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History - 1884 History - Chapter XXXI

CHAPTER XXXI.

MASSENA TOWNSHIP.

Massena township is found in the eastern tier of townships of Cass county, and is a full congressional sub-division. It is bounded upon the north by Lincoln township, on the east by Adair county, on the south by Victoria township, and on the west by Union township. The topography of this township has no striking features. The land is of a very rich, productive quality, and is gently rolling, with but little land which is untillable. There is no timber of natural growth within the borders of Massena, but the artificial groves are quite numerous and thrifty. The west branch of the Nodaway river, and numerous smaller branches of this body of water, traverse the township in all directions, producing plenty of water for stock and all practical purposes. The west branch of the Nodaway rises in the northeastern corner of the township, on section 1, flowing south through sections 12, 13, 24, 23, 26 and 25, and taking a westward course on section 35, passes through sections 34, 33 and 32, making its exit into Victoria township from the southwest corner of the latter named section.

EARLY SETTLEMENT.

The first settlement made in Massena township was that of Frank H. Whitney. He settled at Whitneyville the latter part of July, 1858, and immediately erected a small board shanty on the land now owned by Mrs. S. T. MoCormick, on section 8, and soon afterward commenced breaking prairie. Mr. Whitney is now a resident of Atlantic, and is mentioned in connection with the banking interests of that place.

Eseck Whitney, a cousin of Frank H., was the second settler of Massena township. He settled on section 8, in the fall of 1858.

Eseck Whitney was born in Oswego county. New York, in 1815, and was raised to follow the occupation of a farmer, but spent some eighteen years of his life in the lumber business, commencing when quite a young man. He was united in marriage, in the county of his birth, on the 28th of April, 1844, to an estimable young lady, Nancy M. Barber, who first saw the light in Herkimer county, in the "Empire State," on the 30th of April, 1820. Mr. Whitney owned a farm in Oswego county, but sold it out and came west to Iowa, locating at first in Adams county, where he farmed rented land for about two years, when he came here and took up a claim, in 1858, on section 8, as above mentioned, where he farmed two years. In 1861 the family went to Colorado, where they remained until 1864, when they returned to this place. Mrs. Whitney speaks of the very lonely life she led in that land of mountains, as it was often six months between the times she saw or spoke to one of her own sex. On account of the trouble with the Ute Indians, in 1864, then growing quite alarming, the family determined to return to civilization, and did so. Mr. Whitney died, March 16, 1876, leaving his family and a large circle of mourning friends. He was one of the few men that are found nowadays, who unite a sterling honesty and purity of purpose with intense energy, and who are always looked up to by all their friends. Mrs. Whitney, his widow, still lives on the old homestead, with her son, William S. Whitney. The latter was born in Oswego county. New York, September 28, 1845, and came to Iowa with his parents in 1856. He was married, on the 18th of February, 1872, to Harriet O. Strong, a native of Grand Detour, Illinois, born February 18, 1857. She is the daughter of Marvin O. and Charlotte Strong, who are now living in the town of Washington, Adams county, where they settled in 1871. Mr. and Mrs. Whitney have an interesting family of five children: Etta M., born in 1875; Nina O., born in 1876; Leon E., born in 1878; Vira R., born in 1880, and an infant. Mr. Whitney served as postmaster at Whitneyville for thirteen years, from 1866 to 1879. He is recognized as a worthy scion of a worthy sire, and ranks among the best citizens of Massena.

Samuel T. McCormick settled on section 8 in the spring of 1859.

