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Official Army Records

Miscellaneous-1 1861-1865

GENERAL ORDERS No. 43.

HEADQUARTERS THIRD ARMY CORPS,

October 3, 1863.

Upon the call of General Rosecrans for the services of Brigadier-General Elliott,

commanding the Third Division of this corps, which takes him from the Army of the Potomac

and from the division which he has so ably commanded, the general commanding the corps

deems it a duty to state his regret at losing so valuable an officer. General Elliott was with

General Lyon at the battle of Springfield; he commanded a cavalry brigade of Iowa and

Michigan troops on the first and successful raid of this war upon the Ohio and Mobile Railroad

at Boonville, Miss., and was engaged and wounded at the second battle of Bull Run, 1862, at the

head of his command. In connection with the services of this gallant officer, the occasion

presents itself to mention other officers of the Third Division of this corps. Colonel Keifer,

commanding Second Brigade, served under Rosecrans and Buell in Kentucky, Tennessee, and at

Corinth. In command of the One hundred and tenth Ohio, with other troops, at Winchester he

gallantly resisted attack, and on the retreat this regiment, now in this corps, assaulted the

pursuing enemy with the bayonet, crossing two walls on either side of Martinsburg pike,

reserving its fire until the regiment had crossed both walls, when the enemy were driven from

their batteries. Colonel Smith, commanding the Third Brigade, Third Division of this Third

Corps, commanded the First Ohio at the battle of Shiloh, and was tendered by the Governor of

Ollie his regiment--the One hundred and twenty-sixth Ohio. The general now commanding the

corps of Hooker, Sickles, Berry, and, as his near friend, dares to raise the shroud of the chivalric

Kearny, needs nothing further to convince the brave and intelligent soldiers of this corps that the

efforts for preference are unjust over the reputation of brother soldiers, no matter what State or

what army may claim them; when they have proved themselves true and faithful to our Union, to

our glorious flag (these troops), ought and must be admitted to the position to which by their

gallantry they are entitled.

By command of Major-General French:

JNO. M. NORVELL,

Assistant Adjutant-General.

HEADQUARTERS DEPARTMENT OF THE MISSOURI,

Saint Louis, February 5, 1862.

COMMANDING OFFICER AT CAIRO:

Send troops forward to General Grant as rapidly as possible. Fort Henry is being largely reenforced

from Bowling Green. The Fourteenth Iowa have left to-day, the Forty-third Illinois will

go to-morrow, and the Second Iowa in a few days.

H. W. HALLECK,

Major-General, Comma

SPECIAL ORDERS No. 150.

HDQRS. DEPARTMENT OF THE MISSOURI,

Saint Louis, February 18, 1862.

1. The Second Iowa and Second Michigan Cavalry will proceed toward the seat of war in

Tennessee, touching at Cairo and Paducah for orders.

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3. The troops now at or about to arrive at Saint Charles, Mo., consisting of four companies

U.S. Infantry, three companies Fourth U.S. Cavalry, five companies Thirty-ninth Ohio

Volunteers, Forty-second Regiment Illinois Volunteers, Forty-seventh Regiment Illinois

Volunteers, Fifth Regiment Iowa Volunteers, Twenty-seventh Regiment Ohio Volunteers, two

batteries First Missouri Artillery, Engineer [Bissell's] Regiment of the West, Company F, Second

Artillery, Eleventh Ohio Battery, will proceed without delay to the seat of war in Tennessee,

stopping long enough at Saint Louis to obtain a full supply of ordnance stores and touching at

Cairo and Paducah for orders.

By order of Major-General Halleck:

J. C. KELTON,

Assistant Adjutant-General

SPECIAL ORDERS No. 208.

HDQRS. DEPARTMENT OF THE MISSOURI,

Saint Louis, March 7, 1862.

7. The Sixth Iowa Infantry will immediately proceed to Tennessee, touching at Cairo and

Paducah for orders.

8. The Minnesota battery, Captain Munch, now at the Saint Louis Arsenal, will proceed

without delay and report to Maj. Gen. U.S. Grant, commanding District of West Tennessee.

By order of Major-General Halleck:

J. C. KELTON,

Assistant Adjutant-General.

SPECIAL ORDERS No. 213.

HDQRS. DEPARTMENT OF THE MISSOURI,

Saint Louis, March 8, 1862.

5. The Fifth Ohio Battery and the Eighth, Eleventh, and Thirteenth Iowa Volunteers, about to

arrive in this city, will proceed to report to Maj. Gen. U.S. Grant, touching at Cairo and Paducah

orders.

By order of Major-General Halleck:

J. C. KELTON,

Assistant Adjutant-General.

ORDERS No. 7.

HEADQUARTERS FIRST DIVISION,

March 16, 1862.

I. Col. J. A. McDowell, Sixth Iowa Volunteers, pursuant to orders from Maj. Gen. C. F.

Smith, having reported for duty, is assigned to the First Brigade, and being the senior officer,

will at once assume command of the brigade.

II. The cavalry and artillery will land as soon as practicable.

By order of Brig. Gen. W. T. Sherman:

J. H. HAMMOND,

Assistant Adjutant-General.

SPECIAL ORDERS No. 4.

HEADQUARTERS FIRST DIVISION,

March 18, 1862.

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The Eighth Iowa Volunteers, Colonel Geddes, is hereby attached to the First Brigade,

Colonel McDowell commanding. Colonel Geddes will report with his regiment to Colonel

McDowell on the lines.

By order of Brig. Gen. W. T. Sherman:

J. H. HAMMOND,

Assistant Adjutant-Genera

SPECIAL ORDERS No. 8.

HEADQUARTERS,

Pittsburg, March 19, 1862.

I. The unattached troops at this point are hereby brigaded as follows: Eighth Regiment Iowa

Volunteers is attached to Colonel Lauman's (First) brigade, General Smith's division.

II. Third Iowa Volunteers to Colonel McArthur's (Second) brigade, General Smith's division.

III. Eighty-first Ohio Volunteers to Col. John Cook's (Third) brigade, General Smith's

division.

IV. Fifth Ohio Cavalry to Colonel Hildebrand's (Third) brigade, General Sherman's division.

V. Minnesota battery, Captain Munch, to Colonel Buckland's (Fourth) brigade, General

Sherman's division. The commanding officers of the regiments and companies so attached will at

once report to their brigade commanders.

VI. Fifty-second Illinois Volunteers, Colonel McArthur's (Second) brigade, General Smith's

division.

By order of Brig. Gen. W. T. Sherman:

J. H. HAMMOND,

Assistant Adjutant-General.

SPECIAL ORDERS No. 147.

HDQRS. DEPT. OF THE MISSISSIPPI,

Saint Louis, May 2, 1862.

6. The Seventeenth Iowa and Fourth Minnesota Volunteers will proceed to Hamburg, Tenn.,

and report to Major-General Pope, without delay.

By order of Major-General Halleck:

S. M. PRESTON,

Assistant Adjutant-General.

SPECIAL ORDERS No. 50.

HEADQUARTERS FIFTH DIVISION

Army of the Tennessee, May 3, 1862.

The division will move at 7 o'clock to-morrow morning. The men will carry four days'

rations and eighty rounds of cartridges. Each regiment will also take one wagon load of

ammunition in the immediate rear. The baggage and tents will follow in a separate division train.

The order of march will be the same as in coming to this camp but the ambulances and

ammunition wagons will follow their regiments. Colonel McDowell will march at 7 a.m. by the

new road on the right of Williams', left of Moore's, to Monterey, and the right-hand road toward

Corinth. Behr's battery will take place in column behind the Sixth Iowa, and Major Taylor will

indicate another battery to follow the First Brigade; other batteries as before.

By order of Brig. Gen. W. T. Sherman:

J. H. HAMMOND,

Assistant Adjutant-General.

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SPECIAL ORDERS No. 106.

HDQRS. ARMY OF THE MISSISSIPPI,

Corinth Road, May 6, 1862.

The Third Division of this army will consist of--

First Brigade, Brig. Gen. N. B. Buford commanding: Fifth Iowa Volunteers, Colonel

Worthington; Fifty-ninth Indiana Volunteers, Colonel Alexander; Forty-eighth Indiana

Volunteers, ---- ----; Twenty-sixth Missouri Volunteers, Colonel Boomer.

Second Brigade, Col. N. Perczel commanding: Tenth Missouri Volunteers, Tenth Iowa

Volunteers, Thirtieth Ohio Volunteers, Fifty-sixth Illinois Volunteers.

By order of Major-General Pope:

SPEED BUTLER,

Assistant Adjutant-General.

GENERAL ORDERS No. 63.

HDQRS. ARMY OF THE MISSISSIPPI,

Near Danville, June 12, 1862.

The appointment of Col. W. L. Elliott, Second Iowa Cavalry, and Col. J. D. Morgan, Tenth

Illinois, as brigadier-generals, having been communicated by the major-general commanding this

department, they are announced as such to this army, and will be obeyed and respected

accordingly. Brig. Gen. J. D. Morgan will retain the command of his division. Brig. Gen. W. L.

Elliott is assigned to duty as chief of staff to the major-general commanding the Army of the

Mississippi, and all communications to these headquarters will be addressed to him.

By order of Major-General Pope:

SPEED BUTLER,

Assistant Adjutant-General.

GENERAL ORDERS No. 1.

HEADQUARTERS ARMY OF KENTUCKY,

Covington, Ky., October 7, 1862.

I. The undersigned, pursuant to Special Orders, No. 51, headquarters Department of the

Ohio, October 7, 1862, hereby assumes command of the Army of Kentucky.

II. Brig. Gen. A. J. Smith is assigned to the command of the advance forces, and will

organize it into brigades as the necessities of service may require.

III. The depot of supplies, of subsistence, forage, ordnance and ordnance stores, camp and

garrison equipage, quartermaster's property, and medical supplies will for the present be at

Covington and Cincinnati, and requisitions for the same will be made through these headquarters

upon the chiefs of the respective departments.

IV. Semi-weekly reports, on Mondays and Tuesdays, of the strength, whereabouts, and

condition of the command will be made through regimental, brigade, and division commanders

to these headquarters.

V. On all marches, scouts, reconnaissances, patrols, &c., the officer commanding the same

will be required to observe carefully the country, its roads, streams, bridges, hills, residences of

important persons, towns, cities, the direction and distances between important points, and roads

running parallel or nearly so--in fact, every topographical feature of the country that could

possibly be of benefit in a military point of view. All this must be set forth in a sketch and report

and submitted to the division commander.

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VI. Capt. F. E. Walbridge, assistant quartermaster, is temporarily assigned to duty with Brig.

Gen. A. J. Smith, and will report to him accordingly.

By order of Maj. Gen. G. Granger:

T. G. BEAHAM,

First Lieut., Second Iowa Cav., and Actg. Asst. Adjt. Gen.

GENERAL ORDERS No. 3.

HEADQUARTERS ARMY OF KENTUCKY,

Covington, Ky., October 11, 1862.

Brig. Gen. A. Baird, U.S. Volunteers, having reported for duty at these headquarters, is

hereby assigned to the command of all the troops now in and around Covington, Ky. General

Baird will, with the least possible delay, organize and get his command ready for the field.

By order of Maj. Gen. Gordon Granger:

T. G. BEAHAM,

First Lieut., Second Iowa Cav., Actg. Asst. Adjt. Gen.

GENERAL ORDERS No. 6.

HEADQUARTERS ARMY OF KENTUCKY,

Covington, Ky., October 17, 1862.

First Lieut. Thomas G. Beaham is announced as aide-de-camp and acting assistant adjutantgeneral;

Capt. J. G. Taylor and First Lieut. J. S. Fullerton, as aides-de-camp on the staff of the

general commanding the Army of Kentucky. They will be obeyed and respected accordingly.

By order of Maj. Gen. Gordon Granger:

T. G. BEAHAM,

First Lieut., Second Iowa Cav., Actg. Asst. Adjt. Gen.

Maj. Gen. HENRY W. HALLECK,

General-in-Chief U.S. Army:

GENERAL: I respectfully recommend promotion for the following officers for meritorious

services and qualifications for their advancement: Brig. Gen. C. S. Hamilton; Col. C. C. Marsh,

Twentieth Illinois; Col. M. M. Crocker, Thirteenth Iowa; Col. J. A. Mower, Eleventh Missouri;

Col. M. D. Leggett, Seventy-eighth Ohio; Col. John D. Stevenson, Seventh Missouri, and Col.

John E. Smith, Forty-fifth Illinois.

U. S. GRANT,

Major-General.

GENERAL ORDERS No. 8.

HEADQUARTERS ARMY OF KENTUCKY,

Covington, Ky., October 22, 1862.

Brig. Gen. H. M. Judah, having reported at these headquarters for duty, is announced as

inspector general of the Army of Kentucky.

By order of Maj. Gen. Gordon Granger:

T. G. BEAHAM,

First Lieut., Second Iowa Cav., and Actg. Asst. Adjt. Gen.

GENERAL ORDERS No. 14.

HEADQUARTERS ARMY OF KENTUCKY,

Lexington, Ky., November 3, 1862.

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Capt. F. E. Walbridge, assistant quartermaster, U.S. Volunteers, is announced as chief

quartermaster; Capt. G. W. Burton, commissary of subsistence, U.S. Volunteers, as chief

commissary; and Capt. W. L. Avery, Seventy-first Ohio Volunteer Infantry, as aide-de-camp on

the staff of the general commanding the Army of Kentucky. They will be obeyed and respected

accordingly.

By order of Maj. Gen. G. Granger:

T. G. BEAHAM,

First Lieut., Second Iowa Cav., and Actg. Asst. Adjt. Gen.

GENERAL ORDERS No. 15.

HEADQUARTERS ARMY OF KENTUCKY,

Lexington, Ky., November 4, 1862.

I. Passes will not be required from and after this date for citizens to pass and repass within a

circuit of ten miles from the city of Lexington.

II. Persons desirous of leaving the State, or going beyond the limits prescribed above, must

obtain passes for that purpose from the provost-marshall in this city, or from the commanders in

the immediate vicinity of their homes.

III. No citizen nor non-combatant will be permitted within the camps or lines of this army,

without special authority to that effect. This prohibition does not apply to residents already

domiciled within the lines.

IV. No officer nor soldier will be permitted to visit the city of Lexington between retreat and

reveille, except upon urgent public business--those on duty within the city excepted.

V. All officers in or about the city of Lexington, not on duty with the Army of Kentucky, will

report at these headquarters, in person, without delay.

VI. Only one commissioned officer from each regiment, and one enlisted man from each

company in this command, will be allowed to be absent from his regiment or company at anyone

time; nor will such officer or enlisted man be allowed to be so absent at any time that will in any

way interfere with regimental or company duties.

By order of Maj. Gen. G. Granger:

T. G. BEAHAM,

First Lieut., Second Iowa Cav., and Actg. Asst. Adjt. Gen.

GENERAL ORDERS No. 18.

HEADQUARTERS ARMY OF KENTUCKY,

Lexington, Ky., November 7, 1862.

Capt. H. C. Ransom, assistant quartermaster, U.S. Army, having reported for duty at these

headquarters, pursuant to Special Orders, No. 95, headquarters Department of the Ohio, is

assigned to duty with this army as chief of the quartermaster's department. He will relieve Capt.

F. E. Walbridge, as chief quartermaster, and assign him to duty as depot and post quartermaster

in this city.

By order of Maj. Gen. G. Granger:

T. G. BEAHAM,

First Lieut., Second Iowa Cav., and Actg. Asst. Adjt. Gen.

GENERAL ORDERS No. 23.

HEADQUARTERS ARMY OF KENTUCKY,

Lexington, Ky., November 17, 1862.

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Surg. William Varian, U.S. Volunteers, having reported at these headquarters for duty, is

announced as medical director of the Army of Kentucky, and will be obeyed and respected

accordingly.

By order of Maj. Gen. G. Granger:

T. G. BEAHAM,

First Lieut., Second Iowa Cav., Actg. Asst. Adjt. Gen.

GENERAL ORDERS NO. 30.

HEADQUARTERS ARMY OF KENTUCKY,

Lexington, Ky., November 28, 1862.

Lieut. and Bvt. Capt. William E. Merrill, Corps of Engineers, is hereby announced as chief

engineer of the Army of Kentucky, to date from October 12, 1862. He will be obeyed and

respected accordingly.

By order of Maj. Gen. G. Granger:

T. G. BEAHAM,

First Lieut., Second Iowa Cav., and Actg. Asst. Adjt. Gen.

GENERAL ORDERS No. 31.

HEADQUARTERS ARMY OF KENTUCKY,

Lexington, Ky., December 1, 1862.

Capt. L. D. Watkins, Fifth U.S. Cavalry, is hereby announced as chief of cavalry of the Army

of Kentucky. All returns, reports, requisitions, &c., from the cavalry will be submitted to him.

By order of Maj. Gen. G. Granger:

T. G. BEAHAM,

First Lieut., Second Iowa Cav., Actg. Asst. Adjt. Gen.

SPECIAL ORDERS No. 11.

HEADQUARTERS THIRD DIVISION,

Camp on Hurricane Creek, December 11, 1862.

I. The Twelfth Indiana Regiment, Lieutenant-Colonel Kempton, and the Twenty-seventh

Iowa Regiment, Colonel Gilbert, will, as soon as practicable, move their respective commands to

the town of Waterford, and there remaining, will report to Colonel Du Bois at Holly Springs.

II. The Thirty-third Wisconsin Regiment and Rogers' battery will, under the command of

Colonel Moore, of the Thirty-third Wisconsin Regiment, move to-morrow, the 12th instant, to

the town of Oxford, Miss., starting at the hour of 9 a.m. Arriving there, will report to Brigadier-

General Lauman, commanding Fourth Division.

By order of Brigadier-General Lauman:

H. SCOFIELD,

Assistant Adjutant-General.

GENERAL ORDERS NO. 36.

HEADQUARTERS ARMY OF KENTUCKY,

Lexington, Ky., December 19, 1862.

Deserters from the rebel service, and persons who are returning to their homes in this State--

having been followers of the rebel army, but not in the service--will, upon coming within the

limits of the Military District of Central Kentucky, report in person at these headquarters to the

major-general commanding the Army of Kentucky, and submit their respective cases to be

properly adjudged upon and disposed of. Persons included within the terms of this order who

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shall fail to observe the same will be arrested and treated as spies or as prisoners of war,

according to the circumstances of each particular case. Civil officers and loyal citizens are

requested to aid in the enforcement of this order.

By order of Maj. Gen. G. Granger:

T. G. BEAHAM,

First Lieut., Second Iowa Cav., Actg. Asst. Adjt. Gen.

GENERAL ORDERS No. 40.

HEADQUARTERS ARMY OF KENTUCKY,

Lexington, Ky., December 30, 1862.

Capt. William C. Russell, assistant adjutant-general, U.S. Volunteers, having, in obedience to

Special Orders, No. 173, headquarters Department of the Ohio, reported for duty at these

headquarters, is announced as assistant adjutant-general of this army. He will be recognized and

obeyed accordingly.

By order of Maj. Gen. G. Granger:

T. G. BEAHAM,

First Lieut., Second Iowa Cav., and Actg. Asst. Adjt. Gen.

SPECIAL ORDERS NO. 151.

HDQRS. DEPT. OF THE TENNESSEE,

Near Vicksburg, Miss., June 5, 1863.

6. The Sixty-third Regiment Illinois Infantry Volunteers, Colonel McCown commanding,

now in Major-General Logan's division, Seventeenth Army Corps, will proceed immediately and

without delay to Young's Point, La., and report for duty to Brig. Gen. E. S. Dennis, commanding.

Land transportation, camp and garrison equipage, will be taken. Immediately upon the arrival of

the Sixty-third Illinois Volunteers, the Twenty-third Iowa Volunteers will proceed to join their

proper brigade in the Thirteenth Army Corps. The quartermaster's department will furnish

necessary transportation by river.

By order of Maj. Gen. U.S. Grant:

JNO. A. RAWLINS,

Assistant Adjutant-General.

HEADQUARTERS NINTH ARMY CORPS,

Milldale, Miss., June 22, 1863.

Major-General GRANT:

One of the cavalrymen sent out this morning on patrol has returned and reported that a

detachment of the Fourth Iowa Cavalry out beyond Bear Creek, blockading roads, were attacked

by a force of 1,000 cavalry and driven back to this side of the creek. Two hundred of our men are

reported missing. The rebels have not yet crossed. Re-enforcements have been sent out.

J. G. PARKE,

Major-General.

SPECIAL ORDERS No. 191.

HDQRS. DEPT. OF THE TENNESSEE,

Vicksburg, Miss., July 15, 1863.

4. Brig. Gen. J. G. Lauman, U.S. Volunteers, will proceed to the State of Iowa and there

await orders. He will take with him his personal staff.

By order of Maj. Gen. U.S. Grant:

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JNO. A. RAWLINS,

Assistant Adjutant-General.

HEADQUARTERS DEPARTMENT OF TENNESSEE,

Vicksburg, July 27, 1863.

General L. THOMAS,

Washington, D.C.:

I would very respectfully recommend for gallant and meritorious services and for extreme

fitness for command corresponding to the increased rank the following promotions, to wit: Brig.

Gen. Grenville M. Dodge, Brig. Gen. Alvin P. Hovey, Brig. Gen. John E. Smith, and Brig. Gen.

W. S. Smith, to be major-generals of volunteers; and Col. Charles R. Woods, Seventy-sixth

Ohio; Col. Alexander Chambers, Sixteenth Iowa; Lieut. Col. John A. Rawlins, assistant adjutantgeneral;

Col. Giles A. Smith, Eighth Missouri; Col. John M. Corse, Sixth Iowa; Col. John B.

Sanborn, Fourth Minnesota; Col. W. Q. Gresham, Fifty-third Indiana; Col. M. F. Force,

Twentieth Ohio; Col. T. Kilby Smith, Fifty-fourth Ohio, to be brigadier-generals of volunteers.

These officers have all rendered valuable services in the field and will fill the places for which

they are recommended well. Lieut. Col. John A. Rawlins has been my assistant adjutant-general

from the beginning of the rebellion. No officer has won a more honorable reputation than he has,

and I think I can safely say that he would make a good corps commander. This promotion I

would particularly ask as a reward of merit.

U.S. GRANT,

Major-General.

SPECIAL ORDERS No. 209.

HDQRS. DEPT. OF THE TENNESSEE,

Vicksburg, Miss., August 2, 1863.

4. The Second Regiment Wisconsin Cavalry Volunteers is hereby temporarily assigned to the

Seventeenth Army Corps, Maj. Gen. James B. McPherson commanding, and will report

accordingly.

5. The Third and Fourth Regiments Iowa Cavalry and the Fifth Illinois Cavalry are hereby

temporarily assigned to the Fifteenth Army Corps, Maj. Gen. W. T. Sherman commanding, and

will report accordingly.

By order of Maj. Gen. U.S. Grant:

T. S. BOWERS,

Acting Assistant Adjutant-General.

GENERAL ORDERS No. 13.

HDQRS. SEVENTEENTH ARMY CORPS,

DEPARTMENT OF THE TENNESSEE,

Vicksburg, Miss., April 4, 1864.

(Excerpts)

Private Aaron P. Gilbert, A Company, Fifth Iowa Infantry, medal of gold, inscribed, "New

Madrid, Island No. 10, Siege of Corinth, Iuka, Corinth, Vicksburg."

Capt. J. Henry Smith, A Company, Sixteenth Iowa Infantry, medal of silver, inscribed,

"Shiloh, Iuka, Corinth, Vicksburg."

Second Lieut. Samuel Duffin, K Company, Sixteenth Iowa Infantry, medal of gold,

inscribed, "Iuka, Corinth, Vicksburg."

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The general commanding is requested by the board to state that a large number of medals

intended for the several divisions of this corps yet remain to be distributed, upon the

recommendation of commanding officers, who are hereby directed to forward to the board the

names of officers and men whom they deem entitled to wear this badge of distinction for

"gallantry in action and other soldierly qualities."

By order of Maj. Gen. James B. McPherson:

W. T. CLARK,

Assistant Adjutant-General

HDQRS. SECOND BRIG, THIRD DIV., FIFTEENTH ARMY CORPS,

Savannah, Ga., January 6, 1865.

Maj. Gen. WILLIAM T. SHERMAN,

Comdg. the Mil. Div. of the Mississippi, Savannah, Ga.:

GENERAL: You no doubt remember our conversation at Cartersville, Ga., in September last,

in reference to your report of the battle of Mission Ridge, and the part my command took in that

battle. Acting upon your suggestion, I address you this note for the purpose of putting upon paper

the statements I then made to you. I was ordered to support General Matthies, whose brigade was

closely engaged with the enemy near the crest of the hill to the left of the tunnel. I went forward

at the double-quick, in two lines, under a sharp artillery fire. I formed the Seventeenth Iowa and

Eightieth Ohio Volunteers behind the fence, on the upper side of the field, and the Fifty-sixth

Illinois and Tenth Missouri Volunteers in the road at the foot of the hill. A short time after these

dispositions were made I received information that General Matthies' brigade was running short

of ammunition. I at once ordered the Seventeenth Iowa and Eightieth Ohio forward, intending to

relieve the troops in front. At this juncture the enemy, massing a considerable force upon the

right flank of Matthies' brigade, made a furious attack upon him. I was with my advance troops,

and therefore could not see what was going on around the point of the hill. My men had not

advanced more than forty yards beyond the fence when I discovered that Matthies' right had been

forced back, carrying mine with it, and that the enemy had actually passed to our rear on the

right, while they were making a vigorous attack in front. The disorder on the right communicated

rapidly, and in a few moments the entire line gave way, and was reformed again as indicated in

your report. The enemy pursued and formed an irregular line below the upper fence. My second

line, composed of the Fifty-sixth Illinois and Tenth Missouri Volunteers, stood firm, engaged the

enemy with spirit, and forced him to retire to his works upon the hill. It was whilst directing the

fire of these two regiments that I was wounded. I did not leave the field, however, until the

engagement was over, so that what I have stated is from my personal knowledge. When I read

your report I supposed that from your position on the hill you were unable to see my reserve

line, and seeing the enemy retire, that it naturally occurred to you that the troops on the left had

driven them back. In making the foregoing statements I do not detract from the just meed of

praise to General Lightburn's command, for at Mission Ridge there was glory enough for all. I

have observed that the Army and Navy Journal, in commenting upon that battle, has followed

your report, thus carrying an error into history. With these statements I leave the matter with you

to make such addenda as will do justice to the living and the dead.

I have the honor to be, general, very respectfully, your friend and obedient servant,

GREEN B. RAUM,

Brevet Brigadier-General.

the Seventh Iowa Infantry to the front to support a battery of Major Cavender's rifled 20-

pounder Parrott guns, which were placed in a position to command a portion of the rebel works. I

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obtained permission from you to associate the regiment of Birge's Sharpshooters in the

movement, and placed the two regiments in position, where they remained during the night.

In accordance with your orders on the morning of Thursday, the 13th instant, I moved the left

wing of my brigade, consisting of the Fourteenth Iowa (Colonel Shaw) and Twenty-fifth Indiana

(Colonel Veatch), from their encampment toward the enemy, who were intrenched about a mile

distant therefrom. The advance was made steadily and in as good order as the nature of the

ground would admit of until we reached the ravine at the base of the hill on which were the

enemy's fortifications. Here we halted until the line could be formed, when the Twenty-fifth

Indiana, under Colonel Veatch, moved steadily up the hill and toward the intrenchments under a

most galling fire of musketry and grape, until their onward progress was obstructed by the fallen

timber and brushwood. Having, however, succeeded in gaining an advantageous position, they

held it unflinchingly for more than two hours, and until ordered to fall back out of range of the

enemy's fire. The loss of this regiment in killed and wounded was very severe. The Fourteenth

Iowa advanced at the same time and took position on the right and across a ravine, and did good

execution. Whilst these two regiments were taking the above positions, the Seventh Iowa

Infantry, under Lieutenant-Colonel Parrott, came up in fine style and took a position in the

center, between the Twenty-fifth Indiana and the Fourteenth Iowa. The First Regiment

Sharpshooters, Western Division, Lieut. Col. B. S. Compton, were posted on the hill to the

extreme right, except a detachment of about sixty who were deployed as skirmishers, and

rendered most effective service in that capacity, and proving by their deadly aim that they are a

most valuable arm of the service. We held this position until night, when we fell back to the

position occupied in the morning. On the following day we remained in camp skirmishing with

the rebels during the day and night. On Saturday, the 15th instant, at about 2 o'clock, I received

your order to advance with my whole brigade and assault the heights on the left of the position

attacked by us on the previous Thursday. The brigade was promptly in motion in the following

order: The Second Iowa. Colonel Tuttle, led the advance, followed by the Fifty-second Indiana

(temporarily attached to my brigade), who were ordered to support them. This regiment was

followed closely by the Twenty fifth Indiana, the Seventh Iowa, and the Fourteenth Iowa. The

Sharpshooters were previously deployed as skirmishers on our extreme right and left. Colonel

Tuttle led the left wing of his regiment in line of battle up the hill, supported by the right wing,

advancing at a distance of about 150 yards in the rear. So soon as he came within range of the

enemy's fire he led his men forward, without firing a gun, up to and charged into the rebels'

works, driving the enemy before him and planting his colors on their fortifications. He was

closely followed by the other regiments in the order of advance before named. The enemy was

closely pursued and driven behind their inner works. Night coming on, we held the position we

had gained, and remained under arms until morning, intending at dawn of day to recommence

the attack. In this engagement the Second Iowa suffered terribly. Captains Slaymaker and

Cloutman fell just as they entered the fortification. Cloutman was instantly killed; Slaymaker

died gallantly, shouting to his men to go forward and consummate the work.

In the morning, as day dawned, we were attracted to the inner fortifications by the sound of a

bugle, and saw the rebels displaying a white flag. I instantly dispatched Lieutenant-Colonel

Parrott to ascertain the intent of it, who reported that an officer wished to see me. I repaired to

the spot and received from him offers of capitulation, which I at once forwarded to you. The

result is well known. It would afford me much pleasure to particularize the various instances of

personal bravery displayed on the occasion by officers under my command, but when all

behaved so well it would be invidious to particularize; but I cannot refrain from mentioning in

this connection the bravery of Colonel Tuttle, Lieutenant-Colonel Baker, and Major Chipman

(who received a severe wound in the thigh), of the Second Iowa; Colonel Veatch and

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Lieutenant-Colonel Morgan, of the Twenty-fifth Indiana, and Colonel Shaw, of the Fourteenth

Iowa; also Lieutenant-Colonel Parrott and Major Rice, who led the Seventh Iowa, and to whom I

return my warmest acknowledgments for the gallant manner in which they led their regiment into

the engagement on the 13th and 15th. They did all that men could do, and well sustained the

reputation of the Seventh Iowa. For the kindness, attention, and skill manifested by the surgeons

and assistant surgeons for so many consecutive hours toward the unfortunate wounded I return

my most sincere thanks.

The total loss in killed and wounded is as follows: Second Regiment Iowa Infantry

Volunteers--Killed, 41; wounded, 157; total, 198. Twenty-fifth Regiment Indiana Volunteers--

Killed, 14; wounded, 101; total, 115. Seventh Regiment Iowa Infantry--Killed, 2; wounded, 37;

total, 39. Fourteenth Regiment Iowa Infantry--Killed, 3; wounded, 23; total, 26. First Regiment

Sharpshooters--Killed, l; wounded, 3; missing, 1; total, 5. Recapitulation--Whole number killed,

61; whole number wounded, 321; whole number missing, 1; total, 383.

I herewith append the reports of the colonels of regiments attached to my brigade, to which I

invite your particular attention.

With sentiments of high regard, I remain, respectfully, your obedient servant,

J. G. LAUMAN,

Colonel, Commanding Fourth Brigade, Second Division.

Brig. Gen. C. F. SMITH,

Commanding Second Division.

HDQRS. SECOND DIV., DIST. OF WEST TENNESSEE,

Pittsburg, Tenn., March 29, 1862.

SIR: I present to the major-general commanding the district the following as the report of the

operations of my division during the attack on Fort Donelson:

The First Brigade, commanded by Colonel McArthur, Ninth [Twelfth] Illinois, consisting of

the Ninth, Twelfth, and Forty-first Illinois Infantry, was detached during almost the entire period

of our three days' operations, and hence its service did not come under my personal notice, save

to a very limited extent. It is well known to me, however, they did gallant service; and as no

official notice has been taken of this, so far as I am aware, I take pleasure in transmitting

herewith the reports of the regimental commanders, with a list of the casualties in the brigade,

amounting to 70 killed and 340 wounded. The Second Brigade, commanded by Col. Morgan L.

Smith, of the Eighth Missouri, consisting of his own regiment and the Eleventh Indiana, was in

like manner detached, and, as the report of General Wallace indicates, performed most

distinguished service. Company C of the Second (Captain F[arrand]) and I of the Fourth Regular

Cavalry (Lieutenant Powell)--the squadron commanded by the former--belonging to the division,

were detached from it from before the fall of Fort Henry until after the fall of Fort Donelson. It is

within my knowledge they did gallant and effective service, for which they have thus far

received no credit. I take pleasure, therefore, in transmitting with this the report of Lieutenant

Powell (Captain F[arrand] being absent on account of ill health), and commending both officers

to the favorable notice of the Government.

That part of the division under my immediate orders was organized as follows: The Third

Brigade, commanded by Col. John Cook, Seventh Illinois, consisted of his own regiment,

commanded by Lieutenant-Colonel Babcock; Fiftieth Illinois, Colonel Bane; Twelfth Iowa,

Colonel Woods; Fifty-second Indiana, Colonel Smith, and Thirteenth Missouri, Colonel Wright.

The Fourth Brigade, commanded by Colonel Lauman, Seventh Iowa, consisting of his own

regiment, commanded by Lieutenant-Colonel Parrott; Second Iowa, Colonel Tuttle; Fourteenth

Iowa, Colonel Shaw; Twenty-fifth Indiana, Colonel Veatch, and Sixteenth [Fourteenth] Missouri

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(commonly called Western Sharpshooters), Lieutenant-Colonel Compton. The Second Battalion,

First Missouri Light Artillery, commanded by Major Cavender, consisting of three batteries of

four Parrott guns each--10 and 20 pounders--commanded, respectively, by Captains Welker,

Richardson, and Stone. Arriving on the evening of February 12 at short distance from the outwork

of the enemy on his right, the investment of the place was partially commenced by

throwing the Fourth Brigade on our left and the Third Brigade on its right, joining the First

Division on the right with the First (McArthur's) Brigade in reserve, with a battery in advance on

the road leading to Dover and Fort Donelson. Early on the following morning (13th) the

regiments were posted in order of investment in easy cannon-range of the enemy's line of

defense from the west--his extreme right--to the south, a somewhat central position with

reference to that line, going as far as possible to the left of the First Division. The ground

covered by the division was thickly wooded and exceedingly hilly and broken. The enemy's

works were on the highest ground in the vicinity. He had an infantry breast-work in front of his

main line (vaguely called rifle-pits), crested with logs, from under which they fired, the whole

strengthened by a wide abatis from felled timber of large size. Ignorant of the ground, we had to

feel our way cautiously. As soon as the regiments were measurably in position, orders were

given to brigade commanders to cover our front of attack with as many skirmishers as possible,

well supported by their regiments, keeping a strong reserve; to press forward as steadily and

rapidly as the ground would admit, and, if the opportunity offered, to assault with the bayonet.

During this time Major Cavender's batteries, by sections or pieces, were posted to the best

apparent advantage, well supported, with orders to open on the enemy. This was handsomely

done and quick response made. Our pieces were shifted from time to time, and served with good

effect, better, as we afterward knew from the enemy, than was suspected; their long ranges

sending shells into the fort and causing sharp loss and great moral effect. Our casualties were

numerous on this day. The reports of the different commanders, partially confirmed by my

personal observations, satisfied me that an assault on almost any part of the entire front covered

by us was not practicable without enormous sacrifice of life. At nightfall the skirmishers were

recalled and the troops ordered to remain in position, but from necessity without fires, as the

night was very inclement--rainy, snow, sleet, and cold--and the discomfort of the men was very

great. On the next day (14th) the same system of annoyance was kept up, but, under the orders of

the commanding general, to a more limited extent. At nightfall the advance parties were recalled

as before. Our casualties on this day were not so numerous as on the day before. The night

inclement as before, with the same discomfort. During the course of this day I made a personal

reconnaissance of the ground on our extreme left and satisfied myself that the only apparent

practicable point of assault was in that quarter, the enemy's extreme right being protected by an

impassable slough, which fact was communicated to the commanding general. Under the orders

of the commanding general the division remained quiet on the next day (15th), except to keep up

the annoyance by skirmishers and slow artillery fire, until toward 3 o'clock p.m., when I received

the general's personal order to assault the enemy's right, a half mile or more from my habitual

position. On the receipt of the order the artillery was ordered to open heavily and the brigade

commanders to press forward with large numbers of skirmishers, and make a dash at any

available opening, whilst the Second Iowa, supported by the Fifty-second Indiana (belonging to

the Third Brigade, but which had been posted to guard the left), Twenty-fifth Indiana, Twelfth

Iowa, &c., was ordered to lead the assault. The regiment was ordered to rely on the bayonet and

not to are a shot until the enemy's ranks were broken. Right gallantly was the duty performed.

The left wing of the regiment, under its colonel (Tuttle), moved steadily over the open space,

down the ravine, and up the rough ground, covered with heavy timber, in unbroken line,

regardless of the fire poured into it, and paused not until the enemy broke and fled. It was

14

quickly followed by the other wing, under Lieutenant-Colonel Baker, in the same manner, the

united body pursuing the enemy through their encampment and toward the enemy's works just

above, where they skirmished for a considerable time. The movement of this regiment was a

very handsome exhibition of soldierly conduct.

The Fifty-second Indiana, ordered to follow and support the Second Iowa, from the nature of

the ground and want of tactical knowledge, instead of going to the left, as I had intended, came

up [in] confusion, and instead of moving forward, remained behind the earth-work just taken,

from where, and from some unexplained cause, fired a number of fatal shots into their friends in

front. They remained in this position until ordered to reform in the rear. The Twenty-fifth

Indiana, following in order, moved in advance to the support of the Second Iowa, and covered it

when that regiment, for want of cartridges, retired behind the intrenchments just taken from reenforcements

of the enemy. As soon as the out-work was taken I sent for a section of Stone's

battery, which soon arrived and opened upon the enemy with happy effect, silencing a heavy gun

(24-pounder). Meantime the regiments of the Third (Cook's) Brigade arrived, but as it was

getting late I deemed it better to dispose of the troops for the night and be in readiness for a

renewed assault on the morrow, the crest of the enemy's works being only some 400 yards

distant and the ground more or less favorable. Increasing the artillery on the ground just taken by

a couple of 20-pounder Parrott guns, the Fourth Brigade was disposed to guard the position, with

the Third Brigade in reserve several hundred yards in rear. The Ninth and Twelfth Illinois (First

Brigade)having reported at this time, the latter was thrown forward around the base of the hill

toward the enemy's main work, the Ninth remaining in reserve. The night very cold, but without

the cruel storm.

ASSISTANT ADJUTANT-GENERAL,

Hdqrs. District of West Tennessee, Savannah, Tenn.

[The foregoing is a true copy of the original pencil draft of General C. F. Smith's report,

unfinished and unsigned. General Smith died April 25, 1862.]

g there, under charge of First Lieut. W. G. McElrea, Company A, Fifth Iowa Infantry:

The train left the landing early on the morning of the 6th with a guard of one corporal and

twelve men from the several regiments of the brigade. Soon after leaving Lieutenant McElrea

learned of the capture of a picket at the landing the night previous, and on arriving near the

church, three miles out, lie discovered a cavalry picket in the roads when he deployed his men

and advanced. He soon discovered a force of about sixty men with two mountain howitzers,

when he halted and sent back for re-enforcements to the hospital. When they arrived, twentyseven

in number, he deployed and advanced. The right of the line fired and dismounted one man,

and the force retreated rapidly. He then advanced with his own guard and train about three

miles, when he met the Sixth Missouri Cavalry, who proceeded after the enemy in the direction

they retreated. He also learned that this was the same force that captured several ambulances the

day previous. He remained last night at Port Gibson and met with no further difficulty. I consider

Lieutenant McElrea entitled to great credit for bringing his train through safely with so small a

force.

Very respectfully,

GEO. B. BOOMER,

Colonel, Commanding.

Capt. M. ROCHESTER,

Assistant Adjutant-General, Seventh Division.

HEADQUARTERS SEVENTH IOWA VETERAN INFANTRY,

15

In the Field, near Kingston, Ga., May 20, 1864.

SIR: I have the honor to submit the following report of the part taken by the Seventh Iowa

Veteran Infantry in the engagement on Oostenaula River May 15, 1864:

Our gallant lieutenant-colonel, J. C. Parrott, having been quite unwell for several days, and

feeling worse on the morning of the 15th of May--I regret very much that his health would not

permit him to be with us--turned the command of the regiment over to me. Orders were received

from Col. E. W. Rice, commanding First Brigade, about 7 a.m., to move toward the Oostenaula

River, distant some three miles. When within half a mile of the river I was ordered by Col. E. W.

Rice, through you, to move by the flank into the field on the right of the road in rear of Company

H, First Missouri Light Artillery, to deploy the right wing of the regiment as skirmishers, leaving

the left wing, commanded by Captain Hedges, acting field officer, to support the battery, and

move forward across the field to the river and open a brisk fire on the enemy in case he

attempted to interfere with the pioneers who were laying a pontoon bridge across the river. The

right wing moved in good order on the double-quick, deploying as they advanced. When they

arrived at the river no enemy was in sight. Shortly after I received orders to bring up the left

wing and be in readiness to cross over as soon as the Sixty-sixth Indiana Infantry should all be

across. While the regiment above mentioned was crossing in boats the pontoon bridge was

constructed, and I marched across upon this and formed in line on the right of the road. Orders

were soon received to move the Seventh Iowa forward through the timber in the direction of

Frick's house, about one-fourth of a mile distant, to feel for and engage the enemy, if not in too

strong force. Companies B and F were deployed as skirmishers, under command of Captain

Mahon, to cover the regiment, and moved forward, the regiment conforming to their movements.

