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Eckerman, Matthew G. (1829-1906)

ECKERMAN, BOWEN, CRISMAN

Posted By: Linda Linn (email)
Date: 3/7/2011 at 18:32:53

LeMars Semi-Weekly Sentinel
1-12-1906

DEATH OF M. G ECKERMAN.
Old and Honored Resident Passes Peacefully
Away.
Matthew G. Eckerman died at his residence on Plymouth street in this city, after an illness of some weeks' duration.

He was born in Franklin county, Pennsylvania, near the city of Chambersburg on August 18, 1829. He was a member of a pioneer family of that section and the blood of sturdy Irish,
Scotch and Pennsylvania Dutch derived from his ancestors was his heritage. He was educated at the Elder Ridge academy, a school celebrated in the annuals of the early history of the Presbyterian church, and later he was a member of the congregation of the Rocky Springs
church of which three generations of the family dating back to before the beginning of the last century were also members.

When a young man he moved to the west and was a professor in a school at Memphis, Tenn., for a number of years. He came to Iowa in 1854, and settled on a farm in Benton county near where the town of Dysart now stands. He was united in marriage in the year 1858, to Miss Martha J. Bowen. From Benton county they moved to Osceola county in 1883, and in 1892, came to LeMars to make their home.

Five children survive him. They are Mrs. D. M. Crisman of West Bend; A. H, Eckerman, of Des Moines; G. W. Eckerman, of Clarke county, South Dakota; C. D. Eckerman, of Rockwell City; and Mrs. A. L. Adamson, of LeMars.

Mr. Eckerman fought for the union in the war and was a member of the Second Iowa infantry. He was in Sherman's famous march through the Atlanta campaign. At Jonesborough he was given a furlough to go to Rome, Ga., to bring his wife’s brother, who was in a hospital at that
place, back but he did not arrive there until some days after his brother-in-law had been buried. He rejoined the army at Goldsborough, North Carolina, and from that timeuntil the close of the war acted as chief clerk in the adjutant general's office.

Mr. Eckerman was a man with a splendid classical education and was a fine linguist. He was a Hebrew, Greek and Latin scholar. When a student at Elder Ridge he joined the Presbyterian church. Later he affiliated with the United Brethren church and since coming to LeMars he was amember of the Baptist church.

His sons A, H. and C. D. Eckerman were summoned to his sick bed and were with him in his last moments. His faithful wife and Mrs. A. L. Adamson, his daughter struggled in vain to stay the hourof bereavement by devoted nursing and attention. The other members
of the family were prevented by distance from being in attendance.
The deceased was a man of strong religious principles and sterling character.
His last words were "just home.''

This is the first break in the family circle.

His brother J. B. Eckermann, of Washington, came to attend the funeral, which was held from the home yesterday afternoon. Rev. W. T. McDonald, of Sioux City, an old friend of the deceased came up to officiate at the funeral and paid a tribute to the memory of the departed. The pallbearers were T.C. Carpenter, Ed Pauley, Geo. Heyl, R. B. Molampy, A. W. Crouch and Dan Hammond.
-----------------------------

LeMars Globe-Post
January 13, 1906

DEATH OF M. G. ECKERMAN.
Passes Peacefully Away on Wednesday Morning.

Mathew G. Eckerman died at his home on Plymouth street on Wednesday morning
at 11 o’clock at the age of 77 years, old age being the cause of his death.
He was highly esteemed as a citizen and neighbor and his death will be
sincerely mourned. This is the first death in the family circle and the
bereaved ones have the sympathy of all in their great sorrow.

He was born in Franklin county, Pennsylvania, near the city of Chambersburg
on August 18, 1829. He was a member of a pioneer family of that section and
the blood of sturdy Irish, Scotch, and Pennsylvania Dutch derived from his
ancestors was his heritage. He was educated at the Elder Ridge academy, a
school celebrated in the annuals of the early history of the Presbyterian
Church, and later he was a member of the congregation of the Rocky Springs
church of which three generations of the family dating back to before the
beginning of the last century were also members. When a young man he moved
to the west and was a professor in a school at Memphis, Tenn., for a number
of years. He came to Iowa in 1854, and settled on a farm in Benton county
near where the town of Dysart now stands. He was united in marriage in the
year 1858, to Miss Martha J. Bowen. From Benton county they moved to
Osceola county in 1888, and in 1892 came to LeMars to make their home.

Five children survive him. They are Mrs. D. M. Crisman of West Bend; A. H.
Eckerman, of Des Moines; G. W. Eckerman, of Clarke county, South Dakota; C.
D. Eckerman, of Rockwell City; and Mrs. A. L. Adamson, of LeMars.

Mr. Eckerman fought for the Union in the war and was a member of the Second
Iowa Infantry. He was in Sherman’s famous march through the Atlanta
campaign. At Jonesborough he was given a furlough to go to Rome, Ga., to
bring his wife’s brother, who was in a hospital at that place, back but he
did not arrive there until some days after his brother-in-law had been
buried. He rejoined the army at Goldsborough, North Carolina, and from that
time until the close of the war acted as chief clerk in the adjutant
general’s office.

Mr. Eckerman was a man with a splendid classical education and was a fine
linguist. He was a Hebrew, Greek and Latin scholar. When a student at Elder
Ridge, he joined the Presbyterian Church. Later he affiliated with the
United Brethren Church and since coming to LeMars he was a member of the
Baptist church.

His sons, A. H. and C. D. Eckerman, were summoned to his sick bed and were
with him in his last moments. His faithful wife and Mrs. A. L. Adamson, his
daughter, struggled in vain to stay the hour of bereavement by devoted
nursing and attention. The other members of the family were prevented by
distance from being in attendance.

The deceased was a man of strong religious principles and sterling
character. His last words were “just home.”

His brother, J. B. Eckerman(n), of Washington, came to attend the funeral,
which was held from the home yesterday afternoon.

Rev. W. T. McDonald, of Sioux City, an old friend of the deceased came up to
officiate at the funeral and paid a tribute to the memory of the departed.
The pallbearers were T. C. Carpenter, Ed Pauley, Geo. Heyl, R. B. Molampy,
A. W. Crouch, and Dan Hammond.

Civil War Record
 

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