Samuel Taylor McCormick, son of Ralph and Nancy McCormick, was born in Morgan county, Illinois, October 13, 1840. His parents were of Scotch-Irish descent, and moved from Kentucky to Illinois in 1831, where they opened a farm near the city of Jacksonville, upon which they resided for thirty-three years. Here his father having died, he, with his mother and family, removed to Mason county, Illinois, in 1864, where he lived for six years, during which time, he being the eldest boy at home, the running of the farm depended mainly upon him. In 1869 he traveled through Iowa, looking at the country, and finding land that suited him, he, in company with his brothers, James and John, removed to Cass county in the spring of 1870, where they opened a farm near the postoffice of Whitneyville, in Massena township, upon which he lived until his death. Being one of the oldest settlers of the county, and before the townships were organized, he, in company with twelve others, organized the township of Massena, of which he was elected a trustee, and held said office for several years. Mr. McCormick was considered one of the most substantial and influential farmers in the county; a man of conservative ideas, and one who threw his influence for what he thought was right. He was generous and liberal toward all benevolent and religious societies, and being himself raised a Presbyterian, his influence was with that body. He received fatal injuries by falling from a stack while stacking hay, from which he never rallied, but passed quietly and peacefully away on the evening of September 24, 1883.

In the spring of 1860, Milon Prary settled on section 8, coming from Illinois, although a native of New York. He remained about a year, when he returned to Illinois, where he subsequently died. Milon was a brother of Mark Frary, who is well known throughout Cass county.

In June, 1867, Samuel M. Holaday settled on section 8, coming from Madison county. He remained here about eight years, when he removed to section 9, where he now resides.

Samuel M. Holaday is a native of Vermillion county, Indiana, born on the 8th day of November, 1839, and is the son of George M. and Lydia Holaday. In 1843, George M. brought his family to Iowa, and settled in Keokuk county, where he remained about ten years, when he came to Adair county, and settled on Middle river. In 1860 he moved to California, and is there engaged in agricultural pursuits. Samuel remained until December 14, 1863, when he was married to Almira Root, a daughter of Azariah and Myra Root. In 1867 he came to Cass county, Iowa, and bought the town plat of Whitneyville, where he remained eight years.

He then bought his farm of two hundred acres on section 9, and has improved the land and made it one of the best farms in the county. He has been an honorable and upright man in the county, and has been honored by the citizens as secretary of the board of trustees, a member of the school board, and has been treasurer and assessor of the township. He is one of the prominent men of the township, and is highly esteemed by the more substantial class of the county. Mr. and Mrs. Holaday have been blessed with eight children: Gertrude; George, died in October, 1879; Charles, Thaddeus, Myra, William L., Blanche and Harry M.

J. Q. A. McCormick came in the spring of 1870, settling on section 8, where he still resides.

John Q. A. McCormick, a native of Morgan county, Illinois, was born on the 16th of January, 1848, and is the son of Ralph McCormick, one of the early settlers of Morgan county, who died in 1851. John was reared on a farm, and in the spring of 1870, came to Cass county to make his home, and in the spring following he bought, with his brother, the north half of section 8, John settling on the easterly portion. He was married on the 27th of February, 1873, to Cordia Joy, born in New York State in April, 1848. They have five children living: Nancy, Florence, Effie; David, died in infancy; George and Samuel. Mr. McCormick is a good, substantial citizen, and by his intelligence and ability has made his place one of the finest in the county.

OTHER SETTLERS.

It would be impossible, minutely, to trace the settlement of all who came in later years, but mention is made of a requisite number to make the history of Massena both complete and interesting, and demonstrates the character of its citizens of today.

Orren Stone, was born in St. Lawrence county. New York, on the 3d of July, 1845, and in 1846 his father, R. E. Stone, moved to Sauk county, Wisconsin, where he died in March, 1884; his widow now resides on the old homestead. Orren was united in marriage in January, 1877, to Elvira Kellogg, a daughter of Chester and Lucinda Kellogg. They have three children: Ada, Earl and Arthur. Mr. Stone came to Cass county in the fall of 1869, and purchased good land on section 4, Massena township, but returned to Sauk county, Wisconsin, where he remained two years, when he came to his farm in Cass county. He commenced to improve his land, and has since purchased enough to make one of the finest farms in the county. Mr. Stone is one of the prominent members of the Baptist church.

