[ Return to Index ] [ Read Prev Msg ] [ Read Next Msg ]

Libertyville Celebrates 175 Years -- 2017

MCVEY, ALDEN, JEWETT, STUMP, BURNETT, HOLT, UNKRICH, MCDOWELL, SMITH, HOBSCHEIDT, TROUTMAN, MITCHELL, PROCTOR, PARKER, MCCRACKEN, WILLIAMSON, BOYD, DAVIS, COLVIN, MOSS, ZUEHKLE, GALLUP, SCHWARTZ, FORDYCE, SWANSON, BUERKENS, CREEK, BONNETT, NELSON, BLAKELY, TRUITT, SCOTTON, PROCTOR, SMITHBURG, WAUGH, SMALL, MYERS, WISECARVER, NANCE, CONGER, BROBSTON, UNDERWOOD, PENCIL, CHANNEL, MEYERS, DAILEY, ROULET, ENGLE, RING, -MORE-

Posted By: Joey Stark
Date: 11/4/2017 at 18:46:05

"The Fairfield Ledger"
Thursday, August 31, 2017
Page 2

Celebrations

Libertyville
A look back in time

Note: Libertyville will be celebrating its 175th anniversary on Oct. 7. To lead up to the event, the town, its businesses and resdients will be sharing highlights from the community's history.

The history of Libertyville is closely tied to that of Iowa and Jefferson County. The year 1832 is the beginning of Iowa history, for before that the land we know as Iowa was the domain of Indians.

Following the defeat of Chief Black Hawk, the famous Sac Indian, a treaty was concluded by the United States and the Winnebagos, Sacs and Fox tribes by which the government acquired 6 million acres of land west of the Mississippi River.

The territory was opened June 1, 1833, and immediately settlers rushed in.

In 1837, only that part of Jefferson County lying east of the treaty line was open to settlement. This line entered the county at a point on the south county line, which is directly south of Libertyville, then ran northeast crossing Cedar Creek near the old Rock Island Railroad bridge, then in a straight line northeast, passing just west of Fairfield, and leaving the county at a point west of Old Pleasant Plain.

The earliest settlers came from the east and south following the major water courses. In 1836, the county had an estimated population of 69 men, women, and children.

Before July 4, 1842, the village of Libertyville was known as the Colony. On that date, 300 people gathered in an open square Just northeast of the town crossroads and witnessed the raising of a flagpole. Some of the men celebrated by firing anvil salutes, bottles of powder wrapped in twine, and even some flintlock muskets.

Sam McVEY proposed the name of Libertyville, and it was unanimously adopted.

Charles ALDEN delivered the address of the day.

Small Town - Great Place

~~~~

"The Fairfield Ledger"
Thursday, September 7, 2017
Page 2

Celebrations

Libertyville
A look back in time

Note: Libertyville will be celebrating its 175th anniversary on Oct. 7. To lead up to the event, the town, its businesses and resdients will be sharing highlights from the community's history.

On July 4, 1842, while the men celebrated with loud salutes the women cooked a feast in the new JEWETT barn located just east of the intersection. The JEWETTs had three daughters and twin sons named Daniel Boone and Davy Crockett. The boys looked so much alike that only their parents could tell them apart; the two played many tricks on the townsfolk. John JEWETT hired a surveyor to plot the town and was the first postmaster.

At this time, two roads passed through Libertyville, the old Dragoon Trail from the Mississippi River to the Indian agency, 12 miles west; the other from Fairfield to the Des Moines River. Stage Coach Inn was a busy stop as the stage coach made an overnight stop there; sleeping quarters, meals and fresh horses were available.

Small Town - Great Place

~~~~

"The Fairfield Ledger"
Thursday, September 14, 2017
Page 2

Celebrations

Libertyville
A look back in time

Note: Libertyville will be celebrating its 175th anniversary on Oct. 7. To lead up to the event, the town, its businesses and resdients will be sharing highlights from the community's history.