When within a short distance of the house the skirmishers' line encountered a large force of the

enemy, and receiving a heavy fire fell back gradually and in good order to the regiment for

support, the regiment moving forward cautiously the while, till they, too, came upon a brigade of

the enemy, and opened a brisk fire and received one in return. Here the enthusiasm was intense,

the men rushing forward, cheering as they charged. About this time I received orders to fall back

gradually, but found much difficulty in communicating this order amidst the heavy firing and

loud cheering. Accordingly the line pushed forward until the enemy was routed and the firing in

a measure ceased. The whole line now fell back a little, where it remained till ordered to fall

back to the river.

It affords me great pleasure to say that the conduct of officers and men, with a very few

exceptions, was unexceptionable, the recruits exhibiting the coolness and courage of veterans.

The following are the names of commissioned officers of the regiment present and absent: Col.

Elliott W. Rice, commanding First Brigade, Second Division, Sixteenth Army Corps; Lieut. Col.

James C. Parrott, sick in field hospital; Maj. J. W. McMullin, commanding the regiment;

Quartermaster C. H. Trott, present; D. T. Bowler, acting assistant adjutant-general, First Brigade,

Second Division, on the field; Surg. J. Everingham, on operating board; Asst. Surg. John Ashton,

on the field; Capt. W. W. De Heus, detached on General Dodge's staff; Capt. R. G. Reineger,

commanding detachment, left at Prospect, Tenn.; Capt. G. J. Bennett, present; Capt. Ben. B.

Gale, present; Capt. T. L. Montgomery, present; Capt. C. F. Conn, present; Capt. Benj. S.

Barbour, present; Capt. Samuel Mahon, present; Capt. J. F. Warner, absent on leave of absence

in Iowa; Capt. C. Hedges, present; First Lieut. A. W. Springer, present; First Lieut. S. P. Folsom,

present; First Lieut. W. H. Berkey, present, commanding Company G; First Lieut. J. B.

Morrison, present, aide-de-camp, First Brigade, Second Division, Sixteenth Army Corps; First

Lieut. J. L. Bess, detailed in pioneer corps; First Lieut. C. D. Dillin, prisoner of war at

Richmond; First Lieut. T. N. Barnes, aide-de-camp to General Lauman; First Lieut. R. N.

Graham, present; First Lieut. F. A. Irwin, detailed in signal corps; First Lieut. M. Wightman,

16

present; Second Lieut. Thomas W. Eichelberger, absent, commanding detachment at Tunnel

Trestle; Second Lieut. H. I. Smith, present; Second Lieut. S. Helmick, present; Second Lieut.

John McCormick, present; Second Lieut. Charles J. Sergent, present; Second Lieut. W. Camp,

absent, complained of being sick; Second Lieut. T. Spence, present. Exceptions: Thomas

Tredick, Company C, fell back demoralized during the fight. Corpl. Nicholas Gross, Company

D, color guard, cowardly deserted his post. Private William H. Wortman, Company F, behaved

well till ordered back, then deserted his post and was not seen till evening. Private David Yates,

Company K, deserted his post and has not since returned. With these few exceptions officers and

men are entitled to great credit. Number engaged: Commissioned officers, 21; enlisted men,

431. Casualties: Killed--enlisted men, 3; wounded--1 commissioned officer and 49 enlisted men-

-4 mortally, since died. Prisoners captured during the engagement, 23, nine of whom were

wounded.

JAMES W. McMULLIN,

Major, Commanding Seventh Iowa Veteran Infantry.

D. T. BOWLER,

Actg. Asst. Adjt. Gen., 1st Brig., 2d Div., 16th Army Corps.

HDQRS. 100TH REGT. INDIANA VOLUNTEER INFANTRY,

Savannah, Ga., January 3, 1865.

SIR: I have the honor to respectfully report the following as the part performed by the One

hundredth Regiment Indiana Volunteer Infantry, Second Brigade, First Division, Fifteenth Army

Corps, Department and Army of the Tennessee, in the great campaign of the Federal forces

commanded by Maj. Gen. William T. Sherman, from Atlanta to Savannah, Ga.:

In obedience to orders from headquarters Second Brigade, First Division, Fifteenth Army

Corps, the One hundredth Regiment Indiana Volunteer Infantry broke camp at Atlanta, Ga., at 6

a.m. November 15, 1864, and in conjunction with the remaining forces of the command moved

toward McDonough, the county seat of Henry County, Ga., marching the distance of twenty

miles. From thence forward our operations run as follows: November 16, marched at 7 a.m.;

passed through McDonough at 4 p.m., and encamped at 6 p.m., having marched sixteen miles.

November 17, marched at 1 p.m., and encamped on Indian Springs road at 11 p.m., having

marched fourteen miles. November 18, marched at 7 a.m. and encamped at Indian Springs,

having marched five miles. My regiment was placed upon provost duty in the town. November

19, marched at 10 a.m., crossing the Ocmulgee River on pontoon bridge near the Ocmulgee

Mills, and bivouacked at 2 a.m. 20th November on the Hillsborough road, having marched

fifteen miles through the rain and over the worst of roads. November 20, marched at 7 a.m.,

passing to the right of Hillsborough, in Jasper County, and Tranquilla, of Jones County;

encamped near Clinton, county seat of Jones County, having marched fourteen miles. November

21, marched at 6.30 a.m., passing through Clinton, county seat of Jones County, and reaching the

Macon and Savannah Railroad, crossed the same and encamped between Griswoldville and

Gordon on the railroad, having marched eighteen miles. November 22, the Second Brigade, First

Division, Fifteenth Army Corps, to which my regiment is attached, having been ordered to make

a reconnaissance for the purpose of showing to the enemy a column of infantry moving toward

Macon, Ga., I moved the One hundredth Regiment Indiana Volunteer Infantry from their place

of bivouac at 6 a.m. and joined the column of the brigade on the Griswoldville and Macon road,

occupying my assigned place in the column. The column moved forward on the above-named

road some two miles, when we encountered the enemy's cavalry in strong force posted upon

Duncan's farm on the left of the railroad, proceeding toward Macon. We soon drove them from

this position, and as they retreated the column moved forward, driving the enemy before us some

17

two miles and a half, when, upon being informed by the major-general commanding the

Fifteenth Army Corps that the object of our reconnaissance was obtained, the command was

ordered to fall back and take up a position on Duncan's farm and remain there until the remaining

troops of the column and trains passed by, and then act as rear-guard to the entire column.

Having arrived at the point designated upon Duncan's farm, we formed line of battle covering the

Macon road, with our flanks resting in the timber while our front and center was in the open

field. The regiments composing the command were assigned positions on the line as follows: On

the right of the road were placed the Sixth Iowa Infantry, One hundred and third Illinois Infantry,

and Ninety-seventh Indiana Infantry; on the left of the road were posted the Fortieth Illinois

Infantry, One hundredth Regiment Indiana Volunteer Infantry, and Forty-sixth Ohio Infantry,

while in the center and on the road the section of artillery which had accompanied the brigade

took up a position. Having formed line and taken up the position assigned me, I immediately

directed my men to build slight barricades of rails to guard as a precaution against any

contingency that might arise, and then to get dinner, previously, however, covering my front with

skirmishers to give warning of the approach of the enemy in time to be ready to meet him.

In less than an hour after getting into position, as above stated, our skirmishers became

engaged with the advance of the enemy, who was moving upon us, and it soon became apparent

that a heavy battle must ensue, as it was evident the enemy intended to endeavor to drive us from

our position, and with that view had formed in heavy force upon our front and opened upon our

barricades with four pieces of artillery. Brig. Gen. Charles C. Walcutt, commanding Second

Brigade, First Division, Fifteenth Army Corps, perceiving this, ordered me to take the three right

companies of my regiment and support the section of the First Michigan Battery, occupying the

center of the line, which order I immediately obeyed. I had no sooner done this than from the

maneuvering of the enemy it became apparent that he would endeavor to turn our extreme right

flank, and to checkmate him there, General Walcutt ordered me to withdraw three more

companies of my regiment from the left flank, and putting them in position on the extreme right

flank, take charge of that end of the line, and at all hazards hold the enemy at bay at that point. I

accordingly moved Companies A, B, and C of my regiment to the extreme right of the brigade

line, and placing Companies A and C on the line, deployed Company B as skirmishers to extend

the line to the right, instructing the men to shelter themselves behind trees and to hold their

positions at all hazards. Companies I, K, and H, having been placed in the center of the brigade

line, and the Forty-sixth Ohio Volunteer Infantry having, by order of General Walcutt,

previously moved to the right, I had only Companies D, E, F, and G of my regiment with which

to hold what had been the line occupied by the One hundredth Regiment Indiana Volunteer

Infantry and the Forty-sixth Ohio Volunteer Infantry. These companies I deployed along the

works so as to cover the two regimental fronts, and placed them in command of Edwin

Goldsmith, lieutenant and adjutant, who managed them admirably during the remainder of the

day. The three companies in the center I placed under the immediate command of Capt. John W.

Headington, and he continued to manage them during the remainder of the fight with skill and

sound discretion. On the right flank my men were much exposed, having no works to shelter

themselves; but the ground being rather favorable, I succeeded in checking the enemy so

suddenly in his effort to turn our line that he did not afterward attempt seriously to get around

our flank, nor did he even have time to discover the strength of our line or number of our forces

at that point. In this engagement, which lasted from 1 o'clock until dark, the enemy made some

seven distinct assaults upon our lines, and was handsomely repulsed with heavy loss on his part

each time. Toward evening I received an order from Col. R. F. Catterson, Ninety-seventh Indiana

Infantry, who in the meantime had assumed command of the brigade, owing to Brigadier-

General Walcutt's having been wounded, to be ready with a heavy skirmish line in my front to

18

charge the enemy at the sound of the bugle, and to bring in such of the enemy as had remained

behind in the last repulse and taken shelter under the cover of a ravine which ran along our front.

This movement was accordingly executed, and resulted in the capture of several prisoners, most

of whom were wounded. We found a considerable number of small-arms, which I had brought in

and turned over to the brigade commander, and the wounded prisoners were sent back to the

hospital for care and treatment. After the close of the fight and the gathering up of all the

prisoners obtainable, and property left by the enemy on the field, in Obedience to orders received

we withdrew from the works and rejoined the column some three miles in our rear, and

encamped for the night. In this engagement I lost 2 men killed and 18 wounded, a list of which is

attached hereto. Prisoners captured represent that the enemy attacked us with fifteen regiments of

infantry and seven regiments of cavalry, and yet the gallantry of our men was such that we

successfully held him at bay and drove him from the field. In justice to my men I should state

that at one time the ammunition being scarce, they voluntarily fixed bayonets and expressed their

determination to hold their line as long as there was a man of them left. My officers all behaved

with conspicuous gallantry, and at all times during the engagement kept cheering their men and

telling them to hold their ground and beat back the enemy. My regiment occupying and holding

the left flank, center, and right flank of the brigade line, I could not well be present at each point

but a part of the time, but I am assured that every man and officer did his full duty and behaved

gallantly. The strength of my regiment in this engagement was 330 effective men, armed as

follows:

Springfield rifled muskets, caliber .58 305

Spencer rifles, caliber .52 25

Total 330

November 23, continued our march at 7 a.m., and encamped on the Irwinton road near

Gordon, Wilkinson County, Ga., having traveled the distance of four miles. November 24,

marched at 7 a.m.; distance traveled twelve miles, and encamped at Irwinton, county seat of

Wilkinson County, Ga. November 25, marched at 7 a.m., and encamped on the Oconee River

near Emmett, having marched twelve miles. November 26, marched at 4 p.m.; crossed the

Oconee River at 8 p.m. on pontoon bridge, and encamped at Irwin's CrossRoads, in Washington

County, at 11 p.m., having marched thirteen miles. November 27, broke camp at 1 p.m., and

marched to Riddleville, a distance of thirteen miles. November 28, broke camp at 8 a.m., and

marching eighteen miles encamped on the Savannah road twelve miles from Summerville,

Emanuel County, Ga. November 29, broke camp at 8 a.m., passing through Summerville,

encamping on the Ogeechee River, having marched fifteen miles. November 30, continued our

march at 8 a.m., and encamped on Savannah road; distance traveled, twelve miles.

December 1, broke camp at 6 a.m., and marching ten miles on Savannah road, encamped for

the night. December 2, broke camp at 7 a.m., and marching seven miles, crossed Scull's Creek

and encamped in the edge of Bulloch County, Ga. December 3, remained in camp. December 4,

broke camp at 6 a.m., and marching sixteen miles encamped at 3 p.m. on Savannah road.

December 5, continued to march at 7 a.m., and encamped at 5 p.m., having marched eighteen

miles. December G, broke camp at 3 p.m., and marching in rear of division train as rear-guard,

encamped at 6 p.m. on the Ogeechee River, having traveled nine miles. December 7, the Third

Brigade, First Division, Fifteenth Army Corps, Colonel Williamson commanding, having

obtained possession of Wright's Bridge across the Ogeechee River, crossed that stream and built

works on the east side. In obedience to orders received I moved the One hundredth Regiment

Indiana Volunteer Infantry and the Forty-sixth Ohio Volunteer Infantry, Major Upton

19

commanding, across the river and occupied the works held by Colonel Williamson's command,

while he moved down the river on the east side to co-operate with General Corse, commanding

Fourth Division, Fifteenth Army Corps, at Eden, on the Macon and Savannah Railroad. With

these two regiments I held position on the east side of the Ogeechee River until 12 midnight,

when I received orders to join my brigade, on the west bank of the Ogeechee, and burn all the

culverts across the swamp and the bridge across the river in my rear, all of which I accomplished

as directed, and joined the brigade with my command at 3.30 a.m., December 8, 1864. December

8, broke camp at 7 a.m., and marching twenty miles, encamped at Eden, county seat of Bryan

County, Ga. December 9, remained in camp. December 10, broke camp at 10 a.m., and crossing

the Ogeechee River above the mouth of the Cannouchee River, marched eighteen miles, and

encamped at 9 p.m. before the city of Savannah, Ga. December 11 to 19, moved two miles to the

right and encamped with the brigade on the Ogeechee road eight miles from Savannah. Here we

remained until the 17th of December, when I was ordered to proceed with my regiment down the

Ogeechee road and support the Twelfth Wisconsin Battery, stationed on that road; was relieved

from that position on the night of the 18th and returned to our former camp. December 20,

received orders to proceed with my regiment as escort to forage train across the Ogeechee River

toward Altamaha River, and to command the escort, consisting of 200 mounted infantry; Twenty

sixth Iowa Volunteer Infantry, Major Lubbers commanding; Ninth Iowa Volunteer Infantry,

Captain McSweeney commanding, and One hundredth Regiment Indiana Volunteer Infantry,

Capt. John W. Headington commanding.

Returned to Savannah December 24, having loaded our train, composed of 160 wagons, with

corn and sweet potatoes, and made the whole trip, traveling 100 miles, in four days, and

obtaining supplies without any loss of men or wagons. I also drove into camp 100 head of beefcattle,

which I turned over to the commissary department for the use of the troops. During the

entire campaign from Atlanta to Savannah, Ga., between the dates of November 15 and

December 24. 1864, my officers and men behaved as became good soldiers. The health of the

command during the entire march was unexceptionably good. We foraged largely upon the

country, and yet did it without having it attended with any of the demoralizing influences which

usually steal over a command obliged so to subsist. On starting from Atlanta November 15 my

regiment numbered:

Enlisted men present for duty 361

Officers present for duty 17

Aggregate present for duty 378

At the battle of Duncan's farm, November 22, I lost twenty killed and wounded. On

December 6 one of my men who was detailed as scout at the headquarters of Maj. Gen. O. O.

Howard, commanding Army of the Tennessee, was killed, leaving the strength of my command

on reaching Savannah at---

Enlisted men present for duty 340

Commissioned officers present for duty 17

Aggregate strength present for duty 357

During the entire campaign I have used the following amount of ammunition:

Elongated ball cartridges, caliber .58 22,000

Spencer rifle cartridges, caliber .52 1,610

Henry rifle cartridges, caliber .44 200

20

Total 23,810

I regret to state, however, in connection with this report, that Levi Kennedy, a private of

Company K, One hundredth Regiment Indiana Volunteer Infantry, having been detailed away

from the command to guard ordnance train, by order of General Walcutt, commanding Second

Brigade, and thus being out from under the healthful moral influences of his company

commander, was led into the committing of the grievous crime of pillaging, for which, however,

he has been tried and properly punished. Save this, there is no exception to the uniform good

conduct and soldierly bearing among any of the men or officers of this command during the

entire campaign, and I am satisfied had Private Kennedy been with his company and regiment no

such misfortune would have befallen him.

Tendering my thanks to the brigade commander and his entire staff for their uniform

kindness and ready assistance during the entire campaign, I have the honor to be, captain, very

respectfully, your obedient servant,

R. M. JOHSTON,

Major, Comdg. One hundredth Regt. Indiana Volunteer Infantry.

Capt. ORLA. J. FAST,

Acting Assistant Adjutant-General to Robert F. Catterson, Colonel Ninety-seventh Indiana

Volunteer Infantry, Commanding Second Brigade, First Division, Fifteenth Army Corps, Army

of the Tennessee.

HDQRS. MILITARY DIVISION OF THE MISSISSIPPI,

Saint Louis, Mo., July 22, 1865.

GENERAL: I have the honor to submit the following report of the operations of the

quartermaster's department of Major-General Sherman's army from December 10, 1864, the date

of its arrival before Savannah, Ga., to May 11, 1865, when it commenced the march from

Richmond, Va., to the North:

After the capture of Fort McAllister, December 13, supplies in very limited quantities were

brought from Hilton Head to Ossabaw Sound, and thence up the Ogeechee River to King's

Bridge, and a detail of 2,500 men from the army was immediately set to work to construct a dock

upon which to unload supplies. The channel of the Ogeechee was practicable only for boats

drawing seven feet or less at high tide. We had very few of that class, and all the boatmen were

ignorant of the unused channel and it was very difficult to supply the army by this river. On the

21st of December Savannah was occupied by our army. The north channel of the river, the main

and direct one, had been very thoroughly obstructed by the rebels by sinking in it heavy cribs

filled with stones and brick. Admiral Dahlgren, after an examination of them, assured me that it

was impracticable to remove them at that time, but learning from Maj. C. W. Thomas,

quartermaster at Hilton Head, of a Mr. Orlando Bennett who was employed by the Government

as a wrecker and who was provided with facilities for such work, I requested him to send for

Bennett, who was then down on the Florida coast. He arrived and went to work, and was

eventually entirely successful, but the process of removing the obstructions was necessarily so

slow that it was not completed until about the 20th of February, though a practicable passage was

made by the 3d of February. Until that time we had to use the south channel, which was much

smaller and shallower than the other and very circuitous.

In this the rebels had left unobstructed a narrow passage for their own use, and through it

light draft vessels came up to the wharves at Savannah immediately after our occupation of the

place. It was necessary to unload all the large vessels by lighters at a distance below the city of

from eight to twenty miles. I organized matters by assigning Capt. George B. Cadwalader,

21

assistant quartermaster, as chief of the depot and in charge of water transportation; Lieut. L. R.

Young, Thirty-fifth New Jersey Infantry, in charge of forage; Capt. F. C. Butze, assistant

quartermaster, in charge of quartermaster's stores; Capt. F. A. Seely, assistant quartermaster, in

charge of clothing and equipage; Lieut. A. B. Howard, One hundred and seventh New York

Infantry, in charge of corrals and surplus animals turned in from the army, and assignment of

buildings; Lieut. Fred. Hope, Sixteenth Iowa Infantry, in charge of wagon transportation and

repair shops; Lieut. C. F. Matteson, One hundred and third Illinois Infantry, in charge of shops

for repair of vessels, and Lieut. T. J. Lambert, Sixty-eighth Ohio Infantry, in charge of railroads

and all captured railroad property. Under these officers the work of the depot proceeded

successfully. All the supplies that arrived were landed and distributed; all repairs needed by

vessels were promptly made by the shops under Lieutenant Matteson. All the unserviceable and

surplus animals of the army, numbering about 5,000, were turned into the corrals of Lieutenant

Howard, and from them were made up the depot teams. We captured in the city 213 cars and 8

locomotives. These were placed in charge of Lieutenant Lambert, who repaired and operated the

Gulf railroad for 5 distance of ten miles from the city, and brought in over the road all the wood

used by that portion of the army within the city and what was necessary for the citizens. The

effective strength of the army was now about 66,000, with 35,000 animals, 2,690 wagons, and

503 ambulances. The object to be accomplished by the quartermaster's department was to

thoroughly refit the men, the animals, and the wagons, and to accumulate enough to lead the

trains with the more essential articles necessary to the long march into North Carolina, which

was the plan determined on by the commanding general. Time was very valuable, for he desired

to approach Southern Virginia in time to cooperate in the spring campaign. As soon as I learned

that a quantity of supplies had been sent by you to Pensacola, Fla., to meet the contingency of

General Sherman's army coming to the coast at that place instead of at Savannah, I dispatched a

steamer with orders to the vessels containing them to come immediately to Savannah, but only

two arrived in time to be of service in supplying the army before it left Sister's Ferry and

Pocotaligo on the march northward. There was some delay in the arrival of supplies from the

North, and the amount that could be spared from the depot at Hilton Head was very small.

Forage was especially slow in arriving, not being received in sufficient quantities to supply the

daily consumption until about the 10th of January, and for a week the animals suffered a great

deal for want of food. In the meantime they subsisted mainly on rice straw, which was found in

the vicinity, but did not do well on that alone.

My officers worked with ability and almost unceasingly to hasten the resupply of the army,

and notwithstanding the unavoidable delay occasioned by the slow arrival of forage, shoes,

stockings, stationery, wagon grease, and other articles of less importance, the army was

sufficiently supplied by the 15th of January to begin the new campaign. The want of wagon

grease I partially remedied by directing Captain Butze to take possession of and issue a quantity

of tar owned by the Savannah Gas Company, which, mixed with a little flour, made a tolerable

substitute The overflowing of the low country occasioned by the heavy rains delayed the Left

Wing, the command of General Slocum, from crossing the Savannah River at Sister's Ferry until

February 1, and the Right Wing, General Howard, was detained at Pocotaligo until January 29.

Supplies were forwarded to both these points in light-draft steamers up to the last moment before

the troops left, so that before starting they were nearly equipped. The principal deficiency was in

stockings. A partial supply of that article arrived and was immediately forwarded to the two

wings a few days before they left. The commanding general left Savannah for the army January

22, 1865, and ordered me to remain on the coast and be prepared to supply his army wherever it

might be compelled to come to the coast. Georgetown, Wilmington, and Morehead City, and

possibly Charleston, were mentioned as points to turn my attention to. The uncertainty of the

22

point was very perplexing and embarrassing, and I determined to make a trip to Morehead City,

looking into the harbors designated, in order to get all the information I could in regard to the

facilities, &c., for supplying an army. After making this inspection I returned to Savannah on

20th of February, 1865, and gave orders that all vessels laden with supplies for our army then at

Hilton Head or in Savannah River, or which should arrive, be sent to Morehead City, except that

some vessels containing forage and subsistence should be left at Hilton Head and some should

go into Cape Fear River so as to be prepared for the possibility of the army's coming to the coast

at Charleston, Georgetown, or Wilmington. Such of our supplies at Savannah as had not been

taken by the army were reladen and sent to Morehead City, leaving sufficient at Savannah for the

troops at that place.

Having a good deal of faith in General Sherman's ability to reach Goldsborough, I

determined to commence at once preparations at Morehead City for a depot. On the 21st of

February I sent my chief depot officer, Captain Cadwalader, and his assistants, to Morehead City

with instructions to commence work at once. Having given instructions to Maj. C. W. Thomas,

quartermaster at Hilton Head, that in case General Sherman should come to the coast, either at

Charleston or Georgetown, to immediately force supplies to him (the means having been left at

Hilton Head for that purpose), I started from Savannah March 4. I touched at Wilmington, placed

an officer in charge of the laden vessels arriving there, and reached Morehead City March 8. At

this place there were no storehouses whatever, and a very small wharf for landing stores. I

immediately applied to Major-General Schofield for 1,500 men for guards and working parties,

who were promptly furnished. I had brought some lumber from Savannah, and immediately

started a saw-mill in the vicinity, getting out more, and bought all the lumber then in the harbor,

which consisted of but a few thousand feet. I sent to New York for some carpenters and laborers,

and to General Rucker, at Washington, for additional mechanics and a supply of felt roofing, in

order to put up some temporary store-houses of the most economical kind. The work of enlarging

our small wharf and of building our store-houses was pressed forward as rapidly as possible, and

the repair of the railroad beyond New Berne was making good progress under Col. W. W.

Wright. For depot teams I had to take some which were being landed for the Twenty-third Corps.

The railroad being entirely occupied in forwarding rails and other material used by the

construction corps, I shipped large quantities of stores to New Berne in light-draft steamers

through Hatteras Inlet and Pamlico Sound (there being eight feet of water by that route), and

thence up the Neuse River to the bridge opposite Kinston. The Twenty-third Corps, which was

being brought from Wilmington to Kinston to cover the working parties on the railroad, was

supplied in this manner.

On the 23d of March General Sherman arrived at Goldsborough, where the commands of

Generals Schofield and Terry joined his former army, making a force of 95,000 men, with

23,000 mules and 10,500 horses to be supplied; the number of men and animals rapidly

increasing by re-enforcements from the North. General Sherman wrote me on the same day

describing the destitution of his command, whose clothing was entirely worn out by their long

and arduous march, and who were out of flour, bread, sugar, and coffee. His letter closed by

saying that he "must be off again in twenty days, with wagons full, men reclad, &c." Two days

later, the 25th, the railroad was completed to Goldsborough, and I commenced sending up

subsistence and clothing, and later quartermaster's stores. There were about sixty cars and four

engines, which were used to the best advantage. Trains were loaded and unloaded at either end of

the road with the greatest dispatch, and no one was allowed to travel on the cars toward the army

except couriers and staff officers under orders. The numerous detachments arriving marched,

officers and all, to the army. I still continued to ship via Hatteras Inlet, sending sail vessels

containing grain to that place, whence their cargoes were taken by steamers to New Berne,

23

loaded there into river steamers and a few barges (which had been used by the troops of the

Department of North Carolina in their former operations) and carried to Kinston, or Neuse River

bridge, to which point General Sherman's wagons had been coming for supplies since the 20th

instant. From March 29 to April 2 I was at New Berne, Kinston, and Goldsborough, and while at

the latter place, by order of General Sherman, made an equitable reapportionment of the

transportation of the Fourteenth, Twentieth, Fifteenth, Seventeenth, Tenth, and Twenty-third

Army Corps, and the cavalry command, in view of the campaign which it was soon intended to

begin. The transportation then consisted of 3,140 wagons and 570 ambulances. The railroad from

Wilmington to Goldsborough was completed April 4. The rolling-stock on this road consisted of

a very few captured cars. Some forage and subsistence were brought to Goldsborough by this

line. By the 10th of April, sixteen days from the time the road was finished, and sooner than the

earliest moment anticipated by General Sherman, the army was completely resupplied and the

wagons filled, and they moved from Goldsborough that day. The following is what General

Sherman says in his report dated May 9:

Owing to a mistake in the railroad department in sending locomotives and cars of the 5-foot

gauge we were limited to the use of the few locomotives and cars of the 4-foot 8 1/2-inch gauge

already in North Carolina, with such of the old stock as was captured by Major-General Terry at

Wilmington and on his way up to Goldsborough. Yet such judicious use was made of these, and

such industry displayed is the railroad management by Generals Easton and Beckwith and

Colonel Wright and Mr. Van Dyne, that by the 10th of April our men were all reclad, the wagons

reloaded, and a fair amount of forage accumulated ahead.

The army occupied Raleigh April 13, and the railroad was finished to that place by the

construction corps on the 18th. Additional cars were captured there, giving us 120 cars in all,

with enough engines to move them. The army had been re-enforced so that it now numbered

103,000 effective men, and the number of animals hail also been much increased. All were

supplied satisfactorily and stores accumulated by the railroad until April 30, when the march of

the armies of Georgia and the Tennessee to Washington, via Richmond, commenced, the Tenth

and Twenty-third Corps and the cavalry being left in North Carolina. I relieved such of my depot

officers as I thought would be needed in supplying General Sherman's army at Richmond and

Alexandria, assigning other officers in their places, and turned over the general depots in North

Carolina to Col. J. F. Boyd, chief quartermaster of Schofield's command. May 3 I started from

Morehead City for City Point, Va., taking with me such clothing and other supplies as were not

required for the troops remaining in North Carolina, and as I thought General Sherman's army

would need, not knowing whether they could be spared from the depots of the Potomac army.

The army arrived at Manchester, Va., and refilled its wagons on the 8th, 9th, and 10th of May,

and then recommenced the march to Alexandria. My assistants at the depots in North Carolina

were as follows: At More-head City, Capt. G. B. Cadwalader, chief depot quartermaster; Lieut.

E. R. Haight, One hundred and seventh New York Infantry, assistant; Capt. J. D. Tredway, in

charge of quartermaster's stores; Capt. A. Austin, in charge of railroad and water transportation;

Lieut. C. F. Matteson, One hundred and third Illinois Infantry, and Lieut. T. J. Lambert,

assistants; Capt. A. S. Gear, in charge of wagon transportation and corrals; Lieut. L. R. Young,

Thirty fifth New Jersey Infantry, in charge of forage; Lieut. A. B. Howard, One hundred and

seventh New York Infantry, in charge of coal; Capt. T. F. Orner, Fifty-ninth Indiana Infantry,

inspector, &c. At New Berne, Col. J. T. Conklin had general charge; Capt. A. S. Kimball and

Capt. S. W. Hoskins received and forwarded supplies; Capt. F. A. Seely received at New Berne

and Morehead City all the clothing and equipage for the army; Capt. R. W. Clarke was in charge

of forage at Neuse River bridge; Capt. Justin Hodge received and distributed all stores at

Goldsborough, and Capts. A. S. Flagg and H. B. Whetsel received and distributed all stores at

24

Raleigh during the short time the army was there. I consider all these officers entitled to high

praise for the zeal, energy, and success with which the duties intrusted to them were performed,

and commend especially to your favorable notice Captains Cadwalader, Tredway, and Austin for

ability, energy, and industry. Lists of all property issued by the depot officers at Savannah and

Morehead City are annexed hereto. I append the journal of Capt. H. M. Whittelsey, chief

quartermaster Twentieth Corps, from January 27 to March 25, which will give you a good idea

of the difficulties the army had to contend with during the march from Savannah to

Goldsborough. Annexed also is a statement showing the number of animals and amount of

forage captured by the army, with the exception of those taken by the Fifteenth Corps, whose

quartermaster, Lieut. Col. G. L. Fort, has made no report, although directed to do so. In

conclusion I desire to express my appreciation of how greatly our success has been owing to you.

The campaign was such that it was difficult for the army quartermasters to estimate correctly for

any considerable time ahead. The changes of the points of supply were frequent, and the location

of the next base very uncertain. This made it necessary at times to call on you for supplies to be

furnished with the greatest dispatch. Our best thanks are due for the uniformly prompt attention

which all our wants received from you. I also feel greatly indebted to you for valuable

suggestions and advice given me in your visits to Savannah, Morehead City, Goldsborough, and

Raleigh.

I have the honor to remain, very respectfully, your obedient servant,

L. C. EASTON,

Brevet Brigadier-General and Chief Quartermaster.

P. S.--I have also attached to this report a list of vessels used in transporting supplies from

Savannah and Hilton Head to Cape Fear River and Morehead City. I regret that I am unable to

give the cargoes of these vessels. A statement is also attached showing the quantity of

subsistence transported from the Northern cities to Morehead City and points south of that for

the use of General Sherman's army.

L. C. EASTON,

Brevet Brigadier-General and Chief Quartermaster.

Maj. Gen. M. C. MEIGS,

Quartermaster-General U. S. Army, Washington, D.C.

HEADQUARTERS DISTRICT OF INDIAN TERRITORY,

Fort Towson, Choctaw Nation, February 7, 1864.

Col. S.S. ANDERSON,

Assistant Adjutant-General:

COLONEL: I yesterday returned from the grand council of the Indian tribes, in session at

Armstrong Academy, about fifty-five miles northwest from here. The session was well attended

and will be harmonious, and I think its action will be patriotic. I gave them a talk by special

invitation day before yesterday. Colonel Watie has returned from his raid through the Creek and

Cherokee Nations. Although he was unable to effect as much as he expected on account of the

inclement weather, in all of which he was, still his move has done good. I wish I had as much

energy in some of my white commanders as he displays. He is now gathering his command at

Carriage Point, in vicinity of Fort Washita. I inclose a note handed me by Colonel Adair, of the

Second Cherokee Regiment, who had been requested by Colonel Watie to see me on the subject

therein referred to. The move strikes me favorably. Made a little before a move of the rest of the

command north toward the Divide (toward Holston's, a point heretofore described as convenient

to Fort Smith, Waldron, and the forks of the road from Forts Gibson and Smith to Preston, Tex.),

it would be a good diversion in favor of any move that might present itself as profitable from that

25

point. As to the general move I thought it necessary to make, I refer you to former letters. I

inclose letters received from Col. S. A. Roberts, of Bonham, Tex., disclosing the plan of a young

man in whom he has confidence. This move, of course, would be to the left of Watie, and on the

extreme left of the line. It is an enterprise that might be productive of good, and undoubtedly

would be if he can destroy the Pike's Peak nest and bring out 300 or 400 good men. I regard all

moves of that kind as side issues, and will do well enough when they are conducted by men that

can very well be spared, but are not profitable to bank good men on. I know of but one command

in the Confederate service eminently qualified for this work. Quantrill and his men would

exactly do, and if you have nothing else for them to do better they might very well be put to

work at this. I inclose a note from Maj. I. G. Vore, quartermaster, Cooper's division, and Creek

agent, which explains itself. The real design of this move is not far from Watie's.

Believing it my duty to do everything in my power to encourage these people, who, from the

present signs, will have to depend on themselves, I shall give them as much beef as is necessary.

So much for the Indian part of my command. I have made the best disposition for the indigent

Indians the circumstances will admit. What little white force I have, which is scarcely worth

talking about, is, so far as Gano's brigade is concerned, in a deplorable condition. They seem

(most of them) to be utterly demoralized. Desertions are by wholesale, and, judging from my

letters from there, the concern seems panic-stricken or worse. The elegant example of twentyfive

desertions from Hardeman's regiment was magnificently eclipsed by about 200 from De

Morse's regiment a very few days after. Excelsior. The only regiment of the three in the brigade

which has stood good to its colors is Gurley's, now and for a considerable time past commanded

by Lieutenant-Colonel Battle, who has sacrificed his personal popularity for the sake of his

country. I inclose his letter asking to be relieved from duty with the regiment. I know nothing of

Colonel Gurley, only so far as the records disclose the difficulty between himself and Colonel

Bankhead. I can say of Lieutenant-Colonel Battle that the reports of my inspector general and

chief of ordnance speak in the highest terms of this regiment and its management. If Colonel

Gurley returns I see nothing to prevent a re-enactment of the Bankhead and Gurley difficulty (in

the case of Gano and Gurley); and if so, away goes that regiment. The chief of ordnance reports a

great lack of guns in that brigade. I think those who yet remain would use them, and I would like

to give them a chance. I never fully appreciated General Scott's remark on being ordered to

Mexico till now. The best regiment I have is in rear on conscript duty, and in addition I have

recently sent two companies after deserters, one as far down as Caldwell County, the other out to

Denton, where it may take up its abode in the brush. Martin is a good officer--too good to be in

that business. I have frequently asked for him, because I know the necessity of it. I get no reply.

It seems to me that the militia might do this work. Gano's brigade is so greatly reduced (always

small) that it could not stand against a serious attack, and if it gives way the Line road is open.

These things are of too serious moment to admit of delay. Walker's brigade of Indians cannot be

moved from here without exposing this route and all the supplies collected. For the same reason

Watie's cannot be moved. The commissary has succeeded in collecting a valuable quantity of

supplies, including a large amount of pork, at Boggy Depot. The force there (Bass' remnant of a

regiment) is altogether too small to guard it, and yet I have no force to send. De Morse asks to

cross his brigade to the south bank of Red River, representing it as wholly inadequate to hold its

position if attacked; the camp miserable, &c. I have declined, and told him if his ground is not

good to move forward and get better. A retrograde move for any cause across the river would be

attended with disastrous consequences too plain to argue to a military man. Abandon this

country, and the Indians abandon the service. They are under no obligations by their treaty to

leave their Territory. Once they leave us and they are against us. Brigade after brigade may be

piled up elsewhere. The best place to enter is as good as they (the Yankees) want. A Greek

26

warrior of the times of mythology was said to have had but a single vulnerable part. That was

found and finished his case.

The gathering up of conscripts in Texas is certainly very important; keeping Yankees out of

Texas more so. Hence I again ask, whilst there is time, that Martin's regiment be sent here. I am

satisfied if I could possess the lieutenant-general commanding of the real state of affairs and the

importance of aid here, he would at once send that and others if he can spare. I shall kick hard

against the fate of my predecessors, but stare decisis is a hard old rule; the precedents are against

me. I intend to point out my wants in the hope that something may turn up. Give me even a

decent-sized white force, and I will hold my position as long as a man will stand. I know the

Indian character. Despondency with them is followed by despair. I was informed by the

lieutenant-general commanding that this had proved the pons asinorum of generals. He has sent

me to the blackboard, and hasn't so much as allowed me a piece of chalk to work with; only keel.

Do not understand me as complaining. I see my inevitable fate if I fail to hold this country, and I

most sincerely trust that some means will be allowed. I have pictured out my campaign, the

outlines of which I have now and heretofore furnished. I hope to have means to make it. I know

perfectly well that he is straining every nerve for the good of the country. I think I have a fair

knowledge of the resources of the various parts of the Trans-Mississippi Department. Unless I

am greatly deceived, the possession of this country and Northern Texas would be the most

serious blow the enemy has ever struck this department. I hope, therefore, he will understand that

I am thus urgent from the intense anxiety I have to sustain my position. I send you the following

latest news from Fort Smith, Van Buren, Fort Gibson, and Waldron, which I deem reliable:

About three weeks ago Blunt and McNeil both left Fort Smith for Washington. Colonel

Cloud now commands at Fort Smith. Six regiments there, viz, two Kansas--one cavalry

(Fourteenth), one infantry--one Iowa cavalry (Eighteenth [sic.]), one negro regiment (not full),

two others (not known where from); sixteen pieces artillery, viz, six mountain howitzers, four

siege guns (32 or 42 pounders, from description); the remaining six 4, 6, and 12 pounders, brass.

Have been issuing quarter rations for two months; poor beef, hard bread, and no salt. They get

rations from Little Rock now; heretofore from Fort Scott till Watie's last raid through the

Cherokee country. One regiment infantry and one of Kansas cavalry left for Little Rock during

the snow. Took no train but baggage train. Was said they were sent to escort trains up. One

company Choctaws, Capt. Jere Ward, does principal scouting. River very low and falling; not

more than knee-deep where my informants crossed last Friday night; was a week ago below Van

Buren, at Major Rector's place. Are fortifying at Nigger Hill, half a mile southwest from Old

Fort, on Sulphur Springs road. Have just commenced work; plan on a large scale; were throwing

up breastworks on the road to Van Buren, half a mile from town (Fort Smith), in the edge of the

prairie. Works about a mile long (ditch on both sides), curving with prairie. East side, next Major

Rector's (or race track), not fortified; only fortified above and below. Worked negro battalion

and all other negro men. Great many negro men there. As soon as grass gets up say they are

going to strike out toward Boggy Depot. Eavesdropped some of the officers (captains and

majors) and heard them talk. Telegraph wires up to Saint Louis and Little Rock. Yanks are

frequently deceived by our men (bushwhackers), who come in and join and get guns, &c., and

leave. One Arkansas regiment raised there since Yanks got there. No pickets out at Fort Smith;

bushwhackers scared them in. None but infantry pickets at Van Buren, one-quarter of a mile out.

Some political troubles amongst themselves, and some Copperheads sympathize with us. Men

don't like McNeil; say he is a tyrant. Cavalry only go out foraging. Forage very scarce. Have to

go out toward Fayetteville and down toward Clarksville for forage. Regiments not full, ranging

from 200 to 500. Time of many nearly out. One regiment, new (Fourteenth Kansas), is larger;

numbers near 800. A good deal of sickness--chills and fever, pneumonia, some frostbitten; one

27

whole regiment vaccinated one day with bad vaccine matter; a good many died; they are not well

yet. Some had to have arms amputated. Fort Smith and Van Buren full of sutlers' goods. Not

many Indians trade with them. Sutlers' trains from Springfield via Fayetteville without escorts.

Mail to Fayetteville and Little Rock goes out Wednesdays and Fridays without guard. Indians,

since snow, have been from Fort Gibson to Ray's Mills and Cane Hill, Washington County, Ark.

Are about 1,200 strong, mounted. A good many Pins died during cold weather. I have their

camp-grounds. McNeil has offered condemned horses to farmers to make crops; don't take stock.

But little preparation to raise crops; very little wheat sown. Phillips commands the Indians. Two

regiments at Van Buren, Third Wisconsin Cavalry (Major Schroeling), Thirteenth Kansas

Infantry (Colonel Bowen); one battery, six pieces (from description Napoleons), two mountain

howitzers. The 12-pounders have been condemned and are to be taken to Saint Louis and

exchanged. One regiment Arkansas infantry at Clarksville, and one company cavalry; a negro

regiment at McLean's Bottom, eight or ten miles below Clarksville. At Waldron their force in

December was believed 500 and two pieces artillery. Have some negro troops at Dardanelle

making salt. Infantry armed with Enfield rifles, negroes well as white; cavalry, Sharps carbine,

six-shooter, and saber; horses are very poor. As this, when it touches other sources, agrees, and

as, from a thorough personal examination under the rule of the two, I found their reports to agree,

and as I believe my informants are first-rate Southern men and had the best means of knowing

that of which they speak, I give it as reliable.

Respectfully: your obedient servant,

S. B. MAXEY,

Brigadier-General, Commanding.

If our Arkansas cavalry can't profit by this it is no use sending. This is fresh from first hands,

who left last Friday night was a week ago, one of them using for convenience the provostmarshal's

horse.

S. B. M.

By an order dated 21st ultimo, Maj. James Burnet's battalion of sharpshooters is ordered to

report to me. A portion of that command is without guns. It has not yet been officially reported. I

desire to send it at once to Boggy Depot, the point, you will observe, where my bacon is being

made, and the point, as you will see by information now sent, is spoken of as the one the

Yankees will make for when grass rises. It should be prepared for action.

S. B. M.

SPECIAL ORDERS No. 25.