Cornelius Denham, a farmer of Massena township, was born in Ontario county. New York, on the 16th of June, 1830. His parents moved to Bureau county, Illinois, in 1838, where they remained until their death. Cornelius remained in New York with his grandfather, until 1843, when he joined his father's family in Illinois, and was there reared to manhood. He was married in Bureau county, Illinois, in January, 1852, to Harriet A. Smith, a native of that State. In March, 1873, he and his family came to Cass county and bought 160 acres of land in Massena township. Mr. and Mrs. Denham have been blessed with seven children: Ella, died in October, 1877; Butler, died in 1855; Lucy S., wife of M. O. Newton, of Illinois; William A., married in 1881, to Emma J. Brown, a daughter of Isaac and Lucinda Brown; Clara, wife of John Yarger; Isaac P. and Cornelius.

William Cool was born in Warren county, New York, May 20, 1841, and was the son of Abraham Cool, a native of that State, William spent most of his life in his native county, coming to this township in the spring of 1873, where be purchased one hundred and fifty acres of land on section 7. He was married in Warren county, New York, November 26, 1862, to Mary F. Kishpaugh. She was born in the same county, June 10, 1843. They had three children: Carrie H., Alice and Hattie M. He was elected in 1878, and served three years on the county board of supervisors, representing the Fifth district.

Martin M. Smith, who was born in October, 1835, is a native of St. Lawrencecounty, New York. His father, Adolphus Smith, a farmer and pioneer of that county, died in 1880 at his old homestead, and his mother, Nancy (Dodge) Smith, now lives at her old home, being over eighty years of age. Martin was reared on a farm, and in 1857 he went to California, and remaining but a short time he traveled through Oregon, Washington and Idaho, and after spending about ten years in that country he returned to his home and was married on the 3d of November, 1869, to Mary Kellogg, a daughter of Chester Kellogg, and a sister of Mrs. Orren Stone of this township. Mr. Smith came to Cass county and purchased forty acres of good land on section 3, in Massena township, and two years later he added forty acres more to his farm. They have six children whose names are: Jessie L., Chester A., Wallace A., Richard A., Ethel A. and Flora Bell. Mr. Smith is school director, and is much, interested in educational matters of this township.

Allen Smith, a son of Eli Smith, was born in Bureau county, on the 7th of June, 1844. He came to Cass county in 1872, and purchased a farm on section 34, Massena township, where he now lives, and has a nice farm of cultivated land. He was married in 1868 in Illinois, to Mary Shugart. They have been blessed with five children: Maggie A., Angelia A., Emma G. Philip R. and Frances.

Lucius L. Langworthy was born in Bureau county, Illinois, June 29, 1837. His father, Cyrus, was one of the pioneer settlers of that county. Lucius was reared a farmer and enlisted under the first call, and re-enlisted in company I, Twelfth Illinois Volunteers, and served three years. He was married December 24, 1865, to Sarah Daniels. He came to Cass county and settled in Massena, in 1880, on section 35, where he still resides. They had seven children: William H., Burton E., Ida M., Mary E., Clara B., Lotta and George W.

Samuel Wickey, a native of Ohio, was born on the 4th of January, 1850, and is the son of Joseph and Lizzie Wickey. In 1870 Samuel came to Madison county, Iowa, and thence to Elkhart county, Indiana, and in 1873 was married to Fannie Housouer. They have four children: Frank E., Melvin H., Ella C. and Milo A. Mr. Wickey came to Cass county in 1881, and purchased eighty acres of land, which he has nicely cultivated. By trade he is a blacksmith, but has taken to farm life and is very successful in his enterprise. He is an intelligent and progressive farmer, and may be proud of his beautiful land, which is being extensively cultivated.

