His religious faith is that of the Methodist Episcopal church, to which he gives his moral and material support. Mr. Schwieger has many friends in Morgan township and stands high in the confidence of the general public. He is a successful man, and his prosperity has come to him in response to closely applied effort.

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William Senf

William Senf, living retired in Latimer after many years of close connection with business interests of the city, was born in DuPage county, Illinois, December 31, 1869. He is a son of August and Mary (Schermer) Senf, natives of Germany. The father came to America when he was twenty-one years of age and located first in Cook county, Illinois, whence he moved to DuPage county. In 1890 he came to Franklin county, Iowa, and located in Marion township, where he resided until he retired from active life. He and his wife are now living in Latimer. Among their eleven children are included the following: Henry, of Minnesota; Louisa, deceased; William, of this review; Annie, the wife of F. H. Menning, of Latimer, and Herman and Louis, both deceased.

William Senf was reared in DuPage county and in 1892 established himself in the hardware business in Latimer, this county, and operated this enterprise for ten years thereafter, building up a large and representative patronage. When he disposed of this business he bought a grain elevator, which he conducted successfully for eleven years, or until he retired from active life in 1913. He owns a fine house in Latimer and two hundred acres of excellent land in Wisner township.

On the 26th of November, 1892, Mr. Senf married Miss Emma Schmidt, a native of DuPage county, Illinois, and they have become the parents of four children, Herbert, Edna, Laura and Luella. Mr. Senf is a member of the Evangelical church and gives his political allegiance to the republican party. He served as township clerk for six years and is at all times interested in the growth and development of his community. He has contributed in substantial measure to the commercial progress of Latimer, and his present period of leisure rewards many years of active and earnest labor in the past.

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James J. Sharpe

James J. Sharpe, filling the office of county attorney and recognized as an able lawyer, fully capable of handling the litigated interests in which the county becomes involved, was born in Pennsylvania, August 8, 1873, his parents being Moore I., and Katherine (Johnson) Sharpe. The father, a native of Ireland, came to America when eighteen years of age, or in 1863, and settled in Mercersburg, Pennsylvania. It was in that state that he met and married Katherine Johnson., a native of Pennsylvania. In the year 1885 he brought his family to Iowa, settling in Franklin county, where he followed the trade of blacksmithing, which he has made his life work. He now resides in Perry, Iowa. To him and his wife were born nine children James J; Anna, who is engaged in teaching near Algona, Iowa; William, statistician for the Chicago, Rock Island & Pacific Railroad at Chicago Emma, the wife of Lee A. Robinson, of Perry, Iowa; Lucy, the wife of Carl Bramner, of Fort Dodge, Iowa; Stewart, a practicing attorney at Delmont, South Dakota; Alfred, who is agent for the Chicago, Milwaukee & St. Paul Railroad at Perry, Iowa; Susan, who is engaged in teaching school; and John, of Fort Dodge, Iowa, who is traveling auditor for the Illinois Central Railroad.

Brought to Iowa when a lad of twelve years, James J. Sharpe was graduated from the high school of Iowa Falls with the class of 1893, and afterward entered the State University at Iowa City, where he pursued a classical course, winning the degree of Bachelor of Arts in 1898. During vacation periods and in the evenings he studied law and he also taught school for a year. He was admitted to the bar in 1898 and subsequently followed the profession of teaching until he felt able to concentrate his efforts entirely upon law practice. For two years he was associated with Judge Lewis of Montezuma, Iowa, and in 1909 he came to Hampton, where he has since followed his profession. He is now county attorney, to which office he was elected in 1912. He has also been accorded a good private practice, and his fellow members of the bar speak of him as one who is careful and painstaking in the preparation of his cases and clear and cogent in the presentation of his cause.

Mr. Sharpe was married June 20, 1899, to Lillian Ehret, a graduate of the Iowa City high school and the State University, of Iowa, winning the degree of Bachelor of Philosophy. She is a representative of one of the old pioneer families of the state. Unto Mr. and Mrs. Sharpe have been born a daughter and son: Esther, whose birth occurred July I7, 1902; and Lawrence, who was born August 17, 1903. Mr. Sharpe gives his political allegiance to the republican party and keeps well informed on the questions and issues of the day. Fraternally he is a Mason and in religious belief is a Methodist. He stands for all those things which tend to promote welfare and progress in city, county, state or nation. He chose as a life work a profession in which advancement must be gained by individual merit, and through earnest study, close application and ability he is working his way steadily upward as a member of the Franklin county bar.

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James A. Sheets

James A. Sheets, a well known farmer of Mott township, was born in Delaware county, Ohio, October 22, 1860, a son of Peter and Mary Ann (Russell) Sheets, the former a native of Virginia and the latter of Ohio. The father came to Franklin county in 1865 and bought a quarter section of land in Mott township. On his return journey to Virginia he stopped in Illinois, and there his death occurred in 1872. His wife and children made their home upon the farm in Franklin county now owned by the subject of this review. In this family were seven children: two who died in infancy; Harriet, deceased; Franklin P., of Des Moines; Caroline, the wife of Peter Nelson, of Ada, Minnesota; James A.; and Peter, of Ada, Minnesota.

James A. Sheets was twelve years of age when his father died, and he and his brother took charge of the homestead, operating it together until 1893. In that year James A. Sheets purchased his brother's interests, and he has since managed the property alone. He engages in general farming and has met with a success which places him among the substantial and representative agriculturists of his locality.

On the 12th of February, 1895, Mr. Sheets was united in marriage to Miss Margaret A. Slee, and they have become the parents of three children: Myrtle, who was born November 28, 1895; Mary, born July 8, 1897; and James A., born March 10, 1902. Mr. Sheets is a member of the Methodist church and in politics votes independently. He has been connected with agricultural interests of his township for over forty years and has accomplished a great deal of important work in the intervening period, contributing in substantial measure to the welfare and growth of the community and winning a gratifying personal success.

