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Henry M Graves

GRAVES

Posted By: County Coordinator
Date: 3/12/2009 at 12:30:02

Henry M Graves, Henry M Graves, who for the past two years has been a resident of Madrid, engaged in real estate dealing, is numbered among the pioneer settlers of the county and among the pioneer settlers of the county and among the veteran soldiers of the Civil war. His entire life has been one of fidelity to duty in every relation, and his loyalty to his country in her hour of danger was but an indication of his entire career. He arrived in this county in 1859, coming to Iowa from Indiana, his birth having occurred in Clay count of the latter state on April 1, 1840.. He is a son of William Graves, a native of North Carolina, while his grandfather was Gillum Graves, also a native of the same state, where he spent his entire life. After his death the family removed to Indiana, settling in Clay county, where William Graves was reared to manhood. He afterward married Sarah Lucas, a native of Indiana born in Clay county and a daughter of William Lucas, who was one of the heroes of the Revolutionary war. He was born in North Carolina and became a resident of Clay county, Indiana at a very early epoch in its history. He lived to the advance age of about seventy-five or eighty years. Mr Graves was a farmer in Clay county, carrying on agricultural pursuits there until his death. He died however in the prime of his life when the subject of this review was only four years old. His wife survived him, carefully reared the family, and married the second time, becoming the wife of Linsey Stinson, who afterward removed with the family to Hendricks county, Indiana.
In that county Mr Graves of review, was reared, receiving but limited educational privileges, attending the district schools only during the winter months and even then his school life covered but a few years. When a young man he resolved to seek a home n the west where land was cheap and business opportunities were good. Accordingly he arrived n Boone county in 1859 and began work as a farm hand, being employed I that way for two years On the expiration of that period he enlisted for service n the Union army, for the country had become involved in Civil war. He joined the Third Iowa Volunteer Infantry and was assigned to Company E, with which he soon joined the Western Army. The first year was spent in Missouri, but in February of the following year he proceeded to Tennessee and participated in the battle of Pittsburg Landing. He also was under fire at the second battle of Corinth and in the siege of Vicksburg. He participated in the second battle of Jackson and upon re-enlisting in 1864 as a veteran he received a furlough of thirty days, which he spent at home. He then joined the army at Big Shanty ad participated n the Atlanta campaign, after which he went with Sherman on the celebrated march to the sea and took part in numerous engagements along the way. After the surrender of Johnson he proceeded to Richmond and on to Washington. When the grand review was held he was one who formed with the “bayonet crested wave of blue” that for hours swept by the reviewing stand upon which the president of the United States stood. In 1861 he was held for three months in the hospital at Quincy, Illinois with typhoid fever, but he lost no further time from other sickness of wounds during his ling army service. At the close of the war he was honorably discharged at Davenport, Iowa in July 1865. He has every reason to be proud of his military record, for throughout the whole contest he was found as a loyal advocate of the Union cause, never shirking any duty imposed upon him.
When the war was ended Mr Graves returned to Boone county and for several months remained with his uncle, cultivating the latter’s farm. Henry M Graves, Henry M Graves, who for the past two years has been a resident of Madrid, engaged in real estate dealing, is numbered among the pioneer settlers of the county and among the pioneer settlers of the county and among the veteran soldiers of the Civil war. His entire life has been one of fidelity to duty in every relation, and his loyalty to his country in her hour of danger was but an indication of his entire career. He arrived in this county in 1859, coming to Iowa from Indiana, his birth having occurred in Clay count of the latter state on April 1, 1840.. He is a son of William Graves, a native of North Carolina, while his grandfather was Gillum Graves, also a native of the same state, where he spent his entire life. After his death the family removed to Indiana, settling in Clay county, where William Graves was reared to manhood. He afterward married Sarah Lucas, a native of Indiana born in Clay county and a daughter of William Lucas, who was one of the heroes of the Revolutionary war. He was born in North Carolina and became a resident of Clay county, Indiana at a very early epoch in its history. He lived to the advance age of about seventy-five or eighty years. Mr Graves was a farmer in Clay county, carrying on agricultural pursuits there until his death. He died however in the prime of his life when the subject of this review was only four years old. His wife survived him, carefully reared the family, and married the second time, becoming the wife of Linsey Stinson, who afterward removed with the family to Hendricks county, Indiana.