Leander Prall, one of the substantial men of Cass county, was born in Ohio, on the 5th of June, 1843, and is the son of Gabriel and Mary Prall. When about two years of age his parents removed to Clark county, Indiana, where they both died a few years later. At the age of nine years, Leander removed to Adams county, Illinois, with an older brother, who now resides in Atlantic township, Cass county, and there remained until the breaking out of the war, when he enlisted in company K, Seventh Indiana Volunteers, and, after serving three months, was discharged. He re-enlisted in the Thirty-third Indiana Volunteers, and was at Laurel Hill, and in the Thirty-third Wild-cat array, at Shelbyville. He was in some of the most famous battles in the history of the Rebellion, and was always found in the ranks when service was needed. He was honorably discharged at Indianapolis, Indiana, at the close of the war, and was received by his many friends, of Adams county, Illinois, as one of the brave defenders of the Union and the old flag. He was united in marriage, in February, 1866, to Sarah M. Allison, a native of Adams county. They have been blessed with six children: Luella, born in 1868 and died in 1871; Everett, born in 1870 and died in 1871; Emmett, born in 1872; Rebecca A., born in 1876; Walter, born in 1880; and Ida, born in 1882. Mr. Prall, in September, 1866, came to Cass county, Iowa, and purchased eighty acres of land in Franklin township, where he remained until March, 1873, when he went to Smith county, Kansas, and was there engaged in farming for one year, when he sold his farm and returned to this county, buying an estate of one hundred and twenty acres, in Franklin township, where he lived until February, 1883, when he came to Massena township and bought laud of William Holaday, which was some of the first land broken in the township. He now owns two hundred and forty acres of cultivated land on section 7, and has one of the finest farms in the county.

William M. Porter was born in Shelby county, Indiana, on the 28th of June, 1844. His father, Merritt Porter, was a farmer, and died when William was but two weeks old. At an early age his mother died, and William went to live with an uncle, William Duckworth, where he remained until the breaking out of the war, when he enlisted in company F, Seventieth Indiana Volunteer Infantry, and served in the engagements at Resaca, Pine Mountain, Peach Tree Creek, and was with Sherman through Georgia and the Carolinas, besides many skirmishes. In June, 1865, he received an honorable discharge and returned home, where he was engaged in farming. In 1868, he went to Jasper county, Iowa, and was there engaged in farming until 1882, when he came to Cass county and purchased one hundred and sixty acres of land on section 9, Massena township, where he owns one of the finest farms in the county. He was married in 1868 to Martha Cameron, who died in March, 1879, leaving a family of five children to mourn her departure: Merritt, Effie, Elmer, Arthur and Nettie. Mr. Porter was married again, in 1880, to Sarah Roots, a native of Kentucky. They have two children: Letta May and Ezra.

Elias Willis, born in Hagerstown, Maryland, on the 23d of January, 1826, is the son of Isaac Willis, a native of Maryland. When a child, Elias emigrated with his parents to Belmont county, Ohio, where his father died in 1864. In 1849, Elias went to Bureau county, Illinois, and was there engaged in farming, and was there married in March, 1853, to Mary Jane Murray, and by whom he has had three children: Charles I., Alfred H. and Mary E. Mr. Willis enlisted in 1864, in company F,One Hundred and Fifty-first Illinois Volunteers, and served one year. After his discharge, he moved to Poweshiek county, Iowa, and was there engaged in farming, until 1871, when he came to Cass county, and bought one hundred and twenty acres of land on section 25, Massena township, and has one of the finest farms in the township.

George H. Hosfelt was born in Saxony, Germany, on the 4th of October, 1836, and when fifteen years of age, he started out in the world for himself, and inclined with love for free America, he embarked at Liverpool, for Baltimore, in the spring of 1852. Soon after arriving at Baltimore, he went to Newark, New Jersey, and remaining there three years, he went to Illinois, and there remained some twelve or fourteen years, with the exception of three years, which he served in the army. He enlisted in 1861, in company H, Twelfth Illinois Infantry, and served for three years. He was always in the ranks, and participated in nearly all the engagements, and was in the battles at Fort Henry, Fort Donelson, Pittsburg Landing, siege of Corinth, siege of Atlanta, Georgia, and was in the principal campaigns. After receiving an honorable discharge, he returned to Bureau county, Illinois, where he was married, in the spring of 1865, to Rebecca Murray, a sister of the present auditor of Cass county. She was a native of Illinois, and one year after her marriage, died, leaving a little daughter, Ruba Margaret, alone with her father. Three months later the child died, and in several months Mr. Holfelt was married to Pamelia S. Smith, a native of Pennsylvania. They have had nine children born to them: Wealthy, born in 1868; Aden H. born in 1869; William H., born in 1871; Nellie M., born in 1872; Martha I., born in 1875; Cora B., born in 1877, and died the same year; Jasper R., born in 1878, and Eva L., born in 1883. Mr. and Mrs. Hosfelt remained in Illinois until 1868, when they came to Tama county, Iowa, and bought forty acres of land, and made that their home until May, 1871, when he came to Cass county, buying eighty acres of land on section 27, in Massena township. Mr. Hosfelt has been very prosperous, and now owns one of the best farms in the township. He now owns two hundred and eighty acres of land, two hundred acres on section 27, and eighty acres on section 34. He has served as township trustee, and is very prominent in school affairs.