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John H. Sherer

John H. Sherer, who since 1891 has owned and operated a fine property of one hundred and twenty acres on section 8, Reeve township, was born in Ulster county, New York, May 17, 1863. He is a son of Jacob and Lena (Hilt) Sherer, natives of Germany. The father was a stone mason and carpenter by trade and followed these occupations in New York state until his death. His wife has also passed away. Six children were born to their union: Jacob, of Cohoes, New York; Henry, of Wisconsin; Frank, a resident of Iowa Falls, Iowa; John H., of this review; W. M., of Watertown, South Dakota; and Lena, deceased.

John H. Sherer was eight years of age when his mother died and he was taken to Iowa, where he entered the home of Richard Horner near Geneva. There he remained until he was seventeen years of age, when he began earning his own livelihood, engaging in teaming and in the general merchandise business in Hampton. In 1891 he bought one hundred and twenty acres of excellent land on section 8, Reeve township, and this he has developed and improved since that time, carrying on general farming and stock-raising. He has met with a gratifying degree of success, for he gives his farm careful personal supervision and follows always the best and most modern agricultural methods.

On the 27th of September, 1886, Mr. Sherer married Miss Hattie Kibbe, a native of Wisconsin, who has lived in Franklin county since she was three years of age. Mr. and Mrs. Sherer have become the parents of seven children: Mabel, the wife of Ed Christensen, of Marion township; Maud, who married Ray Hobson, living three miles east of Hampton; Flo; Roy; Nellie; Lottie; and William.

Mr. Sherer is a member of the Christian church and is connected fraternally with the Modern Woodmen of America. He gives his political allegiance to the republican party and was for nineteen years secretary of the school board, of which he is now president. He stands for progress at all times and seeks his own success and the advancement of the community along lines which will bear the closest investigation and scrutiny.

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John Godfrey Showalter

John Godfrey Showalter, a progressive and practical young agriculturist of Reeve township, operating a farm of two hundred acres on section 3, was born in Freeport, Illinois, August 6, 1883, a son of Charles F. and Isabelle Jane (Vought) Showalter. He was reared at home, remaining with his parents in Iowa until he was twenty one years of age. He then moved to Illinois, his native state, but at the end of one year returned to Franklin county, where he has since been engaged in farming, operating his father's farm of two hundred acres on section 3, Reeve township. His methods are practical and therefore productive of excellent results, and he is meeting with gratifying and well deserved success.

On February 2I, 1911, Mr. Showalter married Miss Laura Schroeder, a native of Freeport, Illinois, and they have become the parents of one child, Cheryll Isabelle, born December 1, l9I2. Mr. Showalter is a member of the Methodist church, is connected with the Masonic fraternity and is a republican in his political beliefs. Although he is still a young man he has already been carried forward into important relations with agricultural interests, and his continued success is assured.

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L. S. Showalter

Agricultural interests of Franklin county find a worthy and progressive representative in L. S. Showalter, who operates the old Showalter homestead of two hundred and forty acres in Reeve township. He was born in Freeport, Illinois, June 25, 1875, and is a son of Charles F. and Permelia L. (Scott) Showalter. The former was born in Pennsylvania, June 25, 1849, his parents being John S. and Mary (Millwood) Showalter, also natives of the Keystone state. John S. Showalter moved from Pennsylvania to Wisconsin and thence to Illinois, where he passed away. He had the following children: Josiah M. and Osborne, deceased; Charles F., father of the subject of this review; John W., deceased; Emma, the wife of I. Eastman, of Monmouth, Illinois; Carrie, who married William Currier, of Freeport, Illinois, Frank; and a son, who died in infancy.

Charles F. Showalter began his independent career in Illinois, where he engaged in farming and also operated a threshing machine until 1885. In that year he moved to Franklin county and bought two hundred and forty acres of fine land in Reeve township. To this he later added an additional two hundred acres and upon this property engaged in general farming and stock-raising, shipping his animals to the eastern market, where they obtained a ready sale. He became one of the best known and most progressive agriculturists in this part of the county and contributed in substantial measure to its growth and development. In 1909 he retired from active life and moved into Hampton, where he has since resided. He was twice married, his first wife being Miss Permelia Scott, mother of the subject of this review. To their union was born a son, L. S., of this review. After the death of his first wife Charles F. Showalter married Miss Isabelle Vought and they became the parents of five children: Lillian. the wife of Fred Kron, of Reeve township; Godfrey, also of Reeve township; Mary, the wife of G. W. Fox, of Reeve township; Emma, at home; and Charles, of Freeport, Illinois. Charles F. Showalter is a member of the Methodist church and is connected fraternally with the Knights of Pythias. He is independent in his political views and has held a number of township offices, being public-spirited and progressive in matters of citizenship. He has become well and favorably known in Hampton, where he is spending his retired life.

L. S. Showalter was reared upon his father's farm in Reeve township and remained at home until he was twenty-two years of age. He then rented one hundred and eighty acres near the homestead and after operating this for three years rented four hundred and eighty acres in Hamilton township. He remained upon this place for eight years, after which he rented his father's farm of two hundred and forty acres, upon which he has since resided. , Having grown up on the farm and having been familiar with the details of farm operation since his childhood, he has met with most gratifying success in the conduct of his agricultural and stock-raising interests and is recognized today as one of the progressive and representative farmers of Franklin county.

On the 29th of November, 1899, Mr. Showalter married Miss Nellie May King, a native of Illinois, and they became the parents of three children: Pearl Genevieve; May, who has passed away; and Mildred Alice, born June 29, 1913. Mr. Showalter attends the Methodist church and gives his political allegiance to the republican party. He is a man whose actions have always conformed to a high standard of business and personal ethics, and his record is a credit to a name that has long been an honored one in his community.

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Dennis Walter Shroyer

D. W. Shroyer, carrying on general farming and stock-raising upon a quarter section of land on section 16, Reeve township, was born in Franklin county, December 28, 1858, a son of Lewis and Johannah F. (Jones) Shroyer, of whom further mention is made elsewhere in this work. Mr. Shroyer of this review was reared in Franklin county and acquired his education in the district schools. When he was about thirty years of age he moved to South Dakota and took up a homestead there. In 1888 he bought a farm of one hundred and twenty acres in Wright county, operating this for four years. When he sold it he returned to Franklin county and purchased a quarter of section 16, Reeve township, upon which he has since resided. He has made excellent improvements upon it, erecting new buildings and installing modern equipment and has made it a productive and valuable farm.