In that county Mr Graves of review, was reared, receiving but limited educational privileges, attending the district schools only during the winter months and even then his school life covered but a few years. When a young man he resolved to seek a home n the west where land was cheap and business opportunities were good. Accordingly he arrived n Boone county in 1859 and began work as a farm hand, being employed I that way for two years On the expiration of that period he enlisted for service n the Union army, for the country had become involved in Civil war. He joined the Third Iowa Volunteer Infantry and was assigned to Company E, with which he soon joined the Western Army. The first year was spent in Missouri, but in February of the following year he proceeded to Tennessee and participated in the battle of Pittsburg Landing. He also was under fire at the second battle of Corinth and in the siege of Vicksburg. He participated in the second battle of Jackson and upon re-enlisting in 1864 as a veteran he received a furlough of thirty days, which he spent at home. He then joined the army at Big Shanty ad participated n the Atlanta campaign, after which he went with Sherman on the celebrated march to the sea and took part in numerous engagements along the way. After the surrender of Johnson he proceeded to Richmond and on to Washington. When the grand review was held he was one who formed with the “bayonet crested wave of blue” that for hours swept by the reviewing stand upon which the president of the United States stood. In 1861 he was held for three months in the hospital at Quincy, Illinois with typhoid fever, but he lost no further time from other sickness of wounds during his ling army service. At the close of the war he was honorably discharged at Davenport, Iowa in July 1865. He has every reason to be proud of his military record, for throughout the whole contest he was found as a loyal advocate of the Union cause, never shirking any duty imposed upon him.
When the war was ended Mr Graves returned to Boone county and for several months remained with his uncle, cultivating the latter’s farm. On September 20, 1866, he was united in marriage to Miss Carrie A Hull, who was born in Missouri and was reared and educated in Boone county. Here she was brought by her parents when two years of age. For six years prior to her marriage she successfully engaged in teaching. He father Jesse Hull, removed with his family from Ohio to Iowa. He was born near Wheeling, West Virginia and was a son of George Hull, one of the pioneer settlers of the Buckeye state whose home was in Morgan county. Jesse Hull was there reared and educated and accompanied the family on its later removal to Fulton county, Illinois, where he was united in marriage to Elizabeth Cadwallader, a native of Ohio born in Morgan county.
After their marriage Mr and Mrs Graves took up their abode upon a rented farm, which our subject continued to cultivated for a number of years. He then bought a small place and afterward purchased another farm three miles north of Madrid, continuing its cultivation for several years. Subsequently he removed to Ames in order to educate his sons, and while there became employed in the boarding department of the college, continuing in that capacity for six years, while his wife was matron during this time. In 1890 he returned to Boone county and again purchased a small farm near Madrid, which he continued to make his home for about a year. On the expiration of that period he removed to Des Moines and took charge of the bearding department of Highland Park College in 1892, upon the opening of the institution. For eight years he remained at that place as manager of the boarding department and gave good satisfaction to the manager of the institution. In 1900 he returned to Madrid and settled upon the place where he and his wife are now living. He is engaged in the real estate business and handles considerable property.
Unto Mr and Mrs Graves have been born two sons, to whom they have given an excellent education, thus preparing them for the practical responsibilities of life and both are now prominent and reliable business men who are a credit to their families and to the town. Frank H the elder is a graduate of the Ames College. He is now married and resides in Madrid, where he is conducting a drug store. Harry C competed his education by graduation in the Highland Park College, and he too, is married and its living in Madrid. He has one son, Russell L. Harry Greave is now filling the position of postal clerk on the Chicago, Milwaukee & St Paul railroad, running between Marion and Council Bluffs, Iowa.
Politically Mr Graves is a Jefferson Democrat, who cast his first vote for Bell and Everett in 1860, supporting each presidential candidate of the party since that time. He has never sought or desired office, preferring to give his attention to his business interests. He with his wife and sons is a member of the Methodist Episcopal church of Madrid ,and he belongs to the Masonic fraternity, holding membership in Star Lodge, No 115, F & A M. He also belongs to the Grand Army Post, of which he is the present commander. He has reside in Boone county much of the time during the past forty-three years, having come here when a young man, without capital, but possessed of a strong heart and willing hands he feared not that laborious attention to business which is the foundation of all success and as the years have passed he has gained a comfortable competence and provided well for his family.

1902 Boone County History Book


 

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