Hiram Blake was born in Jackson county, Ohio, on the 19th of July, 1832, and is the son of John Blake, who moved to La Porte county, Indiana, with his wife and eleven children. When Hiram was about twenty-one years of age, his father gave him three hundred dollars, and he started for Michigan, where he remained two years, when he joined his father's family, who had moved to Bureau county, Illinois, and there made his home until 1867, excepting his time in the service, having enlisted in company H, Twelfth Illinois Infantry, and served about three months. In the spring of 1867, he came to Iowa, and settled in Marshall county, and was there engaged in farming. Mr. Blake was married in July, 1868, to Nancy Evans. They have three childrenl Jessie Blanche, Minerva M. and Verna May. Mr. Blake lived in Marshall county, until 1878, when he came to Cass county, and purchased one hundred and twenty acres of land on section 16, Massena township. He is president of the school board at the present time, and has taken great interest in the township affairs. He is the postmaster of Whitneyville, also music teacher.

Owen L. Smith, named after the old patriarch of abolitionism, was born on the sixth of May, 1842, and is the son of Eli and Clarissa Smith. His father died in August, 1871, and his mother still lives in Bureau county, Illinois. On her eightieth birthday, on October 5, 1884, there was a re-union of her children: Owen, Allen, Mary Ann, Henry and Eli, at her home. Owen was married in 1864 to Mary, a daughter of Samuel Wood. They have been blessed with seven childrenl George Walter, Clarissa V., Mattie M., Eli S., Wilbert K., Eva A. and Lucy A. Mr. Smith came to Cass county, Iowa, in March, l873, and bought eighty acres on section 29, Massena township, where he now resides, having one of the best farms in the township. Mr. S. is a man of noble ability, and is greatly honored by his many friends and neighbors.

George P. Fish, a prominent farmer of Massena township, was born in St. Lawrence county, New York, on the 10th of March, 1848. He was married in September, 1870, to Lydia E. Staplin, also a native of St. Lawrence county, New York. They have had four children: Don H., Jesse W., who died in infancy; Grace I. and Marion I. Mr. Fish came to Cass county May 3, 1871, and located on the land where he has since improved a nice farm on section 2. He has since added two hundred acres to his farm, owning now one of the largest and best improved farms in the county. He has served on the board of trustees, and has been justice of the peace.

Dr. C. M. Dodge, one of the prominent citizens of Massena township, was born in Hardin county, Kentucky, on the 26th of March, 1836. He is the son of Josiah Dodge, who was also a native of that county. When about sixteen years of age, his parents moved to Warren county, Illinois, and remaining there until eighteen years of age, when he attended a school of medical science, and several years after he taught in a district school while he studied with some of the best physicians in this country. In 1854 he removed to Fulton county, Illinois and commenced his practice, and a few years later he came to Dallas county, and there continued his practice, which he made a great success. In 1880 he went to Graham county, Kansas, and there remained until 1882, when he came to Iowa, and settled in Griswold, Cass county, where he practiced one year, and then moved to his farm in Massena township. Mr. Dodge was united in marriage, in 1857, to Nancy J. Rose, a native of Brown county, Ohio. They have six children: Julius M., conductor on the Rock Island railroad; Elizabeth, wife of J. O. Andrews, an attorney in Dakota; Harriet, wife of Dr. A. C. Woodruff of Griswold; George, employed by the railroad company; Ira, at home and Katie.