In 1885 Mr. Shroyer married Miss Melinda Bullis, who has passed away. They became the parents of a daughter, Lulu May, who died at the age of eleven. Mr. Shroyer afterward married Miss Kathryn Blake, a native of Franklin county, and to this union have been born four children: Lewis Blake, whose natal day was August 31, 1901; Grace Joan, who was born February 5, 1903; Raymond Allison, born December 30, 1904; and Willard Martin, born July 5, 1906. Mr. Shroyer attends the Methodist church and gives his political allegiance to the republican party. He is one of the most progressive and active farmers of Reeve township--a man whom Franklin county is proud to number among her native sons.

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Martin L. Shroyer

Martin L. Shroyer, a native son of Reeve township and today one of the most prosperous and successful farmers of that locality was born November 6, 1862, and is a son of Lewis and Johannah F. (Jones) Shroyer, the former a native of Virginia who went to Indiana in his younger days and moved from that state to Franklin county, Iowa, in 1855. He located in Reeve township and for some time operated a sawmill there, after which he turned his attention to farming. He also worked at the carpenter's trade and helped to erect some of the first buildings in Reeve township. He died here October 23, 1905, and is survived by his wife, who makes her home with the subject of this review. To their union were born five children: a son, who died in infancy; Dennis Walter, of Reeve township; Clara, who married James A. Green of Alexander, Iowa; Martin L., of this review; and Victor E. of Geneva.

Martin L. Shrover was reared in Reeve township and acquired his education in the district schools. In 1891 he bought one hundred acres of land on. section 16 and to this he has since added sixty acres, bringing the farm to its present proportions. General farming and stock-raising command his attention, and by intelligent management and constant supervision he has been very successful along both lines.

On the 24th of March, 1897, Mr. Shroyer married Miss Mabel Showalter and to this union has been born a daughter, Doris Marguerite, who lives at home. Mr. Shroyer is a member of the Methodist Episcopal church and gives his political allegiance to the republican party. His worth is widely acknowledged, his enterprise having gained him a prominent place in agricultural circles, and his integrity and standing are unquestioned facts in his life record.

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William J. Shroyer

In taking up the personal history of William J. Shroyer we present to our readers the life record of one of the oldest pioneer settlers in Franklin county. Almost six decades have passed since he arrived here, finding a sparsely settled region that gave little indication of the changes which were to occur and make this one of the populous and prosperous sections of the state. For an extended period he was identified with its agricultural interests and land which he purchased at a nominal figure is today worth two hundred dollars per acre.

Mr. Shroyer was born February 19, 1834, in Monongalia county, West Virginia, a son of Melker Baker and Rebecca (Jones) Shroyer. The father was born October 25, 1807, and died in 1877, while the mother, a native of Virginia, born November 1, 1812, passed away in 1848. The former was a son of Louis Shroyer, a gunsmith of Maryland, who was of Dutch lineage. The father, who was a gunsmith and, blacksmith, went to West Virginia and from there to Delaware county, Indiana, where he continued throughout the remainder of his life, conducting a gunsmith and blacksmith shop, although he lived upon a farm, which was cultivated by his sons. There were eight children in his family. Louis, who was born December 26, 1832, was a farmer of Franklin county, Iowa, but died in 1907. William J. is the second of the family. Sarah, born August 20, 1836, became the wife of Joseph Dean and after his death married Mordecai Dodge, who died while serving as a soldier of the Civil war, while her death occurred in 1905. Nathan, who was born October 25, 1838, and followed farming in Delaware county, Indiana, died in 1909. Elizabeth, who was born July 20, 1841, became the wife of Joseph Meeks, a farmer and stockman of Indiana, and died in 1910. Jacob, who was born September 10, 1843, was killed at the battle of Kenesaw Mountain when but sixteen years of age. John A., born December 21, 1845, was a farmer of Indiana and died in 1908. Eliza J., born July 10, 1848, passed away in March, 1910.

William J. Shroyer was but four years of age when his parents went to Indiana from West Virginia. He spent his youth on a farm in that state and had but limited educational opportunities, for his labors were needed upon the old homestead. He continued to assist his father until he attained his majority save for a short time when he worked as fireman at a steam mill. When he had reached manhood he and his eldest brother, Louis, started for Iowa, whither an uncle, Henry Shroyer, had preceded them. They traveled on the railroad to Galena, Illinois, and by stage to Dubuque, Iowa, and thence walked to their destination. They had none of the comforts of modern travel, but the hardships of the trip did not deter them, as they were ambitious and eager to try life in this state, where they hoped success awaited them. William J. Shroyer arrived in Blackhawk county May 13, 1855, and remained there for two months, after which he joined his brother in Franklin county, where both entered the employ of their uncle, Henry Shroyer, where they helped build a mill for him near Maysville. There they continued until the marriage of William J. Shroyer. In the meantime they had arranged to buy the mill, but as their wage was but seventy-five cents per day each this hardly gave them sufficient capital to make the purchase and they accordingly resorted to other means. They built two houses for their uncle, who was then county judge, and through him they secured a contract for building a bridge. Through that work they made an exchange so as to secure the mill about the time of William J. Shroyer's marriage. Afterward he sold the mill and his share was invested in eighty acres of land, which he purchased at seven dollars and a quarter per acre. In after years he added to his holdings until he had one hundred and thirty acres and such has been the increase in land values that his property is worth two hundred dollars per acre. His farm is situated on section 9, Reeve township, and is now occupied and managed by his son, Wooster W. Mr. Shroyer carried on general farming and stock-raising with marked success until the time of his retirement in 1903, when he took up his abode in Hampton, where he is now enjoying the fruits of his former toil.

