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Adair County Iowa

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Lincoln Township Education

SCHOOLS OF LINCOLN TOWNSHIP, 1976

Lincoln #1, “Sipes School” or Pleasant Ridge, was built in 1870, closed in 1958. Max Barr bought it and made it into a home. First one burned and a new one was built in 1930.

Lincoln No. 2-In 1862 or 1863, school was built (Lindley) for sub-district. Sold to R. S. Kirkpatrick and moved to his farm. 1875 school was first held in Robert Ewers’ octagonal house. Then in 1875 a new building was built for $700. Teacher was M. W. Haver who was also County Superintendent of Schools. Called: Washington Independent.” Closed around 1920.

Lincoln No. 3, “Frost School” or “Pleasant Hill.” Built in 1875, closed in the 1920s, pupils sent to Alcott School with paid tuition.

Lincoln No. 4, “Prairie Queen” School, was built in 1875, closed in 1947. This school is being used as a voting place for Lincoln Twp.

Lincoln No. 5, “Center” or McKee School, built in 1869, closed in 1945. Sold and moved away.

Lincoln No. 6, “Mt. Vernon,” built in 1870, closed 1952. This school was moved to town and used for a band room one year and fourth and fifth grade classrooms later. First school was held in Joe Barnett’s home in a bedroom, 1869.

Lincoln No. 7, “Baily” School, was built in 1868, closed in 1943. This school was bought by Dwight Barr and made into part of a barn to shelter cows and calves. Now used for farrowing pigs.

Lincoln No. 8, “North River” or “Gray,” built in 1870, closed in 1953. Moved to make a home for Guy Garrell. The wooden coal house was moved to the Stuart football field for an FFA concession stand. First school was taught in a shed in 1869.

Lincoln No.9, “Harmony.” Built in 1874, closed in 1956. This was sold, torn down and a home was built in Stuart.

Miss Edna Barnes was County Superintendent for 22 years. She retired in 1955.

The Alcott School in South Stuart was platted in 1877. Torn down in 1940. There was a rope machine in the building and the janitor would help children make their own jumping ropes.

LINCOLN TOWNSHIP IS KNOW FOR ITS ELEVEN INDEPENDENT SCHOOLS

Lincoln Township is unique in being the only township in Adair County to have each school district independent of one another in organization and in taxation. All of these districts have a history of school classes being taught in a home, granary, etc. Before 1870 there had been a converted dwelling called the Old School House. This may or may not be the “Summit” school built at a cost of $2,000 in the Town of Stuart and Section 4. Mr. Foote may have been the first teacher here. With the rapid growth of the town and the large families, the class rooms were set up all about town with the pupils running the streets to classes. The three wards in Stuart became independent in 1872 as a Guthrie County school. The third ward, in Adair County School was plated in 1877.

In Section 5, north half of block 29, west of the pump (still there and used for watering of plants ) and facing east, the 50 x 50 square three-story red brick south school with Mansard roof and fine corniced windows was built by the Morrison Bros., planned by James Corey, carpenter, mason and architect, all of Stuart. The handsome school cost $8,000.00.

To the left one can view the two wooden “girls” and “boys” buildings with wooden walls and wall fronts. The wooden outdoor entrance led to the furnace in the basement. The wooden main entrance led to a first floor cloak room with a bench for lunch pails and hooks for each person’s drinking cup; there was a bucket of fresh water nearby. The stairway led up on the northeast corner inside the building for another cloak room for the older pupils. The third floor was a high school room until 1895 when the third story was removed and the room was built with only one dormer window in each side instead of the three on each side. This attic was used for a winter time play area and a theater and play practice room. The two lower floors were the grade school class rooms with two rooms to each floor; first floor had first and second grades and then third and fourth, with the second floor housing in two rooms the fifth and sixth and then the seventh and eight together.

Transcribed from Adair County History, 1976 by volunteer Mary Chochran

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