Benjamin F. Eastman is a native of Onondaga county. New York, born on the 9th of June, 1839. He is the son of Neil and Amancy Eastman, his father being a farmer and a distiller of essential oils. Benjamin came to Cass county in 1873, and settled on land which was deeded to him by his father, owning about one hundred acres of land on section 30. He was married in Madison county, New York, on the I7th of May, 1871, to Adelia Agnes Rudd. Her parents dying when she was quite young, she was adopted by Benjamin Britt, of Madison county, New York. They have been blessed with six children: Jennie Blanche, died in infancy; B. Franklin, Herbert C, Clarence B. (deceased), Carroll M. and Florence I.

Luma W. Stone, born in St. Lawrence county, New York, on the 3rd of April, 1841, was the son of Earl and Lydia Stone. He enlisted in 1861, in company B, Fifteenth Massachusetts Volunteers, and serving about one year, when he was imprisoned in the Libby prison, and remained there that winter, when he was discharged on account of lung disease. He regained his strength and enlisted in the Fourth Massachusetts Infantry, and so served until the close of the war. He was one of the bravest soldiers in our country's cause, and his services will long be remembered. Mr. Stone came to Cass county in 1870, and settled in what is now Massena township. He owns one hundred and twenty acres of good land on section 2, which is a beautiful and productive place. He should be greatly honored in this township, for the great interest he has taken in the development of the county. He assisted in organizing the township, and gave it the name of Massena, after his birth place in St. Lawrence county. In 186ti, his health began failing so fast, he visited Wyoming, where he remained about four years, when he returned home. He was married in February, 1871, to Mrs. Isabella H. Hill, the widow of Charles H. Hill, who gave his life to the cause of the Union. Their only child, Frederick E., died in Wyoming Territory, and now the child of Mrs. Stone, by her first marriage resides with them. Mr. Stone was one of the first trustees in the township.

T. C. Danforth, a native of Union county, Ohio, was born on the 14th of September, 1849, and is the son of J. M. and Mary Ann (Smith) Danforth. His father was a farmer, and owned a great deal of land in Union county. Thomas came to Cass county in June, 1876, and lived the first year with Henry McElfish in Massena township, and also with Allen Smith. He remained there until 1882, when he went to Anita and was there employed in the bank until the 24th of June, the same year, when he started for Chicago in charge of live stock, and was injured in a railroad accident, being thrown about sixty-three feet, and his nervous system was so shocked that he has never recovered, and since that time has never been able to do manual labor. He owns two hundred acres of land on section 26, nearly all under cultivation. Mr. Danforth was united in marriage in April, 1884, to Lotta Langworthy, a daughter of G. C.. and M. E. Langworthy, now residing in Audubon county, Iowa.

Among the prominent citizens of Massena township, we will mention John H. Yarger, who was born in Center county, Pennsylvania, on the 12th day of August, 1843. When about thirteen years of age he went to Monroe, Wisconsin, and was there engaged in clerking in the store of Whitney and Treat, and there remaining about three years, when he went to California and remained there about one year. He again worked in the establishment of Whitney and Treat until 1862. when he went into partnership with A. Perrine, in the grocery business. He continued his business until 1868, when he went to Texas and began raising stock, and so continued two summers, when he went to the frontier, and was there engaged in raising cattle. He wandered through the Indian Territory several times, and until 1875, when he came to Cass county, Iowa, and purchased four hundred acres of land and has cultivated a nice farm. He is a member of the board of trustees, and is justice of the peace, of Massena township. Mr. Yarger was married in February, 1880, to Clara L. Denham. They have been blessed with two children: Ida May and Orlando.