Libertyville Savings Bank was founded in 1901 in Libertyville, Iowa. In 1920, the first female employee was hired. The bank's current president, Robert B. STUMP joined the bank as a teller in 1960. In 1976, the original bank building was given a large face-lift and expansion, which doubled the size of the original bank building. In 1980, Mr. STUMP gained majority interest in the bank which continued to grow. At that time, the bank had grown to $6 million in assets. In February of 1996, the bank constructed a new building and moved its charter from Libertyville to Fairfield. In July of 1997, we purchased a closed bank building in Eldon and reopened it, quickly gaining the support and business of many Eldon private citizens, businesses and farmers. By that time our assets had reached abut 55 million. In October of 2007, the bank opened its fourth location in Keosauqua, Iowa and had grown to $150 million in assets. In 2015, we purchased the Farmers Savings Bank in Keota increasing the bank's size by about 50 percent. The bank continues to grow and today has assets of over $340 million with 50 full time employees.

Mr. STUMP's daughter, Jill BURNETT, serves as CEO and two other daughters play integral roles at LSB. The board of directors includes: Robert B. STUMP (Chairman), Mike HOLT, Jill BURNETT (CEO), Larry UNKRICH, Amber STUMP McDOWELL (VP Marketing), Blain SMITH (VP AG Loan Officer) Dave HOBSCHEIDT, Ryan TROUTMAN (CFO), and Lori MITCHELL (COO).

The bank has been named one of the Des Moines Register's Top Places to Work for 3 years in a row.

Small Town - Great Place

~~~~

"The Fairfield Ledger"
Thursday, September 21, 2017
Page 2

Celebrations

Libertyville
A look back in time

Note: Libertyville will be celebrating its 175th anniversary on Oct. 7. To lead up to the event, the town, its businesses and resdients will be sharing highlights from the community's history.

In 1843, the small log school house was replaced by a one-room building located east of the crossroads. With the growing population, this school soon became inadequate. A two-room school was erected where the present school stands.

In 1900, a two-story wooden school house was built. At first, grades 1 through 8 were taught, then grades 1-11 were taught with seniors attending Fairfield. A few years later all 12 grades were offered in Libertyville.

A brick addition was added in 1931, including a gymnasium which was the largest among the Jefferson County's smaller schools. Teams from surrounding schools loved to play basketball in the large, well-lit, wooden floored gymnasium. Only Fairfield had a more elaborate school.

In 1970, the present brick building was erected, retaining the gymnasium, and in 1971, the old wooden part of the school was removed. Libertyville's last high school graduating class was in 1958 and they continue to have school reunions. Libertyville's last elementary classes were held in the building in 2017.

Small Town - Great Place

~~~~

"The Fairfield Ledger"
Thursday, October 5, 2017
Page 2

Celebrations

Libertyville
A look back in time

Note: Libertyville will be celebrating its 175th anniversary on Oct. 7. To lead up to the event, the town, its businesses and resdients will be sharing highlights from the community's history.

In 1996 a large goal was achieved with over $22,000 raised in just over six months for new playground equipment. The ACTION Team (Adults and Children Together in Our Neighborhood) was created by Jeff Proctor, school board member Gene PARKER, and then-principal Sue McCRACKEN. The goal was to raise money for extra things not included in the school district's budget for Libertyville Elementary School. Playground equipment was the first project.

After several months looking over other playgrounds, work began in earnest. The area had to be dug out, then leveled, over 40 holes measured and dug, much thanks to Iowa Electric's auger truck, and over three ton of parts unloaded.

Volunteer workers assembled at 7 a.m. to begin the task of putting all the playground pieces together. By night, all the assembly had been completed and that remained was to finish the base which consisted of six inches of pea gravel covered by six inches of wood shavings. The play area is nearly 3000 square feet and features slides, crawl tube, web climber, overhead flyer, and other climbing devices.