HEADQUARTERS WESTERN DEPARTMENT,

Saint Louis, Mo., August 5, 1861.

The following movements of troops will take place immediately: Colonel Worthington's

Fifth Iowa Regiment from Keokuk to Boonville; Colonel McDowell's Sixth Iowa Regiment from

Keokuk to Saint Louis; Colonel Lauman's Iowa regiment from Burlington to Saint Louis; Col.

Fitz-Henry Warren's mounted riflemen from Burlington to Saint Louis.

By order of Major-General Frémont:

JNO. C. KELTON,

Assistant Adjutant-Genera

SPECIAL ORDERS No. 42.

HEADQUARTERS WESTERN DEPARTMENT,

Saint Louis, Mo., August 9, 1861.

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General Curtis, Iowa Volunteers, is hereby assigned to command a camp of instruction for

volunteers at Jefferson Barracks. General Curtis will use the utmost expedition in drilling and

disciplining the regiments, which will be directed to report to him. The school of the company

and battalion will be commenced at once. Colonel Burbank, commanding officer at Jefferson

Barracks, will furnish every facility to General Curtis to carry out his instructions by detailing

such of the officers under his command as General Curtis may find useful in tendering efficient

the new regiments which will compose his camp.

By order of Major-General Frémont:

J.C. KELTON,

Assistant Adjutant-General.

SPECIAL ORDERS No. 284.

HEADQUARTERS WESTERN DEPARTMENT,

Near Jefferson City, October 4, 1861.

I. Col. Frederick Steele, Eighth Regiment Iowa Volunteers, having reported for orders, is

assigned as acting brigadier-general to the division of General McKinstry. He will proceed to

organize a new brigade with the battalion of regular infantry composed of three companies of the

First and two of the Second Infantry, under Captain Huston, First Infantry, and the three

companies of Fourth Cavalry under Captain Stanley. To these will be added, as soon as

practicable, his own regiment (Eighth Iowa Volunteers) and such other troops as may be

hereafter assigned to his command.

By order of Major-General Frémont:

J. H. EATON,

Colonel and Acting Assistant Adjutant-General

SPECIAL ORDERS No. 49.

HDQRS. DEPT. OF THE MISSISSIPPI,

Saint Louis, March 28, 1862.

1. Brig. Gen. J. W. Denver having reported to the major-general commanding the

department, he will, in compliance with General Orders, No. 7, current series, from these

headquarters, proceed to Fort Leavenworth and assume command of the District of Kansas.

2. The Twenty-third Missouri and the Fifteenth and Sixteenth Iowa Volunteers, now at

Benton Barracks will immediately proceed up the Tennessee River and report to Maj. Gen. U.S.

Grant, commanding District of West Tennessee.

By order of Major-General Halleck:

J. C. KELTON,

Assistant Adjutant-General

SPECIAL ORDERS No. 128.

HDQRS. DEPARTMENT OF THE MISSOURI,

Saint Louis, Mo., May 13, 1863.

4. Col. W. McE. Dye, with the brigade under his command (Twentieth Iowa, Twenty-sixth

Indiana, Thirty-seventh Illinois Infantry, and Battery E, First Missouri Artillery), heretofore

attached to the Army of the Frontier, will repair forthwith to Pilot Knob, Mo., and report to

Brigadier-General Vandever.

By command of Major-General Schofield:

A. V. COLBURN,

Assistant Adjutant-Genera

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SPECIAL ORDERS NO. 69.

HDQRS. DEPT. OF THE NORTHWEST,

Milwaukee, Wis., May 21, 1863.

I. In accordance with instructions from the Headquarters of the Army, Brigadier-General

Sully will proceed without the least delay to Sioux City, Iowa, and assume command of the

expedition against the Indians.

II. Brig. Gen. John Cook, on being relieved by General Sully, will report in person to the

headquarters of this department.

By command of Major-General Pope:

R. O. SELFRIDGE,

Assistant Adjutant-General.

HDQRS. DEPARTMENT OF THE MISSOURI,

Saint Louis, Mo., June 5, 1863.

12. The First Cavalry Division of this department will be organized as follows, viz: First

Brigade, Col. Lewis Merrill commanding--Merrill's Horse, First Missouri Cavalry (First and

Second Battalions), Seventh Missouri Cavalry, Eighth Missouri Cavalry. Second Brigade, Col. J.

M. Glover commanding--Third Missouri Cavalry, First Iowa Cavalry, Third Iowa Cavalry (six

companies), Tenth Illinois Cavalry (Second and Third Battalions). Brig. Gen. J. W. Davidson is

assigned to the command of the division. Regiment and brigade commanders will report for

orders by telegraph where practicable, otherwise by letter.

13. Hauck's and Stange's batteries of the Second Missouri Artillery are hereby assigned to the

First Cavalry Division, and the commanding officers of those batteries will report to Brig. Gen.

J. W. Davidson.

15. The Army of the Frontier having been broken up by the transfer of troops from this

department, all public records belonging to the headquarters of that army will be sent to

department headquarters. Commanding officers of regiments, battalions, and batteries of the

Army of the Frontier still remaining in this department and not assigned to the First Cavalry

Division will report for duty to the commanding officer of the district in which they are now

serving.

By command of Major-General Schofield:

A. V. COLBURN,

Assistant Adjutant-General.

SPECIAL ORDERS No. 78.

HDQRS. DEPT. OF THE NORTHWEST,

Milwaukee, Wis., June 8, 1863.

I. Brig. Gen. B. S. Roberts, having been assigned to the command of the District of Iowa,

will proceed to his headquarters at Davenport and assume his duties.

By command of Major-General Pope:

M. J. ASCH,

Acting Assistant Adjutant-General.

WASHINGTON CITY, D.C., October 1, 1863.

His Excellency ABRAHAM LINCOLN,

President of the United States:

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DEAR SIR: I have the honor, by request of the members of the Missouri delegation, to

submit for your consideration the following facts: First. That, let the cause be what it may, the

state of insecurity as to person and property is as great as and, in parts of the Fifth Congressional

District that I have the honor to represent, greater than at any time during 1862. The entire

delegation from Fifth Congressional District will so testify. In all parts of the district outrages

have recently been committed; but to specify some cases: Second. In Cedar County on or about

10th of August a Union man was shot down in his own yard. Witnesses, T. S. Morgan and Alex.

McWilliams, delegates. Third. On 4th of September a band of bushwhackers made raid into

Quincy, Hickory County, and killed four Union men and wounded another. Two of the killed

were officers of the Eighteenth Iowa Regiment; store and post-office were robbed and four stage

horses taken. Witnesses as last. Fourth. Recently, about 15th of August, three or four

bushwhackers visited and were harbored by a man named Kounts, professing to be a Union man.

Lieutenant Ware and seven or eight privates sought them out and were shot at and Lieutenant

Ware wounded severely. The bushwhackers escaped. Kounts' property was taken possession of,

but General Schofield ordered its restoration. Witness, J. L. Consalus, of Morgan County. The

occurrence took place near Sedalia or Tipton. Fifth. Recently, say latter days of August, on

Missouri River, in La Fayette County, a steam-boat was boarded by guerrillas and robbed and

three furloughed Union soldiers shot. Sixth. About 10th of September a store, eleven miles and a

half southwest of Jefferson City on a public road, was plundered by eighteen guerrillas and four

shots were fired into the residence of the owner of store. Witness, A. Peabody, of Jefferson City.

Seventh. About 15th of September near Iberia, Miller County, say fifty miles southwest from

Jefferson City, a storehouse was robbed and a Union man named Jackson was killed in his own

house. Witness, T. J. Babcock, of Miller County. Eighth. Thomas J. Babcock, of Miller County,

will testify that "in the vicinity of Cole and Miller Counties the guerrillas remain robbing," &c.;

that "in Morgan County, recently, Union men's houses have been burned and Union men have to

band together to protect themselves;" that "in Miller County bands of five to fifteen are passing

about almost daily." Ninth. Hon. L. C. Marvin, of Clinton, Henry County, will testify that "thefts,

murders, and robbery are as common as the ordinary incidents of life in former years ;" that

"men are robbed and shot within two or three miles of military posts, and officers seem to be

more ambitious in catching runaway negroes and returning them." Tenth. Mr. B. Hornsby, of

Johnson County, will testify that "robbery and murder were going on in his neighborhood to a

fearful extent and hundreds of families made destitute;" that "the officers in command are in

sympathy with the rebels." Eleventh. Dr. A. Peabody will testify that "while General Curtis was

in command negroes belonging to disloyal owners could and did come into Jefferson City and

that they were registered as contraband. Now such slaves are captured and returned to most

disloyal owners." That "in organizing the provisional regiments officers of equivocal loyalty

have been selected, while the most loyal and efficient have been avoided;" that "much

dissatisfaction exists, and that now General Schofield could do nothing to reinstate himself in the

estimation of loyal men ;" that "he has identified himself with the Conservative party, composed

of the disloyal, headed by a few professedly loyal but pro-slavery, like Governor Gamble; that

now all confidence in him is destroyed;" that "under loyal men, recruiting for both white and

colored regiments might be rapidly going on;" that "loyalty now encouraged will bring strength

to the Government and Administration; that neglected, the result cannot be imagined." Twelfth.

We would respectfully remind you that the contest is between loyalty and disloyalty. Loyalty and

freedom should not receive a blow from their friend.

I have, Mr. President, the honor to be, for members of Missouri delegation from Fifth

Congressional District, very respectfully, your obedient servant,

J. W. McCLURG.

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SAINT LOUIS, January 25, 1862.

General N. B. BAKER,

Adjutant-General of Iowa, Des Moines.

GENERAL: I have to acknowledge the receipt of your letter of the 17th in relation to the

exchange of prisoners of war. I have frequently urged upon the Government at Washington the

policy of exchanging prisoners but have received no authority to do so except in two particular

cases. I have urgently asked for a general authority and hope soon to receive it.

Very respectfully, your obedient servant,

H. W. HALLECK,

Major-General.

HDQRS. DEPT. OF THE MISSISSIPPI,

Camp, Pittsburg Landing, Tenn., April 24, 1862.

I. At the military commission which convened at Warrenton, Mo., pursuant to Special

Orders, No. 118, of February 6, 1862, from the headquarters Department of the Missouri, and of

which Capt. E. H. Henry, Tenth Missouri Volunteers, is president, were arraigned and tried:

Francis Skinner.

CHARGE 1: Violation of the laws of war.

Specification.--In this, that he, Francis Skinner, a citizen of Montgomery County, Mo., did in

said county on or about the 10th day of June, 1861, counsel, invite and request Robert Skinner,

John Skinner, Elmer Stowe and other persons unknown to burn and destroy the North Missouri

Railroad to prevent the passage of U.S. troops thereon.

Specification 2.--In this, that the said Francis Skinner did in said county on or about the last

day of July, 1861, make and cause to be made a certain arrangement, viz, a ditch or hole in the

ground with pieces of timber prepared to be placed upright in said hole or ditch in such manner

as to extend above the ties and railing on the North Missouri Railroad in said county in order to

throw from said railroad the train bearing U.S. troops, and did then and there have and procure a

number of men, about forty, with guns to fire upon said troops so thrown from the railroad.

CHARGE 2: Aiding and abetting rebellion against the Government and laws of the United

States.

Specification 1.--In this, that he, Francis Skinner, a citizen of Montgomery County, Mo., did

in said county on or about the 10th day of May, 1861, counsel, invite, request and procure Robert

Skinner, Carelton Tennehill, William Nunly, Thomas Nunly, James Woody, Thomas Miller,

Joseph Custer and other persons unknown to wave and unfurl publicly a secession flag in High

Hill in said county.

Specification 2.--In this, that he, the said Francis Skinner, a citizen of said county, did in said

county on or about the 27th day of October, 1861, counsel, advise and urge that all Union men

should be compelled to leave that part of the country.

Specification 3.--In this, that he, the said Francis Skinner, being a citizen of said county did

in said county on or about the 5th day of December, 1861, offer to furnish one mule ready shod

to any man who wanted to join and aid Price's army.

Specification 4.--In this, that he, the said Francis Skinner, a citizen of said county, did in said

county on or about the 16th day of September, 1861, give two guns, two mules and a certain

quantity of money, amount unknown, to two men unknown to use in aid of Price's army.

To which charges and specifications the prisoner pleaded not guilty.

The commission finds the prisoner as follows:

Of the first specification, first charge, not guilty.

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Of the second specification, first charge, not guilty.

Of the first charge, not guilty.

Of the first specification, second charge, not guilty.

Of the second, third and fourth specifications, second charge, guilty.

And does therefore sentence him, Francis Skinner, to pay a fine of $2,000 for the use and

benefit of the United States at such time and place as the commanding general may direct.

Finding approved; the sentence disapproved. The commission had no authority to confiscate

private property not contraband of war. Francis Skinner will be retained in custody until he take

and subscribe the oath of allegiance and give bond in $5,000 for future good conduct and loyalty

to the Government.

II. At the military commission which convened at Columbia, Mo., pursuant to Special

Orders, No. 160, of February 20, 1862, from the headquarters Department of the Missouri, and

of which Lieut. Co]. William F. Shaffer, Regiment Merrill's Horse, is president, were arraigned

and tried:

Calvin Sartain.

CHARGE: Violation of the laws of war by attacking a vessel transporting U.S. troops.

Specification 1.--In this, that the said Calvin Sartain, a citizen of Howard County, Mo., did

shoot and discharge a loaded gun at and into the steamer White Cloud, which said steamer was

being used for the transportation of troops of the United States on the Missouri River; and the

said Sartain did thereby with malice afore-thought kill and murder a certain person whose name

is unknown, the pilot of said boat. This near the Missouri River in Howard County, Mo., on or

about the 25th day of August, 1861.

Specification 2.--In this, that the said Calvin Sartain, a citizen of Howard County, Mo., did

aid and abet certain persons whose names are unknown in an armed attack upon the steamer

White Cloud, which said steamer was engaged in the transportation of U.S. troops on the

Missouri River. This near the Missouri River in Howard County, Mo., on or about the 25th day

of August, 1861.

To which charge and specifications the prisoner pleaded not guilty.

The commission finds the prisoner as follows:

On the first specification, guilty, except as to the murder and killing of a certain person

whose name is unknown, the pilot of the boat.

Of the second specification, guilty.

Of the charge, guilty.

And does therefore sentence him, Calvin Sartain, to be shot to death at such time and place as

the commanding general of this department may direct.

Finding and sentence approved. Sentence will be carried into effect at a time and place to be

hereafter designated by the general commanding this department. In the meantime the prisoner

will be confined in the military prison at Alton.

James W. Barnes.

CHARGE: Violation of the laws of war by attacking the dwelling of a citizen of the State of

Missouri with the intent to murder the occupants of said house.

Specification 1.--In this, that the said James W. Barnes on the 13th day of December, 1861,

with certain other persons unknown attacked the dwelling-house of one Thomas H. Keene in

Boone County, Mo., and with guns and pistols attempted to murder the occupants of said house.

All this at Boone County, Mo.

Specification 2.--In this, that on the 13th day of December, 1861, the said James W. Barnes,

a citizen of Boone County, Mo., did make an assault upon one Luther B. Caldwell, a citizen of

33

Missouri, with intent to kill and murder the said Caldwell. All this at the county of Boone, State

of Missouri.

Specification 3.--In this, that on the 13th day of December, 1861, the said James W. Barnes

did incite certain persons unknown to make an armed attack upon the dwelling-house of one

Thomas H. Keene, a citizen of Missouri, with the intent to murder occupants of said house. All

this at Boone County, Mo.

To which charge and specifications the prisoner pleaded not guilty.

The Commission finds the prisoner guilty as charged, and does therefore sentence him,

James W. Barnes, to be shot to death at such time and place as the commanding general of this

department may direct.

Finding and sentence approved. Sentence will be carried into effect at a time and place to be

hereafter designated by the general commanding this department. In the meantime the prisoner

will be confined in the military prison at Alton.

Matthew Thompson.

CHARGE 1: Aiding and abetting in the destruction of property of the North Missouri

Railroad Company.

Specification 1.--In this, that Matthew Thompson, a citizen of Boone County, Mo., did aid

and abet by his presence among and joined with a band of armed men who were then and there

engaged in the destruction by fire or otherwise of certain rails, ties, bridges and timbers

belonging to and necessary to the use of the North Missouri Railroad Company in the transaction

of their ordinary and legitimate business. All this at or near the town of Mexico, Mo., on or about

the 21st day of December, 1861.

CHARGE 2: Violation of the laws of war by joining, aiding and assisting a band of robbers

and bandits.

Specification 1.--In this, that Matthew Thompson did in company with one Cobb and other

persons join a band of desperadoes whose object was plunder and robbery, and that the said

Thompson for a long space of time, viz, from about the 1st day of November, 1861, taking

advantage of the unsettled condition of the country has been joining with, aiding and assisting

said band in the commission of acts of plunder, robbery and abuse of the citizens of the State of

Missouri.

Specification 2.--In this, that the said Matthew Thompson did on the 21st day of December,

1861, attempt to steal and take away from one Conrad Pewlis, a citizen of Missouri, one horse to

be appropriated to the use of said band of robbers and bandits. This at the house of said Conrad

Pewlis in Audrain County, Mo.

To which charges and specifications the prisoner pleaded not guilty.

The commission finds the prisoner, Matthew Thompson, guilty as charged, and does

therefore sentence him to be hanged to death at such time and place as the commanding general

of this department may direct.

Finding and sentence approved. Sentence will be carried into effect at such time and place as

may be hereafter designated by the general commanding this department. In the meantime the

prisoner will be confined in the military prison at Alton.

III. At the same military commission, Col. Lewis Merrill, Regiment Merrill's Horse,

president, were arraigned and tried:

John E. Waller.

CHARGE: Violation of the laws of war by aiding and assisting in the arrest and

imprisonment of a citizen of the United States within the lines of the U.S. forces.

Specification.--In this, that John E. Waller on or about the 23d day of December, 1861, in

Boone County, Mo, and within the lines of the U.S. forces did with certain other persons

34

wrongfully and violently arrest, search and imprison one Perry C. Jeffrey, a citizen of the United

States and of the State of Missouri, the said Waller then and there not being a member of any

regular military organization. To which charge and specification the prisoner pleaded not guilty.

The commission finds the prisoner, John E. Waller, as follows:

Of the specification finds the facts as set forth except the words "wrongfully and violently,"

and the words "the said Waller then and there not being a member of any regular military

organization."

Of the charge, not guilty.

And does therefore acquit him.

Finding and acquittal approved. John E. Waller will be released from arrest upon his taking

and subscribing the oath of allegiance and giving bond for his future good conduct and loyalty to

the Government.

Owen C. Hickam.

CHARGE: Violation of the laws of war.

Specification 1.--In this, that the said Owen C. Hickam did assault one John Quinn, a citizen

of the United States and of the State of Missouri, with intent feloniously to kill and murder said

John Quinn. This within the lines of the U.S. forces at Boone County, Mo., on or about the 1st of

January, 1862.

Specification 2.--In this, that the said Owen C. Hickam did threaten to kill and murder one

James Smallwood; a citizen of the United States and of the State of Missouri, the said

Smallwood being engaged in recruiting men to serve in the armies of the United States. This at

Boone County, Mo., on or about the 1st day of December, 1861.

Specification 3.--In this, that the said Owen C. Hickam did give clothing and goods to certain

persons to be by them appropriated to the use of persons in rebellion against the lawfully

constituted government of the United States. This within the lines of the U.S. forces, at Boone

County, Mo., about December 9, 1861.

Specification 4.--In this, that he, Owen C. Hickam, for a long time past, viz, for four months,

has been threatening the lives of citizens of the United States with intent to further and assist the

existing rebellion against the Government of the United States. This within the U.S. lines at

Boone County, Mo.

To which charge and specifications the prisoner pleaded not guilty.

The commission finds the prisoner, Owen C. Hickam, guilty as charged and does therefore

sentence him to be shot to death at such time and place as the general commanding this

department may direct.

Finding and sentence approved. The sentence will be carried into effect at such time and

place as may be hereafter designated by the general commanding this department. In the

meantime the prisoner will be confined in the military prison at Alton.

Aroswell D. Severance.

CHARGE: Violation of the laws of war.

Specification.--In this, that Aroswell D. Severance did on or about the 23d day of January,

1862, steal and carry away from the possession of one Thomas Throckmorton, a citizen of the

United States, one gray stallion being the property of said Throckmorton. This at or near

Monticello, Lewis County, Mo.

To which charge and specification the prisoner pleaded not guilty.

The commission finds the prisoner guilty as charges and does therefore sentence him,

Aroswell D. Severance, to be shot to death at such time and place as the commanding general of

this department may direct.

35

Finding and sentence approved. The sentence will be mitigated to imprisonment during the

war in the military prison at Alton.

IV. At the military commission which convened at Fulton, Mo., pursuant to Special Orders,

No. 62, of January 20, 1862, from the headquarters Department of the Missouri, and of which

Capt. E. Mayne is president, were arraigned and tried:

Austin Brewner.

CHARGE: Administering intoxicating liquors to soldiers.

Specification.--In this, that Austin Brewner on the 7th day of March, 1862, and on divers

days before that time at the county of Callaway, Mo., at a military camp in said county did sell

and administer to Rawley Shaw, Black, George F. Greenough, Murray and Kino and divers other

persons unknown, being soldiers in the volunteer service of the United States, intoxicating

liquors, to wit, whisky and brandy, contrary to martial law then prevailing in the State of

Missouri and in violation of the laws of war.

To which charge and specification the prisoner pleaded guilty.

The commission finds the prisoner guilty as charged, and does therefore sentence him,

Austin Brewner, to pay a fine of $25 and in default of payment to be imprisoned thirty days.

Finding and sentence approved

Henry Willing.

CHARGE 1: Aiding in the destruction of the North Missouri Railroad.

Specification.--In this, that the said Henry Willing on the night of the 20th of December,

1861, with other parties unknown did unlawfully within the Military District of North Missouri

destroy and burn a portion of the ties and rails forming the North Missouri Railroad. This in

violation of martial law prevailing in the State of Missouri.

CHARGE 2: Giving aid and comfort to railroad and bridge-burners.

Specification.--In this, that the said Henry Willing did on the night of the 20th of December,

1861, by his presence and advice give aid, comfort and assistance to a party of armed men who

on the night of the 20th of December, 1861, did destroy a portion of the North Missouri Railroad.

This in violation of martial law then prevailing in the State of Missouri.

CHARGE 3: Accessory before the fact to the destruction of the track and bridges of the

North Missouri Railroad.

Specification.--In this, that said Henry Willing at the county of Callaway, State of Missouri,

on the 18th day of December, 1861, and at divers days before and after that date did solicit,

persuade and induce divers persons whose names are unknown to go to the track of the North

Missouri Railroad in Audrain County, Mo., on the 20th day of December, 1861, and then and

there to destroy, aid and assist in burning and otherwise destroying the track of said road and the

bridges thereon. This in violation of martial law prevailing in the State of Missouri.

CHARGE 4: In giving aid and comfort to the rebellion.

Specification.--In this, that the said Henry Willing in Callaway County, Mo., did on divers

days from the 1st of September, 1861, until the 1st of January, 1862, solicit H. W. Riley,

Company E, Third Iowa Cavalry, and divers other persons unknown to enlist in the rebel service

under General Sterling Price, and did on divers days between the times aforesaid use his

influence to get persons unknown to engage in the rebel service by making false representations

to them in violation of the laws of war.

CHARGE 5: Being a bad and dangerous man.

Specification.--In this, that the said Willing has been a notorious rebel and during the times

aforesaid and still is and was engaged in tearing up railroad tracks and burning bridges and

making war upon private and peaceable citizens and soliciting men to rebel against their country

in violation of the laws of war.

36

To which charges and specifications the accused pleaded not guilty.

The commission finds the prisoner as follows:

Of the specification to first charge, not guilty.

Of the first charge, guilty.

Of the specification to second charge, guilty.

Of the second charge, guilty.

Of the specification to third charge, guilty.

Of the third charge, guilty.

Of the specification to fourth charge, guilty.

Of the fourth charge, guilty.

Of the specification to fifth charge, guilty, except the words "and was engaged in tearing up

railroad tracks and burning bridges and making war upon private and peaceable citizens."

Of the fifth charge, guilty.

And does therefore sentence him, Henry Willing, to be shot to death at such time and place

as the major-general of this department may direct.

The commission having acquitted the prisoner of the only specification to the first charge

should also have acquitted him of the charge. Sentence confirmed and will be carried into effect

at such time and place as may be hereafter designated by the general commanding this

department. In the meantime the prisoner will be confined in Alton prison.

James Sisrico.

CHARGE 1: Aiding in the destruction of the North Missouri Railroad.

Specification.--In this, that James Sisrico did on the night of Friday, December 20, 1861.

with other parties unknown destroy a portion of the rails and ties of the North Missouri Railroad.

This in opposition to martial law then prevailing in the Military District of North Missouri.

CHARGE 2: Aiding and abetting in the destruction of the North Missouri Railroad.

Specification.--In this, that James Sisrico on the evening and night of the 20th of December,

1861, did by his presence aid and encourage a body of armed men who on the night aforesaid did

destroy a portion of the North Missouri Railroad. This in opposition to martial law then

prevailing in the Military District of North Missouri.

To which charges and specifications the prisoner pleaded not guilty.

The Commission finds the prisoner as follows:

Of the specification to first charge, not proven.

Of the first charge, guilty.

Of the specification to second charge, guilty.

To the second charge, guilty.

And does therefore sentence him, James Sisrico, to be shot to death at such time and place as

the commanding general of the department may direct.

Finding approved. The commission having recommended the prisoner to the mercy of the

commanding general the sentence will be mitigated to imprisonment during the war in the

military prison at Alton.

James P. Snedicor.

CHARGE 1: Aiding in the destruction of the North Missouri Railroad.

Specification.--In this, that on the night of the 20th day of December, 1861, James P.

Snedicor with other persons unknown did unlawfully within the Military District of North

Missouri burn and destroy certain railroad ties and with crowbars, picks, sledges and axes

remove certain rails, which ties and rails formed a part of the common traveled way known as

the North Missouri Railroad. This in violation of martial law then prevailing in the Military

District of North Missouri.

37

CHARGE 2: Giving aid and comfort to railroad and railroad bridge-burners and destroyers.

Specification.--In this, that the said James P. Snedicor did on the evening or night of the 20th

of December, 1861, meet with other parties unknown and plan the destruction and by his

presence aid, assist and afford comfort and assistance to said parties unknown who did burn and

destroy certain ties, rails, track and bridges being part of and appertaining to the North Missouri

Railroad. This in violation of martial law then prevailing in the said Military District of North

Missouri.

CHARGE 3: Accessory before the fact to the destruction of the North Missouri Railroad.

Specification.--In this, that James P. Snedicor at the county of Callaway, State of Missouri,

on the 19th day of December, 1861, and after that date did solicit divers persons to go to the

track of the North Missouri Railroad in Audrain County, Mo., within the Military District of

North Missouri on the 20th of December, 1861, to then and there aid and assist in the destruction

of the North Missouri Railroad. This in violation of martial law then prevailing in the said

Military District of North Missouri.

To which charges and specifications the prisoner pleaded as follows:

To the first charge and its specification, guilty.

To the second charge and its specification, guilty.

To the third charge and its specification, not guilty.

The commission finds the prisoner as follows:

Of the first charge and its specification, guilty.

Of the second charge and its specification, guilty.

Of the third charge and its specification, not guilty.

And does therefore sentence him, James P. Snedicor, to be shot to death at such time and

place as the commanding general of this department may direct.

Finding and sentence approved. The sentence will be carried into effect at such time and

place as may be hereafter designated by the general commanding the department. In the

meantime the prisoner will be confined in the military prison at Alton.

Samuel Jamerson.

CHARGE: Furnishing supplies to the enemies of the Federal Government and giving them

aid and comfort.

Specification 1.--In this, that said Samuel Jamerson at the county of Callaway, State of

Missouri, during the months of September, October, November and December, 1861, did make,

aid, cause and permit to be made at his house a large quantity of clothing, to wit coats, pants,

vests and drawers, made for and given to Pyne, Harris, Jamerson and divers others whose names

are unknown who were and are rebels and enemies of the Federal Government and who have

been in arms against said Government and who were and are in open rebellion against said

Government; and the clothing so made by and at the house of said Jamerson and with his

knowledge, advice and consent was intended to be given and was given to said rebels to aid and

comfort them in their rebellion against the Government, and the said Jamerson furnished all or

part of the cloth and other materials to make said clothing.

Specification 2.--In this, that said Jamerson did aid and assist in taking from the Lunatic

Asylum at Fulton, Mo., a large quantity of blankets, to wit 1,000, the property of the State of

Missouri, which said blankets after they were so taken from said asylum by the assistance,

knowledge and consent of said Samuel Jamerson were by the assistance, advice, knowledge and

consent of said Jamerson given to persons unknown and in arms against the Federal Government

to aid and assist said rebels in arms against the Government. All this at Callaway County, Mo.,

during the months of September, October, November and December, 1861.

38

Specification 3.--In this, that said Samuel Jamerson at the county of Callaway, State of

Missouri, during the months of November and December, 1861, did procure, aid and assist in

procuring a large quantity of lead, to wit 500 pounds, which said lead was procured and kept by

the said Jamerson on his premises for the use of the rebels and persons in open rebellion and in

arms against the Federal Government, and the said lead so procured and kept by said Jamerson

was by him concealed to keep the Federal authorities from seizing the same and was by the said

Jamerson and with his knowledge, advice and consent given to the rebels then in arms against

the Federal Government.

Specification 4.--In this, that said Samuel Jamerson at the county of Callaway in the State of

Missouri on the --- day of January, 1862, did permit James P. Snedicor and Joseph Watkins to

stop at his house and did keep the horses of said Snedicor and Watkins and did furnish food,

beds and shelter to the said Snedicor and Watkins, they being at the time rebels in arms against

the Federal Government and having aided and assisted in the destruction of the North Missouri

Railroad on the 20th of December, 1861, all of which was known to the said Jamerson; and the

said Snedicor and Watkins were at the time they were so fed and sheltered by said Jamerson

fleeing from the U.S. authorities to avoid being arrested which fact was well known by the said

Jamerson; and while said Jamerson was so sheltering said rebels and outlaws a detachment of the

Second Battalion, Third Iowa Cavalry, commanded by Major Caldwell, proceeded to the house

of said Jamerson for the purpose of arresting said criminals whereupon the said Jamerson did

declare to the said troops that the said criminals were not at his house; whereupon the house of

said Jamerson was searched by said troops and the said Snedicor and Watkins were found

concealed in the garret of said house, and the arms of said rebels, to wit one carbine, one doublebarrelled

shotgun and two pistols were found in the house of said Jamerson. All of which was

fully known to said Jamerson; and the representations as aforesaid made by said Jamerson were

false and were made to mislead the authorities of the Government and to conceal said criminals

and aid them in their efforts to avoid an arrest and punishment by the U.S. military authorities.

To which charges and specifications the prisoner pleaded not guilty.

The commission finds the prisoner, Samuel Jamerson, as follows:

Of the first specification, not guilty.

Of the second specification, not guilty.

Of the third specification, not guilty.

Of the fourth specification, guilty.

Of the charge, guilty, except the words "furnishing supplies to the enemies of the Federal

Government," and does therefore sentence him to pay a fine of $500 and costs of prosecution and

that he be imprisoned until said fine and costs are paid and he takes and subscribes the usual oath

of allegiance.

Finding approved; sentence disapproved. The prisoner will be retained in custody until such

time as he will take and subscribe the oath of allegiance and give bond in the sum of $2,000 for

future good conduct and loyalty to the Government.

Lewis L. Chaney.

CHARGE 1: Aiding in the destruction of the North Missouri Railroad.

Specification.--In this, that the said Lewis L. Chaney on the night of the 20th of December,

1861, did with other parties unknown unlawfully destroy and burn a portion of the North

Missouri Railroad. This in violation of martial law prevailing in the State of Missouri.

CHARGE 2: Giving aid and comfort to railroad and bridge burners.

Specification.--In this, that the said Lewis L. Chaney on the evening of Friday, the 20th of

December, 1861, did by his presence and advice aid, assist and afford aid and assistance to a

party of armed men who on the night of the 20th of December, 1861, burned and destroyed a

39

portion of the ties and rails forming a part of the North Missouri Railroad. This in violation of

martial law then prevailing in the State of Missouri

CHARGE 3: Accessory before the fact to the destruction of the North Missouri Railroad.

Specification 1.--In this, that Lewis L. Chaney at Callaway County, Mo., on the night of the

18th of December, 1861, and on divers days before and after that date did solicit, persuade and

induce divers persons whose names are unknown to go to the track of the North Missouri

Railroad in Audrain County, Mo., on the 20th day of December, 1861, and then and there to

destroy and aid and assist in burning and otherwise destroying the track of said road and the

bridges thereon. This in violation of martial law then prevailing in the State of Missouri.

Specification 2.--In this, that the said Lewis L. Chaney at the county of Callaway, Mo., did

procure crowbars and other implements to be used in destroying the track of the North Missouri

Railroad; and the said crowbars and implements so procured by said Chaney were by him given

and delivered to persons whose names are unknown for the purpose and with the view and

intention of having said persons use said crowbars and other implements in the destruction of the

track of said road and said crowbars and implements were used by said persons to aid in the

destruction of said road. This in violation of martial law then prevailing in the State of Missouri.

To which charges and specifications the prisoner pleaded not guilty.

The commission finds the prisoner, Lewis L. Chaney, not guilty of the charges and

specifications and does therefore acquit him.

Finding and acquittal approved. Lewis L. Chaney will be released from arrest upon his taking

the oath of allegiance and giving bond in $2,000 for future good conduct and loyalty to the

Government.

By command of Major-General Halleck:

N.H. McLEAN,

Assistant Adjutant-General.

HDQRS. DEPARTMENT OF THE MISSOURI,

Saint Louis, February 17, 1862.

III. At the military commission which convened at Pacific, Mo., pursuant to Special Orders,

No. 35, of January 12, 1862, from these headquarters, and of which Capt. A. W. Drips, Ninth

Regiment Iowa Volunteers, is president, was arraigned and tried--

Isaac H. Breckinridge, a citizen of Franklin County, Mo.

CHARGE: Violation of the laws of war.

Specification l.--In this, that Isaac H. Breckinridge did send clothing to his son, then a soldier

in the army of the so-called Confederate States in rebellion against the lawful authority of the

Government of the United States. This in Franklin County, Mo., in the summer or fall of the year

1861.

Specification 2.--In this, that the said Isaac H. Breckinridge did keep ammunition on his

premises for the purpose of furnishing the same to men in rebellion against the lawful authority

of the United States and did harbor and maintain persons in rebellion against the lawful

authorities of the United States. This in the summer or fall of the year 1861 in Franklin County,

Mo., in violation of the laws of war.

Specification 3.--In this, that the said Isaac H. Breckinridge did assist in an attempt to stop

railroad trains and destroy the track of the southwestern branch of the Pacific Railroad. This on

or about the 1st of July, 1861, in Franklin County, Mo., in violation of the laws of war.

To which charges and specifications the prisoner pleaded not guilty.

The commission finds the prisoner guilty as charged and does therefore sentence him, Isaac

H. Breckinridge, to have all his property except his houses and lands confiscated to the use of the

40

Government of the United States and that he be detained as a prisoner at hard labor until the end

of the war.

Finding approved. The sentence is mitigated on condition that Isaac H. Breckinridge give

bond in $5,000 to keep the peace against the Government of the United States and that he take

the oath of allegiance. If mitigated sentence should not be complied with the original sentence

will be enforced.

By command of Major-General Halleck:

N.H. McLEAN,

Assistant Adjutant-General.

HEADQUARTERS DISTRICT OF CENTRAL MISSOURI,

Otterville, December 23, 1861.

Capt. J. C. KELTON,

Assistant Adjutant-General.

CAPTAIN: I have the honor to report that having replaced by troops from La Mine the

garrison of Sedalia I marched from that place on Sunday, the 15th instant, with a column of

infantry, cavalry and artillery numbering about 4,000 men.

On the morning of the 18th Lieutenant-Colonel Brown's forces rejoined the command.

Knowing that there must still be a large force of the enemy north of us I moved slowly on the

18th toward Warrensburg, and when near that town the spies and scouts I had sent before

marching from Sedalia in the direction of Lexington, Waverly and Arrow Rock reported to me

that a large force was marching from the two latter places and would encamp that night at the

mouth of Clear Creek, just south of Milford. I posted the main body of my command near

Warrensburg and Knobnoster to close all outlet to the south between those two points and

dispatched seven companies of cavalry, five of the First Iowa and two of the Fourth Regular

Cavalry, afterward re-enforced by another company of regular cavalry and a section of artillery,

all under command of Col. J. C. Davis, Indiana volunteers, to march on the town of Milford so as

to turn the enemy's left and rear and intercept his retreat to the southeast, at the same time

directing Major Marshall, with Merrill's regiment of horse, to march from Warrensburg on the

same point turning the enemy's right and rear and forming a junction with Colonel Davis. The

main body of my command occupied a point four miles south and ready to advance at a

moment's notice or to intercept the enemy's retreat south.

Colonel Davis marched promptly and vigorously with the forces under his command, and at

a late hour in the afternoon came upon the enemy encamped in the wooded bottom-land on the

west side of Blackwater opposite the mouth of Clear Creek. His pickets were immediately driven

in across the stream--which was deep, miry and impassable except by a long narrow bridge

which the enemy occupied in force as is believed under Colonel Magoffin. Colonel Davis

brought forward his force and directed that the bridge be carried by assault. The two companies

of the Fourth Regular Cavalry being in advance, under the command respectively of Lieutenant

Gordon and Lieutenant Amory, were designated for that service and were supported by the five

companies of the First Iowa. Lieutenant Gordon, of the Fourth Cavalry, led the charge in person

with the utmost gallantry and vigor, carried the bridge in fine style and immediately formed his

company on the opposite side. He was promptly followed by the other companies. The force of

the enemy posted at the bridge retreated precipitately over a narrow open space into the woods

where his whole force was posted. The two companies of the Fourth Cavalry formed in line at

once, advanced upon the enemy and were received with a heavy volley of small-arms, muskets,

rifle and shotguns. One man was killed and eight wounded by this discharge, with one exception

all belonging to Company D, Fourth Cavalry, Lieutenant Gordon. Lieutenant Gordon himself

41

received several balls through his cap. Our forces still continuing to press forward and the enemy

finding his retreat south and west cut off and that he was in presence of a large force and at best

could only prolong the contest a short time surrendered at discretion. His force reported by the

colonel commanding consisted of parts of two regiments of infantry and three companies of

cavalry, numbering in all 1,300 men, among whom there were three colonels (Robertson,

Alexander and Magoffin), one lieutenants-colonel (Robertson) and one major (Harris) and fiftyone

commissioned company officers.

I am, captain, your obedient servant,

JOHN POPE,

Brigadier-General, Commanding.

F.

The accused objects to the paper read by the judge-advocate purporting to be an attested copy

of an extract from the official report of General Pope to the [assistant] adjutant-general, Kelton

first, because it purports only to bean extract; second, because it is not evidence of the facts

therein stated; third, because it is ex parte and can not be evidence against the accused; fourth,

because it is only competent testimony to prove the fact that General Pope made a report.

E. MAGOFFIN.

SPECIAL ORDERS No. 81.

HEADQUARTERS DEPARTMENT OF THE MISSOURI,

Saint Louis, December 21, 1861.

IV. A military commission is hereby appointed to meet in this city on Monday, the 23d

instant, at 10 a.m., or as soon thereafter as practicable, for the trial of such persons as may be

brought before it.

Detail for the commission: Bldg. Gen. S. D. Sturgis, U.S. Army; Col. R. D. Cutts, of the

staff; Lieut. Col. John Scott. Third Iowa Volunteers; Maj. E. W. Chamberlain, First Iowa

Cavalry; Capt. T. W. Sweeny, Second Infantry, U.S. Army. Col. R. D. Cutts will act as judgeadvocate

and recorder.

By order of Major-General Halleck:

J. C. KELTON,

Assistant Adjutant

HEADQUARTERS DEPARTMENT OF THE MISSOURI,

Saint Louis, January 9, 1862.

Colonel CARLIN, Commanding, Ironton.

COLONEL: Governor Gamble has referred to me a letter from you to Colonel Murphy,

Eighth Iowa [Wisconsin] Infantry, in relation to the delivery of a fugitive slave to his master

which order was evaded by Colonel Murphy's command. I think you mistook your duty as a

military officer in this matter. I do not consider it any part of the duty of the military to decide

upon the rights of master and slave. It is our duty to leave that question for the action of the loyal

civil authorities of the State. This is accomplished by keeping all such fugitives out of our camps.

This is the object of Orders, No. 3. Those orders should in all cases be enforced and we shall

then be freed from these vexatious questions.

I inclose a copy of a letter to General Asboth in which this view is more fully set forth. I

hope you will not permit difficulties of this kind to occur again in your command, for the action

of the military in regard to fugitives if once admitted into camp is so liable to be misrepresented

and misunderstood.

Very respectfully, your obedient servant,

42

H. W. HALLECK,

Major-General

HEADQUARTERS,

Memphis, Tenn., December 14, 1861.

Col. W. W. MACKALL, Assistant Adjutant-General.

COLONEL: I have the honor to report the departure on this day December 14 for Columbus,

Ky., of ten Belmont prisoners selected by lot from the privates, to wit: H.T. Stein, Company A,

W. W. Sapp, Company A, and W. E. Gregg, Company H, Seventh Iowa Volunteers; George W.

Black, Company H, and B. Faunin, Company A, Thirty-first Illinois Volunteers; Henry

Harrington, Twelfth Illinois Volunteers, Company B; Israel G. Heaps, Company B, A. Anderson,

Company E, and Marcus Tenkesled, Company B, Twenty-seventh Iowa [Illinois] Volunteers; the

whole under command of Captain Begbie, of the Memphis Legion. These prisoners were sent in

obedience to instructions from General Polk, commanding First Division, Western Department,

with the purpose of exchange.

I am, colonel, very respectfully, your obedient servant,

JOHN ADAMS,

Captain, C. S. Army, Commanding.

SPECIAL ORDERS No. 196.

HEADQUARTERS,

Memphis, December 14, 1861.