Lewis Dressier was born in Schuylkill county, Pennsylvania, on the 6th of April, 1853. His father, Elias Dressier, left Pennsylvania, when Lewis was about two years of age and settled in Indiana, where he remained until 1882, when he settled in Cass county, Iowa. Lewis settled in Massena township, Cass county, in 1879, and bought eighty acres of land on section 11, where he now resides. In 1876, Lewis went with his father and family to Colorado, and remaining there about two years, his father returned to Muscatine county, Iowa, and Lewis went to Mahaska county, where he was working by the month. He was married in 1879, to Lucinda E. Coffin, a native of Indiana. About one week after his marriage he came to Cass county, to look for a home, and finally bought one hundred and sixty acres of land on section 11, Massena township. He returned for his wife to Indiana, and about the latter part of October he settled on his farm. He has since added to his laud eighty acres, which is nicely improved and affords good crops of corn, and is an excellent stock farm. Mr. and Mrs. Dressier have three children: Gertrude I., Isabella Rose and Charles C.

Charles W. Huff, one of the prominent men of this township, enlisted in 1862, in the Nineteenth Iowa Infantry, and was made first lieutenant of Company G. He fought bravely at Prairie Grove, and was in the siege of Vicksburg, and in all of the principal engagements of the army. He was promoted to a captaincy on the 15th of April, 1864, and was known as one of Iowa's best officers. Captain Huff received an honorable discharge at Davenport, in 1865. He was married in October, 1865, to Margaret A. Winder, a native of Knox county, Ohio. Mr. Huff was born in Wayne county, Ohio, on the 6th of January, 1836. After his marriage he moved to Madison, and there remained two years, when he came to Cass county, settling in Grant township, near Anita, and there remained until the spring of 1883, when he sold his real estate in that township, and bought two hundred and forty acres on section 13, Massena township, where he owns a fine and productive farm. Mr. and Mrs. Huff have been blessed with seven children: Rowena Ruth, died in infancy; Theodore, Charles, Blanche, Delpha, Laura and Frances.

William H. Kreamer was born in Center county, Pennsylvania, on the 20th of May, 1841. His father, William Kreamer, was one of the early settlers of Stephenson county, Illinois, and is now a resident of Atlantic township, Cass county, William H. enlisted in company B, Twenty-sixth Illinois Infantry, and was in the engagements at Corinth, Iuka, siege of Vicksburg, Jackson, Missionary Ridge, Atlanta, and with Sherman on his March to the Sea. He was discharged at Butler in 1865, and returned home to his many friends and aged parents. He was married on the 18th of March, 1866, to Mary M. Long, a native of Stephenson county, Illinois. They have had eight children, one of whom is now dead Jennie M., Elizabeth, Laura, died at the age of seven years; Ida, Ella, Francis D., Mamie and Blanche. Mr. Kreamer came to Cass county, Iowa, in 1875, and located on section 18, Massena township, where he now owns one hundred and sixty acres of fine land, all being under cultivation. He is one of the trusted men of the township, having been assessor, school director, and is now chairman of the board of trustees.

EDUCATIONAL.

The following composed the first school board of Massena township ; J. Q. A. McCormick, president; S. M. Holladay, secretary: S. T. McCormick, treasurer; William Holaday, Nathan Poole, J. Q. A. McCormick, directors. At the last election the following officers were elected: Hiram Blake, president ; S. M. Holaday, treasurer; W. S. Whitney, secretary; E. A. Harris, M. M. Smith, Lee Prall, Cornelius Denham, Hiram Blake, C. C. Huff, Alfred Willis, Henry McElfish and John Watson, directors.

School district No. 1 is composed of sections 1, 2, 11 and 12. The school house is situated on the southwest corner of section 1, which was completed July 12, 1878, at a cost of $335, and is 18x28 feet in size. J. N. Porter was the pioneer teacher of this district. E. A. Harris is the present director.

School district No. 2 comprises sections 3, 4, 9 and 10. The school house is situated on the northeast corner of section 9, and was completed July 15, 1874, at a cost of $525, and is 18x28 feet in size. Alice Kellogg was the first teacher in the building. The present director of this district is M. M. Smith.

School district No. 3 embraces sections 5, 6, 7 and 8. The first school house in this district was erected on section 8, and was also the first in the township. It was used for school purposes some time, after which it was occupied as a residence, and later used for a granary. In May, 1871, it was removed to its present location, on section 7, and rebuilt. S. M. Holaday, was the first teacher in the new building. Lee Prall is the present director of the district.