The ACTION team, over the next 21 years, would raise and donate tens of thousands of dollars to Libertyville school for library books, handicap swings, mats under the playground, electronic equipment, field trips, laminators, chairs, and much more for teachers and students.

--

Libertyville celebrated its Centennial in July of 1942 with a crowd of over 500.

Highlights of the centennial celebration included a picnic dinner served at noon in the city park, a historical pageant, and an address by the Rev. S. P. WILLIAMSON, pastor of the First Christian Church in Fairfield. The Rev. WILLIAMSON's topic was "Those Self-Evident Truths."

Another speaker for the day was the history of the communiuty read by Mrs. J.O. BOYD. Mac DAVIS served as master of ceremonies. Mrs. Harry COLVIN was narrator for the pageant entitled "A Pioneer's Vision." Music was provided by a choir group accompanied by Ruth MOSS and the ZUEHLKE Brothers of Batavia. Mrs. Jess GALLUP gave the history of her great-aunt who was born in Libertyville and lived to be 101. A variety of games and contests were held during the afternoon.

A large hobby and antique show was also held. The larges (sic) hobby exhibit was a collection of 8,300 buttons displayed by Mrs. George SCHWARTZ. Many unusual antiques were displayed by the FORDYCE, SWANSON and BUERKENS families. John CREEK had a large display of antique farm machinery and tools.

One of the most popular things at the celebration was a tank full of ice water provided by Russell BONNETT.

Small Town - Great Place

~~~~

"The Fairfield Ledger"
Thursday, October 5, 2017
Front Page

Libertyville to celebrate sesquicentennial (sic) Saturday
by Nicole Major,
Ledger staff writer

LIBERTYVILLE -- The city of Libertyville is gearing up to commemorate its 175th year of existence Saturday, with nothing less than a carnival-style celebration that's open to the public.

The event kicks off at 8:30 a.m., and will culminate with a fireworks display at 8 p.m.

"There's going to be so much going on that day that I can hardly keep track of it all," said event organizer Beverly NELSON.

The town, which started in 1842 - incidentally, before became a state in 1846 - has deep roots, and NELSON said in addition to the parade, shows, food and fun, the celebration would also showcase much of the town's rich history.

"[Faith United Methodist Church] will be having a quilt and antique exhibit from 11:30 a.m. to 4:30 p.m. At the same time, there will be Libertyville history dieplays at the community center," said Libertyville city clerk Karen BLAKELY.

Although the planned king and queen contest has been canceled, NELSON said that many community members would be honored.

"We won't be doing a contest, but we will still be honoring kings and queens who will be dressed in period constumes and riding on a float during the parade," she said. "A lot of these citizens grew up here and have been big contributors to our community."

NELSON said that some of those participating in the parade would be wearing 19th century period costumes borrowed from First National Bank of Fairfield.

The prince and princess and beard contests are first on the docket at 8:30 a.m., and both take place at the Libertyville Community Center.

At 9:30 a.m. vintage cars, trucks and tractors can line up at the Church, while those planning to ride floats and all other parade participants who are not kings or queens should line up south of the school.

At 10 a.m., kings and queens should line up at the school.

The parade, which will include performances by the Fairfield Middle School and Fairfield High School bands, begins at 10:30 a.m. and will start and end at the school.

Celebration goers can enjoy horse-drawn surrey rides; inflatable children's games including a bouncy house; ballon (sic) twisting, a cupcake walk and a barbecue contest, which are just a few of the offerings during the celebration.

"There's going to be a kick ball at the ball field, face painting, cotton candy ... there will be an apple pie contest at the church, and they will be selling pie and ice cream later around 1 p.m.," NELSON said, adding that several vendors would also be on hand at Stump Park, such as Sweet Pea Concessions, Sweet & Saucy, Mr. Taco, and Randy Woods's Kettle Corn.

Kids games begin at the school and include a bouncy house, an obstacle course, slide, ringtoss, and a cornhole/beanbag toss tournament. Younger children will get a chance to "squirt out a candle." NELSON said that there would also be plenty of opportunities to win prizes throughout the day.

"There will also be a smoke trailer at the Libertyville Fire Station, where kids can pretend to get out of a burning house," NELSON said, adding that at 12:30 p.m., LeCyne Dance Studio is slated to perform, followed by baton twirlers at 1 p.m. Both performances will take place at the community center.

The kickball tournament is at 1:30 p.m. Teams are encouraged to sign up for $10.

"There will be a Taekowndo demonstration at 3 p.m., followed by an "Old Time Music" concert at the community center.

Patrons can enjoy a bingo game at the fire station at 4:30 p.m., followed by a barbecue judging contest at the fire station.

"The public can sample the barbecue for $5, and there will be a 'People's Choice Award' judging, too," NELSON said. "At 7 p.m. there's going to be a performance by the 'One Man Band with a Mini Van.'"

At 7:30 p.m., NELSON said celebration goers will be able to enjoy an outside movie on the fire station wall.

"It's a surprise," NELSON said of the movie's title. "But it will be a family-friendly G-rated movie."

NELSON said tha the Libertyville Savings Bank supported the event financially.

"I want to thank everyone who served and contributed and also those who were on the committee," she said. "We are really looking forward to it."

For more information, or to preregister for the barbecue contest, contact NELSON at 641-693-8202.