In compliance with instructions dated headquarters First Division, Western Department,

December 11, 1861, Captain Begbie and ten noncommissioned officers and privates of Memphis

Legion will proceed to Columbus, Ky., in charge of the ten Belmont prisoners selected by lot

from the privates, to wit: II. T. Stein and W. W. Sapp, Company A, W. :E. Gregg, Company H,

Seventh Iowa; George W. Black, Company H, and B. Faunin, Company A, Thirty-first Illinois

Volunteers; James Shaw, Company H, Thirtieth Illinois Volunteers; Henry Harrington, Company

B, Twelfth Illinois Volunteers; Israel G. Heaps, Company B, A. Anderson, Company E, and

Marcus Tankesley, Company B, Twenty-seventh Iowa [Illinois] Volunteers. Turn them over

there subject to the orders of the general commanding. Having performed this duty Captain

Begbie will report with his detachment at this place.

JOHN ADAMS,

Captain, C. S. Army, Commanding.

HDQRS. FIRST DIVISION, NORTHWESTERN DEPARTMENT,

Columbus, Ky., December 19, 1861.

Brig. Gen. U.S. GRANT, U.S. Army,

Commanding, Cairo, Ill.

GENERAL: In pursuance of my agreement I have at my earliest convenience had ten

privates of the prisoners held by me selected to send up to you, that being the difference between

the number released by you, 124, and the number released by me, 114, agreed upon by yourself

and General McCown. This does not include Lieutenant Smith, the attendant of Colonel

Dougherty, who was released by me on parole and of whom no account is taken.

These men were chosen by lot and sent up from Memphis. Since their arrival I find one of

them declines to return; I must therefore send you another in his place at a future day.

I send you also your hostler. The terms on which he was to be returned you have already

discussed with Colonel Tappan.

I have the honor to be, respectfully, your obedient servant,

43

L. POLK,

Major-General, Commanding.

List of prisoners sent to General Grant December 19, 1861.

Thirty-first Regiment Illinois Volunteers: Company A, H. T. Stein, B. Fannin (not sent), W.

W. Sapp; Company H, G. W. Black.

Seventh Regiment Iowa Volunteers: Company H, W. E. Gregg.

Twenty-seventh Regiment Iowa [Illinois] Volunteers: Company B, Israel G. Heaps, M.

Tankesley; Company E, A. Anderson.

Thirtieth Regiment Illinois Volunteers: Company H, James Shaw. Twelfth Regiment Illinois

Volunteers: Company B, H. Harrington. Francis M. Smith, hostler of General Grant, sent in

accordance with agreement between Generals Grant and Cheatham to the effect that Colonel

Tappan's colored servant, George, should be returned to him.

HEADQUARTERS DISTRICT OF SOUTHEAST MISSOURI,

Cairo, December 19, 1861.

OFFICER IN COMMAND OF MILITARY PRISON,

Columbus, Ohio:

Inclosed you will find copy of an order this day received from headquarters Department of

the Missouri. By forwarding the said prisoner John Groves at once a speedy exchange could be

effected.

U.S. GRANT,

Brigadier-General, Commanding.

GENERAL ORDERS No. 4.

BRIGADE HEADQUARTERS,

Hudson City, July 19, 1861.

For the purpose of more orderly and satisfactory control of the Hannibal and Saint Joseph

Railroad and the maintenance of the various important points that road will be divided into two

divisions and four sections. The first division will extend from Saint Joseph to Brookfield; the

second division from Brookfield to the Mississippi River at Hannibal and Quincy.

The first section of the road will extend from Saint Joseph to Hamilton, and will be held by

the Second Iowa Regiment, Lieutenant-Colonel Tuttle, headquarters at Saint Joseph. The second

section from Hamilton to Brookfield will be held by the Third Iowa Regiment, headquarters at

Chillicothe. The third section from Brookfield to Salt River will be held by the Sixteenth Illinois,

Col. R. F. Smith, headquarters at Hudson City. The fourth section from Salt River to Hannibal

and Quincy will be held by the Fourteenth Illinois Regiment, headquarters at Palmyra.

Each regiment will gradually draw in within its own lines as fast as relieved by the

appropriate force and keep communication at least daily from each post to headquarters of

regiment. Reasonable force will always be held at headquarters to assist any post in case of

attack or for scouting duty. One company of Third Iowa will occupy Brook-field and will be

joined by one company from Sixteenth Illinois, after which that point will be held jointly by the

two companies. Detail of movements to make necessary changes will be ordered by Colonel

Williams within the first division and Colonel Thomas in the second under directions from the

brigadier-general.

S. A. HURLBUT,

Brigadier-General, U.S. Army,

Commanding Line of Hannibal and Saint Joseph Railroad.

HEADQUARTERS DISTRICT OF NORTH MISSOURI,

44

Saint Charles, July 23, 1861.

His Excellency SAMUEL J. KIRKWOOD, Governor of Iowa.

SIR: Your letter to General Hurlbut with a communication from Colonel Bussey has been

transmitted to me. In reply to it I have to say that I most cordially accept the proffered aid in

maintaining peace and quiet in those portions of North Missouri bordering on the Iowa line. In

sending your State or other forces into Missouri be pleased to intrust their command to discreet

and prudent officers, who should be directed to keep me advised of all their operations and who

should inform me frequently of all matters of interest or importance connected with the condition

of that region. It is not my purpose to make arrests for opinion's sake but rather to force the

people throughout this section to keep the peace among themselves and to keep open their own

lines of public communication. It is impossible that the Federal Government can employ for any

length of time so large a force merely to protect public works against destruction by those for

whose benefit they were built, and it is my purpose to offer such inducements to the citizens of

this State as will be sufficient to secure their own active agency in protecting their lines of

railroad and other works of public convenience or necessity. I have published a notice to the

people along the line of the North Missouri Railroad which I intend also to apply to the Hannibal

and Saint Joe road based on these views, a copy of which I herewith transmit. As I shall enforce

the penalty to the letter I hope to see good results follow before many days.

Your active interference in North Missouri will I fear be very shortly necessary and in a

stronger force than you suggest. The unfortunate repulse of our forces at Manassas has aroused

the whole secession element in this State to renewed activity, and intelligence received this

morning from Saint Louis has compelled me to suspend for the present further movements of the

troops from this place in the direction of the Hannibal and Saint Joe road.

It is by no means improbable that I may be obliged within a few days to move the whole

force in North Missouri into Saint Louis to protect that city from civil tumult and bloodshed, and

in that case I shall call upon yourself and Governor Yates to replace them by State forces. I will

communicate further with you in a day or two when affairs have assumed somewhat more

definite shape.

I am, sir, respectfully, your obedient servant,

JOHN POPE,

Brigadier-General, U. S. Army, Commanding in North Missouri.

BRIGADE HEADQUARTERS,

Quincy, July 27, 1861.

Maj. Gen. JOHN C. FREMONT, U. S. Army.

SIR: By orders from Brigadier-General Pope, commanding in North Missouri, I assumed

charge of the line of the Hannibal and Saint Joseph Railroad. Four regiments occupied this line--

Nineteenth Illinois, at Palmyra; Sixteenth Illinois, at Hudson City; Third Iowa, at Chillicothe;

Second Iowa, at Saint Joseph. Orders this day issued by General Pope have been obeyed to

forward the Nineteenth Illinois and Second Iowa to Saint Louis. They are on their way.

But it becomes my duty to report to you that the present force is wholly inadequate for the

duty assigned; that the two regiments removed covered the termini of the road and protected its

connections; that the country north of the road is inflamed and excited, and the region

immediately southwest of Hannibal, in Rails County, is infested by strong bands of rebels

threatening Hannibal in considerable numbers and with at least two pieces of iron artillery. To

oppose this I hold Hannibal with one company of Palmer's Fourteenth Illinois and three illdisciplined

companies of home guards; one company of the Fourteenth at South Bridge, between

Hannibal and Palmyra. There is a vacancy from these points to Salt Creek where the outposts of

45

the Sixteenth Illinois begin. Thence to Hannibal the road is well guarded; from Hannibal to Saint

Joseph no troops; at Saint Joseph about 350 raw home guards. I go to-morrow the length of the

road. I desire to state expressly and officially that the feeling along the line is hostile to this road.

It is owned in Boston by wealthy men and the people believe it will be repaired if injured. They

call it an abolition road. There is no such feeling as to the North Missouri; that is called a State

road. I will defend it to the best of my ability; but with cavalry and artillery withdrawn from me

and stationary scattered guards of infantry, with an entire regiment (the Third Iowa) without

cartridge-boxes, belts or scabbards, justice to myself and the men under my command compels

me to notify you in advance that my means are wholly insufficient and that if the road is broken

up as I think it will be in forty-eight hours I and my command are not responsible. I have

extended and obeyed of course promptly all orders on this subject; but desire to say that unless as

I presume is the case public necessity requires this movement it exposes our connections and

leaves us with both wings cut off in the heart of an unreconciled and hostile country.

Your obedient servant,

S. A. HURLBUT,

Brigadier-General, U. S. Volunteers.

SPECIAL ORDERS No. 10.

HEADQUARTERS WESTERN DEPARTMENT,

Saint Louis, Mo., July 29, 1861.

Brig. Gen. John Pope is assigned to the command of all the troops in the State of Missouri

north of the city of Saint Louis.

By order of Major-General Frémont:

J. C. KELTON,

Assistant Adjutant-General.

HEADQUARTERS DISTRICT OF NORTH MISSOURI,

Mexico, August 2, 1861.

COMMANDING OFFICER IOWA FORCES, Keokuk, Iowa.

SIR: Inclosed are instructions for your movement with your command upon Memphis,

Waterloo, Monticello and Edina. In selecting members for the committee of public safety you are

directed to appoint be sure to put upon it at least two or better still three of the most worthy and

prominent secessionists. It is the service of the secessionists I specially require and I desire that

you will give them plainly to understand that unless peace is preserved their property will be

immediately levied upon and their contribution collected at once in any kind of property at hand.

When once the secessionists are made to understand that upon peace in their midst depends

the safety of their families and property we shall soon have quiet again in North Missouri. Take

care that your men are orderly and commit no excesses.

Respectfully, sir, your obedient servant,

JNO. POPE,

Brigadier-General, Commanding.

HEADQUARTERS DISTRICT OF NORTH MISSOURI,

Mexico, August 2, 1861.

Colonel WORTHINGTON, Commanding Iowa Troops, Keokuk.

SIR: Immediately upon receipt of this order you will direct Colonel Bussey with his cavalry

to march forthwith to Memphis, in Scotland County, and having discharged the duty hereafter

specified in this order to effect a junction at Edina with the remainder of the forces under your

command. You will please put one of your infantry regiments on march for Edina by the way of

46

Waterloo and with the other regiment under your immediate command you will take boat for

Canton and proceed to Edina by way of Monticello. When you have effected a junction there

with your other forces report to me your operations and all matters of interest. Buy provisions for

your troops whenever you need them and give orders for payment on the chief commissary at

these headquarters.

You will disperse all bands of armed secessionists and if any are captured in arms send them

direct to this place for trial. I send you a printed notice to be distributed along the routes pursued

by your respective columns and direct the commanding officer to appoint committees specified

in the printed order, selecting for that purpose the most wealthy and prominent men in the county

preferring mostly the secessionists. The printed orders and accompanying letter will inform you

fully of the system I intend to adopt in Northeast Missouri. I wish to give the secessionists such

inducements as loss of property and danger to families to aid Union men in keeping the peace.

Notify all the population that the forces stand prepared to enforce this printed notice fully and

vigorously and commence it with your forces as soon as you think it desirable. Act promptly and

vigorously and I think peace will result to all parts of North Missouri.

Respectfully, your obedient servant,

JNO. POPE,

Brigadier-General, Commanding North Missouri.

NOTE.--The same instructions given to the commanding officer of the Iowa forces were

furnished Col. T. A. Marshall for his movement upon Paris; Captain Peck, Twenty-first Illinois

Volunteers, for move-meat with his company upon Troy and Warrenton; Captain McNulta for

movement with one company of cavalry upon Bowling Green and Danville, and to the

commanding officer of Fourteenth Regiment Illinois Volunteers for movement with four

companies upon Huntsville and Fayette.

HEADQUARTERS DISTRICT OF NORTH MISSOURI,

Mexico, August 2, 1861.

COMMANDING OFFICER IOWA FORCES, Keokuk, Iowa.

SIR: Inclosed are instructions for your movement with your command upon Memphis,

Waterloo, Monticello and Edina. In selecting members for the committee of public safety you are

directed to appoint be sure to put upon it at least two or better still three of the most worthy and

prominent secessionists. It is the service of the secessionists I specially require and I desire that

you will give them plainly to understand that unless peace is preserved their property will be

immediately levied upon and their contribution collected at once in any kind of property at hand.

When once the secessionists are made to understand that upon peace in their midst depends

the safety of their families and property we shall soon have quiet again in North Missouri. Take

care that your men are orderly and commit no excesses.

Respectfully, sir, your obedient servant,

JNO. POPE,

Brigadier-General, Commanding.

HEADQUARTERS DISTRICT OF NORTH MISSOURI,

Mexico, August 2, 1861.

Colonel WORTHINGTON, Commanding Iowa Troops, Keokuk.

SIR: Immediately upon receipt of this order you will direct Colonel Bussey with his cavalry

to march forthwith to Memphis, in Scotland County, and having discharged the duty hereafter

specified in this order to effect a junction at Edina with the remainder of the forces under your

command. You will please put one of your infantry regiments on march for Edina by the way of

47

Waterloo and with the other regiment under your immediate command you will take boat for

Canton and proceed to Edina by way of Monticello. When you have effected a junction there

with your other forces report to me your operations and all matters of interest. Buy provisions for

your troops whenever you need them and give orders for payment on the chief commissary at

these headquarters.

You will disperse all bands of armed secessionists and if any are captured in arms send them

direct to this place for trial. I send you a printed notice to be distributed along the routes pursued

by your respective columns and direct the commanding officer to appoint committees specified

in the printed order, selecting for that purpose the most wealthy and prominent men in the county

preferring mostly the secessionists. The printed orders and accompanying letter will inform you

fully of the system I intend to adopt in Northeast Missouri. I wish to give the secessionists such

inducements as loss of property and danger to families to aid Union men in keeping the peace.

Notify all the population that the forces stand prepared to enforce this printed notice fully and

vigorously and commence it with your forces as soon as you think it desirable. Act promptly and

vigorously and I think peace will result to all parts of North Missouri.

Respectfully, your obedient servant,

JNO. POPE,

Brigadier-General, Commanding North Missouri.

NOTE.--The same instructions given to the commanding officer of the Iowa forces were

furnished Col. T. A. Marshall for his movement upon Paris; Captain Peck, Twenty-first Illinois

Volunteers, for move-meat with his company upon Troy and Warrenton; Captain McNulta for

movement with one company of cavalry upon Bowling Green and Danville, and to the

commanding officer of Fourteenth Regiment Illinois Volunteers for movement with four

companies upon Huntsville and Fayette.

HEADQUARTERS DISTRICT OF NORTH MISSOURI,

Mexico, August 4, 1861.

Capt. J. C. KELTON.

CAPTAIN: I have the honor to report for the information of the general commanding the

department that by a simultaneous movement I shall to-night or to-morrow morning occupy in

force the county seats of the nineteen counties lying east of the North Missouri Railroad and its

proposed continuation north to the Iowa line. The three Iowa regiments have been instructed to

move as follows: The cavalry regiment to Memphis, the county seat of Scotland County, and

thence to Edina, the county seat of Knox, near which it is reported that a camp of 2,500

secessionists has been established; one infantry regiment to march upon Edina direct from

Keokuk, the other to come down to Canton and thence to march upon Edina by way of

Monticello. These three regiments will effect a junction to-night or to-morrow morning at that

point. Brigadier-General Hurlbut is instructed to occupy Palmyra, Shelbyville and Bloomington,

the county seats of Marion, Shelby and Macon. He has probably done so to-day. Colonel

Marshall with 500 infantry, 100 cavalry and 2 pieces of horse artillery moved from this place

day before yesterday with the design of occupying Paris, the county seat of Monroe, and thence

upon New London and Hannibal; Captain McNulta with 100 cavalry upon Bowling Green, the

county seat of Pike County, from Montgomery City, on the line of North Missouri road. Captain

Peck, Twenty-first Illinois Volunteers, with 300 infantry from Warrenton on this road marched

yesterday and occupies to-day Troy, the county seat of Lincoln. Five companies of infantry

under Major Goddard occupy Fulton, the county seat of Callaway County. Lieutenant-Colonel

Johnson with 400 men occupies Huntsville, seat of Randolph County, to-day. Macon City, the

48

junction of Hannibal and Saint Joe road, is held by five companies of Sixteenth Illinois

Volunteers, and Sturgeon on line of North Missouri road by four companies of the Fourteenth.

If these movements have been made promptly and vigorously by to-morrow morning the

forces will occupy all those points, and as no place of retreat for armed parties of secessionists

will be left in all that region without the certainty of encountering some portion of the U. S.

forces it is expected that they will either be taken or dispersed. The object of these movements

was as much to put in operation the policy marked out in Special [General] Orders, No. 3, from

these headquarters, copies of which are inclosed, as with an expectation of finding any

considerable force in arms against the United States. I inclose also copy of instructions issued to

officers in command of these various columns as also copy of a letter addressed to J. H.

Sturgeon, Esq. These various papers will explain fully the policy I am pursuing and the reasons

therefor. In addition to the reasons thus assigned I have to say their by pursuing the system of

hunting out these guerrilla par-tics the whole force under my command will be as much

demoralized and as little fitted for active service in campaign as the marauding parties

themselves. I am compelled to pursue some policy however harsh which will enable me to

assemble my forces in a camp of instruction that I may establish that discipline and habit of

service essential to any efficiency in the field hereafter. Raw troops such as these grow worse

every day by this system of small detachments scattered over the country on police duty, and if it

be pursued for two months I shall have a mob and not an army to command.

I have selected a point near Brookfield, on the Hannibal and Saint Joe Railroad, for a camp

for all the forces under my command. Water is abundant and good and the ground fine rolling

prairie with timber at hand on both sides. I shall move to that point as soon as the quartermaster

in Saint Louis can send forward transportation. It is my design in moving to that point to occupy

in succession Columbia, Fayette, Glasgow and Keytesville.

I am, captain, respectfully, your obedient servant,

JNO. POPE,

Brigadier- Commanding in North Missouri.

SAINT LOUIS, August 8, 1861.

General S. A. HURLBUT:

If the train was fired into investigate it immediately. Find what section [the] party which fired

came from and immediately occupy it with Illinois or Iowa regiments, quartering the men in

houses and demanding subsistence, &c., for them in compliance with Special [General]

Orders,No. 3. It is to enforce this order promptly and rigorously that I wish to keep your force

concentrated. As soon as you can ascertain from what county those who fired came from march

instantly with a whole regiment to occupy it. Shoot any who were concerned in the firing. My

headquarters will be here. Keep me advised by telegraph every day.

JNO. POPE,

Brigadier-General, Commanding.

HEADQUARTERS U.S. FORCES,

Jefferson City, Mo. August 26, 1861.

Col. WILLIAM H. WORTHINGTON, Fifth Iowa Volunteers:

See E. B. McPherson, a true Union man, who will show you a copy of the Boonville Patriot.

Bring all the printing material, type, &c., with you. Arrest J. L. Stevens and bring him with you

and some copies of the paper he edits. Bailey is a particularly obnoxious person and should be

arrested. B. S. Wilson & Co. have been furnishing the rebels with groceries. You may therefore

pay him a visit and if you require it draw two or three days' supplies for your command, keeping

49

an account of the amount taken, its value, &c. Give secessionists to understand what to expect if

it becomes necessary to visit them again. Take all canteens you may find from a tin-shop which

is reported to have been working for the rebels. It is reported that the proprietor of the ferry-boat

has observed his part of the engagement entered into as far as practicable but there is no doubt

that he is deceived daily as to the character of the parties he is crossing, and now so many will

want to cross that his boat will be taken possession of if not given freely.

U.S. GRANT,

Brigadier-General.

HEADQUARTERS DISTRICT OF NORTH MISSOURI,

Saint Louis, August 31, 1861.

Colonel WILLIAMS, [Third] Iowa Regiment, Brookfield.

COLONEL: Immediately upon receipt of this letter you will proceed to Palmyra with all the

effective men of your command, leaving the Missouri regiment(Morgan's) to occupy Brookfield

and guard the public stores there. The object of your movement is to open the road which is

reported to be obstructed near Palmyra and occupy Palmyra so as to insure the safety of travel.

You will at once dispatch a messenger to General Hurlbut with the inclosed order and make sure

that he gets it. You can send for your regimental baggage as soon as the road is clear as your

station for some time to come will be Palmyra or Hannibal.

I am, colonel, your obedient servant,

[JNO. POPE,

Brigadier-General, Commanding.]

SAINT JOE, September 15, 1861.

Major-General FREMONT:

Road to Hannibal open except Platte River bridge (finished to-morrow) and all quiet.

Secessionists numbering some 2,500 in detached bands retreating southward to cross river below

Independence. I have sent column of 1,000 men and three pieces of artillery under Colonel Smith

to march rapidly from this place in pursuit, and the Iowa regiment with one piece of artillery and

fifty irregular horse to move rapidly from Cameron upon Liberty and there effect junction with

Smith. There is no doubt in my judgment that the large train of plunder will be captured, though

as usual I presume the forces will disperse, and being cavalry will mostly escape unless Smith

can surprise them. I have put all irregular forces--home guards and others--in motion scouting

the country on all sides. Colonels Cranor and Edwards-the first commanding irregular forces of

Missouri Volunteers, the second about 600 Iowa State troops--will be here to-day having swept

whole region north of this place clean. I put them immediately in motion along both sides of

railroad to clean out the small squads remaining in the woods from Saint Joseph to Chillicothe.

In five days North Missouri will be again quiet and the regiments of Tindall, Moore, Foster,

Morgan and Glover will return. So you will please send Tindall's regiment as soon as possible to

Chillicothe.

I go east to-day to urge into the field the regiments named. There are some disturbances of

minor importance in the extreme northeast and I must get to Canton and Keokuk without

awaiting the return of Smith's command. Can Glover and Bussey get their cavalry armed at

once?

JNO. POPE,

Brigadier-General.

HUDSON, MO., September 16, 1861.

50

General FREMONT:

Just arrived here on my way to Keokuk. Find Ohio regiments on their way to Utica. If you

can send Tindall's regiment to Chillicothe immediately the Sixteenth Illinois and Third Iowa can

also be forwarded to Lexington. There will be no more considerable trouble in North Missouri.

JNO. POPE,

Brigadier-General.

HEADQUARTERS WESTERN DEPARTMENT,

Saint Louis, October 26, 1861.

Col. G. M. DODGE,

Fourth Iowa Volunteers, Commanding, Rolla, Mo.

SIR: Your letter of the 24th instant in relation to prisoners taken belonging to Harris's and

Wood's gang of rebels has been received. In reply I beg leave to state that I do not know what

disposition can be made with these men as there is no military commission in session here. I

think, however, the best course to have pursued would have been to have shot them when they

were captured.

I am, sir, very respectfully, your obedient servant,

CHAUNCEY McKEEVER,

Assistant Adjutant-General.

HEADQUARTERS DISTRICT OF CENTRAL MISSOURI,

Otterville, December 29, 1861.

To the officers commanding detachments of Eighth Iowa, Seventh Missouri, light artillery,

and cavalry belonging to forces in this department:

Immediately upon receipt of this order you will concentrate your forces at Kansas City where

the senior officer present will assume the command. He will then proceed to Sedalia by way of

Pleasant Hill and Warrensburg breaking up and dispersing all camps of rebels and armed squads,

disarming every person who cannot give undoubted proof of loyalty and arresting and bringing

to Sedalia all persons concerned in any way in having given aid, assistance or countenance to

Price's army.

JNO. POPE,

Brigadier-General, Commanding.

SPECIAL ORDERS No. 28.

HDQRS. DEPARTMENT OF THE MISSOURI,

Saint Louis, January 10, 1862.

1. The order for the military commission to meet at Wellsville by Special Orders, No. 17, on

January 8, 1862, current series, from these headquarters, is hereby revoked and the following

detail substituted to meet on Monday, the 13th instant at 10 a.m., or as soon thereafter as

practicable for the trial of such persons as may be brought before it.

Detail for the commission: 1, Lieut. Col. Samuel A. Holmes, Tenth Missouri Volunteers; 2,

Capt. Richard Y. Lanius, Eighty-first Ohio Volunteers; 3, Capt. A. C. Todd, Tenth Missouri

Volunteers; 4, Surg. John O. Edwards, Third Iowa; 5, Capt. Martin Armstrong, Eighty-first Ohio,

who will act as judge-advocate and recorder.

The commission will sit without regard to hours.

By order of Major-General Halleck:

J. C. KELTON,

Assistant Adjutant-General.

51

HEADQUARTERS NORTH MISSOURI RAILROAD,

Saint Louis, January 27, 1862.

Maj. W. M. STONE,

Third Iowa Volunteers, Comdg. Post, Mexico, Mo.

MAJOR: The commanding general desires me to advise you in regard to Col. Jeff Jones, now

held as a prisoner by you, that you will release him from confinement upon the following

conditions, viz: He must give his bond in the sum of $10,000 that he will not leave the county of

Callaway, Mo., without the written permission of Brigadier-General Schofield and that he will

report in person at any military post in his command immediately after a notice to do so shall

have been left at his residence. Upon the execution of his bond as above you will give him a

certificate of release and a safeguard forbidding any United States or State troops from molesting

him or his family in person or property until the charges against him shall have been examined

and disposed of.

Very respectfully, your obedient servant,

C. W. MARSH.

HEADQUARTERS DISTRICT NORTH MISSOURI RAILROAD,

Saint Louis, Mo., February 26, 1862.

Captain HERRON,

Third Iowa Volunteers, Commanding Huntsville, Mo.

CAPTAIN: You will be guided in your treatment of prisoners by the inclosed circular. In all

eases of bad and dangerous men they will be kept and evidence sought. Soldiers from Price's

army may be put under bonds if judged advisable and they have not been engaged in violations

of the laws of war. Negroes will not as a general thing be regarded as property subject to seizure,

and when taken for urgent reasons the same must be immediately reported to this office.

Very respectfully, your obedient servant,

CHARLES S. SHELDON,

Acting Assistant Adjutant-General.

HEADQUARTERS SAINT LOUIS DISTRICT,

Saint Louis, Mo., March 13, 1862.

Major CALDWELL,

Third Iowa Cavalry, Mexico, Mo.

MAJOR: You were correct in deciding that no terms but unconditional surrender of

themselves and their arms could be granted to the rebels.

It may be well, however, to let them know that those who come in voluntarily are likely to be

treated much more leniently than others. Thus General Halleck's circular provides that those who

give themselves up may be released on bonds and oath and receive back all property taken from

them except that of a military character while those captured are to be held as prisoners of war.

It must of course rest with the military authorities to decide after a full knowledge of the case

whether a prisoner who has surrendered himself voluntarily can be released on any terms, and no

promise of release can be given before arrest or surrender unless the character and conduct of the

party is known.

Those who commit acts of rebellion and insurrection within the territory occupied by our

troops are not entitled to be treated even as prisoners of war and probably will not be much

longer. If the influential secessionists want to preserve peace and save their deluded friends from

severe punishment they may as well take the fact above mentioned as the basis of their actions.

52

Very respectfully, your obedient servant,

J. M. SCHOFIELD,

Brigadier- General.

George W. Jones, of Iowa, former Delegate in Congress from Michigan and Wisconsin, U.S.

surveyor-general, U.S. Senator from Iowa, and late minister resident from the United States at

Bogota, New Granada, was arrested in New York by an order of the Secretary of State on the

20th day of December, 1861. His arrest was a precautionary measure to prevent his carrying into

effect a purpose he had repeatedly professed that he entertained--of going South to join his

fortunes and his efforts with those of the rebels. In a letter dated Bogota, New Granada, May 17,

1861, addressed by Jones to Jefferson Davis, of Mississippi, President, &c., as his "noble and

very dear friend," Jones dwells at length upon his sympathy with Davis and his cause; his

admiration of the system of slavery; his hatred of all friends of freedom, and his own wrongs in

being compelled by public opinion to emancipate nine slaves during his residence in the

Territory of Iowa. He says:

You may well say as you do in your letter to me that you "know you (I) will sympathize with

us (you)." How can I feel other, dear old friend college mate and colleague, than sympathy for

you and the people whom you represent on such an occasion? Born in what they tauntingly call a

free State (Indiana), brought up in Missouri, and educated them and in Kentucky, and having

resided for the last thirty-four years in Michigan, Wisconsin and Iowa, l cannot but be well

acquainted with the principles, feelings and actions of the parties to the contest which is now

going on in my beloved country.

When I went to Wisconsin, then Michigan, I took with me my servants whom at their request

I purchased, they having been born in Illinois and made slaves under the ordinance of 1787.

Abolitionists who like Doty, Bronson, Burnett, et al., came to my house to share my hospitality

told my slaves that they were free, and actually made the ignorant but happy Paul to believe he

was free and to bring suit for himself and his sister Charlotte, both of whom you may recollect as

they waited on you when you visited us. I had a vexations and long law suit with Paul but

triumphed over him and his abolution advisers. I served in Congress as Delegate from Michigan

and Wisconsin two years each, and was then beaten for the third term by Doty because I served

as a second in the Cilley and Graves duel and was a slave-owner. In 1841 I was removed from

the office of surveyor-general of Wisconsin and Iowa by General Harrison's administration

through Doty's influence as the then Delegate simply because I was a Democrat and sympathized

with the South; no single objection having been made against me of any other character. Mr.

Polk, God bless him, restored me in 1845, and put out the long-legged black Republican Jim

Wilson, of New Hampshire, who had superseded me. I was transferred from the surveyor

General's office in December, 1848, to the U.S. Senate, and driven therefrom by the Abolitionists

in 1859, no other objection having been made to me save that I was a followed of the South and

a "dough-face" for such men as yourself, Clay and other Southerners. If therefore I had no other

reason for sympathizing with the South the bad treatment which I have received at the hands of

Northern Abolitionists would have made me do so.

Further on in the same letter he says:

My prayers are all regularly offered up for the reunion of the States and for the peace,

concord and happiness of my country. But let what may come to pass you may rely upon it as

you say that neither I nor mine will be found in the ranks of our (your) enemies. May God

Almighty avert civil war, but if unhappily it shall come you may--I think would without doubt--

count upon me and mine and hosts of other friends standing shoulder to shoulder in the ranks

with you and our other Southern friends and relatives whose rights like my own have been

53

disregarded by the abolitionists. I love Wisconsin and Iowa for the honors conferred by them on

me and because I served them always faithfully; but I will not make war with them against the

South whose rights they shamefully neglected.

He concludes this long letter by saying: "The dissolution of the Union will probably be the

cause of my own ruin as well as that of my country, and may cause me and mine to go South."

Jones states in this letter that his latest advices from the United States were of the date of

February 22, 1861, so that he had barely heard of the installation of his correspondent as

President of the insurgent Confederacy. Fearing, however, that his letter might not reach its

destination he sent a copy by a subsequent mail accompanied by a letter dated Bogota, May 23,

1861, in which he says:

It will not be many months, I guess, before my successor shall present himself here. I shall

then return home immediately to try and so arrange my financial matters as to be enabled to save

my delightful residence as a home for my noble and beloved wife and our children. Should I fail

in that I know not what I shall do or whither to look for another, for I shall not be willing to

continue at Dubuque or in. Iowa or the North.

I wish I had taken John M. Bass' advice a few years ago and had sold off the most of my then

valuable property and gone down to Louisiana, Mississippi or Texas and had purchased a cotton

plantation as he did on credit, paying for it in a few years thereafter. Now my property is

unsalable and I apprehend it will grow worse if the reunion of the States be not speedily effected.

To cap the climax the dissolution of the Union will absolutely blast all my hopes. If Breckinridge

or Lane had been elected business and prosperity would have soon revived, and besides I would

doubtless have been retained here. I want you to write me and to give at length your views and

opinions of the present and prospective condition of the country and advise me what to do. Your

letter shall be confidential entirely if you wish it. I have, dear Jeffie, as your wife calls you, more

confidence in your opinion than in that of any living man. The secession of the States leaves us

National Democrats of the North who stood by you in a deplorable condition, and but that I

know you could not do otherwise I should feel hard toward you for leaving us to the mercy of

abolitionism. Even Crittenden's amendments if all adopted would allay the storm but for a short

time. The equilibrium should never have been broken up between the free and slave States, and I

said and knew that twenty years ago.

As the mails were very irregular at that period in New Granada he had not sent off his letter

before he concluded to send a further missive; and he therefore opened the envelope and inclosed

a note dated Bogota, May 27, 1861, in which he comes to the point as follows:

MY DEAR FRIEND: As I have not been able to send off my letter to you I open it to write

you a few lines and to make an earnest appeal to you as my old and valued friend and as the

President of the Southern Confederacy in behalf' of my only brother, General Augustus Jones,

who resides at Columbus, Colorado County, Tex., and who I judge from the tenor of the inclosed

letter from his charming young Virginia wife has become reduced in his pecuniary

circumstances. I wish you, my dear friend, to provide some office for him, either in Texas, at the

seat of Government of your new Confederacy, or anywhere else.

On the 1st day of August, 1861, Jones addressed a letter to Hon. I. E. Morse, New Orleans, in

which he avows the same purpose of adhering to the cause of the insurgents, as follows:

I expect my successor, Allen A. Burton, of Kentucky, every day, and will leave on the next

day after his arrival, being exceedingly anxious to return home to my family, my sons having left

them to come down South to fight for the maintenance of the Constitution, the laws and the

rights of the people of the South, as I intend to do if required to fight at all and it be possible for

me to leave my family and my private affairs, now almost in a ruined state in consequence of the

crisis.

54

In various letters from members of Jones' family to him they allude to his proclivities and his

probable determination to identify himself with the cause of the rebels. April 9, 1861, C. S. D.

Jones, son of George W., writes to his father from New York giving an account of a visit he had

made to the State Department, and an interview he had with Mr. Sanford, then just appointed

minister to Belgium. It seems that Jones had made application to Doctor Mackie and Mr. Sanford

to retain his position at Bogota. Young Jones describes Doctor Mackie as cool, and is surprised

at discovering Mr. Sanford, "instead of being muco fino to be nothing more than a well-educated

Yankee." Mr. Sanford it seems had been at Bogota and young Jones had also been there

afterward, and evidently had his envy excited by hearing the Bogs-tans speak of Mr. Sanford as a

fine gentleman, while he emphatically avers that "he is nothing more than a pretty smart Yankee,

no more to be compared with a Southern gentleman than Hyperion to a Satyr;" and again, "It

strikes me that he had very little of the fine gentleman about him. He did not trouble himself

about you, I feel pretty sure." The young man then adds:

Oh how deeply I regret that your poverty ever made you intimate to Sanford or Mackie that

you would like to be retained. You ought to resign and come home if they do not send your

successor soon. You owe it to your principles and friends in the South. Of course you know it by

this time that the cotton States have seceded and that your old friend Jeff. Davis is President of

the Southern Confederacy. All hail to it I say,--although I loved the Union dearly,--but I hate

abolitionism and love the Southern people. Come home, and let's move South and help them

fight for their independence. The last news is that Old Abe will commence a war on the South.

God protect us if he does. I feel a conviction that I shall fight for the South. Come home soon. I

had not time to get you a pair of holsters made so I send you a pair of the common kind for those

French pistols Mr. Matthew is to send. They are the best extant. You must keep them for our

revolution, if we are to have one precipitated by those damnable abolitionists.

On the 16th of June, 1861, the same C. S. D. Jones wrote to his father from Dubuque setting

forth his views of persons and public sentiment there, and saying:

As long as you were in the Senate or in a good office these fellows and those like them were

very great friends of yours. But now things are changed. When you come home you will know

these things more fully. What I wish to impress upon you now is that you must leave Dubuque or

sink down and sacrifice your principles as no man of honor could ever think of doing. This is to

express the hope that you will not allow first impressions or promises or inducements offered to

you when you get to New York or Washington to compel you to make avowal of sympathy (if

you have any) for Abe Lincoln and his war upon the South--that you will not do as Douglas and

the rest of the semi-abolitionists at the North have done. I wish to advise you to keep all the

money you have till you get home. Don't pay Corcoran or any one else a cent till you have come

home and seen for yourself. You will need more money here than you imagine. If you are

opposed to the war and in favor of Southern independence you must be circumspect and

extremely careful till you arrive at home and get your accounts settled. Doctor Mackie is a very

miserable Black Republican I assure you.

On the 31st of July, 1861, the same son writes to his father from Dubuque, giving an account

of the battle of Bull Run, and says:

I expect a very speedy recognition of Southern independence by all the great powers at an

early day. Viva la Confederacion! Jeff. Davis was very conspicuous during the battle, riding on a

white horse. He commanded the center, Beauregard the right, and General Johnston the left. God

bless them all and their people is my heartfelt prayer. How much I wish that we could have been

there to share in the glory of that day. George went to Nashville about the 26th of May last with

my approbation. He was engaged for a little time in drilling recruits but is now staying with Col.

B. R. Johnson.

55

On the 6th of August, 1861, he again writes to his father from Dubuque, saying:

This will be most probably my last letter to you before our next separation, which I trust an

identity of principle and interest will render unnecessary. With reverence I say it, I think I see the

finger of the Almighty in the battle of Manassas, in your going to Bogota and in Mr. Seward's

doing you the eminent favor to recall you. I regard this act as the greatest favor to you that he

could have done possibly--not the transfer to a mission worth $50,000 a year could have been

half so desirable and honorable in my mind. Thus you will not suffer the disgrace of having

served Lincoln's abolition Government for pay when your sense of honor and lifelong principles

condemned it as disgraceful. I'd rather this minute accept with joy the most abject misery and

poverty than be the favorite Pennsylvania contractor under Cameron and support the war or go to

this war with the brightest epaulettes that ever were worn, or support it (the war) in any way. I

hope you will not pay Corcoran any money; at least not until you come home and pay your taxes.

On the 14th of August, 1861, he wrote to his father from Dubuque, saying:

The Chicago Tribune that came last night contained the inclosed slip which I send that you

may take a salutary hint from Mr. Faulkner's case.( You cannot be too cautious, even

hypocritical, if you are anti-Lincoln or anti-abolitionist in order to get your accounts settled and

come safely home with your dues.

On the 8th of September he writes these words:

You cannot be too cautious and discreet about your political expressions, at least till after you

leave Washington--that is if you are opposed to Lincoln's truculent policy against the South.

On the 25th of September he writes from Cincinnati these words:

You ought to keep whatever money is due you in drafts on New York till you get home and

see the condition of affairs there. I understood before I left home that orders had been received to

fill up Vandever's regiment immediately, and I suppose that this meant impressment. However, I

did not wish to aid in this war even by getting a substitute if I were drafted, so I am here.

On the 10th day of July, 1861, Jones' wife wrote him a letter from Dubuque in which occurs

the following passage:

Our beloved country is in a terrible condition and we know not what to say or do. I am sick

of this war. It is fairly grinding to me and I wish an end was put to it in some way; anything

better than bloodshed; but it seems that such leaders of the Administration as the Blairs are for

the war and nothing else. I hope the South will make a desperate effort upon them ere long, and

succeed, if they continue the cry of war as they do now.

On the 25th of August she wrote him again from the same place saying:

The Government have given orders to suppress the papers that are against Lincoln's cause

and I reckon the Herald will be stopped here. You cannot form an idea of the state of affairs.

Men that were thought decided in their opinions have changed and there is no confidence placed

in any one.

He (Colonel Heath) is in debt, and if he was not so busily engaged in going to fight for

abolitionists (though he says for the Union; that is gone forever) he would be put in jail, so little

do they care for him. The First Company of Iowa Volunteers returned here on Friday morning

and had a grand reception, a breakfast prepared for them at the Washington Square. The streets

and almost every business place were decorated with evergreens, flowers, banners, &c. I did not

go down town for I do not countenance anything for this war. I beg of you, my beloved husband,

to be careful of what you say. We have cautioned you enough in our letters, written some time

ago, but you cannot be too careful. It will be time enough to make your sentiments known after

you settle with the Government, get your money and come home. If you get what is due to you

when you get to Washington I shall be content. Do not pay it out to Corcoran or any one until

you reach home. You can send them what you can spare. We hear occasionally from George,

56

who is in Nashville and thereabouts; he says that he is perfectly happy and will not move from

there until the war is over and then only to visit, for that is his adopted country. Be careful what

you say or do and get home to me as soon as you possibly can. When you get here he (Charles)

will leave here, I reckon, for he hates most of the people, and it will be much better for him to do

so. Judge Pollock told Colonel Heath the other day that he heard you had left Bogota several

months ago and had joined the Confederate Army. He said if we knew General Jones to be a

Union man (that is against the South) we would elect him Governor. We do not say what we

think of your politics, and be careful what you say until you get home.

These extracts from the letters of his wife and son, showing that they were fully prepared to

assume with confidence that he would unhesitatingly join his fortunes with the rebel cause and

would heartily approve the course of his sons in doing the same, served to give confirmation and

emphasis to his own treasonable declarations. Jones in his correspondence generally adds further

weight to the evidence furnished by his wife and son of his long-cherished and habitual

sympathy with the feelings and purposes of the conspirators who originated the rebellion. His

letters to Jefferson Davis disclose the treason he was then contemplating. He had just learned the

first movements of the rebellion, the secession of five or six States, the formation of a pretended

Confederacy and the inauguration of his correspondent as President thereof at Montgomery. He,

a minister of the United States, hastened to give the rebel chief not only assurances of his

sympathy, which had been anticipated, but also of his approbation, adherence and aid. His

recognition of the rebel Government was immediate and his call for political reward from it for

his family equally prompt. To give Davis assurance of, his sincerity he wrote him a history of his

life to show that his views and feelings had always harmonized with the interests on which the

rebellion was founded. There is not in either of his letters to Davis a single word of dissent,

disapprobation, remonstrance, reproach, admonition or caution in regard to his treasonable

course; but unqualified sympathy, approbation and adhesion. The same is true of his letter to

Morse.

The said Jones remained in custody at Fort Lafayette February 15, 1862, when in conformity

with the order of the War Department of the preceding day he was transferred to the charge of

that Department.--From Record Book, State Department, "Arrests for Disloyalty."

DEPARTMENT OF STATE, Washington, December 19, 1861.

Hon. S. P. CHASE, Secretary of the Treasury.

SIR: As this Department has proof of the disloyalty of G. W. Jones, late U.S. minister to New

Granada, I will thank you to direct that the payment of any moneys due to him in that character

be suspended.

