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Theodor Lorch Family

LORCH, MOHR, CRAGGS

Posted By: Volunteer Transcriber
Date: 3/7/2007 at 09:25:37

Theodor Lorch Family

Theodor Lorch came to Iowa from Ontario, Canada, in 1896. He worked for Jeff Carpenter on a cattle ranch in southern Osceola County for one year; then returned to Canada and convinced his parents that Iowa was the place to live. He returned here and worked on the farm of Peter Auker of Business Corner. Theodor heard fascinating stories about South Dakota, so boarded the Milwaukee train and went to western South Dakota, to a village called Hartley. There he staked a claim and built a shack to satisfy the requirements of a Homestead. He also planted a small area to crop. He joined neighbors and together they went to Pierre and worked as stone masons in construction of the State Capitol Building.

After a time he abandoned his claim and returned to Osceola County and rented farm land. He purchased 80 acres in Sec. 12, Harrison Township. This farm was on the Harris mail route.

November 23, 1908, he married Christina Mohr. In 1913, they moved to the farm in Sec. 3, Harrison Township. There were four children were born; Frieda and Clarence (deceased), Lucille now residing in Nebraska, and Otto who married Helen Craggs in 1935. They farmed until Helen died of cancer in 1982. Two of their sons, Bruce and David, continue as farmers and livestock producers in the area.

Theodor served as an Osceola County Supervisor for District 4 which included Allison, Harrison and Baker Townships.

Harris was a convenient trading center—which included J. M. Wren’s harness shop, Zwank’s Hardware, J. F. Anderson Lumber Co., operated by Lee McFarland, C. W. Beeler’s grocery store, Harry Hawk’s barber shop, John Weigand sold gas and kerosene before the days of bulk handling. It came in 55 gallon barrels and was shipped in railroad box cars. The early bulk delivery of petroleum fuels were made by Ed Ringler. Herman Screeden operated a livestock shipping association. Hogs were weighed and marked—then co-mingled in freight cars and shipped to Chicago, for slaughter. The hogs were usually hauled to town in box wagons. Cattle were driven on hoof on the roadways, herded into the stockyard gate and were also shipped to Chicago. Interesting entries from his account book are October 9, 1898. Overalls 90 cents, basket of grapes 30 cents, dinner and livery (feed for the driving horse) 35 cents. Year 1905; fork handle 15 cents, barrel of salt $1.15, milk pail 85 cents, logging chain 76 cents, manure fork 60 cents, alarm clock $2.00, water jug 10 cents, binder canvas $1.00. Sales Feb. 4, 1907—22 lambs, 2240 pounds at $6.40 per cwt.


 

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