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Orphan Train
Emmet County IAGenWeb

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Emmet County Iowa Orphan Train Information

From 1854 to 1929, over 150,000 orphaned, homeless or neglected children were uprooted from New York City and sent by "Orphan Trains" to farming communities, primarily in the Midwest, to be adopted out to good homes. The Orphan Train made one such stop in Emmet County in October of 1914.

Below you will find two, almost identical, newspaper articles about the arrival of 12 orphans from New York City and their placement with Emmet County families. The articles are dated October 23, 1914 and October 28, 1914. The articles that also list the name of the orphanage that brought them here, agents who accompanied them, names/ages of the children & names of the families who took them to raise until adulthood.


MANY HOMES MADE HAPPY
Twelve Orphans of New York City Were Given Homes Near Estherville
MORE COULD HAVE BEEN DISPOSED OF
These Children Were Placed In Some Of The Best Homes In The Vicinity

Thursday evening Miss C. B. Comstock and Miss A. L. Hill of New York who are representing the Children's Aid Society, arrived in Estherville with twelve children. On Friday afternoon at the Emmet County court house these children were placed in care of people who were very highly recommended as people who are capable of providing good homes for the orphan children.

These children are all of legitimate birth and are very bright, the youngest being two years old and the oldest, eleven. Many Estherville people were in hopes that the children would be younger but the Children's Aid Society does not believe in relieving some mothers of the responsibility of motherhood. They think a mother should raise her own children to a certain age and do not believe it a good policy for any institution to welcome little babies as it makes it too easy for some mothers to dispose of their children.

This society has found good homes for over 58,000 children. After the children are placed into homes they are visited by nurses, and if they think any child has been placed in a home where it will not receive good treatment they immediately take it in charge to see that the child is placed where it will be treated as any child should be.

The courtroom was far too small to accommodate the large crowd of sight seers, some interested, but the larger portion there for curiosity, more than anything else. Mr. and Mrs. George Swanson had strong competition for the little baby, Jean Hewett, but they were successful in having the little one placed in their care. Russell Hemstead, four years old and a brother Victor, aged six, were given to the care of Mr. and Mrs. W. J. Fisher of Wallingford, Walter Dawson, aged 8, was taken by Mr. and Mrs. Rudolph Stade of Huntington, Mabel Lampbere, age 7 will make her home with Dr. and Mrs. M. E. Wilson of this city. Hilda Anderson, aged 13, found a home with Mr. and Mrs. Claude E. Cobb. Willie Wiggers, aged 5, was given to Mr. and Mrs. W. A. McLaughlin. Sophia Anderson went to the Andrew Swanson residence. Francis Anderson will be cared for by Mr. and Mrs. A. J. Anderson of Wallingford. Marie Marquandt has not been placed. James L. Mack, aged nine, was placed near Dunnell, Mn. with Mr. and Mrs. Chas. J. Berg.

Source: Estherville paper, Estherville, Iowa, Friday, October 23, 1914.


MANY HOMES MADE HAPPY
Twelve Orphans of New York City Were Given Homes Near Estherville
These children were placed in some of the best homes in this vicinity

Thursday evening Miss C. R. Comstock and Miss A. I. Hill of New York who are representing the Children's Aid Society, arrived in Estherville with twelve children. On Friday afternoon at the Emmet County Court House these children were placed in the care of people who were very highly recommended as people who were capable of providing good homes for the orphan children.

These children are all of legitimate birth and are very bright, the youngest being two years old and the oldest is eleven. This society has found good homes for over 58,000 children. After the children are placed into homes they are visited by nurses, and if they think any child has been placed in a home where they will not receive good treatment they immediately take it in charge to see that the child is placed where it will be treated as any child should be.

The court room was far too small to accommodate the large crowd of sight seers, some interested, but the larger portion there for curiosity more than anything else.

Mr. and Mrs. George Swanson had strong competition for the little baby, Jean Hewett, but they were successful in having the little one placed in their care. Russell Hempstead, four years old and brother, Victor, aged six, were given to the care of Mr. and Mrs. W. J. Fisher of Wallingford. Walter Dawson aged eight, was taken by Mr. and Mrs. Rudolph Stade of Huntington. Mabel Lampbere, aged seven will make her home with Dr. and Mrs. M. E. Wilson of this city. Hilda Anderson, aged thirteen, found a home with Mr. and Mrs. Claude E. Cobb. Willie Wiggers, aged five, was given to Mr. and Mrs. W. A. McLaughlin. James L. Mack, aged nine, was placed near Dunnell, Mn. with Mr. and Mrs. Chas. J. Berg. Sophia Anderson went to the Andrew Swanson residence. Francis Anderson wil be cared for by Mr. and Mrs. A. J. Anderson of Wallingford. Marie Marquaid has not been placed.

Source: Estherville paper, Estherville, Iowa, October 28, 1914.