School district No. 4 comprises sections 17, 18, 19 and 20. The school house was erected on the southwest corner of section 17, in the summer of 1884. It is 22x32 feet in size, and cost $575. Miss Jameson taught the first term of school, in the fall of that year. The director at present is Cornelius Denham.

School district No. 5 has a school house which was built in the summer of 1884, at a cost of $575, on the southeast corner of section 16, and which is 22x32 feet in size. The district embraces the territory contained in sections 15, 16, 21 and 22, and is presided over by Hiram Blake, director.

School district No. 6 comprises sections 13, 14, 23 and 24, and has a school house On the southeast corner of section 14, which was erected in the summer of 1884, at a cost of $575, and is 22x32 feet in size. C. C. Huff is the director.

School district No. 7 has a school house on the southwest corner of section 25, erected in the summer of 1872, at a cost of $430, which is 18x28 feet in size. The first teacher in this building was George Fish. The present director of this district is Alfred Willis. The district embraces the territory contained in sections 25, 26, 35 and 36.

School district No. 8, embraces sections 27, 28, 33 and 34. It has a school house, 18x28 feet in dimension, situated on the southeast corner of section 28, erected in September, 1873, at a cost of $465. The pioneer teacher in this building was Ira Shoudy. The director of this district is Henry McElfish.

School district No. 9 embrace sections 29, 30, 31, and 32, and has a school build-ing on the southwest corner of section 29. It was erected in the summer of 1875, at a cost of $524, and is 18x28 feet in size. The first teacher in this building was S. E. Morrison. Prior to the erection of this building, school was taught in the district in a house belonging to Cornelius Denham, on section 20, by Pauline Holaday.

CEMETERY.

On the 27th day of October, 1877, the trustees of Massena township purchased four acres of land on section 16 at twelve and a half dollars per acre, and laid it out for cemetery purposes. The first interment in this cemetery occurred on August 29, 1878. The deceased was a child, Maggie M. Moore, whose age at the time of her death, was one year, ten months and eleven days. The funeral ceremony was conducted by Rev. Isaac Brown. The cemetery lot was fenced in April, 1880.

WHITNEYVILLE POSTOFFICE.

This office was established at an early day, on section 8, with Frank H. Whitney as postmaster. It was afterward discontinued, but in 1866 was re-established, with W. S. Whitney as postmaster, who continued in the office for about thirteen years. Mr. Whitney received for his thirteen years of labor as postmaster, the sum of $197.36, eight years of which time he was obliged to get up every night to make up mail for a stage line. In July, 1879, the office was removed to the residence of Mr. Whip, who had possession of it hut a short time, when he disposed of his property and removed to Ringgold county, where he now resides. The office was then removed to the dwelling of F. B. Nichols on section 6, and afterward removed to its present location, on section 16, at the residence of Hiram Blake, who is still postmaster.

ORGANIC.

Massena township was constituted June 11, 1870, with S. M. Holaday as organizer, and contains the territory technically known as township 15, range 34. At the fall election of that year, officers were chosen as follows: W. S. Whitney, clerk; S. M. Holaday, justice of the peace and assessor; S. T. McCormick and William Holaday, constables; S. T. McCormick, L. W. Stone and William Holaday, trustees. The present township officers are: S. M. Holaday, clerk; A, H. Willis, assessor; J. H. Yarger and S. M. Holaday, justices of the peace; O. L. Smith and George Culp, constables; J. H. Yarger, John Watson and William Kreamer, trustees; Rhinehold Schwenke, William Porter, Martin Hodge, O. L. Smith, William McCluskey and Charles Willis, road supervisors.

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Transcribed by Cheryl Siebrass, November, 2010 from:"History of Cass County, Together with Sketches of Its Towns, Villages and Townships, Educational, Civil, Military and Political History: Portraits of Prominent Persons, and Biographies of Old Settlers and Reporesentative Citizens", published in 1884, Springfield, Ill: Continental Historical Co., pp. 776-788.
 


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