On the 21st Of October, 1858, was celebrated the marriage of William J. Shroyer and Miss Maria Rucker, who was born February 15, 1839, and removed from Ohio to Indiana and later came to Franklin county, Iowa, with her parents, James and Mary (Baker) Rucker, who were. farming people of Franklin county. Mr. and Mrs. Shroyer traveled life's journey together for more than a half century and were then separated by the death of the wife on the 4th of January, 1910. They were the parents of five children: Everett L., who was born December 22, 1860, and died May 10, 1887; Ella, who was born January 8, 1863, and is now the wife of V. J. Kratz; Cora, who was born February 2, 1866, and for some years was a successful teacher of the county but is now acting as housekeeper for her father; Minnie M., who was born July 2, 1871, and is the wife of B. Appleby, a farmer of Geneva township; and Wooster W., who was born July 16, 1874, and is now carrying on the home farm. There are also seven grandchildren.

Mr. Shroyer is an earnest and faithful member of the Methodist church and also belongs to the Methodist Brotherhood, a social organization of the church. His political allegiance is given to the republican party, but he is not an office seeker, preferring always that others should hold office. He, however, has been town trustee and is a member of the school board. He is a splendidly preserved man of eighty years, possessing the physical and intellectual vigor of a man in his prime. His memory forms a connecting link between the primitive past and the progressive present in his county. He still has in his possession a rocking chair which bears the date 1858, the year in which he was married. He also has a tax receipt which indicates that on the 29th of May, 1858, he paid the county treasurer eight cents, which was the tax upon a town lot in Maysville. Another interesting old paper in his possession is an invitation, dated February 2, 1858, for "himself and lady to a cotillion party at the Hampton House." Mr. Shroyer is one of but three survivors who voted at the first election held in Franklin county on the 5th of August, 1855. He possesses a remarkable memory and relates many interesting incidents and events of the early days as well as of later years, indicating the trend of growth, development and progress in this county. He has lived to see remarkable changes, for at the time of his arrival there was every evidence of frontier life, with little to indicate what the future had in store for this great and growing western country. He has ever borne his share in the work of development and progress and has long been regarded as one of the substantial and valued citizens of the community.

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Arne O. Sime

A great many Norwegians who have made their way to the United States have turned their attention to agriculture with excellent success. Among these is Arne O. Sime, who owns valuable holdings in Franklin county, most of which is located in Oakland township. Mr. Sime was born in Norway in 1833, and although eighty years of age, is still actively looking after his interests. He is a son of Ole and Anna (Johnson) Sime, Norway-born people, who came to America in 1856, locating in Wisconsin. There both passed the remainder of their lives. They were the parents of five children: Anna, deceased; Reginald, also deceased; Martha, who has passed away; Arne O., our subject; and Johanna, deceased.

Mr. Sime of this review was reared under the parental roof and under the parental care studied his lessons and became early acquainted with agricultural labors, assisting his father until the latter's death. Such education as could be had in the neighborhood of the father's farm he acquired in the country schools there. After the demise of the father, Mr. Sime went to Clear Lake, Iowa, where he remained a year and then came to Franklin county. In 1867 he bought eighty acres of land on section 6, Oakland township, and that he has been successful is evident from the fact that he now owns over nine hundred acres in Franklin and Wright counties. Mr. Sime devotes his land to general farming and stock-raising. His buildings are kept in excellent repair and modern machinery is used in the cultivation of the farm, and these methods-have brought the land to a high state of cultivation.

On December 27th, 1861, Mr. Sime married Anna Christiansen, a native of Norway, and to them were born the following children: Anna, who died in infancy; two sons, who have passed away; Anna, second of the name, who died in early girlhood; Julianna, at home; Oscar C., who operates his father's farm; Joseph S., at home; and Amos J., deceased.

Mr. Sime is a republican and for two terms served as township trustee. He is honored by all who know him for his high qualities of character, his straightforwardness and his public spirit. Although born in Norway, he has become a loyal American and a valuable citizen of his adopted county. Mr. Sime has lived to be rich in years, rich in friends and rich in the esteem of all who know him. His worth is recognized, and he is valued for what he has accomplished in life.

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Edmund Slee

Edmund Slee occupies a commodious, beautiful and attractive home on Franklin street in Hampton, where he has lived since retiring from active business life. Industry, perseverance and energy have been the salient features in his life record and have brought to him the measure of prosperity which enables him to live retired. He was born in England, July 4, 1828, and is a son of Robert and Margaret (Foster) Slee, who were natives of the same country and have long since passed away. In their family were thirteen children. This number included Elizabeth, now deceased; Edmund; Robert, who died in Hampton February 7, l912; Hislop, still living in England; and William deceased.

Edmund Slee spent his youthful days in his native land and at the age of fifteen years took up the active work of the farm. He was a young man of twenty-three years when in 1851 he became a resident of Wisconsin, having determined to try his fortune in the new world, of the advantages and opportunities of which he had heard much. For two years he lived in the Badger state and then went to California, hoping to benefit by the discovery of gold on the coast. For eight years he engaged in mining and then returned to Wisconsin, where he remained until 1864. In that year he drove an ox team from Wisconsin to Montana, thence to British Columbia and afterward returned to Montana, where he remained for fourteen years engaged in farming. In 1880 he arrived in Iowa, settling on a farm in Franklin township. For a considerable period he was identified with general agricultural pursuits here but in the evening of life disposed of all of his farm land and purchased a fine home on Franklin street, which he now occupies. His extensive travels over the west brought him wide experience and broad and interesting knowledge concerning the country, and he relates many pleasing anecdotes of his travels.

Mr. Slee was united in marriage to Miss Hannah Graham, now deceased. They were the parents of seven children: Margaret, the wife of James Sheets, of Franklin county; Alvinza, the wife of C. Koch, of Marion township; Robert Foster, also living in this county; William Albert, deceased; Ida, the wife of Fred Nancolas, formerly of Reeve township, now of Hampton; and Ella and Hannah, both at home. For his second wife Mr. Slee chose Miss Jane Robinson, and they became the parents of four children: Mary, Elizabeth, Belle and Clarrie, all at home.

A republican in politics, Mr. Slee filled the office of township trustee but has never been an office seeker, preferring to give his public service as a private citizen. In religious belief he is a Methodist, and his life has been guided by the teachings of the, church, making him an upright, honorable man; whom to know is to respect.