I have the honor to be, your obedient servant,

WILLIAM H. SEWARD.

DEPARTMENT OF STATE, Washington, December 19, 1861.

General ANDREW PORTER, Provost-Marshal, Washington.

GENERAL: I will thank you to cause George W. Jones, late U.S. minister to New Granada,

who is understood to be now in this city, to be arrested and taken to Fort Lafayette, N. Y., in

charge of a trustworthy person.

I am, your obedient servant,

WILLIAM H. SEWARD.

DEPARTMENT OF STATE, Washington, December 19, 1861.

JOHN A. KENNEDY, Superintendent of Police, New York:

57

George W. Jones, ex-U. S. Senator and ex-U. S. minister to Bogota, left here in the 5 o'clock

train tonight. Arrest and convey him to Fort Lafayette.

WILLIAM H. SEWARD.

NEW YORK, December 20, 1861.

His Excellency ABRAHAM LINCOLN,

President of the United States, and his Cabinet:

I respectfully and earnestly ask permission to return to Washington City under my parole of

honor to ascertain there why I have been arrested here, and to answer to whatever charges may

have been preferred against me. On the 3d or 4th of November I took and subscribed to the usual

oath as bearer of Judge Barton's dispatches to support the Constitution of the United States.

I am, very respectfully, &c.,

GEO. W. JONES.

OFFICE OF SUPERINTENDENT OF POLICE,

New York, December 20, 1861.

Lieut. Col. MARTIN BURKE, Fort Hamilton.

SIR: I am directed by the Honorable Secretary of State to deliver ex-Senator George W.

Jones, late minister to Bogota, into your custody for safekeeping. You will please send me a

receipt for his body per bearer.

Very truly, yours,

JOHN A. KENNEDY,

Superintendent.

DEPARTMENT OF STATE, Washington, December 23, 1861.

JOHN A. KENNEDY. Esq.,

Superintendent of Police, New York.

SIR: Your letter of 21st instant inclosing letters taken from George W. Jones at the time of

his arrest has been received.

I am, sir, very respectfully, your obedient servant,

F. W. SEWARD,

Assistant Secretary.

DEPARTMENT OF STATE, Washington, December 28, 1861.

BEN. M. SAMUELS, Esq., Dubuque, Iowa.

SIR: Application has been made to this Department by the Hon. James Harlan for permission

for you to see the correspondence of George W. Jones, a prisoner now confined in Fort

Lafayette. In reply I have to state the rules at present adopted by the Department forbid

compliance with your request.

I am, sir, very respectfully, your obedient servant,

F. W. SEWARD,

Assistant General.

DEPARTMENT OF STATE, Washington, January 10, 1862.

Hon. JAMES W. GRIMES, U. S. Senate.

SIR: Your letter of the 7th instant requesting information in regard to the ground upon which

George W. Jones was arrested has been received. In reply I am directed by the Secretary of State

to say that he was arrested upon a charge that while holding the position of minister of the United

58

States in New Granada he was engaged in treasonable correspondence with Jefferson Davis and

other persons engaged in a conspiracy against this Government.

I have the honor to be, very respectfully, your obedient servant,

F. W. SEWARD,

Assistant Secretary.

WAR DEPARTMENT, Washington, February 21, 1862.

Lieut. Col. MARTIN BURKE,

Fort Lafayette, New York Harbor.

COLONEL: You may release on the 22d day of February instant the following-named

prisoners confined in Fort Lafayette upon their engaging upon their honor that they will render

no aid or comfort to the enemies in hostility to the Government of the United States. George W.

Jones. By order of the Secretary of War:

L. THOMAS,

Adjutant-General.

FORT LAFAYETTE,

New York Harbor, February 22, 1862.

We, the undersigned, do solemnly promise upon our word of honor that we will render no aid

or comfort to the enemies in hostility to the Government of the United States.

GEO. W. JONES.

[AND 35 OTHERS.]

Witness:

HARRY C. EGBERT,

First Lieutenant, Twelfth Infantry.

WAR DEPARTMENT, Washington, March 3, 1862.

Hon. JAMES W. GRIMES, U.S. Senate.

SIR: The Secretary of War directs me to acknowledge your letter of the 31st ultimo and its

inclosures to the Secretary of State asking that copies of the intercepted letters of George W.

Jones, of Dubuque, Iowa, may be furnished to you, and to state in reply that for reasons affecting

the public welfare he feels it to be his duty respectfully to decline complying with your request at

the present time.

I have the honor to be, your obedient servant,

P. H. WATSON,

Assistant Secretary of War.

DEPARTMENT OF STATE, Washington, March 31, 1862.

Hon. JAMES W. GRIMES, U.S. Senate.

SIR: Your letter of this date and its two inclosures relative to the intercepted correspondence

of Mr. George W. Jones has been duly received. In reply I have the honor to inform you that the

subject shall be brought before the Secretary of War, to whom all these papers were transferred

on February 14, 1862.

I have the honor to be, sir, your obedient servant,

F. W. SEWARD,

Assistant Secretary.

DEPARTMENT OF STATE, Washington, January 16, 1863.

59

E. R. MEADE, Esq.

DEAR SIR: I received the note which you addressed to me on the 14th instant informing me

that you have been retained by George W. Jones, of Iowa, to institute proceedings against roe for

damages growing out of his recent arrest and imprisonment, and in consideration of courtesy and

mutual convenience suggest that if it should be agreeable to me I might refer you to attorneys in

New York who could enter an appearance for me and thereby dispense with personal service of

process. I thank you very sincerely for the consideration which you have manifested in this

respect, and pray you to be assured that it is duly appreciated.

I have to state in reply to your suggestion that the matter involved is an official one, and I am

not at liberty to unite or favor the proceedings which you regard it as your duty to institute. For

this reason I must leave you to conduct the affair in your own way. Your letter is marked

personal, which is very proper so far as you are concerned, but the same consideration which I

have before mentioned has obliged me to regard it as a public one, and that communication

together with this answer has thereupon been submitted to the President of the United States.

I am, dear sir, your very obedient servant,

W. H. SEWARD.

William M. Hill was arrested January 8, 1862, by the U.S. marshal of Iowa at the city of Des

Moines on an order of the Secretary of State dated December 28, 1861, and was conveyed to

Fort Lafayette. The charges against Hill were disloyalty to the United States Government and

treasonable correspondence with the rebels. The following extracts are taken from a letter written

by Hill for publication in the South. After writing the above letter and during the summer of

1861 Hill made a visit to Virginia, by some means having obtained permission to pass the

Confederate lines, and was absent several weeks. The said William M. Hill remained in custody

at Fort Lafayette February 15, 1862, when in conformity with the order of the War Department

of the preceding day he was transferred to the charge of that Department.--From Record Book,

State Department, "Arrests for Disloyalty."

DES MOINES, IOWA, December 17, 1861.

DEAR KASSON: Since writing you the other day I have positive information that the

counsel for the defendant furnished to the clerk the names which he placed in the box from

which the jury which is to try Hill was drawn. The most notorious and rabid secessionists in the

State are on the jury, and his conviction on any state of facts is absolutely impossible.

I have talked with Sells and others who concur in the opinion which I have heretofore

expressed to you, to wit, that the indictment should be nollied and the accused committed to

military custody. His absolute discharge will exasperate the loyal people of the State and

embolden the secessionists. I find that it will be impossible for me to make any preparations to

assist in the trial of the cause, and if any counsel is assigned you will confer a favor by naming

some other man to the Attorney-General.

I will not forget, however, your kindness in this matter. Mrs. W.'s health is quite feeble. The

baby is doing finely. Mrs. Goodwin is now with us.

Truly, &c.,

THO. F. WITHROW.

DES MOINES, December 25, 1861.

Hon. W. H. SEWARD, Secretary of State, Washington.

SIR: At the November term of the U.S. district court for the district of Iowa one William M.

Hill, a citizen of this State, was indicted and presented by the grand jury charging him with

60

treason. The indictment was based more particularly on a letter written by him, a printed copy of

which I send herewith, with a statement of the case clipped from the editorial columns of the

Iowa State Register.

The accused will not be found guilty though of his guilt there can be no question. There is a

large secession element in the jury selected to try him. I am convinced that the accused intends to

go South as soon as he is released and that he will be able to give the rebels much valuable

information. His acquittal would be a severe blow to the cause of the Union in our State. Traitors

of whom we have many will be emboldened.

Under the circumstances I believe it would be better for the Government to enter a nolle and

have him committed to military custody by order of the State Department.

I am, sir, very respectfully, your obedient servant,

H. M. HOXIE,

U.S. Marshal, District of Iowa.

P. S.--I also inclose a letter from Hon. S. J. Kirkwood, governor of this State.

DES MOINES, December 25, 1861.

Hon. W. H. SEWARD, Secretary of State, Washington.

SIR: At the November term of the U.S. district court for the district of Iowa one William M.

Hill, a citizen of this State, was indicted and presented by the grand jury charging him with

treason. The indictment was based more particularly on a letter written by him, a printed copy of

which I send herewith, with a statement of the case clipped from the editorial columns of the

Iowa State Register.

The accused will not be found guilty though of his guilt there can be no question. There is a

large secession element in the jury selected to try him. I am convinced that the accused intends to

go South as soon as he is released and that he will be able to give the rebels much valuable

information. His acquittal would be a severe blow to the cause of the Union in our State. Traitors

of whom we have many will be emboldened.

Under the circumstances I believe it would be better for the Government to enter a nolle and

have him committed to military custody by order of the State Department.

I am, sir, very respectfully, your obedient servant,

H. M. HOXIE,

U.S. Marshal, District of Iowa.

P. S.--I also inclose a letter from Hon. S. J. Kirkwood, governor of this State.

INDICTMENT FOR TREASON.

Soon after the commencement of the present term of the U.S. district court in this city

information was filed against Capt. William M. Hill, of Magnolia, Harrison County, Iowa,

charging him with certain treasonable words and acts. A warrant was thereupon issued by Judge

Love and U.S. Marshal H. M. Hoxie proceeded to Harrison County to make the arrest. He found

Mr. Hill at home, served the warrant and started on his return to Des Moines. In Magnolia and in

Council Bluffs there were threats by secessionists that they would rescue Hill from the custody

of the marshal, but fortunately for them the attempt was not made and the prisoner was brought

safely to this city.

A portion of the information upon which the arrest was made was substantially as follows:

Hill was formerly a resident of Monroe County, Va. He has resided in Harrison County five or

six years, during which he held we think for two terms the office of clerk of the district court.

Last summer he concluded to visit his old home in Virginia; by some means obtained permission

to pass the Confederate lines and was absent from this State several weeks.

61

During his absence a letter came to his address from the Dead-Letter Office in Washington

which upon examination proved to have been one which he had written to the Union Democrat, a

secession paper in Monroe County, Va. It had been stopped by some U.S. officer and sent to the

Dead-Letter Office, where, falling into the hands of some traitorous employee, it was remailed to

Hill. Instead of reaching the hands of its author, however, it was in his absence opened by his

deputy J. L. Deforest, a loyal Union man, its contents made known to others and finally

published at length in the Magnolia Republican. Subsequently a private letter written by Mr. Hill

found its way to the Dead-Letter Office in Washington, and falling into proper custody there it

was sent to the U.S. officers of this State for their consideration.

These and other matters were put into tangible shape, the warrant issued and the arrest made

as we have above stated, and on Monday last after a careful examination of the case a bill of

indictment was found by the grand jury against Mr. Hill for treason and his trial assigned for the

7th of January next, at a special term of the U.S. district court to be held in this city. He has

retained as his counsel Messrs. C. C. Cole and S. V. White. The prosecution will be conducted

by W. H. F. Gurley, U.S. district attorney.

The following is a copy of the letter sent by Hill to Virginia, and returned to Magnolia:

CLERKS OFFICE, Magnolia, Iowa, May 14, 1861.

EDITOR UNION DEMOCRAT, Union, Monroe County, Va.:

Some good friend from my far-off paternal home sends me your paper. Whoever caused my

name to be placed upon your book cannot be a submissionist, else the patriotic and Southern

Rights sentiments breathed through your editorials would be suppressed. Continue to forward

your paper to my address, and when I am informed of the amount due on subscription the same

will be sent you. The Democrat is a welcome visitor. First among the exchanges and

correspondents it is opened and read because it hails from the land that is dear to me, hallowed

by the recollection of youthful days, passed amid the mountain sceneries that overlook your

beautiful town; the thoughts of aged parents, relatives and friends in the Southern clime, with

whom I journeyed as youthful days pleasantly fleeted away. All, all makes the tidings from my

paternal home eagerly sought after and interesting.

Truly, Mr. Editor, these are exciting times. The old ship of state that has carried us safely

through storms and perils drifting rapidly toward the breakers. Yea, she has struck and must go

to pieces never again to be reconstructed.

Who has brought this dire calamity upon us? Not the conservative men of the South, nor the

conservative voters of the North. The demons in the shape of Black Republicans and Abolition

rulers have so misled the excitable masses of the North by such doctrines as set out in Uncle

Tom's Cabin and such as taught by Beecher, Greeley, &c., that the fanatics believe they are

doing God's service to wage a war of extermination against the Southern slave-holders. Yes, Mr.

Editor, the black-hearted fanatics have caused the dark clouds of war to hang over us, and this

once peaceful and happy Union to be deluged with the blood of relatives and friends, and the

Union destroyed.

Conservative citizens in this portion of the West justify the course the South is taking and

condemn this Black Republican Administration for waging this unholy and unjust war upon the

South. All over the Northwestern States are thousands and tens of thousands of Union-loving

Democrats who say amen and God speed you in your noble work in driving back the hordes of

unprincipled Abolitionists who bide the calling of a sectional Administration to plunder the

citizens of the South. Never let them pollute your sacred soil.

In the opinion of a majority of the citizens of the Northern States, and perhaps of a majority

of this town and my adopted county, the foregoing are entire secession sentiments. I know I am

pronounced a traitor by the negro worshipers, but my opinion is given now as has been given

62

since I have resided in the State. I have fought the Abolitionists through each canvass with pen

and tongue, and shall continue on, though my office and press are threatened by the friends of

the renowned John Brown.

I am not alone with regard to the views expressed concerning our national difficulties. The

conservative Democracy are with me. I give your readers an idea of the views of the

conservative Democrats of the Northwest. I clip from The Council Bluffs Bugle, a leading

Democratic paper, which I make a part of this communication. I indorse it, as every conservative

man North will. (Here follows an extract from the Bugle.)

I clip another editorial from The New York News, which represents the faithful of the State

who have ever faithfully battled against negro equality and for the rights of the Southern States.

(Here please state that in this communication follows a printed extract from The New York

News.)

I find words local and will bid your readers farewell. Not a company nor a volunteer will

leave Western Iowa to obey the call of Lincoln to battle with the Southern troops. The

Government has called the troops stationed at Fort Randall and Fort Kearny and leaves our

frontier exposed to the invasion of the hostile Indians. Volunteer companies are being formed for

home protection. The Government stopped the transportation of all provisions down the Missouri

River. This act is arousing the masses against the Government and making friends for the cause

of the South.

A thousand cheers for the Monroe volunteers! In their ranks I see the names of a brother and

relatives. May they cover themselves with glory in this struggle and be an ornament to the State

and the Southern Confederacy.

I have spun out this communication too long and perhaps it should go, if at all, on the outside

of the Democrat.

WM. M. HILL.

Mr. Windell, if you think the foregoing would interest your readers, give it a place in your

paper, after correcting bad spelling, &c. If desired I may correspond occasionally.

DES MOINES, December 25, 1861.

Hon. WILLIAM H. SEWARD,

Secretary of State, Washington City.

SIR: Mr. Hoxie, U.S. marshal for this State, informs me he has written you in regard to one

Hill indicted for treason in U.S. district court of the State and whose case is set for trial at a

special term of said court to be holden at this place on the 7th day of next month.

I have information on which I rely that a large number of the jurors selected by the deputy

clerk for the trial of said cause are in sympathy with the rebels. I have personal knowledge that

such is [the] fact as to one or two of them. Under these circumstances a conviction is at least

doubtful and I should regard a failure to convict as a misfortune. An acquittal would embolden

men who are silent only from fear to speak out against the Government.

I state what I believe to be facts, and would suggest if within the rule upon which you have

heretofore acted that Hill be removed from the State by your order and imprisoned elsewhere

under military authority. The evidences of his guilt will as I hear from Marshal Hoxie be sent to

you by him. Permit me also to suggest the necessity for some change in the law for the selection

of jurors and the empaneling of juries. I am of opinion that the sympathies of many of the district

as well as higher judges are at least doubtful. Their clerks, selected by themselves, are of like

sympathies, and from these causes our courts instead of being as they should be, a support to the

Government and a terror to traitors, are made points of attack against the one and a shield to the

other.

63

I have the honor to be, very respectfully, your obedient servant,

SAMUEL J. KIRKWOOD

DEPARTMENT OF STATE, Washington, December 28, 1861.

H. M. HOXIE, Esq., Des Moines, Iowa.

SIR: Arrest and convey to Fort Lafayette, N. Y., William M. Hill as soon as he is discharged

from civil custody under the present indictment against him in the U.S. district court in Iowa.

I am, sir, very respectfully, your obedient servant,

F. W. SEWARD,

Assistant Secretary.

DEPARTMENT OF STATE, Washington, December 28, 1861.

H. M. HOXIE, Esq., Des Moines, Iowa.

SIR: Arrest and convey to Fort Lafayette, N. Y., William M. Hill as soon as he is discharged

from civil custody under the present indictment against him in the U.S. district court in Iowa.

I am, sir, very respectfully, your obedient servant,

F. W. SEWARD,

Assistant Secretary.

FORT LAFAYETTE, N. Y., January 19, 1862.

Hon. WILLIAM H. SEWARD, Department of State, Washington.

DEAR SIR: Since confined here I have been informed that you would learn from the accused

statements and facts which led to the arrest and confinement of persons in this fort. This was

truly gratifying news to me, believing that when heard I will be released. I herewith hastily

condense my statement.

Last spring my wife left Magnolia, Iowa (my residence), to visit her friends in Virginia.

Shortly after her arrival the civil war broke out in Western Virginia and the mails were stopped.

She could not return home, neither could I receive any communication relative to her return or

safety. I was informed through the medium of the press that no citizen of the North could pass

Wise's or Floyd's lines, all being held as spies and their enemies. To aid me in passing these

armies--to pave my way through them--to reach my family and return with them home I

composed a sympathizing letter directed to a little county paper published in the county where

my family had gone to visit, designed to allay any prejudices against me and to accomplish the

object already stated.

I did pass the armies, met my family and in forty days from the time I left I was at my home

in Iowa.

This letter was returned from the Department in my absence and was published in several

papers in the State, commented upon and exaggerated. Some charged that I had left my judicial

office, all my property and a part of my family to join the rebellion. Thus I was misrepresented

and also my motives by designing men who envied me the office of clerk of the district and who

represented that I could not nor did net intend to return to Iowa.

Under these circumstances I was not surprised that I was indicted, having no opportunity to

explain the designs and motives in writing a sympathetic letter to my wife's friends in Virginia.

The U.S. district court appointed a special term to hear my case. I gave bail for my appearance

and at the time appointed I appeared in court. The U.S. attorney after being apprised of the

circumstances and the evidence against me entered a nolle prosequi in my case and I was

discharged. (It was at the sacrifice of much of my means that I procured counsel (of attorney)

and traveling witness 400 miles to defend the civil action against me.)

64

Shortly after my discharge I was arrested by your honor's order and confined in this fort. I

respectfully state further and hope by them and the proof thereof [you] will honorably discharge

me from confinement. Not a citizen of Western Iowa who is acquainted with me and the

circumstances under which the imprudent letter was written but will petition for my release. I can

obtain the proof and petitions of thousands who know me and my loyalty. I can obtain the

prayer of Judge Love, U.S. judge of Iowa; Mr. Gurley, U.S. attorney, and H. M. Hoxie, U.S.

marshal, who are acquainted with all the evidence against me and who will plead that I have

already been punished enough for my imprudence in writing the letter referred to.

I have ever been a loyal citizen. Nothing in this world could have induced me to take up arms

against my Government or give aid and comfort to the enemy. All I possess in this world is in

my adopted State. I have no interest nor affinity in the South. I can obtain the prayers of nearly

all the jury summoned in my case; also every Government witness petitioning that my design

was not to injure the Government, and thousands of citizens who know my loyalty. The State

Flag, a newspaper I published during the last campaign, I can produce as other evidence that I

have charged and blamed the ultras of the South with being the instigators of all our troubles.

With these facts stated by the high judicial authorities of Iowa and all others I have named

may I not fondly hope to soon meet my family again (to whom I am fondly attached, and who

are now among strangers without parental care)? If my loyalty is questioned I will readily take a

solemn obligation to do and perform every act the Government may make incumbent upon me in

this or any other crisis. Could I be released on parole? If so I can obtain an exchange to amply

satisfy my Government, and to this end I will give such security as may be required.

I desire remaining at this place the length of time I am confined rather than at Fort Warren. I

await an answer with much suspense.

Humbly, your servant,

WILLIAM M. HILL

DES MOINES, January 27, 1862.

Hon. W. H. SEWARD, Secretary of State, Washington.

SIR: I inclose herewith a card clipped from the columns of the Iowa State Register, which

was rendered proper by the attacks of certain disloyal newspapers.

Hill is the leader of a class of our citizens who reside near the border of the State of Missouri

that are detrimental to the Union cause.

Since returning a civil action has been commenced against me to recover $1,000 forfeiture

under the provisions of the Iowa habeas corpus act for disregarding a writ which was served

upon me while on my way to Fort Lafayette. Steps are being taken by C. C. Cole, one of Hill's

attorneys, who is a sympathizer with the leaders of the rebellion, to procure the release of Hill. I

respectfully suggest the propriety of con-suiting His Excellency Governor Kirkwood and the

State officers of this State before issuing any order for the release of said William M. Hill.

I am, sir, very respectfully, your obedient servant,

H. M. HOXIE,

U. S. Marshal, District of Iowa.

CARD FROM MARSHAL HOXIE TO THE PUBLIC.

The numerous false statements which have been put in circulation by a disloyal press

concerning my conduct in the arrest and transfer of William M. Hill to Fort Lafayette render a

brief recital of the facts at least proper.

65

Hill was indicted by the grand jury at the last term of the U.S. district court for the western

division of the district of Iowa for treason against the Government. His offense as I am informed

consisted in writing letters to the rebels, of which the following is a sample:

Without entering into details it is sufficient to say that the fact that he wrote the above letter

and others is established beyond dispute and is not denied by him. His trial was set for the 7th of

January and a special jury was drawn and summoned for the purpose. On Thursday, the 3d day

of January, 1862, I received from the post-office in Des Moines an official notification from the

district attorney who was then in Washington of his purpose to enter a nolle in the case pursuant

to instructions received from time Attorney. General of the United States. On Saturday, the 5th

of the same month, I received an order over the signature of William H. Seward, Secretary of

State, bearing date of December 28, 1861, commanding me to arrest and convey to Fort

Lafayette William M. Hill as soon as he is discharged from civil custody under the present

indictment against him in the U.S. district court in Iowa. On the 8th of January I received a letter

from the Assistant Secretary of State, bearing date of January 2, 1862, advising me that the order

above referred to had been issued.

I did not stop to make inquiries as to the new light of which the State Department was

possessed or the reasons upon which this new action was based. My duty as an officer to execute

the order seemed clear and I resolved to do it. On the evening of the 8th I made the arrest at the

Des Moines House in this city and immediately started for Fort Lafayette. There was nothing

unusual or remarkable in the manner in which the arrest was made. The prisoner was in the

office of the Des Moines House when arrested. He quietly made such arrangements for the

journey as were necessary, and when he left the office some time after he was taken into custody

other persons who were there during the entire time noticed no unusual occurrence.

On the 10th we were met on the cars of the Mississippi and Missouri Railroad by the deputy

sheriff of Scott County, who served upon me a writ of habeas corpus, issued by Judge Linderman

of the county court upon the application of James Grant, an attorney. Without immediately

determining in my own mind what course to pursue I proceeded to Davenport and delivered my

prisoner to the jailer of the county for safe-keeping until again demanded. After consulting with

those whose advice I deemed it proper to ask I resolved to disregard the writ as has been

repeatedly done by other marshals having the custody of military prisoners. I demanded the

prisoner of the jailer, received him and went on my way. On the 16th of January I delivered him

to the commandant of Fort Lafayette, as his receipt now in my possession attests. At no time was

any unnecessary hardship practiced upon the prisoner.

The above statement has been rendered necessary by rumor and newspaper articles of which

the following is a sample:

MORE OF THE HILL KIDNAPPING CASE.

From one of our citizens who has been traveling in Illinois we gather a few items concerning

the movements of the scoundrel Hoxie and his kidnapped prisoner, Captain Hill. It appears that

Hoxie was afraid of an attempt at rescue if he did not put a long distance between himself and

the place of his theft, and therefore hired a conveyance and pushed on to Viola, in Mercer

County. Here our informant saw them Saturday morning. Hill was in chains and was compelled

to lie down on the floor with a guard over him. Our informant inquired into the nature of the

offense and was told that Hill was a runaway military prisoner who had been captured in a house

of ill-fame in Davenport. Subsequently, however, Mr. Hill gave our informant the particulars of

the arrest and Hoxie's villainy.

During the recital Hoxie threatened his prisoner with severe punishment if he did not shut his

mouth. Mr. Hill said that all he asked for was his rights guaranteed to him under the Constitution

66

of the United States--a fair and impartial trial--but that now he was beyond the reach of his

friends he had no hopes of being heard until the Government reached his case, which may be in a

month, and perhaps not in a year. Hoxie told our informant that he must keep a close mouth in

Davenport regarding what he had seen and heard, but the scamp mistook his man when he

undertook to frighten our informant into silence. What surprises us is that Mr. Hill should so

tamely submit to the outrage of being carried off after having been released by course of law

from the custody of the marshal. Hoxie in Hill's presence acknowledged that he stole his prisoner

from the jail--at least so our informant says. Hill would have been justified in letting daylight

into Hoxie and then returning to stand his trial, and he should have done just that very thing.

From what we can learn the proper tools for his release were offered him by more than one

individual during the morning the party tarried in Viola.

These paragraphs contain but a single truth. I was in Viola on Saturday morning. Hill was not

in chains and never had been. He was not compelled to lie down on the floor. No one was told

that Hill was a runaway military prisoner who had been captured in Davenport, but the

bystanders were told that he had been indicted as a traitor and that I held him a military prisoner

under an order from the President to deliver him to Fort Lafayette. I did not threaten to inflict

severe punishment upon him or in any other way restrain his statements. The charge that he had

been cleared of crime by a jury of his countrymen is simply false.

The only action that has ever been taken in his case was by the grand jury which indicted

him. The Attorney-General saw proper to nolle that indictment and discharge him from civil

custody for reasons which were doubtless satisfactory to him. The proper Department issued the

order to take him into military custody and I executed the order. General Banks refused to obey a

writ of habeas corpus issued by Chief-Justice Taney and General Dix not only refused to obey a

writ issued in a similar case, but issued an order for the arrest of the attorneys who sued it out. I

held Hill as a military prisoner, and with such examples did not feel disposed to stop and discuss

with every pettifogger between Des Moines and Fort Lafayette the power of the Commander-in-

Chief and those acting under his orders to disregard the writ, when it is sought to be interposed in

revolutionary times for the relief of such prisoners. It was my business to obey an order issued by

the proper Department in the manner authorized by approved precedents, and not to discuss

constitutional law and the powers to be exercised by the Government when engaged in a contest

with domestic traitors, the issue of which involves the very existence of the Government.

I arrested Hill and took him to Fort Lafayette and have nothing to regret in connection with

the transaction. If any similar orders shall be directed to me in the future they will be as promptly

executed. If secret sympathizers with or open partisans of traitors can draw any consolation from

this assurance they are entirely welcome to it.

H. M. HOXIE.

FORT LAFAYETTE, N. Y., February 7, 1862.

Hon. WILLIAM H. SEWARD, Department of State, Washington.

DEAR SIR: Some three weeks since I was informed that you would hear the statements of

those confined here relative to charges of the Government against them. Thus understanding I

made mine condensed in a space that would make it understood. I am well aware of the pressing

and urgent business under your charge, all of which is more urgent than robie, and you may have

not, reached my case or my letter may not have reached you, and thus anticipating I hope you

will pardon my calling up my case and troubling you again.

You are aware that the U.S. attorney (Gurley) of Iowa after advisement with your

Department of State dismissed the civil process against me satisfied that there was not a citizen

67

of the State of Iowa who could find me guilty of the charge after the circumstances surrounding

the case.

I have in my former letter stated why the imprudent letter was written by myself to a friend in

Virginia, namely: My family were there on a visit; I could not hear from them and was informed

that I could not pass the armies to reach them and return with them to my home in the West. I

published The Harrison County Flag (Iowa) and took a strong part against Davis et al. and their

efforts to break up the Union and the party to which I was attached. Many copies of my paper

went to Virginia. I knew I had made enemies there, and the letter written was to reach my family

and to allay for a time the prejudices against me as a citizen of the North.

I regret the aim to dissolve the Union and this rebellion. I have no interest in the South; never

expect to reside there. All I have in this world in the way of property is in my adopted State, and

there, too, I have a young family among strangers and must be suffering for the want of parental

care. I wish I could forward you a copy of the letter. In it I am sure you could see no treason.

I hope you will find it convenient to refer to U.S. Judge Love, U.S. Attorney Gurley and U.S.

Marshal Hoxie, of Iowa, for the proof of my statement of my case. I am willing to readily

subscribe to the oath of allegiance in as binding terms as may be required. I have spent more than

one-half of all my means in defense of the civil charges against me from which by the

instructions of the Government I have been acquitted. It seems hard indeed after all my battles

and sacrifice of my limited means and discharge from the accusation against me that I am

confined here and undergoing another punishment for writing an imprudent letter only, for which

I have already suffered much; but I will submit patiently hoping when my case is reached I will

be released by taking the oath. I await.

Respectfully, your obedient servant,

WM. M. HILL.

DES MOINES, February 12, 1862.

W. M. HILL, Fort Lafayette.

SIR: I have seen a letter addressed to a number of State officers by you in which you say that

I am willing to interpose in your behalf in your efforts to procure a discharge from Fort

Lafayette. Justice to yourself as well as myself requires that you should understand my position

clearly. Those claiming to act as your friends have attempted through the secession press of this

State to fill the public mind with false statements concerning my conduct in connection with

your arrest, and your attorney claiming to act under your instructions has instituted one civil suit

against me and proposes to try his hand at another. A criminal prosecution was even attempted

and failed. To ask any interference on my part under these circumstances is exacting too much of

human nature and I shall therefore decline to interfere in your case.

Respectfully, &c.,

H. M. HOXIE,

U.S. Marshal, District of Iowa.

WASHINGTON CITY, February 16, 1862.

[WILLIAM M. HILL.]

DEAR SIR: I have this morning received yours of the 12th instant, addressed to the entire

delegation in Congress. I will lay it before them to-morrow morning and advise you of their

action. I have no doubt, however, but you will be released very soon under the recent order of the

President. I may say for myself that I have seen and conversed with the U. S. attorney for Iowa

on the subject of your arrest and confinement, and will say frankly that his statements agree

substantially with your narrative.

68

I have no doubt but General Jones will also soon be released. Should you have the

opportunity say to him that I have conversed with Mr. Seward in relation to his case very

recently. I send by this mail some Iowa papers for you and him.

Yours, &c.,

JAS. HARLAN,

[U. S. Senator.]

DES MOINES, February 16, 1862.

W. M. HILL, Esq.

DEAR SIR: A letter has been received by the governor addressed to him and other State

officers, myself included, asking a recommendation from us for your release. While I might

under ordinary circumstances be in favor of granting your request, it is proper for me to say that

your legal adviser in this city having commenced proceedings in court to recover damages from

the U. S. marshal of this State for doing his duty in arresting and conveying you to Fort Lafayette

you can hardly expect any interference from us in your behalf while that prosecution is pending.

Very respectfully,

F. W. PALMER.

DES MOINES, IOWA, February 20, 1862.

Hon. WILLIAM H. SEWARD, Secretary of State.

SIR: Has the President ever made a formal order suspending the privileges of the writ of

habeas corpus? If he has will you be kind enough to cause a copy to be sent me. I make the

application as the attorney of H. M. Hoxie, U.S. marshal, against whom an action is now pending

to recover the forfeiture provided by statute for disregarding a writ of habeas corpus. The action

was brought by William M. Hill, who was recently by your order consigned to Fort Lafayette.

Very respectfully,

THO. F. WITHROW.

FORT LAFAYETTE, New York Harbor, February 23, 1862.

Hon. EDWIN M. STANTON, War Department, Washington.

DEAR SIR: I had fondly hoped that your recent proclamation would have reached my case

and that I would have been released as a political prisoner. Some forty prisoners were discharged

from this fort yesterday whose misdemeanors and offenses were of more magnitude than the one

I am supposed to have committed. My misdemeanor is writing a sympathizing letter to friends in

Virginia from Iowa, my adopted home. For this, too, I have been tried before the civil authorities

of my State and honorably acquitted. I refer you to U. S. Attorney Gurley, of Iowa (who is now

in Washington), and Senator James Harlan from Iowa.

I am willing to subscribe to the reasonable requisition of your proclamation or to take the

oath of allegiance, and if required give any other obligation or security that may be required. All

my property and interest is in a loyal State, where I expect to remain the residue of life. May I

hope to hear of my release by return mail.

I am, very respectfully, your obedient servant,

WM. M. HILL.

FEBRUARY 24, 1862.

I, William M. Hill, of Magnolia, Iowa, a prisoner confined in Fort Lafayette, N. Y., hereby

make application to be released from custody on my parole of honor to render no aid or comfort

to the enemies in hostility to the Government of the United States, in accordance with the terms

69

of Executive Order, No. 1, of the War Department, dated February 14, 1862, in reference to

political prisoners.

WILLIAM M. HILL.

SENATE CHAMBER, Washington, February 26, 1862.

The SECRETARY OF WAR.

SIR: We respectfully request that William M. Hill, a citizen of the United States residing in

Iowa now in confinement at Fort Lafayette on an order as it is said emanating from the Secretary

of State on account of suspicion of disloyalty, may be discharged from custody and permitted to

return to his family.

Your obedient servants,

JAS. HARLAN.

JAMES W. GRIMES.

WAR DEPARTMENT, Washington, March 3, 1862.

H. M. HOXIE, Esq., U. S. Marshal, Des Moines, Iowa.

SIR: I have the honor to acknowledge the receipt of your letter of the 27th of January last,

which was addressed to the Secretary of State, and also a letter from Thomas F. Withrow, esq.,

your attorney, relative to the suspension of the writ of habeas corpus in the State of Iowa. In

reply I inclose a copy, authenticated, of an order which was issued by the President on the 6th

day of December last addressed to Major-General Halleck, commanding the Department of the

Missouri, suspending the execution of the writ of habeas corpus within his command. I have

also to inform you that by an order which was issued from this Department on the 9th day of

August, 1861, the State of Iowa was included within the Department of the Missouri.

I am, sir, &c.,

E. M. STANTON,

Secretary of War.

WAR DEPARTMENT, Washington, March 3, 1862.

H. M. HOXIE, Esq., U. S. Marshal, Des Moines, Iowa:

What are the names of the attorneys who have commenced proceedings against you for

refusing to obey a writ of habeas corpus? Answer by telegraph.

E. D. WEBSTER.

FORT LAFAYETTE, N. Y., March 3, 1862.

General JOHN A. DIX, Baltimore, Md.

DEAR SIR: Unless I can get a parole for a few days I will not be able to offer my evidence

explaining the circumstances under which I wrote a letter in which there is seeming aid and

comfort to the rebellion. At that time I was aiming only to get my family through the lines of

Wise and Floyd to their home. I had no thought of committing the act of treason against my

Government. No one thought then the rebellion would assume such magnitude. The letter was

returned to my address and pilfered from the post-office by an enemy, published in a paper that

has ever aimed to traduce my humble name and character. I have read the copy. It is not all my

production. I can get evidence of this at my home. I wrote my wife in Virginia advising her how

to pass the armies. This was directed to some postmaster to forward to her. In that letter to the

postmaster I may have flattered his views for the same designs.

Nearly every citizen of Iowa who is acquainted with my case would petition for my release.

Thousands of devoted Union men have expressed their astonishment to me of the course pursued

70

in my case. If you cannot consistently release me I ask to be remanded to my district? I will give

good bond and go before a grand jury and ask that my case be investigated and will not depart

until I am honorably discharged. I send you a copy of the order of my release before I was

arrested by the marshal; also some comments of newspapers showing the facts of the marshal's

acts. I am not accountable for the course pursued by some of the newspapers of my State. They

censure some of the Government officers. I wish it had been otherwise. It has been no advantage

to me; but it is no fault of mine.

I hope, general, you will excuse my earnest and anxious demeanor. I have no one to present

my case. While I fear the same persons who have formerly misrepresented me may do so again,

all I ask is the evidence from the capital of Iowa (Des Moines) and from Magnolia, my home.

My importance is not to be compared to Mr. Brounlen. While he is a public man of ability, I am

an humble, quiet citizen. Yet he received his liberties after the civil action was dismissed against

him. Hon. F. W. Palmer and the marshal are against my release because of the suits pending

against the marshal. The marshal procured my arrest. You can see his designs.

I remain, general, your obedient servant,

WM. M. HILL.

WAR DEPARTMENT, Washington, March 8, 1862.

Maj. Gen. H. W. HALLECK, Saint Louis, Mo.

GENERAL: I inclose herewith for your information a letter from H. M. Hoxie, esq., the U.S.

marshal for the district of Iowa, relative to proceedings which one C. C. Cole, who is represented

to be a sympathizer with the persons in insurrection against the authority of the Government of

the United States, has commenced against him for declining to obey a writ of habeas corpus

while in the execution of an order from the Secretary of State. The State of Iowa is in your

military department. The President by an order addressed to you on the 6th day of December last

suspended that writ therein.

With a view to this arrest you will adopt such proceedings as you may find necessary to

protect officers who perform whatsoever duties are required of them by the Executive. It is

presumed that the arrest and detention of Mr. C. C. Cole would have a salutary effect. An order

addressed to the U.S. marshal at Des Moines, Iowa, will without doubt be properly executed.

I have the honor to be, &c.,

E. M. STANTON,

Secretary of War.

WAR DEPARTMENT, Washington, March 10, 1862.

Hons. JAMES HARLAN and JAMES W. GRIMES, U. S. Senate.

GENTLEMEN: I have the honor to acknowledge the receipt of your letter of the 26th ultimo,

requesting that "Mr. W. M. Hill, a citizen of the United States residing in Iowa now in

confinement at Fort Lafayette on an order as it is said emanating from the Secretary of State on

account of suspicion of disloyalty, may be discharged from custody and permitted to return to his

family."

In reply I have the honor to state that Mr. Hill is held upon what appears to be conclusive

evidence that he not only sympathized with the enemies in hostility to the Government of the

United States but that he was actually engaged in affording aid and comfort to them in the

character of a spy. It is presumed, however, that in making this request you may have been

actuated by a knowledge of facts of which this Department may not be aware. I will

consequently thank you to state the reasons upon which your application is founded.

I have the honor to be, &c.,

71

E. M. STANTON,

Secretary of War.

SENATE CHAMBER, Washington, March 13, 1862.

Hon. EDWIN M. STANTON, Secretary of War.

SIR: We have the honor to acknowledge the receipt of your letter of the 10th instant

concerning the imprisonment of William M. Hill, of Iowa, at Fort Lafayette. We are informed

that Mr. Hill was indicted by the grand jury of the U.S. district court for Iowa, but that Hon. W.

H. F. Gurley, U.S. district attorney for Iowa, after consultation with the Attorney-General of the

United States entered a nol. pros. in the case on the ground that there was not sufficient evidence

to convict Mr. Hill of treason.

Although at the beginning of the rebellion Mr. Hill's sympathies may have been with the

enemies of the Government we do not believe he has been guilty of any act of treason, and from

the best information we have now before us we believe him to be in sympathy with the

Government and that he has been sufficiently punished for any improper acts of which we have

any knowledge.

Your obedient servants,

JAS HARLAN.

JAMES W. GRIMES.

SAINT LOUIS, March 15, 1862.

H. M. HOXIE, Esq., U.S. Marshal, Des Moines.

SIR: I had authority to declare martial law in Iowa but have never exercised it. I have made

and send herewith an order in relation to Hill in order to protect you so far as I can. I must have

immediately a full report of the facts of the case in order to justify me in this proceeding. Unless

this is given and it is satisfactorily stated that it is necessary for public good to exercise this

power the order will be revoked.

I am inclined to think from your letter to Secretary Seward that this difficulty has grown out

of some newspaper quarrel. If so I shall have nothing further to do with it. I permit the

newspapers to abuse me to their hearts' content and I advise you to do the same. It is, however, a

very difficult matter where they assist and encourage the enemies of our Government in this

unholy rebellion.

Very respectfully, your obedient servant,

H. W. HALLECK,

Major-General.

SAINT LOUIS, March 15, 1862.

H. M. HOXIE, Esq.,

U.S. Marshal, District of Iowa, Des Moines:

By virtue of authority conferred on me by the President of the United States I direct that you

do not release William M. Hill without the proper orders from these headquarters, the privilege

of the writ of habeas corpus being suspended in regard to said Hill. You are authorized to

disregard the writ or process of any civil court which may have been or may be issued for the

release or production before the court of the body of the prisoner.

H. W. HALLECK,

Major-general.

FORT LAFAYETTE, N. Y., March 17, 1862.

72

General JOHN A. DIX,

Hon. Judge PIERREPONT,

Commissioners, Washington City.

GENTLEMEN: I have aimed to forward to you the evidence of my trial and acquittal in my

State and district of the accusation of treason, the same charge under which I am held here as a

political prisoner. I am hopeful that this evidence with evidence in my behalf is before you.

I will reiterate though that I am only accused of writing a sympathizing letter to friends in

Virginia long before the rebellion assumed the magnitude it has (May, 1861). This imprudent

letter, too, was written while my wife was there on a visit, and pleading for a way or passage

through the armies of Virginia to her home in Iowa. The letter was designed to pave my way

through the armies who would otherwise have denied me a passage, and would in my opinion

have been held as a spy and refused me passage and prevented me returning with my wife to my

home in a loyal State. With much difficulty I made the journey and returned to my home and

office.