~~~~

"The Fairfield Ledger"
Wednesday, October 25, 2017
Page 2

Celebrations

Libertyville
A look back in time

Note: Libertyville cemebrated its 175th anniversary Oct. 7.

Despite a cloudy, sometimes rainy day, Libertyville's 175th Celebration was a huge success. A big Thank You to the committee members, those that volunteered to help with events, and to all who participated.

The day started off with a Prince and Princess contest, Winners were Jack TRUITT and KatieJo Dawn SCOTTON who were crowned by Aaron PROCTOR, the Prince of the 150th celebration. Jack and KatieJo, along with Madalyn SMITHBURG, rode in a surrey, courtesy of Rick Coffman of Douds.

The Beard Contest, sponsored by Jim's Barber Shop, awarded Bob WAUGH the fullest beard and Rod NELSON the best trimmed. It took audience participation to choose the winners!

The parade, coordinated by Jeff and Deb PROCTOR included Fairfield High School and Fairfield Middle School marching bands, Cub Scouts, fire departments from Libertyville, Fairfield, and Douds, floats, businesses, vintage cars, trucks and tractors, and horses. Mayor Rod NELSON gave a welcome speech and Amber STUMP-McDOWELL sang the national anthem.

The Kings and Queens Float, decorated by Gene and Joneane PARKER, included honored present and former Libertyville residents wearing period costumes! Those riding on the float: Bettye SMALL, Evelyn MYERS, Carol Mae WISECARVER, Marilyn NANCE, Don NANCE, Ulala CONGER, Orville CONGER, Judy BROBSTON, Dan BROBSTON, Janet UNDERWOOD, Mary PENCIL, Keith PENCIL, Terri CHANNEL, Roger CHANNEL, Jery MEYERS, Ron MEYERS, Don DAILEY, Gene PARKER and Joneane PARKER. The period costumes were amazing and thank you to the First National Bank and the Fairfield High School for loaning them.

The Kickball Tournament was a huge success with 18 teams participating. Adult teams, family teams, kids and teenagers all competed. The winner was the Strikers Team, of Libertyville. Thanks goes to Kendall ROULET who spearheaded this event and Carrie ENGLE who organized the brackets.

Visitors throughout the afternoon enjoyed entertainment by LeCyne Dance Studio, Ide Gymnastics, Jessica RING's Twirlers, and Rob HELMICK's Tae Kwon Do class demonstrations. Old Time Music and Bingo were enjoyed at the Fire Station.