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Adams Smith

Adams Smith is one of the pioneer settlers of Franklin county, where he has devoted many years to agricultural pursuits. He was born in New Hampshire, a son of Eli and Caroline (Wilson) Smith, who were natives of the same state. The son was educated in the public schools there and spent his boyhood and youth under the parental roof. At the age of twenty years he left the old Granite state and, seeking the wider opportunities of the west, came to Iowa. In 1858 he took up forty acres of land in Oakland township, acquiring his title directly from the government, and since that time has been identified with farming interests in Franklin county.

It was on the 25th of June, 1858, that Mr. Smith was united in marriage to Miss Elizabeth Bigelow, a daughter of Levi and Mary (Cutter) Bigelow, who were also from New Hampshire, and on coming to Iowa settled in Oakland township, Franklin county. It was in the year 1857 that Levi Bigelow left New England and came to this state. He lived for one year at Otisville, now Dana, and in 1858 removed to Oakland Valley, where for a few years he devoted his time to farming. In the early '6os,he opened a general store and when the post office was: established he was appointed postmaster, which position he filled until his death in 1885. His wife passed away in 1873, and he was married again, his second union being with Mrs. Cordelia Gates Wilson, who lived but a few years after their marriage. They had one son, Elbert S., who is now a resident of South Dakota. By his first marriage Mr. Bigelow had five children: Levi S., Horace, and Horace, second of the name, all of whom have passed away; Elizabeth, wife of the subject of this review; and Mary, deceased.

Mrs. Smith was one of the pioneer school teachers of Franklin county, teaching the third term of school after the Oakland district was organized. However, she had already given lessons before that date and in all taught eight terms in Oakland township. After the death of her father she became postmaster at Oakland and remained in the office for fifteen years. She also conducted a general merchandise store at the same time. Mr. and Mrs. Smith have two children: Minnie R., the wife of L. K. Seaver, of Dows; and Leslie E., at home.

Mr. Smith is a republican in his political faith and has always given staunch support to the measures and candidates of that party. He is one of the prominent members of the Franklin County Agricultural Society and has been a regular attendant at the county fairs for many years. He was present fifty-three years ago when the initial fair was held and has since missed but one or two annual exhibitions. For years he has served on the board of directors and has always been loyal to the interests of the society. Although Mr. Smith is in his seventy-seventh year he is still hale and hearty and takes an interest in all affairs that affect the welfare of the community. He is still a great lover of good horses and in his time has raised a great many roadsters on his farm. He is one of the venerable and highly esteemed residents of Franklin county, to the development of which he has contributed largely by his indefatigable labor along agricultural lines.

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Frank C. Smith

Frank C. Smith, engaging in general farming and stock-raising upon the Smith homestead in Lee township, is a native son of this locality, born on the farm he is now operating, January 27, 1884. His parents, Charles A. and Marietta (Reed) Smith, were born in New York, and the father came to Iowa in 1863. He took up a homestead claim in the vicinity of Ackley, in Franklin county, and operated this until 1871, when he moved to Lee township, securing one hundred and sixty acres on section 12. He was twice married and by his first wife, who was in her maidenhood Miss Myra Crosby, had three children: two who died in infancy; and Charles S., of St. Louis, Missouri. By his second union Charles A. Smith became the father of three children: Margaret E., the wife of W. G. Bond, of Buffalo Center, Iowa; Nathan W., of Kansas City, Missouri; and Frank C., of this review. Our subject's mother's first husband was John Andrews, a native of New York. By this union she had two sons: George Andrews, a resident of Buffalo Center; and John W. Andrews, of Lee township. The father of our subject now makes his home in Wyoming county, New York, having survived his second wife since August 16, 1908.

Frank C. Smith acquired his early education in the district schools of Lee township and later attended Ellsworth College for two winters. Following this he became a student in the Cedar Valley Seminary at Osage, Iowa, graduating from that institution in 1903. Afterward he returned home and took charge of the farm, which he has since managed with great success. He is a stock-raiser on an extensive scale and intends in time to deal only in thoroughbred animals. His interests are all carefully and capably conducted and are bringing him a gratifying measure of success.

On the 16th of November, 1904, Mr. Smith was united in marriage to Miss Gertrude B. Smith, a native of Iowa, and they have three children: Howard W., born August 17, 1905; Walter E., born March 1, 1908; and Margaret Leah, born January 7, 1911.

Mr. Smith is a member of the Modern Woodmen of America and gives his political allegiance to the republican party. He is a young man of energy and ambition and he has already secured a gratifying place in agricultural circles of his native township.

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Nis Sorensen

Nis Sorensen is one of the most extensive landowners in Franklin county and is also connected with financial interests as president of the Bank of Latimer. He was born in Germany, February 13, 1853, and is a son of C. N. and Mattie Sorensen. He remained in his native country until he was eighteen years of age and then crossed the Atlantic to America, settling in Ohio, where he remained five years. At the end of that time he returned to Germany but after two years journeyed again to Ohio, making his home in that state until 1879. In that year he came to Franklin county and settled on a farm in Morgan township, operating and improving this property for twelve years thereafter. He then established himself in the hardware business in Latimer but at the end of two years turned his attention to the lumber business, following this until 1900. He has accumulated extensive landed interests, owning four hundred and forty acres in Franklin county and valuable property in North Dakota. He is connected with financial interests of Latimer as president of the Bank of Latimer and manages this institution in an able and conservative way, making it one of the leading banks in this part of the county.

On the 10th of June, 1879, Mr. Sorensen married Miss Annie B. Stork, a native of Germany, and they became the parents of seven children: Mary and Louis, deceased; C. N., of Latimer; Jake, connected with the Bank of Latimer as cashier; Andrew, at home; Mary, deceased; and a child, who died in infancy.

Mr. Sorensen is a member of the Lutheran church. He gives his political allegiance to the republican party and is now serving on the city council, lending the weight of his influence to many measures of advancement and reform. His life has been a busy, useful and active one and his success places him among the representative citizens of Latimer.