The citizens of my State and the legal tribunal through which I have been made to pass with

this mistaken charge against me have judged that I committed an imprudent act only, and all

have been surprised that I have been made to bear the punishment I have, and all would without

distinction of party speed the day of my release. Had not the marshal of the State with seeming

malicious and speculative designs filed the information against me and urged my prosecution the

Government or no one else would have judged I had designed to commit treason against my

Government, nor would my humble and quiet position as a citizen ever been noticed by legal or

Government counsel. I may be all wrong in so referring to the marshal of Iowa, but the journals

of the State I have sent you expose his illegal acts in my prosecution for which he has been sued

(but not at my request or will). His exposition has brought him and a few of his friends down

upon my incarcerated head and they are again misrepresenting me. I am thankful I am not to pass

under their judgment, but under yours, who will judge me as I deserve.

I have aimed to forward you letters of Messrs. Harlan and Grimes, Iowa Senators, who have

been made acquainted with my offense and who have made written request to the War

Department for my release (since your appointment). I refer you to them; also to U.S. Attorney

Gurley for Iowa, now in Washington; to U.S. Judge Love of Iowa, who judged me not guilty of

treason; who tried me and honorably acquitted me. I wish I could refer you to the opinion of the

press and the almost unanimous [voice] of the citizens of Iowa in my favor. But I must not

intrude more upon your time. I have asked in case you cannot immediately discharge me to send

me to my State and district, where I will ask a bill being found and a trial before those who are

well acquainted with my loyalty; where I will neither ask to challenge a juror nor introduce a

witness, nor depart until my title to freedom is clear. I have asked, too, for a parole to seek my

liberty through an exchange of some grade designated by the Government--to secure my liberty

and return to my office, my home and suffering family. I have asked to renew my pledge of

loyalty by taking the oath of allegiance. I have no interest in Virginia nor in this rebellion. All I

possess is in Iowa, my home. I must be excused for presenting my own case. I have no

acquaintance to plead for me nearer than Iowa.

With hopes to hear from you soon, I remain, gentlemen, humbly, yours,

WM. M. HILL.

FORT LAFAYETTE, N. Y., March 18, 1862.

Hon. EDWIN M. STANTON, War Department, Washington.

DEAR SIR: Senator Harlan and Senator Grimes, of Iowa, kindly sent me your letter

addressed to them concerning the charges against [me] and my release.

73

I am much surprised to learn that I am charged with disloyalty, aiding and comforting the

enemies and even [being] a spy. Whoever has made these accusations against me has done me

great injustice. The only act of error and imprudence I have committed was in writing a letter to

Virginia while my family were there to enable me to pass the armies and get my family home.

Had I not resorted to flattery, sympathy and deception I would likely have been incarcerated in a

Southern prison as a spy in my endeavors to get my family home. I repeat again frankly and

honestly and truthfully that was all that induced me to write at all to Virginia, and this letter, too,

was written long before the rebellion assumed the magnitude it has (May, 1861), since which

time and before I have acted the part of a loyal citizen in a loyal district and State, having no

communication with the South nor desiring any; and living content a thousand miles from the

South how unreasonable it is that I can be charged as a spy. If I was a traitor or desired the

success of the rebellion I would have remained in Virginia, but I have no interest there nor any in

the South nor in the rebellion. All my interests are in Iowa, and I would I could refer the

Department to the citizens of my district and get their truthful verdict as a loyal citizen.

I know I have been much wronged in this prosecution by the marshal of the State, who with a

few others for the per diem and fees and through seeming malice have made me suffer for many

months in this prison while my family are among strangers. For the truth of this hasty assertion I

refer your honor to my trial and acquittal under charge of treason in the U.S. court of Iowa, to

U.S. Judge Love and U.S. Attorney Gurley.

To get me confined here the marshal kidnapped me--stole me from the custody of an officer

who had served upon him the sacred writ of habeas corpus for my release. Thus I have been

misrepresented and thus denied the benefit of the habeas corpus writ, and, too, after having been

acquitted of the same charge that stands in your Department.

I have asked to be discharged. If refused I ask to be sent to my district where I will ask the

finding of a bill (if possible to indict me for treason) and will faithfully abide the decision of my

State.

There is not one citizen of my State who is acquainted with my case but will say I have been

much wronged and would plead for my release. Surely I have been punished already more than

my offense justifies. For the safety of my family and myself I did write only a sympathizing

letter. That too may have been altered as I never have seen it since it was published. If my case is

with the commissioners I hope this will be given them.

With great hopes and respect, I await and submit my liberty to your good will.

Very obediently,

WM. M. HILL.

FORT LAFAYETTE, N. Y., March 23, 1862.

General JOHN A. DIX,

Hon. EDWARDS PIERREPONT.

GENTLEMEN: I have before me honorable Secretary Stanton's letter of the 20th informing

me that my case (state or political prisoner) was referred to you and that my release depended

upon your decision. I have aimed to get the evidence in my favor (sufficient I think to discharge

me) before you, though I am not certain it is now before you. The great distance from my home,

from friends, and the difficulties of communication and presenting my case with that light and

truth I would wish prompted me again to refer to other evidence in case you have not received

my letters or that they are not sufficient for my discharge.

At my former trial for the crime and offense of writing the unfortunate letter I had evidence

to prove that the person who abstracted the letter from the post-office--the editor who published

it--had materially altered the wording of it. (They are revengeful enemies.) When I was

74

discharged by the U.S. court from further prosecution by the entering of a nolle the jurors and

Government witnesses signed an entry to the effect that my prosecution was unwise,

unnecessary, and calculated not to result in any good in the cause of the Government.

This resolve by those who know me well, the circumstances under which this letter was

written, and my loyalty, together with the record of my acquittal and discharge, I have written to

the clerk of the U. S. court at Des Moines, Iowa, to send you. If you have not received them

reference is made to Mr. Gurley, U.S. attorney of Iowa, who is now in Washington. Senators

Harlan and Grimes, of Iowa, have been made acquainted with my case. I hope it may be

convenient for you to refer to them.

It seems some one has done me the injustice to accuse me of aiding, comforting, and even

accuse me of acting as a spy to the rebels. I have not written at all or communicated with any one

South for eighteen months except the letter designed to aid me in meeting my family. I reside too

in a loyal State where all my interest is centered, a thousand miles from a rebellious district. My

loyalty is not doubted by any citizen of my State who knows me; nor would my imprudence ever

been noticed or my little property sacrificed or I been for many months incarcerated had not

personal enemies promoted it all and magnified my offense.

I wish I could inform you how much the marshal of Iowa is censured by the citizens of the

State for his malicious persecution. He first commenced my troubles and it is said to get his per

diem and mileage from the Government. He has been sued for his violation of right in my

prosecution and I know he and his friends are doing all they can to misrepresent me. I will not

again give my excuses and apologies for writing at the time I did. My motives I have stated, and

whatever wrong I have done I surely have received my just punishment already. It is my anxious

wish to be sent to my district, where I will urge a trial in case I am not readily released. I wish I

could be informed who made the charges against me and upon what grounds.

I am, gentlemen, your humble servant,

WM. M. HILL.

WASHINGTON, March 24, 1862.

WILLIAM M. HILL, Esq., Fort Lafayette, N. Y.

DEAR SIR: The Iowa delegation in Congress have this day united in requesting your

discharge from confinement. I have no doubt our request will be complied with.

Your obedient servant,

JAMES W. GRIMES.

COMMISSION RELATING TO STATE PRISONERS,

New York, April 8, 1862.

Hon. EDWIN M. STANTON, Secretary of War, Washington.

SIR: We have the honor to inform you that we have had under consideration the case of

William M. Hill, of Iowa, and respectfully recommend that he be discharged upon taking the

oath of allegiance to the Government of the United States, stipulating that he will do no act

hostile or injurious to the Government of the United States, and that he will release all claims

against the U.S. marshal for the district of Iowa growing in any manner out of his arrest and

confinement and particularly in disregarding the writ of habeas corpus.

Very respectfully, yours,

JOHN A. DIX,

EDWARDS PIERREPONT,

Commissioners.

75

FORT LAFAYETTE, N. Y., April 10, 1862.

General JOHN A. DIX,

Hon. EDWARDS PIERREPONT,

Commissioners.

GENTLEMEN: Deputy U.S. marshal informs me that you had requested him to say to me

that you had agreed upon my release and that I would receive my discharge in a few days. I am

not informed upon what conditions. I would rather have been sent to my State and district for

trial, but will accept your conditions, as I anticipate them reasonable from the questions

propounded while I was before you. I have a friend in the city from Iowa who is waiting to

advance me some means and accompany me home. It would be of great convenience and

pleasure to know the time I may expect my discharge, and if it is necessary for you to await

further instructions from Washington. May I hope for an answer.

Very respectfully,

WM. M. HILL.

FORT LAFAYETTE, N. Y., April 14, 1862.

Hon. JAMES W. GRIMES, U. S. Senate.

DEAR FRIEND: I am under many obligations to you and Senator Harlan for the sympathy

you have manifested for me, and for your kindness and efforts in releasing me from my unhappy

confinement. Though I have troubled you much I will ask another favor of you.

Messrs. Dix and Pierrepont have recommended my release on the conditions that I dismiss

suits commenced in Iowa against Mr. Hoxie, the marshal, and by taking the oath of allegiance.

This I am willing to do. I informed you that Mr. Cole, who had formerly acted as my attorney,

had no authority to bring these suits; that what he has done was without my authority or

knowledge. I have not consulted with him, nor has he ever informed me of the bringing of these

suits. I think Mr. Hoxie has done me great injustice, but I never thought of suing him, as I know

litigation with a Government officer would only redound to my disadvantage. But to my request.

I respectfully ask that you would personally refer to the War Department and see that the papers

for my release are made out and sent on. Under the press of business the recommendation and

application of the Commissioners may remain in the office days and weeks without being sent

on.

I cannot be misinformed of the decision of the commissioners. It comes through Mr.

Webster, the Secretary; also through U.S. marshal. I cannot think the Government will refuse to

discharge me under these circumstances. If there is any refusal or any cause, will you please

inform me what can be the reason. You can reiterate the opinion of Mr. Gurley, U.S. attorney,

who knows all about my case--my innocence of the charge against me. You can refer to my trial

and acquittal, to my loyalty, the great distance I reside from the South, and that all my wrong

consists in writing a sympathizing letter to my friends in Virginia, designed to get my family

home through the armies. The letter of the Iowa delegation for my release to the President can

also be transferred to Mr. Stanton. I hope I may hear from you by return mail. I hope to be

situated so I can repay you for your kindness.

Very respectfully, your obedient servant,

WM. M. HILL.

WAR DEPARTMENT, Washington, April 26, 1862.

Maj. Gen. JOHN A. DIX,

Hon. EDWARDS PIERREPONT,

Commissioners.

76

GENTLEMEN: The Secretary of War directs me to acknowledge your letter of the 9th [8th]

instant recommending that William M. Hill be released on taking the oath of allegiance and

stipulating to release all suits and claims against the U.S. marshal, H. M. Hoxie, growing out of

the execution of any orders in connection with his arrest. He approves your findings as above

stated and directs that you carry into effect the decision in respect to William M. Hill upon the

terms and conditions proposed.

Very respectfully, your obedient servant,

P. H. WATSON,

Assistant Secretary of War.

FORT LAFAYETTE, N. Y., April 10, 1862.

General JOHN A. DIX,

Hon. EDWARDS PIERREPONT,

Commissioners.

GENTLEMEN: Deputy U.S. marshal informs me that you had requested him to say to me

that you had agreed upon my release and that I would receive my discharge in a few days. I am

not informed upon what conditions. I would rather have been sent to my State and district for

trial, but will accept your conditions, as I anticipate them reasonable from the questions

propounded while I was before you. I have a friend in the city from Iowa who is waiting to

advance me some means and accompany me home. It would be of great convenience and

pleasure to know the time I may expect my discharge, and if it is necessary for you to await

further instructions from Washington. May I hope for an answer.

Very respectfully,

WM. M. HILL.

FORT LAFAYETTE, N. Y., April 14, 1862.

Hon. JAMES W. GRIMES, U. S. Senate.

DEAR FRIEND: I am under many obligations to you and Senator Harlan for the sympathy

you have manifested for me, and for your kindness and efforts in releasing me from my unhappy

confinement. Though I have troubled you much I will ask another favor of you.

Messrs. Dix and Pierrepont have recommended my release on the conditions that I dismiss

suits commenced in Iowa against Mr. Hoxie, the marshal, and by taking the oath of allegiance.

This I am willing to do. I informed you that Mr. Cole, who had formerly acted as my attorney,

had no authority to bring these suits; that what he has done was without my authority or

knowledge. I have not consulted with him, nor has he ever informed me of the bringing of these

suits. I think Mr. Hoxie has done me great injustice, but I never thought of suing him, as I know

litigation with a Government officer would only redound to my disadvantage. But to my request.

I respectfully ask that you would personally refer to the War Department and see that the papers

for my release are made out and sent on. Under the press of business the recommendation and

application of the Commissioners may remain in the office days and weeks without being sent

on.

I cannot be misinformed of the decision of the commissioners. It comes through Mr.

Webster, the Secretary; also through U.S. marshal. I cannot think the Government will refuse to

discharge me under these circumstances. If there is any refusal or any cause, will you please

inform me what can be the reason. You can reiterate the opinion of Mr. Gurley, U.S. attorney,

who knows all about my case--my innocence of the charge against me. You can refer to my trial

and acquittal, to my loyalty, the great distance I reside from the South, and that all my wrong

consists in writing a sympathizing letter to my friends in Virginia, designed to get my family

77

home through the armies. The letter of the Iowa delegation for my release to the President can

also be transferred to Mr. Stanton. I hope I may hear from you by return mail. I hope to be

situated so I can repay you for your kindness.

Very respectfully, your obedient servant,

WM. M. HILL.

WAR DEPARTMENT, Washington, April 26, 1862.

Maj. Gen. JOHN A. DIX,

Hon. EDWARDS PIERREPONT,

Commissioners.

GENTLEMEN: The Secretary of War directs me to acknowledge your letter of the 9th [8th]

instant recommending that William M. Hill be released on taking the oath of allegiance and

stipulating to release all suits and claims against the U.S. marshal, H. M. Hoxie, growing out of

the execution of any orders in connection with his arrest. He approves your findings as above

stated and directs that you carry into effect the decision in respect to William M. Hill upon the

terms and conditions proposed.

Very respectfully, your obedient servant,

P. H. WATSON,

Assistant Secretary of War.

APRIL 28, 1862.

ROBERT MURRAY, Esq., U. S. Marshal, New York.

SIR: You will please bring before the commission to-morrow (Tuesday, April 29), at 11 a.m.,

the following-named prisoners confined at Fort Lafayette, viz, William[M.] Hill.

By order of the commission:

E. D. WEBSTER,

Secretary.

COMMISSION RELATING TO STATE PRISONERS,

New York, April 29, 1862.

Lieut. Col. MARTIN BURKE, Fort Lafayette.

COLONEL: Mr. Hill having taken the oath of allegiance and engaged to relinquish all claims

against the U.S. marshal for the district of Iowa growing in any manner out of his arrest and

confinement you will please release him.

Very respectfully, yours,

JOHN A. DIX,

EDWARDS PIERREPONT,

Commissioners.

DEPARTMENT OF STATE, Washington, October 21, 1861.

H. M. HOXIE, Esq., U. S. Marshal, Des Moines, Iowa.

SIR: Information has been lodged with this Department that persons In the State of Iowa are

disloyal and co-operating with those in arms against the authority of the Government of the

United States, and that others are engaged in transporting gunpowder across the State for the

insurrectionists. You will please confer with the U.S. district attorney and arrest and commit to

military custody any such persons and report to this Department.

I am, sir, your obedient servant,

WILLIAM H. SEWARD.

78

DEPARTMENT OF STATE, Washington, October 21, 1861.

W. H. F. GURLEY, Esq.,

U.S. District Attorney, Davenport, Iowa.

SIR: Your communication of the 9th instant addressed to the Hon. Caleb B. Smith, Secretary

of the Interior, and by him referred to this Department has been received. In reply I have to

inform you that instructions have this day been issued from this Department addressed to the

U.S. marshal for the district of Iowa directing him to confer with you and arrest and commit to

military custody any persons disloyal and co-operating with the insurrectionists and report to this

Department.

I am, sir, very respectfully, your obedient servant,

F. W. SEWARD,

Acting Secretary

HEADQUARTERS, Memphis, Tenn., November 26, 1861.

Capt. E. D. BLAKE, C. S. Army,

Acting Assistant Adjutant-General.

CAPTAIN: I have the honor to forward to you the inclosed letter from Capt. B. Crabb,

Company H, Seventh Regiment Iowa Volunteers, now confined at this place as a prisoner of war.

The prisoners have up to this time been very well satisfied and have given very little trouble,

but the expense of keeping them is very great. An I sent you a statement a short time ago of what

had to be paid monthly for the use of the building they are confined in, if some arrangement

could be made an spoken of in Captain Crabb's letter it would save much trouble and expense. If

deemed necessary I hope you will forward letters to General A. S. Johnston.

I am, captain, very respectfully,

JOHN ADAMS,

Captain of Cavalry, C. S. Army, Commanding Post.

MEMPHIS, November 26, 1861.

Captain ADAMS.

SIR: I am authorized and requested by the officers and privates now prisoners of war under

your charge to apply to you and through you to the proper military authorities for a release with

the privilege of returning to our homes, the privates to make oath not to take up arms against the

South until exchanged or otherwise discharged from said obligation, the officers on their parole

of honor according to the usual form subject to exchange. Your early attention and favorable

consideration is requested by,

Your most obedient servant,

B. CRABB,

Captain Company H, Seventh Regiment Iowa Volunteers.

HEADQUARTERS SAINT LOUIS DISTRICT,

Saint Louis, Mo., January 9, 1862.

Colonel TUTTLE,

Commanding Second Iowa Volunteers,

McDowell's College, Corner of 8th and Gratiot Streets:

COLONEL: By direction of Major-General Halleck the whole subject of the custody of the

prisoners of war and of the internal police of the place of their confinement as well as

provisioning them is hereby placed under your charge. In the matter of their provisions the

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existing arrangements seem to be satisfactory. In regard to the police you will divide them into

squads, say twenty or more, each under a chief selected from among themselves by election or of

your appointment as you may deem expedient. I would recommend you would place this whole

matter of police under one of your field officers, say the lieutenant-colonel. Requisitions for the

necessary implements such as brooms in limited numbers should and will be approved at these

headquarters. It is of primary importance to the health of the prisoners that care should be taken

so far as circumstances permit that opportunity be offered to the prisoners to wash themselves.

You will please give your attention to this. Any articles of clothing friends of prisoners may

desire to furnish them will be allowed provided no mark is put upon them, and to secure this you

will yourself or by some officer detailed by you for this duty cause the same to be inspected and

will pass only such articles as may be in your opinion of prime necessity, excluding articles of

luxury or ornament. That this may not be misunderstood I would say the prisoners could receive

any article of clothing usually provided for soldiers, also combs and brushes. Should tobacco and

pipes be offered it will not be conveyed to any individual but will be regarded as common stock

and be divided among the prisoners generally. Should it be necessary to issue articles of clothing

to the prisoners the surgeon in charge of the prisoners and the surgeon and assistant surgeon of

your regiment will be constituted a board to decide what may be necessary. A list of the articles

so issued will be kept, designating the parties to whom delivered, and their receipt for the same

will be taken. In regard to the sick every proper facility will be afforded to the surgeon in charge

in the matter of sending for necessary supplies, &c. As to their diet the same will be given to

them as is given to U.S. sick in hospitals, and to this end the surgeon will make the necessary

requisitions on the medical director to be approved at these headquarters for what may be

necessary. If there are any dangerously ill they will if the surgeon deems it expedient be sent to

the nearest general hospital designated by the medical director. In this case the prisoners will be

required to give or rather sign a parole not to attempt to escape while this privilege is accorded to

them under the penalty of death for its violation. Hospital attendants for the sick prisoners will be

detailed from the general prisoners. A proper respect will be required from the prisoners

whenever they are visited by officers charged with inspecting them. They will be informed that

when the order "all attention" is given each one should stand in the position of a soldier until the

inspecting officer has passed.

It is understood that a charge is made by the colored prisoners of war for washing. This they

will be required to do as prisoners of war without remuneration. On the other hand there is no

reason why under proper guard the white prisoners should not bring in fuel, &c. Measures will

be taken as soon as practicable to provide a place in front of the prison where the prisoners may

take exercise when the weather permits. No passes will be recognized not signed by Major-

General Halleck or the undersigned. Any suggestion you may have to make on the subject of the

care and custody of the prisoners will be gladly received. On the other hand frequent inspections

will be made by the general commanding the district or by a staff officer detailed by him for the

purpose to see that the spirit of these regulations are carried out.

Very respectfully, your obedient servant,

SCHUYLER HAMILTON,

Brig. Gen. of Vols., U.S. Army, Comdg. Saint Louis District.

HEADQUARTERS SAINT LOUIS DISTRICT,

Saint Louis, Mo., January 18, 1862.

Col. J. M. TUTTLE, Commanding Second Iowa:

Certain ladies having prepared a quantity of food for the prisoners of war confined in

McDowell's College you are hereby authorized to cause the same to be distributed among them

80

by the process in which their rations are usually distributed. I am well assured the prisoners are

abundantly supplied with food but am prompted to permit this that the provisions may not be

wasted.

Very respectfully, your obedient servant,

SCHUYLER HAMILTON,

Brig. Gen. of Vols., U.S. Army, Comdg. Saint Louis District.

HEADQUARTERS SAINT LOUIS DISTRICT,

Saint Louis, Mo., January 19, 1862.

Col. J. M. TUTTLE, Commanding Second Iowa Volunteers.

COLONEL: I inclose a requisition for clothing for prisoners of war. Inasmuch as Dr. Taft is

not yet mustered into service, which did not occur to me yesterday, you will order the regimental

quartermaster to draw the articles of clothing for the prisoners sick in hospital for which I signed

requisition yesterday. These will be issued under the direction of the attending surgeon, Doctor

Taft, in the presence of a commissioned officer, the prisoners signing a receipt roll, to be

witnessed by him as heretofore directed. In cases where the sick are unable to receipt the officer

witnessing the issue will state the fact on the receipt roll.

I wish you to detail two of the negroes in the employ of the quartermaster's department now

at McDowell's College as special attendants on the sick in hospital, to be under the order of

Doctor Taft. I have applied for a hospital steward for him. I wish you with your officers to

endeavor to systematize matters as much as possible by fixing an hour for yourself or

Lieutenant-Colonel Baker going through the general prison with the surgeon at least once every

day, to the end that the sick may be removed from the prison rooms to the hospital ward. Also to

have some fixed hour, the weather permitting, when the prisoners of one room at a time, or at the

most two, may be allowed to exercise under guard in the street in front of the prison, at the same

time taking their bedding out to hang it on the fences to air.

I want you to understand that everything relating to prisoners is under your charge; that you

are to see when a prisoner is sick and paroled to go to general hospital that he is sent without

delay. The ambulances of your regiment will be used in common with those of the general

hospital department for this purpose. I trust from the improvement visible yesterday on the whole

that the weather permitting matters may be put very shortly in better shape. I would suggest that

you should fix a particular hour of the day during which articles sent to the prisoners from

individuals will be received at your office. Having been examined I would cause them to be

delivered at a particular hour the next day. If you will designate the hour for receiving them I

will cause a notice to be inserted in the papers of the city to that effect. I would also fix an hour

for receiving communications from the prisoners to friends outside, which could be best done by

having a bag hung up for the reception of these communications, to be taken to your office for

examination at a certain hour, and any communication permitted to be sent to them can be

returned in the same way, thus saving much vexation and annoyance. I wish you to give special

attention to having the paroled sick sent without delay to the general hospital, and if it has not

already been done you will see to the case of them?

Very respectfully, your obedient servant,

SCHUYLER HAMILTON,

Brig. Gen. of Vols., U. S. Army, Comdg. Saint Louis District.

HEADQUARTERS SAINT LOUIS DISTRICT,

Saint Louis, January 22, 1862.

Mrs. M. MCREE.

81

MADAM: Your note is just received. In reference to the surgeons taken prisoners of war and

now confined in McDowell's College permit me to say I unwittingly did them injustice in saying

I was surprised they had not offered to attend their own sick. On inquiry I find they had done so

before I was placed on duty in command of this district. Learning this fact I called upon them

and arranged they should in conjunction with Doctor Marsh, surgeon of the Second Iowa

Volunteers, discharge this duty. They will have every facility I can afford in the proper discharge

of their duties.

I remain, very respectfully, your obedient servant,

SCHUYLER HAMILTON,

Brig. Gen. of Vols., U. S. Army, Comdg. Saint Louis District.

HEADQUARTERS SAINT LOUIS DISTRICT,

Saint Louis, February 7, 1862.

Col. J. M. TUTTLE, Commanding Second Iowa Volunteers.

COLONEL: As I am informed by General Halleck a portion of General Burbank's command

will proceed to Alton today. The commanding officer will telegraph when everything is ready,

and it is the intention of General Halleck that a guard for the prisoners to Alton should be

detailed from Colonel Shepard's command now at Benton Barracks. Such prisoners now at the

military prison and arsenal as the provost-marshal shall designate will be taken to Alton. He will

call upon you for a guard to escort them from the military prison to McDowell's College and the

commanding officer at the arsenal will send those in his charge so designated to McDowell's

College under a guard detailed from his command. Those not designated he will retain at the

arsenal for trial by military commission. The prisoners now in McDowell's College the provostmarshal

general may name as proper to be kept here will be sent to the military prison for

confinement. You will see that transportation for the baggage of the prisoners from the college to

the boat is provided. For this you will make requisition on the quartermaster's department. Being

relieved from the custody of the prisoners you will be prepared to move your regiment at a

moment's warning.

Very respectfully, your obedient servant,

SCHUYLER HAMILTON,

Brig. Gen. of Vols., U. S. Army, Comdg. Saint Louis District.

DAVENPORT, February 17, 1862.

Hon. JAMES W. GRIMES, U.S. Senate:

Three thousand prisoners can be kept here at 16 cents each per day, Government furnishing

building, fuel and guards. Government has building for 1,200 men; balance be ready in one

week. Answer.

H. PRICE,

Adjutant-General of Iowa.

SAINT Louis, February 19, 1862.

C. H. ELDRIDGE, Davenport, Iowa:

All wounded are sent to Cincinnati, Mound City, Evansville and Saint Louis. No distinction

is made between States or between friends and foes. It is simply a question of humanity.

H. W. HALLECK,

Major-General.

HEADQUARTERS ARMY OF THE SOUTHWEST,

82

Cross Timber, March 22, 1862.

Lieut. Col. F. J. HERRON,

Ninth Iowa Infantry Volunteers.

COLONEL: Your favor of to-day to the general introducing Doctor Elliott, of the

Confederate (or rebel) Army, was presented by the doctor. As you state he desired permission to

go to Lexington, Mo., to see his family, but in no manner consented to renounce his allegiance to

the Confederate Government which he admitted to have served, nor to take the oath of allegiance

to that under which he has heretofore lived and now wishes as he states to return to. Under the

circumstances therefore the general commanding cannot grant the request, and further directs

that the doctor having relinquished the flag of truce under which he entered our lines will be

considered a prisoner of war, subject to all the regulations concerning surgeons. You will

communicate this to the doctor.

I have the honor, &c.,

[H. Z. CURTIS,]

Assistant Adjutant-General.

SPECIAL ORDERS No. 26.

HDQRS. DISTRICT OF CENTRAL MISSOURI,

Jefferson City, Mo., April 3, 1862.

I. In obedience to Special Orders, No. 14, March 27, 1862, from these headquarters, the two

companies of the First Iowa Cavalry recently stationed at Lexington, Lafayette County, Mo., will

immediately upon receipt of this proceed to take post at Warrensburg, Johnson County, and

remain in that county on duty until further orders from these headquarters.

II. Maj. W. M. G. Torrence, First Iowa Cavalry, will assume command of these companies

and proceed with them to their destination, keeping command of the same and exerting himself

with all his energy to crush out and exterminate all rebels, marauders, &c., in said county. He

will assume command of the troops in that county until such time as Major Curly, Seventh

Missouri Volunteers, arrives with his command, when he will report to that officer for

instructions. So much of Special Orders, No. 10, of March 26, 1862, from these headquarters.,

directing Major Torrence to report at the headquarters of his regiment is hereby rescinded.

IV. Too much vigilance and energy and unceasing activity cannot be exercised by Major

Torrence in the duties to which he is assigned in pursuing with relentless severity and justice all

law-breakers, marauders, murderers, pillagers, robbers, guerrillas and thieves to their utter

extermination, and in the preservation of peace and quiet among the loyal citizens of Johnson

County and such as are quietly attending to their legitimate occupations. Those of the citizens of

Johnson County peaceably pursuing their avocations and who have not heretofore taken up arms

against the Government in the recent rebellion or given aid or comfort to the enemy, and who at

present do not by word, act or deed render assistance in any way to the rebellion, will be left in

the quiet occupation of their homes and property. We cannot govern them in their sentiments and

thoughts, but they must and shall be made to observe and obey the laws of the United States and

the State of Missouri.

By command of Brig. Gen. James Totten, commanding district:

LUCIEN J. BARNES,

Captain and Assistant Adjutant-General.

SPECIAL ORDERS No. 27.

HDQRS. DISTRICT OF CENTRAL MISSOURI,

Jefferson City, Mo., April 5, 1862.

83

1. Maj. W. M. G. Torrence, commanding at Warrensburg, will furnish Col. John A. Turley,

formerly of the Eighty-first Ohio Volunteers, every assistance and facility in his power to enable

him to thoroughly investigate the cause and manner of his brother's recent death at Warrensburg,

Mo.

II. Major Terrence will take measures to examine into the circumstances connected with the

murder of Mr. Turley; also those attending the cases recently reported by Captain Thompson,

First Iowa Cavalry, viz., the burning of the residence, furniture, &c., of Colonel McCowan; the

shooting of Mr. Burgess and his brother and the burning of their dwelling; the killing by Captain

Houts' company of Mr. Piper on March 30 and the burning of some five dwellings by the same,

and any other misdemeanors which may come to his notice. He will place in arrest and prefer

charges against such officers or men as an examination shall indicate as guilty of these outrages

without sufficient cause. A minute report will be made to these headquarters upon these cases,

supported by charges and specifications, where any wrong has been committed upon quiet and

unoffending citizens peaceably occupying their homes. In these investigations Major Terrence

will be guided by General Orders, No. 8, of November 26, 1861; General Orders, No. 13, of

December 4, 1861, Department of the Missouri, and the thirty-second, thirty-third, forty-first,

fifty-first and fifty-fourth articles of war.

By command of Brig. Gen. James Totten, commanding district:

LUCIEN J. BARNES,

Captain and Assistant Adjutant-General.

CAIRO, ILL., April 16, 1862.

Major-General HALLECK, Pittsburg:

Can the Iowa men taken prisoners in the late battle be exchanged There is great anxiety

among our people in regard to them. Hope you will use every endeavor to effect an exchange.

Please answer to me here.

SAML. J. KIRKWOOD,

Governor of Iowa.

HEADQUARTERS U.S. FORCES, Cairo, Ill., April 16, 1862.

Major-General HALLECK, Pittsburg Landing:

SIR: I have concluded to send to you Mr. Frank M. Mills, of Iowa, to see you personally in

regard to the matter of the exchange of the Iowa troops taken prisoners at the recent battle at

Pittsburg Landing. The people of our State feel a deep interest in them and are intensely anxious

to have them exchanged if possible. Thinking that perhaps the personal presence of a messenger

from me might amid the multiplicity of calls on your attention be of service to them I send Mr.

Mills for that purpose. I hope you [will] pardon what may seem to be undue pertinacity in this

matter. Permit me to express my joy and thankfulness that you are in person at the head of the

army.

Very respectfully, your obedient servant,

SAMUEL J. KIRKWOOD.

SPECIAL ORDERS No. 47.

HDQRS. DISTRICT OF CENTRAL MISSOURI,

Jefferson City, Mo., April 21, 1862.

I. It is represented on reliable authority at these headquarters that bands of jayhawkers,

guerrillas, marauders, murderers and every species of outlaw are infesting to an alarming extent

all the southeastern portion of Jackson County, and that persons of influence and wealth in these

84

vicinities are knowingly harboring and thus encouraging (if not more culpably connected with)

these bands of desperadoes. A prairie known as the "Doctor Lee Prairie," its borders and

surroundings, are mentioned as the haunts of these outlaws and the farmers generally in these

neighborhoods are said to be knowing to and encouraging the lawless acts of these guerrillas,

&c., as mentioned above. Murders and robberies have been committed; Union men threatened

and driven from their homes; the U.S. mails have been stopped; farmers have been prohibited

planting by the proclamation of a well-known and desperate leader of these outlaws by the name

of Quantrill, and the whole country designated reduced to a state of anarchy. This state of things

must be terminated and the guilty punished. All those found in arms and open opposition to the

laws and legitimate authorities, who are known familiarly as guerrillas, jayhawkers, murderers,

marauders and horse-thieves will be shot down by the military upon the spot when found

perpetrating their foul acts. All who have knowingly harbored or encouraged these outlaws in

their lawless deeds will be arrested and tried by a military commission for their offenses, and

those who have harbored and fed such miscreants as guerrillas, &c., but against whom clear

proof cannot be obtained and who profess ignorance of having done these wrongs will be put

under heavy bonds and security for their future good conduct or confined until they give such

bonds, &c.

II. In order to correct the evils mentioned in the preceding paragraph and insure the passage

of the mails regularly Lieut. Col. E. B. Brown, Seventh Missouri Volunteers, commanding the

counties of Jackson and Cass, will station one company of cavalry about five miles north of

Pleasant Hill on the southern and one company on the northern border of the "Doctor Lee

Prairie" to punish these guerrillas and escort the mail in safety whenever necessary.

III. Major Curly, commanding post at Warrensburg, will send one company First Iowa

Cavalry to proceed to Pleasant Hill and escort the mail now there through to Independence, when

it will return again to its present post.

By order of Brig. Gen. James Totten, commanding district:

LUCIEN J. BARNES,

Captain and Assistant Adjutant-General.

QUARTERMASTER-GENERAL'S OFFICE,

Washington, April 23, 1862.

Lieut. Col. WILLIAM HOFFMAN Commissary-General of Prisoners, Detroit, Mich.

COLONEL :. The annexed copy of a letter from Hon. James W. Grimes, U.S. Senator from

Iowa, to the Secretary of War with accompanying copy of a telegram received by him from Mr.

French as to accommodations for rebel prisoners at Davenport, Iowa, is respectfully transmitted

for your information.

By order:

E. S. SIBLEY,

Brevet Colonel, U. S. Army, Deputy Quartermaster-General.

WASHINGTON, April 11, 1862.

Hon. EDWIN M. STANTON, Secretary of War.

DEAR SIR: I inclose you a dispatch from the mayor of Davenport, Iowa, concerning the

accommodations there for prisoners of war. Davenport as you are aware is in steamboat

communication with all points on the lower rivers.

JAMES W. GRIMES

HEADQUARTERS MISSOURI STATE MILITIA,

85

Saint Louis, Mo., May 10, 1862.

Governor SAMUEL J. KIRKWOOD, Iowa:

I have the honor to acknowledge the receipt of your communication of the 5th inclosing

certain papers relative to persons who have been in the rebel service and have fled to Iowa to

escape the punishment that awaits them in Missouri. I will gladly take any steps that may be

necessary and practicable to rid the State of Iowa of these criminals against the laws of Missouri

and the United States and bring them to the punishment they so richly deserve. To accomplish

this object, however, the active co-operation of the civil authorities of Iowa will be necessary,

and I have no doubt Your Excellency will willingly direct such assistance as can be given by the

local authorities. I presume it will not be necessary to send U.S. troops into Iowa for the purpose

of arresting these men, as it can be done much more easily and certainly by the civil authorities

of Iowa or of the United States in Iowa.

The men referred to are guilty of crimes more against the United States than against the State

of Missouri, and it belongs rather to the civil than the military authorities to punish them for

these crimes. If, however, a military force is necessary to secure their arrest it can be readily

furnished from Missouri.

I am, Governor, very respectfully, your obedient servant,

J. M. SCHOFIELD,

Brig. Gen., Comdg. U.S. and Missouri State Troops in Missouri.

OFFICE COMMISSARY-GENERAL OF PRISONERS,

Detroit, May 16, 1862.

Hon. E. M. STANTON,

Secretary of War, Washington, D.C.

SIR: I have the honor to report that in pursuance of instructions from the Quartermaster-

General and Adjutant-General I have visited Davenport, Iowa, Fort Snelling, Minn., and Fort

Howard, Wis., with a view to ascertain their fitness to receive prisoners of war, and I respectfully

submit the following as the result of my investigation.

There are buildings at Camp McClellan, near Davenport, to accommodate about 1,200

prisoners with a guard of four companies of eighty men each. The buildings require some repairs

and a fence would have to be built around the quarters occupied by the prisoners, all of which

could be done as shown by the estimate of Captain Hendershott, assistant quartermaster, at

Davenport, for about $1,000. There would be room enough inside for quarters for 500 or 600

more prisoners which could be put up cheaply and no additional guard would be required.

Prisoners could reach this point by water at low rates and provisions are perhaps as low there as

anywhere. Fuel is comparatively high and water would be hauled from the river in wagons.

Fort Snelling if occupied exclusively by prisoners will accommodate 1,200 or 1,500. A guard

of four companies will be required, and for these there are quarters outside the fort of a

temporary character which at little expense can be made to answer the purpose. Some little

expense will be occasioned in adding to the hospital and in erecting a small extent of fencing.

On the other hand it will cost to transport the number of prisoners named from Saint Louis about

$2,000 and not much less to get them back again. Provisions will cost about five cents more per

ration than in any of the States south and east of Minnesota. Fuel is more expensive and more

will be required than in more southern States. Supplies of all kinds must be provided for the

winter, that is from November till May, and during this period the prisoners must remain there

even though circumstances should arise to make it necessary to bring them away. I would not

therefore advise that prisoners be sent there while there are other places at which they may be

properly secured. It would form an excellent hospital for the sick and wounded volunteers from

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Minnesota and the adjoining States. Fort Snelling is claimed as private property and there will

doubtless be claims entered against the United States for the time it is occupied.

Fort Howard, at Green Bay, will furnish quarters for about 1,500 prisoners, but they are

generally in dilapidated condition and before they could be used would require considerable

repairs. Most of the buildings need new shingling, and the timbers in many places are much

rotted; the galleries in front and rear are in many places just ready to fall down. To guard this

number four companies would be necessary and for these barracks would have to be erected

outside of the fort. If the guard is quartered inside three companies would be sufficient, but then

less than a thousand prisoners could be provided for. There is a building outside now occupied

by the military storekeeper and one formerly used as a hospital, both in good condition, which

would furnish quarters for the surgeon and a hospital, and there is also outside a large three-story

store-house sixty feet by forty, in good condition. It will cost $2.50 per man to transport

prisoners from Chicago to Fort Howard, and they must remain there from November to April,

with the disadvantage of furnishing supplies during that time at winter prices. It would not

therefore seem advisable to send prisoners there while there are other places farther south where

they can be held.

I visited also Camp Washburne at Milwaukee, though not instructed to do so, and found it a

very suitable place for prisoners. The quarters heretofore occupied by a regiment will

accommodate 2,250 prisoners, and there are besides other buildings which at small expense can

be fitted up to quarter a regiment as a guard. By using the lumber at Camp Trowbridge not far off

these changes may be made, and in addition other buildings may be erected sufficient to quarter

1,500 to 2,000 more prisoners and no additional guard would be required. The camp is inclosed

by a fence only high enough to aid sentinels in preventing the escape of prisoners. Transportation

to this point can always be had by rail or by steam-boats; supplies must be about the same as at

Chicago. The site is a very desirable one and I don't think there is any place preferable for

prisoners.

I have visited Camp Randall [Madison] Wis., also to which place prisoners have been sent by

authority from General Halleck. The camp is not at all adapted to the purpose and I found things

in a very unsatisfactory condition. There are about 1,200 prisoners guarded by the Nineteenth

Wisconsin Volunteers, which is badly armed, without discipline and scarcely to be relied upon.

Lumber, straw and fuel sent to the camp by the quartermaster have been seized upon by the

officers and used without authority and appropriated to such uses as they pleased; buildings have

been torn down and the material appropriated to private purposes, and all this without any

interference of the commanding officer. I found the sick in a very bad condition, many dying and

few signs of convalescence anywhere; they were under the charge of the surgeon and assistant

surgeon of the Nineteenth, and judging from what I saw and what I heard they were unequal to

the responsibility. The purveyor at Chicago had furnished a supply of medicines for a regiment

and 1,200 prisoners for six months, and of these all the liquors, 168 pint bottles if I remember

rightly, had been used in five days. To remedy these evils as far as possible I appointed Maj. R.

S. Smith, of the Twelfth Infantry, who was at Madison on the recruiting service, to take the

supervision of the camp in my name and to endeavor to introduce something like discipline and

good order in the camp. I gave him minute instructions for his guidance, and all with the

understanding that this service was not to interfere with his other duties. To insure a proper

attention to the sick I directed that a private physician who had been engaged in attendance on

them should be employed at $100 per month to have the sole charge of the sick prisoners of war,

leaving the sick of the Nineteenth Regiment to the care of their surgeons. At the same time I

called for three surgeons from the rebel prisoners at Chicago to assist him. I directed also that the

hospital building should be placed in a proper state of repair and that all necessary steps should

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be taken to provide a reformation in the sanitary condition of the camp. The camp-ground, about

ten acres, is inclosed by a low fence which is no obstacle to the escape of prisoners, and these

quarters are mere sheds built against the fence through which a man could cut his way in an hour

with a penknife, and in consequence a whole regiment is required to guard less than double their

own numbers.

Most of these prisoners were well provided for at Camp Douglas and should have remained

there, but Colonel Kelton, in the name of General Halleck, insisted that they should be sent to

Camp Randall at a cost of about $1,500. Wherever prisoners may be ordered hereafter a guard

should be ordered from the army in the field to accompany them and to have charge of them after

they reach their destination, and if possible these guards should not be of regiments from the

State in which the camp is located as it would be impossible to prevent them obtaining furloughs

to go home and the camp would be overrun by the families of those whose homes are near by.