Who knew Corn Hole (bean bag toss) Tournaments were so competitive? Two-person teams signed up to play on custom made cornhole boards. Sponsors fo the boards were BURKHALTER Ag Repair & Trucking, HANEY Augo Sales, Amsoil Oil/She Shed Shenanigans, HICKENBOTTOM Inc., Live Wire Electric, and the Dew Drop. First place winners "Chillin n' Grillin'" -- Dennis DAVISON and Andy PEARSON; Second Place "Young Guns" -- Landon NORDURF and Nate WOODBURN; Third place was "Winners" -- Robert ESTLE and Mark EKLUND. Nicole WALKER gets all the credit for this fun event.

Hawkeye Pedal Pull held a sanctioned event with trophies going to these winners: Age Group 4: 1st Joey ROOP, Packwood, 2nd Gracyn VICE, Fairfield; 3rd Blake KELLER, Brighton. Age Group 5: 1st Blake LUCAS, Ollie; 2nd Riley VICE, Fairfield; 3rd Preston LENNOX, Batavia. Age Group 6: 1st Alyssa KELLER, Brighton; 2nd Jolene RUIZ, Agency; 3rd Alivia SHEPHERD, Keosauqua. Age Group 7: 1st Parker LENNOX, Batavia; 2nd Sychaela SOUTHERN, Fairfield; 3rd Cooper FITZSIMMONS, Ollie. Age Group 8: Teagan GILCHRIST, Fairfield. Age Group 9: 1st Nathanial PRATT, Salem. Age Group 11: 1st Sterling SPEES, Fairfield; 2nd Sophia PRATT, Selma.

The BBQ Contest participants started at 7 a.m., judging at 5:00 and the public tasting at 5:30. Sponsors for the event were RMP Automotive and Straight Up Doors. Winners were: 1st place $300 Ed GARRETT and Brett NORDURF, who graciously donated their prize to the Libertyville Fire Department; 2nd place $125 to Brian MORRIS; 3rd place to Andy PEARSON; Peoples' Choice Award went to the GOEHRING Brothers.

The 175th Celebration ended the evening with a Band at the Fire Station. An ourdoor movie and fireworks had to be canceled due to weather conditions but will be held next summer.

Faith United Methodist
Libertyville's 175th was celebrated at the Libertyville Faith United Methodist Church on October 7, 2017 with antiques, quilts, and homemade pie. A big thank you to everyone that contributed such a variety of antiques that filled nine tables and 50 quilts, which was a beautiful sight hung over the pews.

Guests attended from California, New York, Michigan, Minnesota, Colorado, Missouri and all over Iowa. They enjoyed reminiscing and reviewing the displays.

Votes were taken on a favorite quilt and the winner was a Cathedral Window quilt made by Alfreda BONNETT, mother of Carol WISECARVER of Libertyville.

There were eight entries in the applie pie contest with Linda DOUGHERTY receiving 1st place, Jessie CAVES, 2nd place, and Joyce WILKINSON, 3rd place. Prizes were awarded to all. Thanks to those who participated.

Homemade Pie and Ice Cream were served throughout the day for a free-will offering. Red water bottles and stylus ball point pens were given away to all the guests.

Small Town - Great Place

*Transcribed for genealogy purposes; I have no relation to the person(s) mentioned.

In the photo below, Libertyville native Tim Tedrow dresses as a mountain man from 1842, complete with a donkey carrying his provisions. Tedrow participated in Libertyville's parade Saturday morning celebrating the town's 175th anniversary. Tedrow said he was also in the town's 125th anniversary parade, and hopes to be back in another 50 years.


 

Jefferson Documents maintained by Joey Stark.
WebBBS 4.33 Genealogy Modification Package by WebJourneymen

[ Return to Index ] [ Read Prev Msg ] [ Read Next Msg ]