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Frederick Spangenberg

Frederick Spangenberg has been connected with agricultural interests of Franklin county since 1888, and his success in this line of work is evident in his ownership. of one of the finest farms in Marion township. He was born in Cook county, Illinois, April 6, 1858, and is a son of John and Sophia (Buholtz) Spangenberg, natives of Germany. The father came to America in 1857 and located in Cook county, Illinois, whence he moved to Delaware county, Iowa, in 1869. There his death occurred March 3, 1901, having survived his wife since 1883. To their union were born five children: Annie, the wife of William Ortman, of Clayton county, Iowa; Frederick, of this review; Louisa, deceased; Henry, of Delaware county; and Dora, who has passed away.

After the death of his mother Frederick Spangenberg joined his brother in the operation of the home farm and they continued together for two years, after which Mr. Spangenberg of this review managed the property for one year. In 1888 he came to Franklin county and rented one hundred and sixty acres in Marion township, carrying on general farming upon that place for five years. At the end of that time he bought ninety acres on section 25, Marion township, and to this later added thirty acres. He has brought the farm to its present proportions and has made extensive improvements upon the property, erecting substantial buildings and installing modern machinery. His general farming and stock-raising interests are carefully and capably conducted and are bringing him a gratifying measure of success.

On June 13, 1884, Mr. Spangenberg married Miss Minnie Specht, a native of Wisconsin, and they became the parents of three children: William, Lena and Clara, all at home. Mr. Spangenberg is a member of the Lutheran church. He is a democrat in his political views and has held a number of township offices, proving himself a capable and trustworthy official. Wherever he is known he is respected for his unfaltering allegiance to the principles of honorable manhood as manifest in his business and social relations and in public-spirited citizenship.

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State Savings Bank of Hampton

The State Savings Bank of Hampton was organized in 1905 by about fifty stockholders living in Franklin county. For seven years it has occupied the main corner in Hampton, and the position which it occupies in the community is indicated by its constant and substantial growth. It has ever acted upon the policy that a satisfied customer is the best advertisement, knowing also that the bank which most carefully safeguards the interests of its depositors is the one most worthy of public support. The following statement given at the dates mentioned to the auditor of state indicates the substantial and continuous growth of the bank:

August 4, 1904 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $ 48,827.32
August 25, 1905 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 87,546.58
May 17, 1906 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 131,707.96
December 3, 1907. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 145,610.45
December 3, 1908. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 147,728.82
May 18, 1909 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 176,627.78
September 14, 1910. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 187,004.64
February 8, 1911 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 206,438.32
June 21, 1912. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 216,105.09
April 17, 1913 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 292,105.19

The bank is capitalized for forty thousand dollars and its present officers are: Adam Messelheiser, president; S. T. Blain, vice president; O. W. Maxwell, cashier; D. C. Wolf, assistant cashier; and Robert M. Harrison, teller and second vice president.

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Andrew W. Stewart

Andrew W. Stewart still owns a valuable farm of fifty-three acres on section 22, Oakland township.. Success has come to him in response to indefatigable labor, judicious management and up-to-date methods. Mr. Stewart-was born in lower Canada, April 15, 1845, his parents being Andrew and Margaret (Evans) Stewart, natives of Ireland. The father came to America when a boy, and the parents moved to Iowa in 1870, locating in Delaware county. From there they came to Franklin county in 1880, making their home near Burdette. They have both passed away. They were the parents of fourteen children of whom seven are now living, as follows: Mary, the wife of James Lowrey, of the province of Quebec, Canada; Robert, of Iowa Falls; A. W.; George, of Colorado; Ella, the wife of Albert Story, of Idaho; Edward, of Iowa Falls; and Susan, who married William Hill, of Dixon, Missouri.

Andrew W. Stewart spent the early part of his active career on farms in Vermont, where he worked for several years during the Civil war. In 1870 he made his way to Michigan and there farmed for five years, before coming to Iowa. He became a resident of Delaware county in 1880 and later came to Franklin county, locating near Burdette, making his home there for five years. He then bought one hundred and twenty acres of land on section 22, Oakland township, of which he still owns fifty-three acres. He has brought his land to a high state of productivity and has instituted all modern improvements about his place. He engages in general farming, and his industry, energy and close application to his work have resulted in his financial independence.

On April 15, 1868, Mr. Stewart married Miss Olive F. Lee, a native of Canada, and a daughter of Edward and Betsey (Willey) Lee, the father a native of England and the mother born in Connecticut. They had eleven children, of whom five are now living, namely: William, of Boston; Malina, who married Charles Thurston, of Boston; Olive F., who is now Mrs. Andrew W. Stewart; Isabelle, the wife of J. Stevens, of Boston; and Charles R., of Toledo, Ohio. Mr. and Mrs. Stewart have three children: Cora B., who married Lee A. Montgomery, of Arkansas; Carrie, the wife of Dell Soddey, of Dows, Iowa; and Minnie E., who married J. T. Bellman, of Canastota, South Dakota.

Mr. Stewart is one of the progressive agriculturists of Franklin county and has contributed his part toward improving land values In the middle west and raising agricultural standards. He is a republican and has always done a citizen's duty faithfully, although he has never aspired to public office. Fraternally he is a member of the Ancient Order of Odd Fellows, and his religious faith is that of the Congregational church. He enjoys the confidence and goodwill of his friends and neighbors and such success as has come to him is highly merited.

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Edward Hugh Stinson

Since 1870 Edward Hugh Stinson has lived upon his present farm of two hundred acres on section 21, Hamilton township, and by his well directed efforts and intelligent management has surrounded himself with a comfortable degree of prosperity, contributing at the same time in substantial measure to community growth and development. He is numbered among the early settlers and among the prosperous and progressive farmers of his locality, and he is, moreover, entitled to representation in this volume as a veteran of the Civil war. He was born in Stephenson county, Illinois, January 24, 1842, and is a son of Michael and Elizabeth (Kelly) Stinson, natives of Ireland. The father came to America when he was eighteen years of age and, after five years returned to Ireland, where his marriage occurred. With his wife he crossed the Atlantic and settled in Vermont, whence after one year he moved to Chicago. Later he preempted a tract of eighty acres of land in Stephenson county and there remained until his death, which occurred May 4, 1895, when he was ninety-five years of age. His wife has also passed away, her death occurring April 4, 1870. To their union were born six children: Edward Hugh, of this review; Michael, a resident of Rockford, Illinois; William Francis, operating the old homestead in Stephenson county, Illinois; Mary Ellen, deceased; Nora, widow of Thomas Highland, of Lincoln, Nebraska; and Elizabeth, the wife of James Crane, of Los Angeles, California.