The responsibilities of the commanders of these camps are very great and it is very desirable

that intelligent officers of integrity and decision of character should be selected for the duty.

There are stables at Camp Douglas which may be fitted up to provide for 2,000 more prisoners

and when other camps are full I recommend that more prisoners be sent there.

I shall proceed in two or three days to examine the camps in Indiana and adjoining States to

ascertain their availability for this purpose. In order that there may be no confusion I respectfully

suggest that the officers intrusted with the distribution of prisoners of war should be directed to

confer with me on the subject that the most convenient camps may be first occupied.

If my suggestions are approved I request notice to that effect by a brief telegram as there may

not be time for written instructions.

I have the honor to be, very respectfully, your obedient servant,

W. HOFFMAN,

Lieut. Col. Eighth Infantry, Commissary-General of Prisoners.

HEADQUARTERS DEPARTMENT OF THE MISSISSIPPI,

Camp on Corinth Road, Miss., May 18, 1862.

Adjt. Gen. N. B. BAKER, Clinton, Iowa.

GENERAL: Your letter of the 12th in relation to exchange of prisoners of war is just

received. Some 200 privates have been exchanged within the last day or two, and I understand

from General Beauregard that he proposes to release more very soon on agreement that I will

send him an equal number. He, however, declines to release any officers who are prisoners

unless I will make the exchange general--that is, for all--which I have no authority to do. I shall

continue to exchange whenever I can. It is now ascertained that the number captured by the

enemy at the battle of Pittsburg Landing was very small, most of those at first reported as

missing being stragglers who have since joined their regiments.

Very respectfully, your obedient servant,

H. W. HALLECK,

Major-general.

ADJUTANT-GENERAL'S OFFICE,

Washington, May 19, 1862.

Maj. Gen. JOHN E. WOOL, U.S. Army,

Commanding Department of Virginia, -Port Monroe.

SIR: The commanding officers at Fort Columbus and camp on Johnson's Island have been

directed to transfer to your custody Lieuts. Spier Whitaker, of Chapel Hill, N. C., and Thomas L.

Sykes, now prisoners of war, to be exchanged for Lieuts. Noah N. Tyner, Fourteenth Iowa

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Volunteers, and D. S. Gordon, Second Cavalry, U.S. Army, respectively. The Secretary of War

directs that upon their arrival at Fort Monroe you notify, the rebel officer nearest to you that they

are there to be exchanged for the officers named, and upon the arrival of those officers from

Richmond you are authorized to release Lieutenants Whitaker and Sykes.

I am, sir, &o.,

L. THOMAS,

Adjutant-General.

HEADQUARTERS DEPARTMENT OF VIRGINIA,

Fort Monroe, May 25, 1862.

Maj. Gen. B. HUGER,

Commanding Department of the Appomattox, Petersburg, Va.

GENERAL: I have received by flag of truce your communication of the 23d instant.

I have made arrangements to have the privateersmen forwarded to you as soon as you can

procure our hostages. Captain Milward, who goes with the flag, will wait for any communication

you may have to make on the subject of this letter.

Col. Roger W. Hanson, Second Kentucky Regiment, goes with the flag of truce on parole

under the expectation of procuring an exchange for Colonel Corcoran, a hostage. This exchange

if you should think proper to make it will in nowise interfere with the delivery of the

privateersmen who have been placed subject to my orders and who will be released as I have

promised as soon as you can comply with the arrangements suggested in your letter of the 23d;

in a word the privateersmen shall be sent you as I have promised.

Second Lieut. Spier Whitaker, of Chapel Hill, N. C., accompanies the flag to procure an

exchange with Second Lieut. Noah N. Tyner, Fourteenth Iowa Regiment. If you agree to the

arrangement and will promise to send me Lieutenant Tyner Lieutenant Whitaker can go on his

parole until Lieutenant Tyner reports to me at Fort Monroe, when he (Lieutenant Whitaker) will

be released from his parole.

Capt. H. H. Robertson, of the Confederate Army, also goes with the flag of truce to procure

an exchange with Captain Bowman, Fifteenth Massachusetts Volunteers, now on parole in the

North. If you agree to the exchange and release Captain Bowman from his parole Captain

Robertson will be released from his parole.

I also send on Privates John d'Antignac, of Company B, Tenth Georgia Regiment, and

Alexander E. Fosket, of the same company and regiment, taken at Yorktown.

Private R. A. Palmer, Third Georgia Volunteers, will be released and sent to you as soon as

the condition of his wounds will permit him to travel.

If you do not agree to the exchanges of Colonel Hanson, Capt. H. H. Robertson and Second

Lieutenant Whitaker as proposed they will return with the flag of truce to Fort Monroe.

Very respectfully, your obedient servant,

JOHN E. WOOL,

Major-General.

HEADQUARTERS ARMY OF THE SOUTHWEST,

Batesville, Ark., June 10, 1862.

Brig. Gen. J. S. ROANE, Confederate Army.

GENERAL: I am pleased to know from your letter of the 24th ultimo that you do not

approve and will hereafter prevent such atrocities as those reported at Searcy. My resentment

will be confined to the perpetrators, not being disposed to demoralize my troops by making them

assassins.

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In regard to peaceable citizens you and the public are misinformed. I make war only on

belligerents, and only take oaths and bonds to save the trouble of sending away captives.

In a civil war some doubts and difficulties arise in the determination of belligerents,

especially when men disguise themselves in the garb of peaceable citizens, but in this regard I

include those who are recruiting officers and engage as many have in coercing peaceablydisposed

citizens to join the belligerents; also all those who engage in furnishing quartermaster's

and commissary supplies to the belligerent army.

In all this I conform to well-established usages of war between regularly constituted

belligerents because the magnitude of this unfortunate rebellion has in my judgment inaugurated

and constituted a regular war. Irregular unauthorized banditti will not receive such consideration.

General Price refused to exchange prisoners taken in Missouri because they neither belonged to

State nor Confederate organizations. Therefore the sneaking assassins who without badges of the

soldier and in the disguise of private citizens and without authority of even a pretended

government assail my pickets will be regarded as robbers and murderers and summarily disposed

of. No determination of difficulties grow out of neighborhood broils and assassinations, but on

the contrary such warfare corrupts the fountain of all social systems and must insure a perpetual

flow of anarchy and confusion.

In regard to surgeons I have given great license, and at least in one case the surgeon of a

Texas regiment behaved so badly by stealing the horse of the surgeon of the Ninth Iowa and two

Rams, and afterwards boasting of the felony, I must have more regard to the person who assumes

the functions of the office and exclude those who do not seem to be gentlemen.

I submit the orders of General Halleck as my guide in this regard, and another order of his in

relation to prisoners (Nos. 33, 50, and 3).

I have the honor to be, general, very respectfully, your obedient servant,

S. R. CURTIS,

Major-General.

HEADQUARTERS SECOND DISTRICT,

Vicksburg, November 1, 1862.

Maj. J. R. WADDY,

Assistant Adjutant-General:

I have the honor to report that in accordance with a dispatch from General Pemberton four

Federal prisoners have been selected by lot as hostages for the Confederates seized in Tennessee.

Their names are James E. Gaddy, Company E, Sixth Illinois Cavalry; Bernard Collins,

Company E, Thirty-ninth Ohio Infantry; A.M. Shipman, Company D, Forty-third Ohio Infantry;

Nicholas Hoit, Company C, Seventh Iowa Infantry.

I am, major, very respectfully, your obedient servant,

M. L. SMITH,

Brigadier-General, Commanding

GENERAL ORDERS No. 84.

WAR DEPARTMENT,

ADJT. AND INSP. GENERAL'S OFFICE,

Richmond, November 10, 1862.

I. The following orders are published for the information and guidance of the Army:

II. Whereas, reliable information has been received that Col. [William W.] Lowe [Fifth Iowa

Cavalry] and Col. A. C. Harding, Eighth [Eighty-third] Illinois Regiment, U.S. Army, have been

engaged in a series of wanton cruelties and depredations in Clarksville, Tenn., and the

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surrounding counties, which in many instances have resulted in the arrest, incarceration and

maltreatment of non-combatants and peaceful citizens of the Confederate States, and in others in

the unjustifiable destruction of private property without compensation and contrary to the rules

and practice of civilized warfare; therefore it is ordered that the aforesaid Col. [William W.]

Lowe [Fifth Iowa Cavalry] and Col. A. C. Harding, Eighth [Eighty-third] Illinois Volunteers,

U.S. Army, be and they are hereby declared no longer entitled to be regarded as soldiers and that

they have forfeited all claim to the benefits of the cartel existing between the Governments of the

Confederate States and the United States for the exchange of prisoners of war; and further, in the

event of their capture they shall be kept in close confinement and treated as felons until

otherwise ordered by the President of the Confederate States.

III. And whereas, other officers of the U.S. Army yet unknown to the Confederate

Government are represented and believed to have participated in the wrongs and outrages before

referred to; therefore it is also ordered, that the provisions of the first paragraph of this order

shall be applicable to any other officers of the Federal army in the State of Tennessee upon proof

of their guilt deemed satisfactory by the commanding officer of the department in which they

may be captured and held.

IV. And whereas, Maj. Gen. John Pope has been removed from the Federal army operating in

Virginia and the obnoxious order (No. 11) of July 23, 1862, issued by him, has been stated by the

U.S. authorities to be inoperative and without effect; therefore it is ordered, that so much of

General Orders, No. 54, of August 1, 1862, from the Adjutant and Inspector General's Office,

Richmond, as applies to the said Major-General Pope and the officers serving under him in

Virginia be, and is hereby, rescinded.

By order:

S. COOPER,

Adjutant and Inspector General.

HEADQUARTERS WESTERN DEPARTMENT, June 15, 1862.

Maj. Gen. H. W. HALLECK,

Commanding U. S. Forces, Corinth, Miss.

GENERAL: Under instructions from my Government recently addressed to General

Beauregard it has devolved upon me to inform you that it is understood Asst. Surgs. T. S. Foster

and Newton Vowles, of the Missouri State Guard, were captured (possibly some time since),

brought to trial as bridge burners and one at least of them condemned to death under your

authority. The authorities of the Confederate States have caused private individuals to be

executed for burning bridges, but they deny the right to punish an officer acting under orders and

I am directed to say will retaliate on the prisoners in our hands for any execution in violation of

the rules of civilized warfare. Further, our authorities will consider themselves at liberty to

examine into the regularity of the proceedings under which any citizen of Missouri shall be

executed and to retaliate if it should prove a fair trial was not granted.

I must avail myself of the occasion to bring to your notice an act recently committed by an

officer of your command without precedent to my knowledge in regular warfare. On the morning

of the 30th ultimo a cavalry detachment from your army under command, as I learn, of Colonel

Elliott, of the Second Iowa Cavalry, made a descent on Booneville, on the Mobile and Ohio

Railroad and a depot for our sick, and burned a train of cars and the railroad depot, in so doing

burning to death not less than one sick soldier in a car and three in the railroad depot, as well as

consuming the bodies of some of our dead.

Respectfully, general, your obedient servant,

BRAXTON BRAGG,

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General, Commanding

HEADQUARTERS DEPARTMENT OF THE MISSISSIPPI,

Corinth, June 28, 1862.

N. H. BRAINARD, Secretary, &c., Iowa City, Iowa.

SIR: Your letter of the 21st is received. General Beauregard refuses to exchange prisoners

except on terms which our Government will not admit. It is therefore impossible to reorganize

the prisoners at Nashville and exchange them for future service till their officers can be released.

Under these circumstances the Secretary of War has sent paymasters to pay them off and

discharge them. It is the only thing that can now be done for them.

Very respectfully, your obedient servant,

H. W. HALLECK,

Major-general.

U. S. SENATE, Washington, July 6, 1862.

Hon. E. M. STANTON, Secretary of War.

DEAR SIR: I have the honor to inclose a letter from Governor Kirkwood covering one from

J. B. Dorr, quartermaster of the Twelfth Iowa Regiment. I respectfully and earnestly request that

the subject may receive the favorable consideration and action of your Department.

Your obedient servant,

JAMES W. GRIMES.

EXECUTIVE OFFICE, Iowa City, June 21, 1862.

Hon. JAMES W. GRIMES, Washington.

DEAR SIR: Inclosed find copy of letter from J. B. Dorr, which explains itself. Governor

Kirkwood is disabled from writing, and directs me to inclose this copy to you and ask you to

bring all the influence of our delegation in Congress to the relief of these men. Other letters are

received of the same import of this, and the Governor does not feel that it is necessary to keep

these men in their present uncomfortable position.

He would call especial attention to the fate of our officers still in rebel hands as peculiarly

hard and deserving of the most active efforts for their relief. Will you not press this matter upon

the authorities at Washington with all the influence in your power?

Respectfully, yours,

N. H. BRAINARD,

Military Secretary, &c

NASHVILLE, TENN., June 11, 1862.

Hon. SAMUEL J. KIRKWOOD, Governor State of Iowa.

DEAR SIR: Lieut. John Elwell, of Company E, Twelfth Iowa, and myself made our escape

from prison at Montgomery, Ala., on the 24th ultimo and reached Huntsville on the 28th, from

which place to this city we accompanied 1,450 paroled privates, among which were 141 of the

Twelfth, 200 of the Fourteenth, 230 of the Eighth and a number of the Third, Sixth, Seventh,

Eleventh, Fifteenth and Sixteenth Iowa Regiments, all captured at Shiloh. These men are now

detained here in camp, having at present very unhealthy and uncomfortable quarters, waiting for

orders from General Halleck. To-day within the hour I have learned that orders have been

received from General Buell to put them into another camp and require them to do guard duty

and drill. They have received clothing, yet they are very indignant that they are not allowed to go

farther west if they are to be retained in camp, or if compelled to perform military duty that they

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are not allowed to return to their regiments. Exhausted and worn out with two months'

imprisonment upon starving rations they feel that they should be allowed a short respite from the

duties of a soldier and that if they are to be kept at any point for the purpose of exchange they

should be sent to some point nearer home. With few exceptions all are willing to continue in the

service when honorably released from parole forced upon them by the alternative of death by

disease or starvation in a Southern prison, but deem it an infraction of their obligation to be

required to perform guard duty in this latitude where the only enemies of the United States are

the adherents of the Southern Confederacy. But whether their feelings are reasonable or

unreasonable they earnestly desire you to intercede in their behalf and procure for them removal

to some point farther west and a speedy exchange or a prompt discharge from the service.

Some 600 more paroled privates are daily expected here, which will include the balance of

the Iowa troops captured at Shiloh, making a total of 300 of the Fourteenth and 340 of the

Twelfth, for whom also I trust you will use your influence with the Government. I need not say

to you that these men performed their duty as soldiers at Shiloh. The Iowa brigade maintained its

position, driving back the enemy, until after 5 p.m., and was ordered to fall back with no enemy

in view of its front. Nor did the remainder of the Twelfth and Fourteenth surrender until they

found themselves surrounded by 15,000 troops and after every other regiment in that part of the

field had retreated or surrendered.

But there is another subject to which I earnestly beg Your Excellency's attention. Two

hundred and fifty commissioned officers taken at Shiloh are now at Selma, Montgomery, Ala.,

and Macon, Ga. Among them are the company commissioned and non-commissioned officers of

the Fourteenth and Twelfth and the regimental officers of the Fourteenth and Eighth, as well as

officers of several other regiments, including Major Stone and Colonel Geddes, These men are

receiving less than one-fourth rations of a private in the U.S. Army, and are subjected to all the

hardships and indignities which venomous traitors can heap upon them. They are without money

or clothing, and a large number of them at Montgomery are imprisoned in a foul and verminabounding

cotton shed. They are desirous for their discharge, and if bravery and cool and

determined behavior deserves it none are more deserving of it than these Iowa men.

Will you not interfere with the President and General Halleck in their behalf? I should have

written you before, but expecting to leave here every day I intended to report to you in person.

Having experienced the tender mercies of the rebels I beg of you that you will exert yourself for

these brave and meritorious men.

Were the officers of the Eighth, Twelfth and Fourteenth exchanged (and men) the three

regiments could take the field with little delay. Excuse this hasty letter. I am quite unwell and

hardly able to even write.

I am, most respectfully, your obedient servant,

J. B. DORR,

Quartermaster Twelfth Iowa.

SPECIAL ORDERS No. 25.

HEADQUARTERS MIDDLE DEPARTMENT,

Baltimore, Md., July 6, 1862.

I. The following-named officers of the volunteer force of the United States recently escaped

from the military prison at Macon, Ga., will proceed to Washington and report in person to the

Adjutant-General: Henry W. Mays, first lieutenant, Ninth Kentucky; N. J. Camp, second

lieutenant, Twenty-third Missouri; George W. Brown, second lieutenant, Twenty-third Missouri;

George H. Logan, second lieutenant, Company I, Fourteenth Iowa; John S. Agey, first lieutenant,

Company D, Fourteenth Iowa; I. N. Rhodes, second sergeant, Company I, Fourteenth Iowa,

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Milton Rhodes, third sergeant, Company I, Fourteenth Iowa. Maj. James Belger, quartermaster,

U.S. Army, will furnish the necessary transportation.

By command of Major-General Wool:

WM. D. WHIPPLE,

Assistant Adjutant-General.

BALTIMORE, July 6, 1862.

Col. E. S. SANFORD:

(For W. W. Harding, Philadelphia Inquirer, Philadelphia.)

Arrived here from Fort Monroe this a.m. and gives cheering accounts of McClellan's army up

to Friday p.m. On that day national salute and review by McClellan. Still occupies strong and

invincible position. Men anxious to move to Richmond and full of spirits. They heard rumor that

movement was called defeat and very indignant as they deem it brilliant success. Richmond

papers announce arrival of McCall. I learn that he was wounded slightly in arm during battle and

three hours after which in piece of woods captured before he could draw pistol or sword.

Richmond papers Friday acknowledge loss 30,000. Reported death Stonewall Jackson denied.

He is said to be on left bank Chickahominy. Captain Hazzard, Fourth Artillery, arrived this

morning from Fortress badly wounded [in] leg with grape-shot. Spaulding and large ship in tow

with sick and wounded left Fortress Saturday evening for New York. Also large steamer for

Philadelphia. Steamer Massachusetts arrived at Fortress Friday night with Lieuts. G. W. Brown

and N. J. Camp, Twenty-third Missouri; J. S. Agey and G. H. Logan, Fourteenth Iowa; H. W.

Mays, Ninth Kentucky, and Sergeants I. N. Rhodes and Milton Rhodes, Fourteenth Iowa,

escaped prisoners, on board. All were captured at Shiloh except Mays, who was taken by the

guerrilla Morgan. They belonged to General Prentiss' brigade and they corroborated the

statement that the surrender took place in the evening after stubborn struggle. While at Macon,

Ga., June 1, Lieutenants Camp, Brown and Mays determined to escape. They passed sentinels

and walked through town singing Dixie. Traversing swamp at midnight reached Ocmulgee River

and finding small boat, by using tin plate and canteen for paddle, started. Next morning found

them twenty-five miles from Macon. Secreted themselves all day and at night having cut

wooden paddles from tree started. Toward morning came across a boat which they endeavored to

avoid by hiding in bushes. To their horror, however, boat came alongside, but--subsequent joy--

turned out to be Lieutenants Agey and Logan and two Sergeants Rhodes, who escaped a previous

Tuesday in disguise of rebel soldiers and having around waists a bag with flour, dried peaches,

&c., and files, salt in boots, and they subsequently escaped in boat. The two boats then kept

together safely 600 miles by night with oars muffled with cypress moss. On the 11th reached

Hawkinsville, where three small deserted steamers were tied up. Passed by without observation.

On trip where persons [were] observed on bank, cheered for Davis and said were messengers

from Davis. On the 17th reached Wolf Island, in Altamaha Sound. Next day reached Sapelo

Island; found deserted. On the 18th went aboard steamer Wamsutta which next day transferred to

steamer Florida at Saint Simon's Sound. Put aboard steamer Massachusetts, which brought [us]

to Fort Monroe. They report Lieutenant Bliss, of Fifty-eighth Illinois [Second Michigan Battery],

on May 1, was wantonly murdered by the rebel guard.

J. ROBLEY DUNGLISON.

ADJUTANT-GENERAL'S OFFICE,

Washington, July 8, 1862.

COMMANDING OFFICER, Cairo, Ill.:

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General Orders, No. 72, just issued, requires paroled prisoners from Illinois, Wisconsin,

Minnesota, Iowa and Missouri to be sent to camp near Jefferson Barracks, Mo. They must not

be furloughed. Send them at once.

L. THOMAS,

Adjutant-General

CAMP NEAR CORINTH, MISS., July 16, 1862.

Brig. Gen. P. A. HACKLEMAN.

GENERAL: I have already in the Missouri Republican of 18th June ultimo published an

account of the condition and treatment of the Union soldiers captured at Shiloh by the rebels into

whose hands they fell. But as Brigadier-General Oglesby, commanding this (Second) division,

Army of the Mississippi, requested a written statement through you of the facts connected with

the murder of Lieut. W. S. Bliss, of the Second Michigan Battery, and the treatment of the

Federal soldiers taken with him, I comply with his request and send you the following, which

came under my own personal observation, or as attested by my late fellow-prisoners.

Lieutenant Bliss was murdered on the 1st or 2d day of May. He and other officers and others

who had the means had been in the habit of buying cakes and milk at a house near a well whence

we brought water and had on the morning of that day left his canteen at this house to be filled in

the evening. At about 5 p.m. Lieutenant Bliss and Lieutenant Winslow of the Fifty-eighth

Illinois, went to the well for water, under guard of course. Arrived at the well Lieutenant Bliss

stepped to the back window of the house in question, distant about ten or twelve paces, to get his

milk. Ordered by the guard to come away he replied that he merely wanted to get his milk, at the

same moment receiving it from the woman of the house and in return handing her a shinplaster

in payment. The guard, standing about six paces from him, repeated the order. Lieutenant Bliss

said, "In a minute," and receiving his change stepped back some three feet. At this moment the

guard raised his piece and Bliss perceiving the movement exclaimed, "Good God! you will not

shoot me, will you?" Saying he "must do his duty" the guard fired, shooting Bliss through the

heart, who fell dead without a groan or motion.

The guard although standing almost within reach of Lieutenant Bliss had made no effort to

prevent him from going to the window nor could he have supposed he would escape, since all

parties were in a yard, nor did he inform him that he was violating orders, nor had the prisoners

been informed that the purchase of milk was prohibited.

That this atrocious and most inhuman murder is not to be charged to the brutality of the

individual soldier, although by no means innocent, is proved by the assertion of Capt. D. S. Troy,

the highest Confederate officer in Montgomery, made to me that the shooting was "according to

orders."

At Tuscaloosa two enlisted men were killed by the guard for looking out of the window of

their prison, one of them being shot before any notice was given them prohibiting them the poor

privilege of looking at their mother earth. After the first killing a written notice was posted up

that the guard were to discharge their pieces at any prisoner seen looking out of a window.

Several were shot at but none wounded.

At Tuscaloosa the prisoners were confined in close rooms; only a few were allowed to go out

for water and to the sinks at a time, and although the diarrhea was prevailing in the prisons to a

terrible extent the unhappy victims were obliged to use tubs during the night, which were often

not removed until 9 a.m. Alive with vermin such prisons must rapidly develop every form of

disease and death claim many a noble mark.

At Montgomery upward of 500 privates and 100 commissioned officers were confined in a

cotton shed. Within it were their sinks, many as in the field, open trenches. They were almost

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wholly without blankets, hundreds without coats, while many had sold their clothing, even to

their pants, for food. No clothing of any description was forwarded to them, and their only beds

were the hard earth and harder planks, mitigated for a short time by a small supply of damaged

hay, soon exhausted and never replenished.

The sick were sent to hospitals in the cities where they had such care as surgeons of our own

number could give them, with entirely inadequate supplies of medicines and hospital necessaries.

The diarrhea, ague and milder forms of disease at Montgomery were treated by Dr. W. A. Morse,

a lieutenant of Twelfth Iowa, who never had less than 150 cases, and was many times for several

successive days entirely without medicines. The deaths of prisoners were announced as follows:

"Died, a Yankee prisoner," among the deaths of slaves--no name or rank being given. Such were

the obituaries of many well-educated officers and privates.

The rations issued at Tuscaloosa and Montgomery, where I was confined, were of the most

execrable description. Corn bread made of unsifted, coarsely ground meal, a small slice of wheat

bread, and two or three small pieces of meat, often spoiled, and fetid salt beef constituted the

ration for a day. Occasionally small allowances of sugar, rice, stock pease and molasses were

made, the whole not exceeding half rations. Miserable as was this allowance it was in a few

weeks reduced one-half, until no more than a quarter ration was issued. I have often seen men

consume at one meal the amount received for three.

It is no wonder that upon such subsistence men became reduced in health and strength until

death from starvation stared them in the face.

These officers and men who had manfully held their ground at Shiloh until 5 o'clock p.m.,

and until ordered back, and who had repulsed every attack of the enemy, were obliged to drag

out a miserable existence in prisons overrun with vermin under circumstances at which humanity

revolts and to which felons are not condemned by civilized nations. But I have given the main

facts in the case and have no desire to deepen the picture. They speak their own language; further

details are unnecessary.

Of the 9,300 to 2,400 captured on the 6th, 1,600 have either been released by death from the

barbarism of traitors, have been paroled or have made their escape.

God grant that the remainder may soon be restored to their friends and homes.

I am, most respectfully, your obedient servant,

J. B. DORR,

Lieutenant and Quartermaster, Twelfth Iowa Infantry.

HEADQUARTERS SECOND DIVISION,

Camp near Corinth, July 19, 1862.

I inclose for the notice of the commanding generals of the post, district and department the

official statement of Lieut. J. B. Dorr, Twelfth Iowa Infantry, in regard to the treatment and

punishment of Union soldiers, prisoners of war at Montgomery and Tuscaloosa, by the rebel

authorities. I have asked for the communication that it may be officially known, as far as it is

possible to make it official, the barbarous and inhuman treatment our soldiers receive as

prisoners of war from the rebel army.

Most respectfully forwarded.

R. J. OGLESBY,

Brigadier-General, Commanding

HEADQUARTERS DEPARTMENT OF THE MISSISSIPPI,

Saint Louis, July 19, 1862.

N. B. BAKER, Clinton, Iowa:

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Paroled prisoners are obliged to do guard, police and fatigue duty for the proper order of their

own corps. Those who refuse are mutineers.

H. W. HALLECK,

Major-General.

HEADQUARTERS DEPARTMENT OF THE MISSISSIPPI,

Corinth, Miss., July 20, [1862.]

Capt. GEORGE S. PEIRCE,

Military Commander, Dubuque, Iowa.

SIR: In reply to your telegram with reference to the discharge of paroled prisoners I have the

honor to state that permanently disabled paroled prisoners will be discharged from the service on

certificates of disability the same as other soldiers.

By order of Major-General Halleck:

S. M. PRESTON,

Assistant Adjutant-General.

WAR DEPARTMENT, Washington, July 21, 1862.

Hon. JAMES W. GRIMES, Senate.

SIR: The Secretary of War directs me to acknowledge the receipt of your letter of the 6th

instant inclosing a communication from His Excellency Governor Kirkwood, covering one from

J. B. Dorr, quartermaster of the Twelfth Regiment Iowa Volunteers, with regard to 1,450 soldiers

of Iowa regiments, paroled prisoners of war, and 250 officers now confined at Selma, Ala., and

in reply to say that the Department is making every effort for a general exchange of all prisoners

of war and has now strong hopes of its early accomplishment.

Inclosed please find a copy of General Orders, No. 72, regarding paroled prisoners, &c.

I have the honor to be, your obedient servant,

C. P. WOLCOTT,

Assistant Secretary of War.

CLINTON, IOWA, July 21, 1862.

SECRETARY OF WAR:

Will not Iowa soldiers of the Eighth, Twelfth, Fourteenth and Sixteenth Iowa sent home on

parole be furloughed until exchanged? Was this not by officers commanding below Saint Louis?

Who has a right to detail them for further service? Was not the detail for relief of the Twentythird

Missouri a violation of their parole?

N. B. BAKER,

Adjutant-General of Iowa.

CLINTON, IOWA, July 21, 1862.

SECRETARY OF WAR:

I object to Iowa soldiers who are on parole doing anything which by implication or

indirection may make them violate that parole. Most of these men are at Benton Barracks and

should be furloughed to their homes until exchanged. They are as brave and willing men as ever

lived. They have proved what they are. They understand their parole prohibits any service.

Should you put them in service for the relief of the Twenty-third Missouri and put muskets in

their hands? Do not allow punishment to brave and gallant men who have done their duty.

N. B. BAKER,

Adjutant-General of Iowa.

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WASHINGTON, July 22, 1862.

Hon. EDWIN H. STANTON, Secretary of War.

SIR: By the inclosed letters it appears some of the Iowa troops taken prisoners at Shiloh are

at Benton Barracks. It is stated in one of the letters they are unpaid and without clothes. I hope

this matter has been attended to ere this, but if it has not I earnestly ask that arrangements may be

made at once for their relief It appears from the letter of McMaken that the officers in command

and the paroled prisoners do not understand alike the duties of the prisoners in their present

situation, and that this misunderstanding has led and is likely to lead to very unpleasant results. I

do not know which is right, but it is very desirable that a conflict such as is shown to exist should

be avoided. Will you be kind enough to make some order in the matter and send me a copy? If

the boys are in the wrong I will use my best exertions to set them right. I am well satisfied the

best way is to exchange them, and as there are a large number of rebel prisoners at Chicago and

elsewhere I do not see why it cannot be done.

Very respectfully, your obedient servant,

SAMUEL J. KIRKWOOD.

COLUMBUS CITY, LOUISA COUNTY, IOWA,

July 16, 1862.

Hon. Mr. KIRKWOOD.

DEAR SIR: Please pardon the liberty I now take in addressing you with reference to a matter

in which no one can feel a deeper interest than yourself. But to the point. I have been in regular

correspondence with a member of Company C, Eighth Regiment Iowa Volunteers, ever since the

mustering of that company into the service. Many of that regiment you are aware were taken

prisoners at Shiloh with no other clothing than their fatigue suit. You no doubt are as well aware

of their suffering ever since that period as any one. They are now at Benton Barracks in a

destitute condition, without a change of clothing, being compelled to wash and dry one piece at a

time, and exposed to all the privations, inconvenience, &c., incident to disorganized regiments or

companies.

Now, dear Governor, is there no way by which these boys of the noble Eighth Iowa, who

stood so nobly on that ever memorable and dreadful Sabbath at Pittsburg Landing from 9 a.m.

until past 5 p.m., and though charged upon five times never faltered, standing nobly in the name

of Iowa by the flag of this country, while death and disorder reigned and reveled all around, yet

still standing like the noble Romans ready to die, but never for a moment thinking of turning

their backs upon a foe (I am proud to know that Iowans never do turn their backs to a foe), while

other regiments were being disorganized and fleeing in confusion and insubordination, yet still

like the everlasting rocks they stood firm, the noble boys of Iowa, until both right and left flanks

gave way and let the enemy around them in overwhelming numbers, yielding only when they

could resist no longer.

Now in the name of that incomparable conduct, the suffering of that raining and hailing

night--wet, cold and hungry, and their future suffering as prisoners among barbarians--can we do

anything for them? Can you by any effort secure their immediate back pay? The boys are

penniless. If they cannot be paid off or in part immediately can you secure permission for them

to return for the time being to their friends?

Pardon me for calling your attention to their present unhappy condition. I know your

multiplicity of business and feared perhaps you might not have had sufficient time to look after

this matter. I deeply sympathize with all our civil officers from Governors of States up to

Cabinet members and President in these times of great care, unceasing anxieties and unending

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toil, having not only the ordinary labors and cares of office but all the additional labor and care

of war times. We pray for you all. We feel that the Lord can sustain you all and overrule our

present afflictions for our national and individual good. This war properly conducted will

renovate, ennoble and bless our nation. We shall yet be a free and happier people. Only let us

carefully observe the working and directions of Providence. Who can tell but like Esther in the

Eastern court our present State and national officers have been called to the kingdom for just

such a time as this; and though your labors, cares, anxieties, &c., may be greater than any of your

predecessors for years yet the reward will be in proportion. It is nothing to build a ship compared

with the skill, exposure and labor to run her safe among reefs, shoals, rocks, sands while the

waves foam and lash and the tempest howls and beats furiously upon her and yet at last in spite

of all land her safe in the desired haven. Our fathers did a great and good work to form and build

up this beloved country but the men who will save it will accomplish a far greater.

Please pardon the trespass upon your time. I should not have presumed so much but for the

fact that by birth and rearage we are both Marylanders; by adoption Iowans and profession

patriots, and purpose death to traitors.

Yours,

J. H. BUSER.

MIDDLETOWN, IOWA, July 18, 1862.

Hon. SAMUEL J. KIRKWOOD.

DEAR SIR: Inclosed with this I take the liberty of sending you a letter I this day received

from a brother in the Fourteenth Iowa Regiment, with the paroled prisoners at present at Benton

Barracks, Saint Louis. You are acquainted I presume with the movements of these Iowa paroled

prisoners since they entered the Union lines. It appears that they have got into some difficulty

with the military authorities in regard to the performance of garrison duty which has been

assigned them. It pains us to know that men who have braved death on the battle-field in defense

of their country and endured the hardships and sufferings of prisoners in the hands of their

enemies should be subjected to more humiliating and degrading treatment from their own

Government (or those who represent it) than they did from the rebels. [The] Government should

certainly require no duty of our paroled prisoners that could be construed as bearing arms against

the rebel States, or which they (the prisoners) believed to be a violation of their oath. And if our

Government wants 300,000 more troops it should see that its present volunteers were not treated

as convicts. If the boys are wrong in the position which they have taken they are honestly and

conscientiously wrong [and] measures should be taken that would be calculated to convince

them of the fact.

They have not been paid since January and have been entirely destitute of funds since they

returned to our lines, and it was only by great exertion they raised the necessary funds to pay for

a dispatch to you in reference to their condition while at Nashville. The only apology which I

shall make for troubling you with this is the interest I feel for these paroled prisoners, portions

of the Iowa Eighth, Twelfth and Fourteenth, who have done quite as much fighting and endured

more hardships perhaps than any troops in the service. As I am almost a stranger to you, for the

credibility of both these letters I would refer you to the Hon. James W. Grimes, to whom you

may show this correspondence. As your position as chief executive of the State gives you a

fatherly care over all our volunteers I take this liberty of calling your attention to this case if you

have not been otherwise notified of it.

I remain, yours, truly,

J. J. McMAKEN.

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CLINTON, IOWA, July 22, 1862.

Hon. EDWIN M. STANTON, Secretary of War:

I explain at the request of General Thomas my dispatch of the 21st. Some 600 or 800 Iowa

soldiers of the Eighth, Twelfth, Fourteenth and Sixteenth Infantry were taken prisoners at Shiloh

and subsequently released on parole. Attempts were made to make them serve in violation of

parole before they arrived at Chicago from Cairo. They were sent forward to be furloughed as

was well understood when paroled. They were in some way detained at Benton Barracks and

ordered by colonel of Twenty-third Missouri to relieve that regiment, and put on service which

they deem inconsistent with their parole; they refused and are put in the guard-house. I want

them sent home and furloughed until exchanged. It is proposed to treat them as mutineers. I

object to such treatment to brave and willing men. I may be mistaken in my views, but the first

order to relieve the Twenty-third Missouri was in effect a direct violation of parole. Please

answer.

N. B. BAKER,

Adjutant-General of Iowa.

WAR DEPARTMENT, Washington, July 25, 1862.

His Excellency SAMUEL J. KIRKWOOD, Governor of Iowa.

SIR: Your letter of the 22d instant has been referred to the Secretary of War. I am directed to

say in reply that arrangements have been made for a general exchange of prisoners which it is

hoped will remove all further cause of complaint on the part of paroled prisoners of war. The

principle, however, is settled that our soldiers when sent back by the enemy on parole must not

be placed on any duty that will increase the effective force of our army by relieving other troops

and permitting them to act more effectively against the enemy.

By order of Secretary of War:

C. P. BUCKINGHAM,

Brigadier-General and Assistant Adjutant-Genera

WASHINGTON, July 28, 1862.

His Excellency the PRESIDENT:

I inclose certain papers in regard to certain Iowa troops taken prisoners at Shiloh, since

paroled and now at Benton Barracks.

The difficulty between them and the officers there is very unfortunate and will have a bad

influence on recruiting in our State. It will be some time before they can be exchanged. Cannot

orders be sent releasing them from any duty until exchanged or sending them to Davenport,

Iowa, to occupy the Government barracks there until exchanged?

They have not been paid since January 1, but I think I have arranged for that to-day.

Please give this matter early attention.

Very respectfully, your obedient servant,

SAMUEL J. KIRKWOOD.

BENTON BARRACKS, Saint Louis, Mo., July 12, 1862.

His Excellency SAMUEL J. KIRKWOOD, Governor of Iowa.

SIR: We the undersigned, paroled prisoners, members of the Eighth Iowa Regiment, desire to

make the following statements concerning our treatment since the battle of Shiloh:

April 6 we arrived on the battle-field between 8 and 9 o'clock a.m. and were surrounded and

completely cut off at 2 o'clock p.m. so we have been told, but were not taken prisoners until

twenty minutes past 5 o'clock p.m., when we were overpowered by superior numbers. After an

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imprisonment of no ordinary severity, hardships and indignities of which few if any could form a

correct opinion without being placed under the same circumstances we were delivered over to

our own forces. Part of us arrived at Huntsville May 28, but the majority of us May 30. We were

kindly received and treated by our soldiers at Huntsville. May 31 we started toward Columbia,

distant from Huntsville eighty miles. The train was loaded with cotton, and we had to march

seventy-five miles in three days. We from close confinement and insufficient food were hardly

fit for this march; yet though difficult it was accomplished and we arrived at Nashville June 3.

At Nashville from some unaccountable circumstances which appear very mysterious to us

privates who have no means of seeing the workings of the hidden machinery [we were detained

until] June 30, notwithstanding an order was posted up emanating from the War Department to

the effect that all paroled prisoners were considered on leave of absence and were to report their

post-office address to the Governors of the respective States to which they belonged. No

countermanding order was made public to us, yet we were told that in our case this order was

revoked. But in the face of all this the Ohio troops were sent home on furlough.

On the 24th of June another change took place in the programme; furloughs were made out

dated June 3 and countersigned by the commanding officer at Nashville. These we have never

received. Payrolls were made out and our descriptive lists taken that when the propitious moment

should arrive all would be ready. June 30 an order came for our removal to Louisville, but on

reaching that point we were put aboard a boat and reached Cairo July 2 and were quartered in

dirty barracks little or no better than a hogpen, and if our senses of sight and smell did not

deceive us these barracks had previously been occupied by this and some other animals, and it is

doubtful if any of the lower apartments of the barracks had not been visited more than once

recently by some of the brute creation and yet there were no means furnished us of cleansing

them.

We were here informed by the commanding officer that he would treat us as brothers; that we

would be paid off and discharged; that he would see to it that we should have every cent which

rightfully belonged to us and the machinery which the Government had put between them and us

should not deprive us of it, either; that we should get all the conveniences allowed us and even

that ice should be furnished us. And then as at Nashville the inducements, threats, or both, to

break our parole by standing guard were depicted to us in glowing colors. Yet 1,300 or 1,400

paroled prisoners well know that here (Cairo) as at Nashville we have never got full rations; that

we had to carry three-fourths of all the water used from the Ohio River, distant three quarters of

a mile; that the citizens locked or nailed up their wells so we had to get water as we best could

from the river and the so much longed for ice was a myth.

July 9 much to our astonishment the Iowa, Missouri, Illinois and Wisconsin troops were

ordered to Saint Louis, while an extract from a newspaper gained credence amongst us that we

were to report at Jefferson Barracks for such duty as might be assigned us. The officer in charge

of us reported at that point and we were ordered to Benton Barracks. Since being taken prisoners

no camp equipage or cooking utensils whatever have been furnished us either to cook or eat our

victuals with, except a cup and plate apiece to the prisoners at Tuscaloosa, Ala., and one plate,

one cup, one knife, one fork and one spoon to every seven prisoners at Macon, Ga. Since coming

within our own lines nothing of this kind has been furnished us but a few pans and far fewer

kettles. We are thus, comparatively speaking, wholly destitute of anything to eat our victuals

with and wretchedly supplied with anything to cook them with. To-day requisitions have been

made out for these much-needed articles which we fain hope and expect will be furnished to us.

Since our first sight of Nashville we have been fed on empty promises for which we have no

more appetite, and owing to the uncertainties which surround our future disposition very few if

any of us have received any word from home.

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In making these statements to you we do not mean to make an unsoldierly or whining

complaint to you over what we have suffered but it must be remembered that those who would

have attended to our wants and not suffered us to be trampled upon are now lying in Southern

prisons, and now it does appear to us we have none who care for us further than to make so many

stepping stones of us for their own promotion to office.

We make these statements to you that you may understand our situation and if you think

necessary take such steps as you see proper under the circumstances, and that whatever our rights

may be we may have them, that our parole may be respected and we not driven to the alternative

of violating our conscience by perjury or suffering as mutineers. Very many of us would

consider ourselves released from the parole if discharged and would either join the old or enter

the new regiments, while all would make this preferable to being scattered to different places and

duties, under officers we know not and who care not for us.

Form of parole.

MONTGOMERY, ALA., May 23, 1862.

I do hereby solemnly swear and pledge my most sacred word of honor that I will not during

the existing war between the Confederate States and the United States of America bear arms or

aid and abet the enemies of said Confederate States or their friends, either directly or indirectly

in any form whatsoever, until regularly exchanged or released.

Parole given, at Macon, Ga.

I do solemnly swear that I will not take up arms against the Confederate States of America or

form any alliance to defeat them until regularly exchanged or otherwise honorably discharged.

Given and sworn to May 24, 1862.

Names and signers to the above statement: A. B. Smith, Company A, in behalf of 18 men; T.

F. Greenlee, Company G, in behalf of 15 men; Sumner Smith, Company K, in behalf of 27 men;

David S. Fuller, Company B; Jacob L. Tinkhan, Company D, in behalf of 36 men; Norman

Sloan, Company F; Edward Young, for and in behalf of 26 men, Company B; John Pruitt, for

and in behalf of 8 men, Company I; William Kirkpatrick, for and in behalf of 31 men, Company

H; Gideon McHenry, Company C, in behalf of 32 men.