Edward H. Stinson remained at home until September 4, 1862, when he enlisted in Company I, Seventy-fourth Illinois Volunteer Infantry, under Captain William Irwin. He took part in many engagements and battles, including the battle of Resaca, Georgia, May 14, 1864, and was wounded in that engagement. He was afterward transferred to Company C, Thirty-sixth Infantry, Veteran Volunteers, and he had charge of the government mail from New Orleans to San Antonio, Texas. He still has his official papers signed by General Phil H. Sheridan. Mr. Stinson continued at the front until October 11, 1865, when he was mustered out with his honorable discharge at Springfield, Illinois. He returned to Stephenson county and there worked at farm labor for two years, receiving sixteen dollars a month. In 1868 he rented land near his father's homestead, chopping cordwood to earn money to pay the rent. In the same year he purchased eighty acres of land in Hamilton townships Franklin county, and in 187o he moved upon this property, adding to it from time to time until he now owns two hundred acres. He has now resided upon this place for over forty years. With characteristic energy he has carried forward the work of improving and developing his land and has made it a productive and valuable property provided with substantial buildings and modern machinery. He is ranked with the representative and progressive farmers of his locality, and his influence has been for many years a force in agricultural development.

On the 22d of February, 1874, Mr. Stinson was united in marriage to Miss Maria Underkofler, a daughter of Amos and Susan (Schoul) Underkofler, natives of Pennsylvania. Mr. and Mrs. Stinson have become the parents of seven children: Lydia Irene, the wife of A. S. Stockdale, of Hamilton township; Cora Nina, who married Fred C. Rawlston, of Meservey, Iowa; Jesse Edward, of Hampton; Ellen, the wife of Guy Booth, of Hamilton township; Ira W., of Mason City; lrvin H., at home; and Susan Viola, who married William Roach, of Bradford.

Mr. Stinson is a member of the Catholic church and is connected fraternally with the Grand Army of the Republic. He gives his political allegiance to the republican party and has taken an active interest in public affairs, having held various township offices and being now secretary of the school board. During the years of his residence here he has gained a high place in both business and social circles and well deserves mention as one of Franklin county's representative agriculturists and useful citizens.

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I. L. Stuart

I. L. Stuart, owner and editor of the Franklin County Recorder, the oldest paper in the county, became foreman of that journal in 1881 and has been identified therewith continuously since or for a period covering more than three decades. His birth occurred in Chester, Vermont, on the 27th of August, 1855, his parents being J. Q. and Lucy J. (Burton) Stuart, who removed to Wisconsin in 1867. The father still survives and is now living retired in Wisconsin, but the mother passed away in that state.

I. L. Stuart attended the common schools of Wisconsin and when fourteen years, of age entered a printing office, learning the trade. He was with the Milwaukee Sentinel for two years and in 1878 came to Iowa, locating at Charles City, where he was employed as foreman by the Floyd County Advocate until 1881. In that year he came to Hampton and was made foreman of the Franklin County Recorder, which paper he now owns. He subsequently became assistant editor under L. B. Raymond, who was his partner for twenty-six years. In 1909 he purchased Mr. Raymond's interest and has since conducted the journal independently and in such a manner that its subscription and advertising patronage is steadily increasing.

Mr. Stuart married Miss Kitty Clemmer, a representative of a pioneer family of Wisconsin. They have two children, as follows: Ralph R., who is a graduate of the law department of George Washington University; and May, a student in the University of Iowa. Mr. Stuart gives his political allegiance to the republican party and fraternally is identified with the Knights of Pythias, being a charter member of Windsor Lodge, NO. 71. He likewise belongs to Mason City Lodge No. 375, Benevolent Protective Order of Elks.

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Robert Francis Sullivan

Robert F. Sullivan
Robert F. Sullivan &
Emogene McCarty Sullivan
Emogene (McCarty) Sullivan


Robert Francis Sullivan, who passed away at Phoenix, Arizona, on the 9th of December, 1905, where he had gone in search of health, took up his abode in Franklin county in 1870 and during the long period of his residence here was variously engaged, following school teaching and farming and later being identified with the implement business and also the dry-goods trade.

Mr. Sullivan was born in Dubuque county, Iowa, on the 1st of February, 1845, his parents being John and Margaret Sullivan, the former a native of Ireland and the latter of Georgia. The period of his boyhood was spent in his native county and in the acquirement of his early education he attended the common schools, later continuing his studies at Iowa City. Subsequently he spent a few years in the west and after returning to this state taught school in Jones county. During the summers of 1868 and 1869 he resided in Franklin county, having purchased one hundred and sixty acres of prairie land in Ross township. In the winter seasons of those two years he taught school near Monticello, Jones county. One of his pupils there was Miss Emogene McCarty, whom he wedded in 1870. She was born in Watertown, New York, on the 17th of June, 1851, her parents being Hayes and Emeline (Angel) McCarty, natives of Canada and Vermont respectively. In the year of their marriage, in March, Mr. and Mrs. Robert F. Sullivan drove overland to Hampton, Franklin county, the trip consuming an entire week. Then they spent another week in Hampton while Mr. Sullivan prepared their home. It was a frame structure and was not yet completed when they took up their abode therein, the floor being not entirely laid and no doors or windows having yet been put in. Their household possessions consisted of six plates, six cups, six saucers, six chairs, a table, a bedstead and a little cook stove. During the first year they planted corn with a hand dropper, and the Marsh harvester was used to cut grain. When household duties did not require her attention, Mrs. Sullivan was often out in the fields and helped shock the grain. During several winter seasons her husband was engaged in teaching in Franklin, the schoolhouse being situated a mile from their home. She accompanied Mr. Sullivan to his school every day and remembers a visit of the old county superintendent, L. B. Raymond. There were no newspapers and no magazines in circulation here, and in her hunger for reading matter she perused her schoolbooks many times. Robert F. Sullivan had operated a threshing machine and the funds obtained from this source, added to his salary as a teacher, were such that he was enabled to begin saving a little money. He owned three horses and a wagon and had paid six dollars an acre for the quarter section of raw prairie land which first came into his possession. As time passed and his financial resources increased, owing to his untiring industry and capable management, he acquired a half section of land in Ross township and also purchased property elsewhere, in Iowa, Minnesota and Dakota. Success attended his various undertakings, for he was a man of excellent business ability and sound judgment. He devoted his attention to general agricultural pursuits for ten years and then came to Sheffield, embarking in the implement business and building up a gratifying trade in this connection. He was likewise engaged in the dry-goods business in association with his son. Impaired health at length necessitated his retirement and he went west, hoping that a change of climate would prove beneficial. While in Phoenix, Arizona, he passed away on the 9th of December, 1905.

To Mr. and Mrs. Sullivan were born eight children, as follows: Chester, who has charge of the affairs of the Rumley Manufacturing Company at Buenos Aires, South America; Leon S., who is a resident of Sheffield, Iowa; Hallie, the wife of Van R. Chase, of Alberta, Canada; Clarence F., living in Park River, North Dakota; Olive, who. gave her hand in marriage to Walter D. Bigg, of Sheffield; Eva and Lillian, who died in infancy; and Ida Pearl, who died in 1899, when twenty-five years of age. Mrs. Sullivan resides in a beautiful stucco dwelling in Sheffield. She has lived in Franklin county for a period of forty-three years and is well known and highly esteemed within its borders. In her daily life she exemplifies the teachings of the Methodist Episcopal church, of which her deceased husband was also a devoted member. Mr. Sullivan was a popular member of the local lodge of the Knights of Pythias, and his memory will long be cherished by the many who were his friends.

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Isaac Benjamin Switzer

Isaac B. Switzer
Isaac B. Switzer


Isaac Benjamin Switzer, conducting a feed and sale stable in Hampton, was born in Canada, March 10, 1865, a son of James Switzer, of whom further mention is made elsewhere in this work. When two years of age he was brought to Iowa by his parents, who established their home on what is now the Mott farm, five miles east of Hampton. Later they took up their abode in Giant township, where James Switzer passed away.

At the age of seven years Isaac B. Switzer went to make his home with his uncle, W. H. Weaver, near what was then the town of Otisville and is now known as Dows. There he remained until sixteen years of age, acquiring a common-school education. He engaged as a cattle herder and was afterwards for three years in the cheese business in Franklin county. He afterward took up farming in partnership with his brother, Julius Nelson Switzer, and was later in the livery business in Dows, Iowa. At the end of six years he became interested in the construction of township roads and after following this occupation for two years again turned his attention to agricultural pursuits. In 1904 he bought eighty acres of land in West Fork township, Franklin county, and to this added forty acres, operating the property for six years. At the end of that time he sold his holdings and moved to Hampton, where he erected a sale stable and feed barn one hundred and twenty-two by one hundred and thirty-two feet in dimensions and constructed of cement block. He has since operated this enterprise and has a large patronage, for his prices are reasonable and his business methods beyond reproach.

On the 24th of December, 1902, Mr. Switzer married Miss Sarah Way, a native of Wisconsin, and both are well known in Hampton. Mr. Switzer attends the Congregational church, of which his wife is a member. He is connected fraternally with the Modern Woodmen of America and gives his political allegiance to the republican party. He occupies a high place in business circles, and his success is the natural result of his ability and industry.

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J. Nelson Switzer

J. Nelson Switzer, carrying on general stock farming upon two hundred and forty acres of land on section 29, Geneva township, was born in the province of Toronto, Canada, April 8, 1856. He is a son of James and Mary Ann (Weaver) Switzer, the former a native of Ireland and the latter of Canada. The parents came to Iowa in 1866 and located near Ackley, in Franklin county, where the father engaged in agricultural pursuits until his death. His wife has also passed away. To their union were born six children: Phoebe Ann, the wife of William Harris, of Michigan; J. Nelson, of this review; Jennie, who married J. N. Burwell, of Mason City, Iowa; John H., of Geneva; Francis, deceased; and I. B., of Hampton.

J. Nelson Switzer came to Iowa with his parents in 1866 and grew to manhood here, acquiring his education in the public schools. At the early age of twelve he began working as a farm laborer, and he has engaged in agricultural pursuits continuously since that time. In 1903 he purchased two hundred and twenty-nine acres of land in Grant township and after seven years sold this and bought one hundred and sixty acres in Geneva township. He disposed of this in 19I3, purchasing two hundred and forty acres on section 29. This property Mr. Switzer will call the Fairview Stock Farm, and he will develop it as a general stock farm. He has erected a one hundred and thirty ton silo, a hog house, twenty by sixty feet in dimensions, and is now building a barn fifty-eight by sixty-four feet, in addition to other substantial and modern outbuildings. The farm is already one of the finest in this locality and under Mr. Switzer's able management will undoubtedly become still more productive and valuable.

Mr. Switzer married Miss Rachel Peterson, a native of Iowa, and they became the parents of two children: Mabel, who married Elmer Sawyer, of Sheffield; and Lottie, who lives at home. Mr. Switzer's first wife passed away and after her death he married Mrs. Lydia Mulnix Corbin, a native of Illinois.

Mr. Switzer is connected fraternally with the Independent Order of Odd Fellows and the Modern Woodmen of America and is a devout member of the Methodist church. His political allegiance is given to the republican party, and he has been township trustee for the past sixteen years, proving capable and reliable in the discharge of his duties. He has many friends in Franklin county, where he has so long made his home and where he has attained the success which results from industry directed by good judgment.

 

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1914 Biography Inde

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