P. S.--I have been authorized to add that Companies E and K have never yet received any pay

from the Government. The other companies have been paid up to the 31st of December, 1861.

GIDEON McHENRY.

CAMP BENTON, SAINT LOUIS, Mo., July 14, 1862.

Adjutant-General BAKER.

DEAR SIR: I proceed to write to you by informing you of the critical circumstances that we

(paroled prisoners) are now in.

We are in Camp Benton, arriving here the evening of the 10th, and now after being in the

Southern prisons two months and being fed upon one-fourth rations--I need not tell you the kind-

-we are placed here by our own will by subscribing to the following oath rather than to die in

filth and not a morsel of bread to fill the vacuum in our stomachs. Oath:

I pledge my most sacred honor that I will not during the existing war between the

Confederate States and the United States of America bear arms or aid or abet the enemy of said

Confederate States or their friends directly or indirectly in any form whatever until exchanged or

released.

Besides taking this oath they have taken our description, and now after going through all this

form and after getting back into our lines we are now used as dogs.

The commander here has given orders for us to stand guard. This every one of us will not do

even to a man, believing it to be a violation of our oath. Already forty of us are in the guard-

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house and the rest are ready to go at a moment's notice to be tried by a court-martial. No telling

of the consequences. There are 600 Iowa boys here; not one of us has received a cent pay since

the 1st of January. We unanimously ask you to see into this affair and see what shall be done.

We are here without officers and this is known to be the case and we are run over and trampled

below the Secesh prisoners.

With this explanation and asking help, I submit, yours,

COMPANY D,

Twelfth Iowa, Cerro Gordo.

IOWA CITY, IOWA, August 31, 1862.

Col. E. D. TOWNSEND, Assistant Adjutant-General.

DEAR SIR: Governor Kirkwood desires me to call the attention of the Adjutant-General to

my status as a prisoner of war. You will doubtless remember me as one of three officers who

were sent to Washington to secure a general exchange of prisoners and ordered to report to the

commanding officer at Saint Louis. I was taken prisoner at the battle of Shiloh on the 6th of last

April with Brigadier General Prentiss and paroled for the purpose stated on the 30th day of May.

My parole continues until I am exchanged and therefore I can do no service until then. The

Governor has appointed me colonel, or will as soon as I am exchanged, of the Twenty-second

Regiment from this State. This appointment has been approved by the Secretary of War and I am

waiting to be exchanged in order that I may take command of my regiment. The regiment has

been mustered into the service and is armed and equipped ready for the field. At the time I was

taken prisoner I was major of the Third Iowa Infantry. I desire my name sent forward for

exchange as soon as possible that I may go into the service. All that is necessary is to send some

Confederate officer of my rank, or the number of equivalents according to the existing cartel, to

the lines in exchange for me. As I am here nothing more will be needed in the way of actual

delivery.

I address this to you, colonel, as I have met you and have some acquaintance with you and

believe you will do all you can to aid me in this matter. The early attention of the department to

it will be a great favor to me and my regiment.

Very respectfully, your obedient servant,

W. M. STONE,

Major Third Iowa Infantry.

KEOKUK, IOWA, September 16, 1862.

Respectfully forwarded to Major-General Halleck. General Holmes on paper seems very

reasonable, but to Captain Noble who bore my dispatches he expressed very sad conceptions of

me.

S. R. CURTIS,

Major-General.

OFFICE OF THE PROVOST-MARSHAL-GENERAL,

Saint Louis, September 17, 1862.

Colonel HOFFMAN, Commissary. General of Prisoners.

COLONEL: This office has no official copy and no official information respecting the cartel

for the exchange of prisoners agreed upon between the United States Government and certain

officers of the so-called Confederate States on the 22d of July last. Some paroles have been

granted upon the faith of an unofficial copy of that instrument, but the importance of having

regular and authentic information on the subject is obvious. Several prisoners taken months ago

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who have been sick and from that cause or some other omitted from the list of those lately sent

forward for exchange beyond our lines seek to be sent forward specially now under the terms of

that cartel. In most cases the applicant is to be ordered to report to the commanding officer of the

U.S. forces nearest the enemy's line with a view to be exchanged. I should be glad to have any

instructions or suggestions on the subject which you may think proper to make.

I have the honor to be, colonel, very respectfully,

THOS. T. GANTT,

Provost-Marshal-General, District of Missouri and Iowa.

OFFICE COMMISSARY-GENERAL OF PRISONERS,

Detroit, Mich., September 20, 1862.

Col. THOMAS T. GANTT,

Prov. Mar. Gen. Dist. of Missouri and Iowa, Saint Louis, Mo.

COLONEL: Your letter of the 17th is received. I have not yet been furnished with an official

copy of the cartel for the exchange of prisoners and am governed entirely by the one published in

the New York Times which I assume to be authentic. I have asked for an official copy and as

soon as I receive it I will furnish you with one. I have also asked for definite instructions as to

the mode of carrying out the stipulations of the cartel and as soon as they are received I will

communicate them to you. In the meantime I am instructed thus far: All prisoners belonging to

the Confederate Army held in prisons South are to be collected from time to time at Cairo,

whence when a sufficient number is collected they will be sent to Vicksburg to be exchanged or

paroled. Duplicate rolls giving the rank, regiment and company, and when and where captured,

of every prisoner should accompany each party and a like roll should be sent to this office. The

parties may consist of from twenty to a hundred or more as may be convenient. I am not yet

instructed how to dispose of the irregular military prisoners not belonging to the rebel army, and

for the present they will be detained at Alton. All prisoners belonging to the Confederate Army

who may desire it will be released on taking the oath of allegiance.

Very respectfully, your obedient servant,

W. HOFFMAN,

Colonel Third Infantry, Commissary. General of Prisoners.

WAR DEPARTMENT, Washington, September 27, 1862.

Hon. H. M. HOXIE, Des Moines City, Iowa:

Your letter of the 22d instant respecting the arrest, &c., of sundry persons (Knights of the

Golden Circle) is received, all of which is highly approved and you will accept thanks for

efficiency. Also the copy of the affidavit of George Rose was inclosed. The letter to the War

Department from Governor Kirkwood is also before me with the affidavit of J. E. Painter.

In relation to the members of the Knights of the Golden Circle you are directed to arrest all

such persons as are influential and of character sufficient to have a leading influence, taking

ample proofs that they are members, and report the same to this Department. If in your judgment

it is advisable to convey such persons arrested for greater safety and accommodation to some

other place of custody than Davenport Recruiting Depot please advise. It seems to me that you

can act with more promptness by making arrests by order of Governor Kirkwood. Governor

Kirkwood's suggestions about provost-marshals will be attended to. There is to be a provostmarshal-

general and provost-marshal in Congressional districts where necessary. The order of

the Knights of the Golden Circle is regarded as a traitorous and dangerous one and your action

in relation thereto is highly approved.

By order of the Secretary of War:

104

L. C. TURNER,

Judge-Advocate.

EXECUTIVE OFFICE, Iowa City, October 4, 1862.

Hon. E. M. STANTON, Secretary of War, Washington.

SIR: Most of the field and line officers of the Eighth, Twelfth and Fourteenth Regiments

Iowa Volunteer Infantry were taken prisoners at the battle of Shiloh. They were taken prisoners

about 5 o'clock p.m. of the first day's fight because they did not retreat as soon as their supports

on the right and left did, and it is claimed by many that their stubbornness in holding their

ground delayed the advance of the enemy and perhaps saved our army.

These regiments were at Fort Donelson and in the column led by the Iowa Second that

stormed the trenches there. They were thus largely instrumental in capturing the large number of

rebels there taken.

I cannot learn that a single one of the officers of these regiments has yet been exchanged,

although the rebels taken prisoners at Donelson have been exchanged for other of our officers.

This excites much remark in our State and unless there is some error in the statement affords

good ground for such remark. It seems very hard and unfair that these officers should be kept in

confinement and their regiments disorganized while rebels taken prisoners by them are

exchanged for other officers. Permit me to ask for especial attention to this matter so that if any

wrong has been done it may be righted, and if no wrong has been done I may be furnished the

means of satisfying the friends of these officers and our people of the fact.

Very respectfully, your obedient servant,

SAMUEL J. KIRKWOOD.

P. S.--The privates of these regiments are also still unexchanged although many of them are

at Benton Barracks and have suffered very harsh treatment because they did not understand their

parole, as did the officers under whom they were placed. Cannot this matter be made right?

SAMUEL J. KIRKWOOD.

CORINTH, October 9, 1862.

Major-General GRANT:

Paroled now 813 enlisted men, 43 commissioned officers, in good health; about 700

Confederate wounded, already sent to Iowa, paroled; 350 wounded paroled here; cannot tell the

number of dead yet. About 800 Confederates already buried; their loss about eight or ten to one

of ours. Prisoners arriving by every wagon road and train; will send full reports as soon as

possible. No return yet from the hospitals. The woods stink yet with unburied dead. Oglesby shot

through the breast and ball lodged in the spine; hope for his recovery. No news from Rosecrans. I

understand Hamilton's division, my regiment, and others left Rienzi yesterday at 4 p.m. for the

West; nothing authentic from them. Hillyer is here. Shall I send any wounded Confederates to

Saint Louis? Our hospitals are full of them. McKean telegraphs me he will be here this night.

P. E. BURKE,

Colonel Western Sharpshooters, 14th Missouri Vols., Comdg.

SAINT LOUIS, MO., October 10, 1862.

Brig. Gen. LEWIS MERRILL,

Commanding Northeast District of Missouri.

SIR: I am this moment in receipt of a letter from General Guitar, of which I inclose a copy. I

have referred the letter and the subject to Major-General Curtis. I will say, however, that in my

letter to General Guitar I expressly disclaimed any intention to interfere, not with your discretion,

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but his, in the treatment of prisoners. This you will see by a copy of my letter to him, also

inclosed herewith. All question of interference therefore being set aside, I take the liberty of

saying to you in precisely the same manner as if we were discussing orally the best mode of

dealing with these prisoners, as a practical measure, that I would strongly recommend the

treatment which I named to General Guitar. You will observe that my recommendation to him is

very guarded. I am bound to say that my views are also strengthened by the concurrence of

General Guitar. The only really delicate matter is the determination of a proper case for the

extension of lenity, and this is necessarily (and as far as I am concerned expressly) committed to

the discretion of the military commander. The party must have been guilty of no outrage or act of

violence; he must have been the dupe of his own misconceptions or of evil counsel to go to the

brush, and must have heartily repented and turned from his transgression, voluntarily

surrendering himself and giving assurance satisfactory to the officer admitting his parole that he

will observe its terms. Surely such a man should not be treated with severity when so many

persons, proper subjects of punishment, abound.

I am, very respectfully, your obedient servant,

THOS. T. GANTT,

Provost-Marshal-General for Missouri and Iowa.

OFFICE PROVOST-MARSHAL DIST. OF MISSOURI AND IOWA,

Saint Louis, Mo., October 10, 1862.

Major-General CURTIS, Commanding Department.

SIR: I have the honor herewith to inclose for your perusal the letter of General Guitar on the

treatment of a certain class of prisoners. You will perceive from the letter the terms of that which

I wrote to him. I would be glad to know whether I correctly interpreted your wishes as to the

treatment of the description of prisoners of whom General Guitar speaks.

I have the honor to be, very respectfully, your obedient servant,

THOS. T. GANTT,

Provost-Marshal- General.

SAINT LOUIS, October 15, 1862.

Maj. H. Z. CURTIS, Assistant Adjutant-General.

SIR: I addressed Major-General Curtis on the 13th instant on the subject of the indefiniteness

of the powers and duties of the provost-marshal-general. The inclosed letter from the

commissary-general of prisoners shows a very inconvenient conflict between his authority and

mine and illustrates the necessity of a definition of doubtful powers. If there be anything which is

essential to the due administration of this office it is the control of the military prisons within the

district. I cannot perceive how I can exercise any authority over the prison at Gratiot street if I

have no power over that at Alton. Both are equally within my district. Alton is as much within

the Department of the Missouri as is Saint Louis. There are many prisoners at Alton who will be

discharged on parole and bond--some on parole alone and some unconditionally--as soon as their

cases can be reached and examined. If these persons are to be retained until the Secretary of War

can examine into the cause of their detention their case is very pitiable. Under these

circumstances I solicit instructions from the major-general commanding as to the authority I may

exercise over the Alton Military Prison.

I have the honor to be, very respectfully, your obedient servant,

THOS. T. GANTT,

Provost-Marshal-General District of Missouri and Iowa.

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OFFICE PROVOST-MARSHAL-GENERAL,

Saint Louis, October 15, 1862.

Col. WILLIAM HOFFMAN,

Commissary-General of Prisoners, Detroit, Mich.

SIR: I have just received your letter of 13th instant. The view you take of the control of the

prisons within this district will lead to much inconvenience. I have not been furnished with the

orders you mention from the War Department and was not aware of them, but an order issued by

Major-General Halleck in July last expressly placed all the military prisons within this district

under charge of this office. This district then included Alton, as it still does. The same rule which

would exclude me from control of the Alton Military Prison would deprive me of all authority

over the Gratiot Street Military Prison. There are now at Alton a number of prisoners sent there

merely because of the overcrowded condition of the Gratiot Street Prison. As fast as I can I

examine into the evidence against these persons and in many instances find no cause for

detaining them if they will give their parole and bond for future good behavior. To detain these

prisoners until the War Department can act upon their cases will be the occasion of very

disproportioned imprisonment.

In no case have prisoners been sent to Alton from this office without a full list setting forth

the charge and evidence, but numbers have been sent from Tennessee, Kentucky and Arkansas

directly in which as I learn this has been neglected. I speak of this office only since it has been

under my charge. Of course if it be determined that the Alton Prison is not under my control no

further permits to visit it will be given by this office. On this head I shall seek the instructions of

the major-general commanding the department, which includes Alton.

Very respectfully, your obedient servant,

THOS. T. GANTT,

Colonel and Provost-Marshal-General for Missouri, Iowa and Alton.

EXECUTIVE OFFICE, Iowa City, October 16, 1862.

Hon. EDWIN M. STANTON, Washington City, D.C.

SIR: Allow me again to call your attention to the officers and men from this State taken

prisoners at Belmont and Shiloh and to solicit your good offices for their speedy exchange. Quite

a number of privates of the Eighth, Twelfth and Fourteenth Iowa Regiments have been paroled

and have been in Benton Barracks for some time. Can't they be exchanged and be put to service?

I trust the multiplicity of affairs pressing on your attention will not prevent this matter from

receiving early consideration.

Very respectfully, your obedient servant,

SAMUEL J. KIRKWOOD.

HEADQUARTERS ARMY OF THE SOUTHWEST,

Camp at Helena, Ark., October 15, 1862.

Maj. Gen T. H. HOLMES, Little Rock, Ark.

GENERAL: I have the honor to acknowledge the receipt of your communication dated Little

Rock, October 11, 1862, inclosing one for Maj. Gen. S. R. Curtis, commanding the Department

of the Missouri, for my perusal and transmission to him. I shall transmit your letter by the

earliest opportunity. It speaks of two inclosures, which were not found in the envelope. I have

some prisoners, including Lieutenant-Colonel Giddings, Twenty-first Texas [Cavalry], whom I

should have been glad to return with your flag for exchange, but as you state in your letter to

General Curtis that you have ordered all the prisoners taken from us now in your hands into close

confinement (in violation of the cartel) to await his answer I shall of course be obliged to place

107

my prisoners taken from you in the same position and shall send them to Saint Louis to be placed

at the disposition of Major-General Curtis. Permit me to say that I deprecate as much as you can

the introduction into our unfortunate war of any practices not tolerated by the usages of civilized

nations. It has been reported to me that some of the prisoners taken by the Twenty-first Texas on

the 11th instant were murdered after they had surrendered and given up their arms; also that

Major Rector, of the Fourth Iowa Cavalry, was treated with great indignity. I was tempted to

retaliate on Lieutenant-Colonel Giddings and his party, but concluded to wait for an opportunity

to ask an explanation and redress of the above grievance, which I now request you to furnish.

Lieutenant-Colonel Giddings and his party and all prisoners in our hands have been treated with

all the kindness consistent with security. Though it may not be my province to answer your letter

to General Curtis, permit me to say from my own knowledge: First. That no arms have been

issued by Federal officers to negroes in this part of Arkansas; but on the contrary a party of our

soldiers while engaged in depriving negroes of arms (obtained in some illicit manner) and in

protecting the inhabitants from those very negroes and from the depredations of our own soldiers

were attacked and captured after a severe fight, at which time also an inoffensive citizen in

feeble health was killed by your soldiers. Many other instances have occurred in the

neighborhood of Helena where soldiers placed as safeguards over the property of the inhabitants

outside of your chain of sentinels have been captured and carried off. Second. We have never

pretended to insist that all of your soldiers should be dressed in uniform, because we know you

could not furnish it. My definition of a guerrilla is a man who pretends to be a peaceful citizen at

one time and a soldier at another, as many of the small parties through the country do. We have

recognized men on the battle-field who a few days before were in our camp for the purposes of

trade, and one was killed in a skirmish not long since with a pass from our provost marshal of

recent date in his pocket.

There is no usage of civilized nations which would give the rights of war to such persons,

and the only way to stop such practices is to destroy the houses and farms of persons so

offending, and yet I know of very few instances where this punishment has been meted out by

this army. Most of the conflagrations which have occurred have been the result of the

lawlessness of individuals and in defiance of the orders and the most strenuous exertions and

watchfulness on the part of our officers, and I know of no single instance in this State where a

guerrilla has been executed after being taken prisoner. In some instances citizens have burned

their own houses and those of their neighbors and the acts have been ascribed to our soldiers, and

there has been a systematic burning of houses, mills, and cotton-gins in our neighborhood ever

since we have occupied this place.

In these remarks I do not pretend to answer your letter directed to my commanding officer,

Major-General Curtis, but to meet with an instant denial any charges of deliberate and intentional

violation of the laws of war by this Army of the Southwest, with which I have had the honor to

be associated during its whole campaign. Whatever may be the policy of my commanding

officers and of the Government I shall most cheerfully follow it out, and hope that you will not

compel the Government to resort to severe measures of retaliation.

Very respectfully, your obedient servant,

E. A. CARR,

Brigadier-General, Commanding.

EXECUTIVE OFFICE, Iowa City, Iowa, October 16, 1862.

Hon. E. M. STANTON, Secretary of War, Washington, D.C.

SIR: Governor Kirkwood directs me to again call your attention to the Iowa soldiers taken

prisoners by the rebels at the battle of Shiloh, afterwards released on parole, now at Benton

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Barracks, Saint Louis, Mo. All the rebel prisoners taken at Donelson, Shiloh and Island No. 10,

in large part by Iowa troops, have been returned to the rebels, but no Iowa man received in

exchange. Our people know this and are greatly dissatisfied and feel that the Government is not

treating our troops fairly, and will so feel until they have a sufficient reason for this fact. Will

you inform me why it is that no Iowa man is exchanged?

Respectfully,

N.H. BRAINARD,

Military Secretary to Governor Kirkwood.

SAINT LOUIS, October 18, 1862.

Col. WILLIAM HOFFMAN,

Commissary-General of Prisoners, Washington, D. C.

COLONEL: I experience some difficulty in dealing with prisoners of war confined at Gratiot

Street Prison. I have not received an official copy of the cartel for the exchange of prisoners, but

a newspaper report of its tenor informs me that "all prisoners of war are to be discharged on

parole ten days after their capture" and the terms of the cartel as reported extend to privates as

well as to commissioned officers. There are prisoners here whom General Curtis does not think it

proper to parole--indeed, he declares himself opposed to the paroling of any unless with a view

to their immediate departure from our lines. But the prisoners claim their parole under the cartel.

I beg to be informed whether those now in confinement as prisoners of war who have been

captured more than ten days are entitled of right to be discharged on parole under the cartel, and

whether the circumstance of there being no transportation ready to convey them to Vicksburg

will justify the refusal of their discharge on parole. I make this inquiry of you because an order

from headquarters of the Department of the Mississippi places all prisoners in this department

under my care. This was prior to the arrangement of the cartel in July, but this does not prevent

my being continually applied to as if my powers in this respect were plenary.

I am, very respectfully, your obedient servant,

THOS. T. GANTT,

Provost-Marshal-General for Missouri and Iowa.

EXECUTIVE OFFICE, Iowa City, October 21, 1862.

Hon. EDWIN M. STANTON, Secretary of War.

SIR: Since writing you in regard to the Iowa officers and men taken prisoners at Shiloh and

Belmont I have learned that our Iowa officers have come home on furlough. Cannot they and the

men of their regiments (the Eighth, Twelfth and Fourteenth) be exchanged and the regiments

reorganized? Part of the men are in a kind of captivity as paroled prisoners at Benton Barracks

doing no good to the country or for themselves. Others are in the field in the Union Brigade, socalled,

near Corinth, consolidated with men from a number of other regiments in part from other

States. They have no love for or pride in this organization and will do no good in it. Others are or

soon will be in Annapolis. Now I respectfully insist that our officers and men be exchanged; that

they be allowed time and opportunity to reorganize and that some evidence be given them that

for the future they shall not be overlooked and neglected. I feel very sore on this point as I think

these men (than whom none have proved themselves more brave and more worthy) have been

badly treated.

Very respectfully, your obedient servant,

SAMUEL J. KIRKWOOD.

HEADQUARTERS OF THE ARMY.

109

Washington, October 25, 1862.

His Excellency S. J. KIRKWOOD,

Governor of Iowa, Iowa City.

SIR: Your letter of the 21st instant is just received. I regret that you should suppose that the

Government has made any distinction in the exchange of Eastern and Western prisoners of war.

The exchange is made precisely in the order of date in which the prisoners are delivered by the

enemy within our lines. The enemy retained the Shiloh prisoners in the South an unreasonable

length of time after the cartel was agreed upon, and I learn from General Prentiss that this was

evidently done to produce an impression in the West that a preference was given to Eastern

troops. You will see that this detention was in direct violation of the provisions of the cartel. As

soon as officers and men enough are exchanged to reform a regiment those attached to other

organizations will be returned to their original regiments. All of our paroled prisoners are

exchanged as rapidly as we can deliver an equivalent within the enemy's lines. The rule adopted

is those first delivered are to be first exchanged.

Very respectfully, your obedient servant,

H. W. HALLECK,

General-in. Chief.

HEADQUARTERS U.S. FORCES,

Helena, October 29, 1862.

H. Z. CURTIS, Assistant Adjutant-General.

MAJOR: The steamer Little Rock arrived here on the night of the 28th under a flag of truce

with the inclosed lists of Federal prisoners for exchange. We made but few exchanges from the

fact that we had very few rebel prisoners here and Major Gallagher would not recognize the

indebtedness of twenty-five prisoners which we have claimed to be due. Inclosed I also send

General Holmes' letter, with a copy of my reply. As there are still here seventy-one of our

prisoners unexchanged I would be pleased if you would direct me what to do with them. If they

are sent North we will probably in all probability never see them again. I would suggest that you

send prisoners from Saint Louis belonging to General Holmes' department on a light-draught

steamer, so that we can make the exchange and fully reconnoiter the Arkansas River. I have but

little doubt now that the strongest rebel force at any one point in this State is at Arkansas Post.

Reliable information places their number at 12,000 at that point. We had a glorious day on

yesterday in celebrating the completion of Fort Curtis. There are but few rebels in Little Rock,

and I am induced to think that several regiments have gone to Vicksburg in anticipation of an

attack on that point. The Twenty-fourth and Twenty-sixth Regiments of Iowa Infantry have

arrived and are in good health and fine spirits. The Iowa regiments are anxious to have an Iowa

brigade, and unless Major-General Curtis is opposed to it I believe it would be for the good of

the service.

I have the honor to be, your most obedient servant,

ALVIN P. HOVEY,

Brigadier-General, Commanding

OFFICE COMMISSARY-GENERAL OF PRISONERS,

Washington, D.C., October 29, 1862.

Col. THOMAS T. GANTT,

Prov. Mar. Gen. Dist. of Missouri and Iowa, Saint Louis, Mo.

COLONEL: Your letters of the 15th and 18th are received. To obviate the inconvenience

which would arise from your not having authority to release prisoners from the Alton Prison I

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will direct the commanding officer to release on your order all such as may have been sent there

by you on charges which on investigation prove to be informal. To prevent the necessity of

sending up prisoners whose cases have not been decided on I wish as far as practicable you

would hold such prisoners at the Gratiot Street Prison until a decision is had, and then if they are

not to be released send them to Alton. That this prison may not be so much crowded I will direct

that prisoners be transferred from time to time from there to the depot at Sandusky. I inclose

herewith Orders, No. 142, announcing the cartel. You will perceive that by the supplementary

article prisoners of war are to be sent with all reasonable dispatch (in the West) to Vicksburg

where they will be exchanged or paroled. I have already given orders for them to be sent from

Alton from time to time as the numbers justify it to Cairo, Where the commanding officer is

directed to take charge of them and forward them, and I wish you would send any that may now

be at the Gratiot Street Prison or that you may have in charge hereafter to that point with full

rolls. I would not send less than ten at a time. A larger number would be better. It is the direction

of the Secretary of War--- Alton Prison.

Very respectfully, your obedient servant,

W. HOFFMAN,

Colonel Third Infantry, Commissary. General of Prisoners.

SAINT LOUIS, October 31, 1862.

J. M. BASSETT, Esq.,

Provost. Marshal. General Northwest District of Missouri.

SIR: Your report of prisoners arrested and discharged or forwarded to Saint Louis from the

13th to 24th of October, 1862, has been received. I remark that in the case of H. Hoverson you

say he was "arrested and banished from the State as a suspicious and dangerous person." The

banishment of a man from a State is a serious thing, especially when it is based on a charge so

underlined. It is not within the power of a provost-marshal to give such a sentence. No one less

than the commander of a district (formerly called division) can do this. In General Merrill's

district where this power is exercised very liberally it is yet restricted to him. Indeed he has

arrested several subordinates for assuming to exercise it. It is highly conducive to good order in

other parts of the State to enforce this rule and for this purpose it is essential that it be made

universal. Please report the particulars of this man Hoverson's case.

In many other cases you mention that the prisoner was arrested charged with being in the

rebel army and that he was discharged on oath and bond. The time when he was in the rebel

army is very material. If he was in it prior to the 1st August, 1861, and not since, he is entitled to

the benefit of Governor Gamble's proclamation. If he has not been in it since the 17th December,

1861, he is embraced in the amnesty offered by the convention. Again, in some cases for the

charge of having been in the rebel army you discharge on oath and bond. In others you say

"found guilty and sent to Saint Louis." Am I to understand that in the case in which you simply

administer an oath and take a bond the charge is not sustained? If so, it seems that to exact a

bond is hard measure. I have substituted a parole for the oath formerly required at this office. I

supposed that you had received due notice of this change. I am satisfied that it is salutary. I

inclose a form of the parole.

I have commented thus frankly upon your report because I remark in your office a

disposition (as I think) to do the duties incident to it with zeal and care and I am sure that fair

criticism will not be misunderstood. I wish to bring about as much uniformity in the practice of

the office of provost-marshals in this State as possible, and I make no doubt that you will cooperate

with me in promoting an end so desirable.

111

I remark that you arrest people in some cases for being "rebel sympathizers." I submit to you

that this term is too vague to be proper. Some are called "Southern sympathizers" who are really

guilty of nothing worse than regret for the calamities into which this rebellion has plunged the

South. Others, however, so-called are very mischievous enemies of the Government. So long as a

man does nothing to make his sympathy valuable to the cause with which he sympathizes he

ought to be exempt from fine or imprisonment. Of course I do not mean that a blatant wellwisher

of the cause of insurrection is to be allowed to talk treason without molestation. I hope,

however, you will in future make the charges more definite.

I am, very respectfully, your obedient servant,

THOS. T. GANTT,

Provost. Marshal. General for Missouri and Iowa.

GENERAL ORDERS No. 176.

WAR DEPT., ADJT. GENERAL'S OFFICE,

Washington, October 31, 1862.

I. The commissary-general of prisoners has charge of the U.S. officers and men on parole and

correspondence relating to them as well as all details concerning them will pass through him.

II. Fort Delaware is announced as a chaplain post.

By order of the Secretary of War:

L. THOMAS,

Adjutant-General.

WASHINGTON, November 1, 1862.

His Excellency S. J. KIRKWOOD, Governor of Iowa.

GOVERNOR: Your letter of October 28 is just received. No one appreciates more highly

than I do the gallantry and general good conduct of the Iowa regiments, and it will always give

me pleasure to gratify their wishes where proper discipline and the good of the service will

permit.

The attention of the commissioner for the exchange of prisoners has been called to cases of

the Eighth, Twelfth and Fourteenth Iowa Regiments and no doubt their exchange will very soon

be effected, when the proper measures will be taken for their reorganization.

The question of sending home to their own States fragments of regiments now in the field is

a much more serious question than you seem to consider it. There are regiments similarly

situated from nearly every State in the Union, and to permit them to return home to recruit would

very seriously weaken the armies in the field. One or two applications of the kind were

inconsiderately granted and the withdrawal of the troops was near leading to very grave

consequences. You refer to the services of the Iowa troops of such regiments in the recent battle

of Corinth. Suppose they had been permitted to go home before the battle; the enemy might have

defeated us. Very possibly the presence of these men turned the scale.

When the officers and men of these regiments are exchanged they will be reorganized and

such indulgence given them as the exigencies of the service will allow.

Very respectfully, your obedient servant,

H. W. HALLECK,

General-in-Chief.

SAINT LOUIS, November 3, 1862.

Major-General CURTIS, Commanding Department.

SIR: John C. McDonald, of Ralls County, was in 1861 one of the soldiers of Sterling Price.

He represents that he left the army in May or June last and returned to Rails County without any

112

intention, however, of abandoning the Confederate service; that soon after the Kirksville fight he

was called on to become the captain of a company there of seventy-eight men under Porter; that

he accepted the position of captain on condition that none of his men should practice guerrilla

fighting or bushwhacking, but that they should proceed in a body with him to the South; that

being baffled in the attempt to cross the river he proposed to surrender his company (now

numbering upward of 130 men) provided they would be treated as prisoners of war; that General

Merrill agreed that this treatment should, so far as he could effect it, be extended to them; that at

any rate they should not be shot on surrendering, but confined if they could not be exchanged;

that about eighty of his men surrendered on these terms and are here with him now (they are

about being transferred to Alton), and that he desires permission to return to Rails County and

bring down the remainder of his men to share the fate of those already surrendered. The

remainder are still at large feeling some distrust of the terms indicated by General Merrill, but

the sanction of these by you will in the opinion of Captain McDonald enable him to bring them

all with him to Alton or Saint Louis. These men not being regularly prisoners of war Captain

McDonald proposes (if you will grant him a parole for twenty days for that end) to repair to the

city of Vicksburg and make arrangements for the exchange of these men as prisoners of war,

returning for them an equivalent of Federal soldiers. He will, whether successful or unsuccessful

in this mission, return in twenty days (which term is to begin when he returns with the remainder

of his company) to this city, and if unsuccessful will submit to imprisonment during the war or to

such other terms, having his neutrality for their object, as may be determined on by the military

authorities of the United States.

I am, very respectfully, your obedient servant,

THOS. T. GANTT,

Provost-Marshal-General for Missouri and Iowa.

HEADQUARTERS OF THE ARMY,

Washington, November 5, 1862.

His Excellency S. J. KIRKWOOD,

Governor of Iowa, Iowa City.

GOVERNOR: Your letter of the 30th is just received. The main points have been answered

in my letter of the 1st instant. I have no official information in regard to the treatment of Iowa

prisoners at Annapolis. It was reported, however, that some of the prisoners in marching through

the city were guilty of great outrages, robbing and plundering property. I do not know that any of

them were from Iowa. Probably the employment of a guard in marching prisoners through that

city was to prevent a repetition of these offenses.

You may be assured, Governor, that Iowa troops will not be neglected. All their wants have

been and will be supplied there as rapidly as possible, much sooner indeed than they could be if

sent in their destitute condition to their own State.

Very respectfully, your obedient servant,

H. W. HALLECK,

General-in-Chief.

HDQRS. DEPT. OF MISSISSIPPI AND EAST LOUISIANA,

Jackson, Miss., November 12, 1862.

GENERAL OFFICER COMMANDING U.S. FORCES,

Memphis, Tenn.

SIR: I am credibly informed that on or about the 11th day of September, 1862. Mr. William

H. White, a citizen of De Soto County, Miss., was inhumanly murdered in the presence of his

113

mother and wife near his residence on the Hernando and Memphis plank road about thirteen

miles from Memphis. I am also informed that this murder was perpetrated by a party of Illinois

cavalry (said to be the Sixth) in the service of the United States Government and under the

immediate command and direction of one Captain Boicourt. It is further stated that Boicourt

himself inflicted the first wound upon the murdered man.

In view of these reported facts I have the honor to inform you that by direction of my

Government I have taken by lot from the U.S. prisoners of war captured by our forces the four

whose names follow: (1) James E. Gaddy, Company E, Sixth Illinois Cavalry; (2) Bernard

Collins, Company E, Thirty-ninth Ohio Infantry; (3) A.M. Shipman, Company D, Forty-third

Ohio Infantry; (4) Nicholas Hoit, Company C, Seventh Iowa Infantry.

I am also directed to inform you that if the account of the murder be true retaliation will be

made on [these] prisoners unless the murderers are punished. The case, sir, is very plainly before

you. There is not a shadow of doubt that the account of the murder is true and I await your

decision as to who shall suffer the penalty. I have directed Maj. Gen. Earl Van Dorn to forward

this communication through flag of truce.

Very respectfully, your obedient servant,

J. C. PEMBERTON,

Lieutenant-General, Commanding.

OFFICE COMMISSARY-GENERAL OF PRISONERS,

Washington, D.C., November 12, 1862.

Lieut. Col. GEORGE SANGSTER,

Commanding Camp Parole, near Annapolis, Md.

COLONEL: By direction of the Secretary of War, you will order all the paroled troops from

the State of Iowa at Camp Parole to Camp Benton [Benton Barracks], near Saint Louis. Place the

detachment under the command of the senior non-commissioned officer if you have no

commissioned officer from Iowa present and furnish cooked rations for the journey. Call on the

quartermaster for the necessary transportation. Give the officer in charge strict orders to allow no

irregularities or delays by the way and to report to the commanding officer at Benton Barracks

on his arrival. Furnish him with full rolls of the detachment as far as you are able, with a

statement of clothing issued to them.

You will furnish me immediately with a list of all officers and enlisted men absent without

leave, giving the dates, and all so absent will forfeit all pay and allowance. See paragraph 1326,

Army Regulations. Be careful to note all absences on your muster-rolls.

Very respectfully, your obedient servant,

W. HOFFMAN,

Colonel Third Infantry, Commissary. General of Prisoners.

HEADQUARTERS OF THE ARMY,

Washington, November 15, 1862.

His Excellency S. J. KIRKWOOD,

Governor of Iowa, Iowa City.

GOVERNOR: A new commissioner for the exchange of prisoners has been appointed and it

is hoped that the matters complained of may be remedied. All your communications on the

subject will be brought to his notice.

I understand that most of the prisoners referred to by you have been exchanged, but that there

has been some unavoidable delay in making out the rolls. Moreover, lists made out by colonels

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of regiments are frequently very erroneous and defective and that delays are frequently caused by

neglect of regimental officers.

If the enemy has neglected to send forward any prisoners or still retains them contrary to the

terms of the cartel we have no power to correct the evil other than by calling the attention of the

Confederate commissioner to this neglect, which has already been done.

Very respectfully, your obedient servant,

H. W. HALLECK,

General-in- Chief.

HEADQUARTERS OF THE ARMY,

Washington, November 17, 1862.

Governor KIRKWOOD, Iowa City, Iowa.

GOVERNOR: Lieutenant-Colonel Ludlow reports to-day that all Iowa troops captured at

Shiloh have been exchanged; that the Confederate authorities have never reported any prisoners

in their hands taken at Belmont. It was supposed that General Grant had effected their exchange

many months ago. The matter will be further inquired into.

Very respectfully, your obedient servant,

H. W. HALLECK,

General-in- Chief.

GENERAL ORDERS No. 25.

HEADQUARTERS ARMY OF KENTUCKY,

Lexington, Ky., November 21, 1862.

All paroled prisoners of war belonging to the Army of Kentucky having been duly exchanged

will without delay proceed to join their respective regiments as follows:

Those of the Eighteenth Kentucky Volunteer Infantry will report to the commanding officer

at Paris, Ky.; those of the Thirty-third Indiana and Fourteenth Kentucky Volunteer Infantry to the

commanding officer at Nicholasville, Ky.; those of the Tenth Kentucky Volunteer Cavalry,

Ninth Ohio Battery, Twenty-first Indiana Battery, Forty-fourth Ohio Volunteer Infantry,

Nineteenth Kentucky Volunteer Infantry and of Munday's Cavalry to the commanding officer at

this place.

By command of Maj. Gen. G. Granger:

T. G. BEAHAM,

First Lieutenant, Second Iowa Cavalry, Actg. Asst. Adjt. Gen.

HEADQUARTERS DISTRICT OF MEMPHIS,

Memphis, November 23, 1862.

OFFICER COMMANDING GUARD, on Board Steamer Metropolitan.

SIR: I am officially advised by Lieut. Gen. J. C. Pemberton, commanding Confederate forces

at Jackson, Tenn., that he holds four of our prisoners of war, viz, James E. Gaddy, Company E,

Sixth Illinois Cavalry; Bernard Collins, Company E, Thirty-ninth Ohio Infantry; A.M. Shipman,

Company D, Forty third Ohio Infantry, and Nicholas Holt, Company C, Seventh Iowa Infantry,

on whom he proposes by order of the Confederate Government to make retaliation for the killing

of a citizen named White, of De Soto County, Miss., in September last. I have answered him at

length by a flag of truce, and now inform you that it is not a case for retaliation, and have the

honor to request that on arrival at Vicksburg you make specific demand for these prisoners, and

if they be not forthcoming that you withhold from exchange four of like rank, privates, to be

ascertained by lot, and that you bring them to Memphis to await the action of our Government. I

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regard this as a fair breach of the cartel. White was not a Confederate soldier or even guerrilla,

and if the Confederate authorities want to offset the killing of White you can quote plenty of

private murders committed by their adherents.

I have the honor to be, your obedient servant,

W. T. SHERMAN,

Major-General, Commanding.

Don't make known what you propose until you know whether these four men are ready to be

exchanged and then await an answer by telegraph from General Pemberton.

HEADQUARTERS DEPARTMENT OF THE MISSOURI,

Saint Louis, December 3, 1862.

Brig. Gen. C. P. BUCKINGHAM, Assistant Adjutant-General.

GENERAL: Yours of the 26th ultimo in relation to the return to duty of the Iowa officers and

soldiers exchanged is duly received. The trouble is to know who are exchanged. No lists or

descriptions have been sent and I am constantly importuned on this subject. Occasional

newspaper notices inform us of some officers being exchanged and I have acted on these, but I

respectfully submit that immediate notice should be brought home to department and district

commanders of exchanges, so we may know who to detail for duty. Exchanged or not exchanged

should they not return to their rendezvous?

I have the honor to be, general, your obedient servant,

S. R. CURTIS,

Major-general.

OFFICE COMMISSARY-GENERAL OF PRISONERS,

Washington, D.C., December 8, 1862.

Lieut. Col. GEORGE SANGSTER,

Commanding Camp Parole, Annapolis, Md.

COLONEL: The exchanged troops at your camp belonging to regiments serving in and west

of Virginia will leave to join their regiments by the evening train on Thursday next, the 11th

instant. Send as full rolls with the detachment as possible, each regiment by itself, and furnish

cooked rations for the journey. The exchanged men of these regiments at Camp Banks will be

ordered to join this command at the Annapolis Junction and the commanding officer must be

prepared to take charge of them. Direct him to distribute his command as follows, viz: At

Wheeling, for General Wright's department, First, Second, Fourth, Tenth Infantry, Eighth

Cavalry and Second Artillery Regiments [West] Virginia Volunteers; and for General Cox's

command, Thirty-fourth, Thirty-seventh, Forty-second and Forty-seventh Ohio Infantry. At

Camp Wallace, for General Wright's department, the Twenty-third, Thirtieth and Eighty-third

Regiments Ohio Infantry. At Nashville, for General Rosecrans' army, Twenty-first and Twentyfourth

Regiments Ohio Infantry and Third and Fourth Regiments Ohio Cavalry; Tenth,

Sixteenth, Twenty-second, Twenty-fourth, Twenty-seventh and Fifty-first Illinois Infantry; First,

Second, Third, Fourth, Fifth and Sixth Regiments Tennessee Infantry and Second Regiment

Tennessee Cavalry; Thirty-seventh Regiment Indiana Infantry, Eleventh Kentucky Infantry and

First and Fourth Regiments Kentucky Cavalry. At Benton Barracks, for General Grant's army,

First Regiment Ohio Cavalry; Eleventh, Twelfth, Fifteenth, Twenty-eighth, Twenty-ninth,

Thirtieth, Thirty-first and Fifty-eighth Illinois Infantry and Twelfth Illinois Cavalry; Seventh

Regiment Tennessee Infantry; Third, Sixth, Seventh, Eighth, Twelfth, Fourteenth, Fifteenth,

Sixteenth Regiments Iowa Infantry and Second Iowa Cavalry, and Eighteenth Regiment

Missouri Infantry.

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The Quartermaster's Department will furnish the necessary transportation. Notify the

quartermaster at Baltimore in season so that there may be no delay there.

Report immediately the regiments and the number of officers and enlisted men in each that

will move under this order. The sick in hospital will not go.

By order of the General-in-Chief:

Very respectfully, your obedient servant,

W. HOFFMAN,

Colonel Third Infantry, Commissary-General of Prisoners.

Proceedings of a board which met at Saint Louis, Mo., December 12, 1862, pursuant to

Special Orders, No. 16, paragraph III, dated at Headquarters District of Missouri, Saint Louis,

December 10, 1862, of which the following is a true copy:

SPECIAL ORDERS No. 16.

HEADQUARTERS DISTRICT OF MISSOURI,

Saint Louis, Mo., December 10, 1862.

III. A board of officers is hereby appointed for the following purposes:

1. To inquire into the necessity of having additional prison accommodations for the prisoners

now at the Gratiot and Myrtle Street Prisons, and whether provision should be made for others

who may be sent to this city for confinement.

2. In case additional accommodations are found to be necessary to select a suitable building

for the purpose, fix the compensation which should be made for such building and state what